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2.
Acta Derm Venereol ; 100(10): adv00134, 2020 May 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32318743

RESUMO

Sutton naevi can sometimes present a challenging appearance with atypical presentation, also by dermoscopy. Reflectance confocal microscopy could help in making a diagnosis. This study prospectively collected two groups of Sutton nevi: the first one was composed by typical white halo naevi monitored for one year (13, 23%) and the second one was made up of atypical lesions excised in order to rule out melanoma, which were histologically diagnosed as Sutton naevi (21, 37%). These two groups of Sutton naevi were compared to a retrospectively collected cohort of thin melanomas with histologic regression features (23, 40%). On dermoscopy, atypical Sutton naevi and melanomas were indistinguishable. Reflectance confocal microscopy demonstrated significant differences at the dermo-epidermal junction: marked dermo-epidermal junction thickening and non-edged papilla were associated with melanoma, while the presence of nests was associated with Sutton naevi. However, reflectance confocal microscopy also detected marked intraepidermal pagetoid cells in Sutton naevi that were a combination of MelanA+ and CD1a+ cells. Sutton naevi can simulate melanoma, under both dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy. Nevertheless, relevant confocal dermo-epidermal junction features and the clinical scenario can be helpful to make a final diagnosis, especially in those situations where melanoma must be ruled out.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32323445

RESUMO

Congenital melanocytic nevi (CMN) are cutaneous malformations whose prevalence is inversely correlated with projected adult size. CMN are caused by somatic mutations, but epidemiological studies suggest that germline genetic factors may influence CMN development. In CMN patients from the U.K., genetic variants in MC1R, such as p.V92M and loss-of-function variants, have been previously associated with larger CMN. We analyzed the association of MC1R variants with CMN characteristics in two distinct cohorts of medium-to-giant CMN patients from Spain (N = 113) and from France, Norway, Canada, and the United States (N = 53), similar at the clinical and phenotypical level except for the number of nevi per patient. We found that the p.V92M or loss-of-function MC1R variants either alone or in combination did not correlate with CMN size, in contrast to the U.K. CMN patients. An additional case-control analysis with 259 unaffected Spanish individuals showed a higher frequency of MC1R compound heterozygous or homozygous variant genotypes in Spanish CMN patients compared to the control population (15.9% vs. 9.3%; p = .075). Altogether, this study suggests that MC1R variants are not associated with CMN size in these non-UK cohorts. Additional studies are required to define the potential role of MC1R as a risk factor in CMN development.

5.
Eur J Cancer ; 2020 Feb 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32113941

RESUMO

Invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is one of the most common cancers in the white populations, accounting for 20% of all cutaneous malignancies. Factors implicated in cSCC etiopathogenesis include ultraviolet radiation exposure and chronic photoaging, age, male sex, immunosuppression, smoking and genetic factors. A collaboration of multidisciplinary experts from the European Dermatology Forum (EDF), the European Association of Dermato-Oncology (EADO) and the European Organisation of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) was formed to update recommendations on cSCC classification, diagnosis, risk stratification, staging and prevention, based on current literature, staging systems and expert consensus. Common cSCCs are typically indolent tumors, and most have a good prognosis with 5-year cure rates of greater than 90%, and a low rate of metastases (<4%). Further risk stratification into low-risk or high-risk common primary cSCC is recommended based on proposed high-risk factors. Advanced cSCC is classified as locally advanced (lacSCC), and metastatic (mcSCC) including locoregional metastatic or distant metastatic cSCC. Current systems used for staging include the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) 8th edition, the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) 8th edition, and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) system. Physical examination for all cSCCs should include total body skin examination and clinical palpation of lymph nodes, especially of the draining basins. Radiologic imaging such as ultrasound of the regional lymph nodes, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scans are recommended for staging of high-risk cSCC. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is currently not recommended. Nicotinamide, oral retinoids, and topical 5-FU have been used for the chemoprevention of subsequent cSCCs in high-risk patients but are not routinely recommended. Education about sun protection measures including reducing sun exposure, use of protective clothing, regular use of sunscreens and avoidance of artificial tanning, is recommended.

