Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 96
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Eur J Med Genet ; : 103770, 2019 Sep 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31536829

RESUMO

High-throughput sequencing technologies performed in the clinical setting have the potential to reveal diverse genetic information. Whether it is initially targeted or unsolicited, strictly medical or not, or even information on a carrier status as part of preconception screening, access to genetic information needs to be managed. The aim of the current study was to gather potential attitudes of various stakeholders towards the sharing of genetic information from next-generation sequencing, and more specifically towards incidental findings, predictive findings, non-medical information and carrier status. Answers from a total number of 1631 individuals belonging to four different groups (45 molecular geneticists, 65 genetic counselors, 56 medical advisors to the state insurance plan, and 1465 university students) were collected through online questionnaires. Overall, the study reflects preferences towards the return of health risks related to serious diseases when effective treatment is available and information on reproductive risks. The importance of the perceived medical utility, both for disease prevention and treatment, was the main distinguishing feature. Attitudes from genetic health professionals were found more reluctant to receive a wide range of information. Hands-on experience with the practice of genetic testing is likely to influence perception of the utility of the genetic information that should be delivered. At the same time, perceptions of preconception genetic carrier screening brought out less differences between participants. Better understanding of the underlying interest in genomic information and thorough education on its value and usage are key elements to the adoption of future guidelines and policy that respect bioethical principles.

2.
Am J Hum Genet ; 105(3): 509-525, 2019 Sep 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31422817

RESUMO

The human RNA helicase DDX6 is an essential component of membrane-less organelles called processing bodies (PBs). PBs are involved in mRNA metabolic processes including translational repression via coordinated storage of mRNAs. Previous studies in human cell lines have implicated altered DDX6 in molecular and cellular dysfunction, but clinical consequences and pathogenesis in humans have yet to be described. Here, we report the identification of five rare de novo missense variants in DDX6 in probands presenting with intellectual disability, developmental delay, and similar dysmorphic features including telecanthus, epicanthus, arched eyebrows, and low-set ears. All five missense variants (p.His372Arg, p.Arg373Gln, p.Cys390Arg, p.Thr391Ile, and p.Thr391Pro) are located in two conserved motifs of the RecA-2 domain of DDX6 involved in RNA binding, helicase activity, and protein-partner binding. We use functional studies to demonstrate that the first variants identified (p.Arg373Gln and p.Cys390Arg) cause significant defects in PB assembly in primary fibroblast and model human cell lines. These variants' interactions with several protein partners were also disrupted in immunoprecipitation assays. Further investigation via complementation assays included the additional variants p.Thr391Ile and p.Thr391Pro, both of which, similarly to p.Arg373Gln and p.Cys390Arg, demonstrated significant defects in P-body assembly. Complementing these molecular findings, modeling of the variants on solved protein structures showed distinct spatial clustering near known protein binding regions. Collectively, our clinical and molecular data describe a neurodevelopmental syndrome associated with pathogenic missense variants in DDX6. Additionally, we suggest DDX6 join the DExD/H-box genes DDX3X and DHX30 in an emerging class of neurodevelopmental disorders involving RNA helicases.

3.
Hum Mutat ; 40(11): 2021-2032, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31184401

RESUMO

The X-linked NLGN3 gene, encoding a postsynaptic cell adhesion molecule, was involved in a nonsyndromic monogenic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by the description of one unique missense variant, p.Arg451Cys (Jamain et al. 2003). We investigated here the pathogenicity of additional missense variants identified in two multiplex families with intellectual disability (ID) and ASD: c.1789C>T, p.Arg597Trp, previously reported by our group (Redin et al. 2014) and present in three affected cousins and c.1540C>T, p.Pro514Ser, identified in two affected brothers. Overexpression experiments in HEK293 and HeLa cell lines revealed that both variants affect the level of the mature NLGN3 protein, its localization at the plasma membrane and its presence as a cleaved form in the extracellular environment, even more drastically than what was reported for the initial p.Arg451Cys mutation. The variants also induced an unfolded protein response, probably due to the retention of immature NLGN3 proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. In comparison, the c.1894A>G, p.Ala632Thr and c.1022T>C, p.Val341Ala variants, present in males from the general population, have no effect. Our report of two missense variants affecting the normal localization of NLGN3 in a total of five affected individuals reinforces the involvement of the NLGN3 gene in a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by ID and ASD.