6.
Eur J Cancer ; 2020 Feb 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32113942

RESUMO

In order to update recommendations on treatment, supportive care, education and follow-up of patients with invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), a multidisciplinary panel of experts from the European Dermatology Forum, the European Association of Dermato-Oncology and the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer was formed. Recommendations were based on evidence-based literature review, guidelines and expert consensus. Treatment recommendations are presented for common primary cSCC (low risk, high risk), locally advanced cSCC, regional metastatic cSCC (operable or inoperable) and distant metastatic cSCC. For common primary cSCC (the most frequent cSCC type), first-line treatment is surgical excision with postoperative margin assessment or microscopically controlled sugery. Safety margins containing clinical normal-appearing tissue around the tumour during surgical excision and negative margins as reported in the pathology report are necessary to minimise the risk of local recurrence and metastasis. In case of positive margins, a re-excision shall be done, for operable cases. Lymph node dissection is recommended for cSCC with cytologically or histologically confirmed regional nodal involvement. Radiotherapy should be considered as curative treatment for inoperable cSCC, or for non-surgical candidates. Anti-PD-1 antibodies are the first-line systemic treatment for patients with metastatic or locally advanced cSCC who are not candidates for curative surgery or radiation, with cemiplimab being the first approved systemic agent for advanced cSCC by the Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency. Second-line systemic treatments for advanced cSCC include epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (cetuximab) combined with chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Multidisciplinary board decisions are mandatory for all patients with advanced disease who require more than surgery. Patients should be engaged with informed decisions on management and be provided with best supportive care to optimise symptom management and improve quality of life. Frequency of follow-up visits and investigations for subsequent new cSCC depend on underlying risk characteristics.

7.
Acta Derm Venereol ; 100(8): adv00106, 2020 Apr 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32110813

RESUMO

Numerous dermoscopic structures for the early detection of melanoma have been described. The aim of this study was to illustrate the characteristics of dermoscopic structures that are similar to blotches, but smaller (termed microblotches), and to evaluate their association with other well-known dermoscopic structures. A cross-sectional study design, including 165 dermoscopic images of melanoma was used to define microblotches, and 241 consecutive images of naevi from the HAM10000 database, were studied to evaluate the prevalence of this criterion in both groups. Microblotches were defined as sharply demarcated structures ≤1 mm, with geographical borders visible only with dermoscopy. Microblotches were present in 38.7% of the melanomas and 6.7% of the naevi. Moreover, microblotches were associated with an odds ratio (OR) of malignancy of 5.79, and were more frequent in invasive melanoma than in the in-situ subtype (OR 2.92). Histologically, they correspond to hyperpigmented parakeratosis or epidermal consumption. In conclusion, microblotches are related to melanomas. This finding could help dermatologists to differentiate between naevi and melanomas.

8.
Eur J Cancer ; 126: 141-158, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31928887

RESUMO

Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is potentially the most dangerous form of skin tumor and causes 90% of skin cancer mortality. A unique collaboration of multidisciplinary experts from the European Dermatology Forum (EDF), the European Association of Dermato-Oncology (EADO), and the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) was formed to make recommendations on CM diagnosis and treatment, based on systematic literature reviews and the experts' experience. The diagnosis of melanoma can be made clinically and shall always be confirmed through dermatoscopy. If a melanoma is suspected, a histopathological examination is required. Sequential digital dermatoscopy and full-body photography can be used in risk persons to detect the development of melanomas at an earlier stage. Where available, confocal reflectance microscopy can improve clinical diagnosis in special cases. Melanoma shall be classified according to the 8th version of the AJCC classification. Thin melanomas up to 0.8 mm tumor thickness does not require further imaging diagnostics. From stage IB onwards, examinations with lymph node sonography are recommended, but no further imaging examinations. From stage IIC whole-body examinations with CT or PET-CT in combination with brain MRI are recommended. From stage III and higher, mutation testing is recommended, particularly for BRAF V600 mutation. It is important to provide a structured follow-up to detect relapses and secondary primary melanomas as early as possible. There is no evidence to support the frequency and extent of examinations. A stage-based follow-up scheme is proposed, which, according to the experience of the guideline group, covers the minimum requirements; further studies may be considered. This guideline is valid until the end of 2021.

9.
Eur J Surg Oncol ; 46(2): 263-271, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31594672

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is useful for the prognostic stratification of patients with thick melanoma. Identifying which variables are associated with SLN involvement and establishing risk in different subgroups of patients could be useful for guiding the indication of SLN biopsy. The value of complete lymph node dissection (CLND) in patients with a positive SLN biopsy is currently under debate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To identify factors associated with SLN involvement in thick melanoma we performed a multicentric retrospective cohort study involving 660 patients with thick melanoma who had undergone SLN biopsy. To analyze the role of CLND in thick melanoma patients with a positive SLN biopsy, we built a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model for melanoma-specific survival (MSS) and disease-free survival (DFS) and compared 217 patients who had undergone CLND with 44 who had not. RESULTS: The logistic regression analysis showed that age, histologic subtype, ulceration, microscopic satellitosis, and lymphovascular invasion were associated with nodal disease. The CHAID (Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection) decision tree showed ulceration to be the most important predictor of lymphatic involvement. For nonulcerated melanomas, the histologic subtype lentigo maligna melanoma was associated with a low rate of SLN involvement (4.3%). No significant differences were observed for DFS and MSS between the CLND performed and not-performed groups. Nodal status on CLND was associated with differences in DFS and MSS rates. CONCLUSION: We identified subgroups of thick melanoma patients with a low likelihood of SLN involvement. CLND does not offer survival benefit, but provides prognostic information.

10.
Eur J Cancer ; 126: 159-177, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31866016

RESUMO

A unique collaboration of multidisciplinary experts from the European Dermatology Forum, the European Association of Dermato-Oncology and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) was formed to make recommendations on cutaneous melanoma diagnosis and treatment, based on systematic literature reviews and the experts' experience. Cutaneous melanomas are excised with 1- to 2-cm safety margins. Sentinel lymph node dissection shall be performed as a staging procedure in patients with tumour thickness ≥1.0 mm or ≥0.8 mm with additional histological risk factors, although there is as yet no clear survival benefit for this approach. Therapeutic decisions in stage III/IV patients should be primarily made by an interdisciplinary oncology team ("Tumor Board"). Adjuvant therapies in stage III/IV patients are primarily anti-PD-1, independent of mutational status, or dabrafenib plus trametinib for BRAF-mutant patients. In distant metastasis, either resected or not, systemic treatment is indicated. For first-line treatment, particularly in BRAF wild-type patients, immunotherapy with PD-1 antibodies alone or in combination with CTLA-4 antibodies shall be considered. In particular scenarios for patients with stage IV melanoma and a BRAF-V600 E/K mutation, first-line therapy with BRAF/MEK inhibitors can be offered as an alternative to immunotherapy. In patients with primary resistance to immunotherapy and harbouring a BRAF-V600 E/K mutation, this therapy shall be offered in second-line. Systemic therapy in stage III/IV melanoma is a rapidly changing landscape, and it is likely that these recommendations may change in the near future.

11.
Pharm Pract (Granada) ; 17(3): 1455, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31592287

RESUMO

Background: Skin cancer incidence is increasing alarmingly, despite current efforts trying to improve its early detection. Community pharmacists have proven success in implementing screening protocols for a number of diseases because of their skills and easy access. Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of skin cancer risk factors and the photoprotection habits with a questionnaire in community pharmacy users. Methods: A research group consisting of pharmacists and dermatologists conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study to assess photoprotection habits and skin cancer risk factors by using a validated questionnaire in 218 community pharmacies in Barcelona from May 23rd to June 13th 2016. All participants received health education on photoprotection and skin cancer prevention. Patients with ≥1 skin cancer risk factor were referred to their physician, as they needed further screening of skin cancer. Results: A total of 5,530 participants were evaluated. Of those, only 20.2% participants had received a total body skin examination for skin cancer screening in the past by a physician and 57.1% reported using a SPF 50+ sunscreen. 53.9% participants presented ≥1 skin cancer risk factor: 11.8% participants reported having skin cancer familial history and 6.2% reported skin cancer personal history; pharmacists found ≥10 melanocytic nevi in 43.8% participants and chronically sun-damaged skin in 21.4%. Lesions suspicious for melanoma were reported in 10.9% of the participants and urgent dermatological evaluation was recommended. Conclusions: Pharmacists can detect people with skin cancer risk factors amongst their users. This intervention can be considered in multidisciplinary strategies of skin cancer screening.

12.
Eur J Dermatol ; 29(5): 518-523, 2019 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31647462

RESUMO

Immunosuppressants used in organ transplant patients increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer. This study aimed to evaluate patient behaviours towards skin cancer prevention methods and to understand characteristics of a future prevention strategy based on patients' perspective. Carenity, a global online patient community, enabled the recruitment of 200 adult patients with solid organ transplants from four European countries: France, Italy, Spain and Germany. Most patients were well informed about the risk of skin cancer, but only 27% (53/200) monitored their skin. Most patients exposed themselves to intense sun exposure once a month or more. Nevertheless, more than half of patients were motivated to use additional prevention strategies and limit their sun exposure. The most appropriate prevention strategy was reported to be the use of a cosmetically attractive, water-resistant, paraben/fragrance-free cream. A one-size-fits-all approach is not an appropriate prevention strategy and an adapted approach based on patients' preferences may significantly contribute to better compliance and adherence.

13.
Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet) ; 17(3): 0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. tab
Artigo em Inglês | IBECS | ID: ibc-188112

RESUMO

Background: Skin cancer incidence is increasing alarmingly, despite current efforts trying to improve its early detection. Community pharmacists have proven success in implementing screening protocols for a number of diseases because of their skills and easy access. Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of skin cancer risk factors and the photoprotection habits with a questionnaire in community pharmacy users. Methods: A research group consisting of pharmacists and dermatologists conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study to assess photoprotection habits and skin cancer risk factors by using a validated questionnaire in 218 community pharmacies in Barcelona from May 23rd to June 13th 2016. All participants received health education on photoprotection and skin cancer prevention. Patients with ≥1 skin cancer risk factor were referred to their physician, as they needed further screening of skin cancer. Results: A total of 5,530 participants were evaluated. Of those, only 20.2% participants had received a total body skin examination for skin cancer screening in the past by a physician and 57.1% reported using a SPF 50+ sunscreen. 53.9% participants presented ≥1 skin cancer risk factor: 11.8% participants reported having skin cancer familial history and 6.2% reported skin cancer personal history; pharmacists found ≥10 melanocytic nevi in 43.8% participants and chronically sun-damaged skin in 21.4%. Lesions suspicious for melanoma were reported in 10.9% of the participants and urgent dermatological evaluation was recommended. Conclusions: Pharmacists can detect people with skin cancer risk factors amongst their users. This intervention can be considered in multidisciplinary strategies of skin cancer screening


No disponible


Assuntos
Humanos , Serviços Comunitários de Farmácia/organização & administração , Neoplasias Cutâneas/epidemiologia , Proteção Radiológica/estatística & dados numéricos , Protetores Solares/farmacocinética , Radiação Solar/efeitos adversos , Detecção Precoce de Câncer/métodos , Estudos Transversais , Fatores de Risco , Variação Biológica da População
14.
Biomed Opt Express ; 10(7): 3404-3409, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31467785

RESUMO

The effective and non-invasive diagnosis of skin cancer is a hot topic, since biopsy is a costly and time-consuming surgical procedure. As skin relief is an important biophysical feature that can be difficult to perceive with the naked eye and by touch, we developed a novel 3D imaging scanner based on fringe projection to obtain morphological parameters of skin lesions related to perimeter, area and volume with micrometric precision. We measured 608 samples and significant morphological differences were found between melanomas and nevi (p<0.001). The capacity of the 3D scanner to distinguish these lesions was supported by a supervised machine learning algorithm resulting in 80.0% sensitivity and 76.7% specificity.

15.
Eur J Cancer ; 118: 10-34, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31288208

RESUMO

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignant tumour in white populations. Multidisciplinary experts from the European Dermatology Forum, the European Association of Dermato-Oncology and the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer collaborated to develop recommendations on diagnosis and treatment of BCC. A new classification into 'easy-to-treat (common) BCC and 'difficult-to-treat' BCC is proposed. Diagnosis is based on clinicodermatoscopic features for 'easy-to-treat' BCCs. Histopathological confirmation is mandatory in ambiguous lesions and in BCCs located in high-risk areas. The first-line treatment of 'easy-to-treat' BCC is complete surgery. Microscopically controlled surgery shall be offered for high-risk BCC, recurrent BCC and BCC in critical anatomical sites. Topical therapies (5% imiquimod, 5% fluorouracil) and destructive approaches (curettage, electrocautery, cryotherapy, laser ablation) should be considered in patients with low-risk superficial BCC. Photodynamic therapy is an effective treatment for superficial BCC and thin nodular BCC. The therapy for a 'difficult-to-treat' BCC should preferentially be discussed by a multidisciplinary tumour board. Hedgehog inhibitors, vismodegib or sonidegib, should be offered to patients with locally advanced and metastatic BCCs. Immunotherapy with anti-programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) antibodies is a promising therapeutic option, currently being investigated in clinical trials. Radiotherapy represents a valid alternative to surgery for BCC on the face, especially in elderly patients. In patients with naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), close surveillance and regular skin examinations are required to diagnose and treat BCCs at early stage. Long-term follow-up is recommended in patients with high-risk BCC subtypes, high-risk sites, multiple BCCs and NBCCS.

17.
Cancer Med ; 8(9): 4235-4244, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31215168

RESUMO

Mitotic rate is no longer considered a staging criterion for thin melanoma in the 8th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging Manual. The aim of this observational study was to identify prognostic factors for thin melanoma and predictors and prognostic significance of sentinel lymph node (SLN) involvement in a large multicenter cohort of patients with melanoma from nine tertiary care hospitals. A total of 4249 consecutive patients with thin melanoma diagnosed from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2016 were included. The main outcomes were disease-free interval and melanoma-specific survival for the overall population and predictors of SLN metastasis (n = 1083). Associations between survival and SLN status and different clinical and pathologic variables (sex, age, tumor location, mitosis, ulceration, regression, lymphovascular invasion, histologic subtype, Clark level, and Breslow thickness) were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards regression and logistic regression. SLN status was the most important prognostic factor for melanoma-specific survival (hazard ratio, 13.8; 95% CI, 6.1-31.2; P < 0.001), followed by sex, ulceration, and Clark level for patients who underwent SLNB. A mitotic rate of >2 mitoses/mm2 was the only factor associated with a positive SLN biopsy (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.22-7; P = 0.01. SLN status is the most important prognostic factor in thin melanoma. A high mitotic rate is associated with metastatic SLN involvement. SLN biopsy should be discussed and recommended in patients with thin melanoma and a high mitotic rate.

18.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 2019 Jun 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31202873

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows accurate, noninvasive, in vivo diagnosis for skin cancer. However, its impact on physicians' diagnostic confidence and management is unknown. OBJECTIVES: We sought to assess the physicians' diagnostic confidence and management before and after RCM of equivocal skin lesions. METHODS: Prospective, 2-center, observational study. During clinical practice, 7 dermatologists recorded their diagnostic confidence level (measured in a scale from 0 to 10), diagnosis, and management before and after RCM of clinically/dermoscopically equivocal lesions that raised concern for skin cancer. We also evaluated the diagnostic accuracy before and after RCM. RESULTS: We included 272 consecutive lesions from 226 individuals (mean age, 53.5 years). Diagnostic confidence increased from 6.2 to 8.1 after RCM (P < .001) when RCM confirmed or changed the diagnosis. Lesion management changed in 33.5% cases after RCM (to observation in 51 cases and to biopsy/excision in 31 cases). After RCM, the number needed to excise was 1.2. Sensitivity for malignancy before and after RCM was 78.2% and 85.1%, respectively. Specificity before and after RCM was 78.8% and 80%, respectively. LIMITATIONS: Small sample size, real-life environment, and different levels of expertise among RCM users. CONCLUSION: Physicians' diagnostic confidence and accuracy increased after RCM when evaluating equivocal tumors, frequently resulting in management changes while maintaining high diagnostic accuracy.

19.
Lancet Oncol ; 20(7): 938-947, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31201137

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Whether machine-learning algorithms can diagnose all pigmented skin lesions as accurately as human experts is unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of state-of-the-art machine-learning algorithms with human readers for all clinically relevant types of benign and malignant pigmented skin lesions. METHODS: For this open, web-based, international, diagnostic study, human readers were asked to diagnose dermatoscopic images selected randomly in 30-image batches from a test set of 1511 images. The diagnoses from human readers were compared with those of 139 algorithms created by 77 machine-learning labs, who participated in the International Skin Imaging Collaboration 2018 challenge and received a training set of 10 015 images in advance. The ground truth of each lesion fell into one of seven predefined disease categories: intraepithelial carcinoma including actinic keratoses and Bowen's disease; basal cell carcinoma; benign keratinocytic lesions including solar lentigo, seborrheic keratosis and lichen planus-like keratosis; dermatofibroma; melanoma; melanocytic nevus; and vascular lesions. The two main outcomes were the differences in the number of correct specific diagnoses per batch between all human readers and the top three algorithms, and between human experts and the top three algorithms. FINDINGS: Between Aug 4, 2018, and Sept 30, 2018, 511 human readers from 63 countries had at least one attempt in the reader study. 283 (55·4%) of 511 human readers were board-certified dermatologists, 118 (23·1%) were dermatology residents, and 83 (16·2%) were general practitioners. When comparing all human readers with all machine-learning algorithms, the algorithms achieved a mean of 2·01 (95% CI 1·97 to 2·04; p<0·0001) more correct diagnoses (17·91 [SD 3·42] vs 19·92 [4·27]). 27 human experts with more than 10 years of experience achieved a mean of 18·78 (SD 3·15) correct answers, compared with 25·43 (1·95) correct answers for the top three machine algorithms (mean difference 6·65, 95% CI 6·06-7·25; p<0·0001). The difference between human experts and the top three algorithms was significantly lower for images in the test set that were collected from sources not included in the training set (human underperformance of 11·4%, 95% CI 9·9-12·9 vs 3·6%, 0·8-6·3; p<0·0001). INTERPRETATION: State-of-the-art machine-learning classifiers outperformed human experts in the diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions and should have a more important role in clinical practice. However, a possible limitation of these algorithms is their decreased performance for out-of-distribution images, which should be addressed in future research. FUNDING: None.

20.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 81(6): 1330-1338, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31163236

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on the imaging tests that should be performed at the initial staging of melanoma patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 4 imaging studies for the initial staging of melanoma patients. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with prospectively collected data, from January 2011 to April 2017, including patients with clinical stage T2b to T4b according to 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer, without evidence of metastasis. RESULTS: Initial staging of 308 patients detected 16.6% of metastases and 5.8% false-positive results, overall. Regional lymph node ultrasonography showed a metastasis detection rate (MDR) of 12.8%, false-positive rate of 0.8%, and accuracy of 96.0%. Computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-CT had the highest detection rates at stage T4b: MDR, 13.3%; false-positive rate, 8.9%; accuracy, 91.1%; and MDR, 6.9%; false-positive rate, 0%; and accuracy, 93.1%, respectively. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a MDR of 2.0% in T4b. LIMITATIONS: Single-center study. CONCLUSION: Performing ultrasound scans for assessing lymph node metastasis in patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer T2b stage and above is advisable. In patients with stage T4b, CT or positron emission tomography-CT are suitable for the detection of metastasis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging at T4b deserves further discussion, considering the ultimate clinical benefit in management and therapeutic options for asymptomatic patients.

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