4.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2018 Aug 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30104728

RESUMO

Early-onset neurodevelopmental conditions (e.g., autism) affect males more frequently than females. Androgens may play a role in this male-bias by sex-differentially impacting early prenatal brain development, particularly neural circuits that later develop specialized roles in social cognition. Here, we find that increasing prenatal testosterone in humans is associated with later reduction of functional connectivity between social brain default mode (DMN) subsystems in adolescent males, but has no effect in females. Since testosterone can work directly via the androgen receptor (AR) or indirectly via the estrogen receptor through aromatase conversion to estradiol, we further examined how a potent non-aromatizable androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), acts via the AR to influence gene expression in human neural stem cells (hNSC)-particularly for genes of high-relevance for DMN circuitry. DHT dysregulates a number of genes enriched for syndromic causes of autism and intellectual disability and for genes that in later development are expressed in anatomical patterns that highly correspond to the cortical midline DMN subsystem. DMN-related and DHT-affected genes (e.g., MEF2C) are involved in a number of synaptic processes, many of which impact excitation-inhibition balance. Androgens have male-specific prenatal influence over social brain circuitry in humans and may be relevant towards explaining some component of male-bias in early-onset neurodevelopmental conditions.

6.
JAMA Neurol ; 75(10): 1234-1245, 2018 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29913018

RESUMO

Importance: Movement disorders are characterized by a marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, complicating diagnostic work in clinical practice and molecular diagnosis. Objective: To develop and evaluate a targeted sequencing approach using a customized panel of genes involved in movement disorders. Design, Setting and Participants: We selected 127 genes associated with movement disorders to create a customized enrichment in solution capture array. Targeted high-coverage sequencing was applied to DNA samples taken from 378 eligible patients at 1 Luxembourgian, 1 Algerian, and 25 French tertiary movement disorder centers between September 2014 and July 2016. Patients were suspected of having inherited movement disorders because of early onset, family history, and/or complex phenotypes. They were divided in 5 main movement disorder groups: parkinsonism, dystonia, chorea, paroxysmal movement disorder, and myoclonus. To compare approaches, 23 additional patients suspected of having inherited cerebellar ataxia were included, on whom whole-exome sequencing (WES) was done. Data analysis occurred from November 2015 to October 2016. Main Outcomes and Measures: Percentages of individuals with positive diagnosis, variants of unknown significance, and negative cases; mutational frequencies and clinical phenotyping of genes associated with movement disorders. Results: Of the 378 patients (of whom 208 were male [55.0%]), and with a median (range) age at disease onset of 31 (0-84) years, probable pathogenic variants were identified in 83 cases (22.0%): 46 patients with parkinsonism (55% of 83 patients), 21 patients (25.3%) with dystonia, 7 patients (8.4%) with chorea, 7 patients (8.4%) with paroxysmal movement disorders, and 2 patients (2.4%) with myoclonus as the predominant phenotype. Some genes were mutated in several cases in the cohort. Patients with pathogenic variants were significantly younger (median age, 27 years; interquartile range [IQR], 5-36 years]) than the patients without diagnosis (median age, 35 years; IQR, 15-46 years; P = .04). Diagnostic yield was significantly lower in patients with dystonia (21 of 135; 15.6%; P = .03) than in the overall cohort. Unexpected genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with pathogenic variants deviating from the classic phenotype were highlighted, and 49 novel probable pathogenic variants were identified. The WES analysis of the cohort of 23 patients with cerebellar ataxia led to an overall diagnostic yield of 26%, similar to panel analysis but at a cost 6 to 7 times greater. Conclusions and Relevance: High-coverage sequencing panel for the delineation of genes associated with movement disorders was efficient and provided a cost-effective diagnostic alternative to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing.

7.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 26(7): 996-1006, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29695756

RESUMO

High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of human genome coding regions allows the simultaneous screen of a large number of genes, significantly improving the diagnosis of non-syndromic intellectual disabilities (ID). HTS studies permit the redefinition of the phenotypical spectrum of known disease-causing genes, escaping the clinical inclusion bias of gene-by-gene Sanger sequencing. We studied a cohort of 903 patients with ID not reminiscent of a well-known syndrome, using an ID-targeted HTS of several hundred genes and found de novo heterozygous variants in TCF4 (transcription factor 4) in eight novel patients. Piecing together the patients from this study and those from previous large-scale unbiased HTS studies, we estimated the rate of individuals with ID carrying a disease-causing TCF4 mutation to 0.7%. So far, TCF4 molecular abnormalities were known to cause a syndromic form of ID, Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), which combines severe ID, developmental delay, absence of speech, behavioral and ventilation disorders, and a distinctive facial gestalt. Therefore, we reevaluated ten patients carrying a pathogenic or likely pathogenic variant in TCF4 (eight patients included in this study and two from our previous ID-HTS study) for PTHS criteria defined by Whalen and Marangi. A posteriori, five patients had a score highly evocative of PTHS, three were possibly consistent with this diagnosis, and two had a score below the defined PTHS threshold. In conclusion, these results highlight TCF4 as a frequent cause of moderate to profound ID and broaden the clinical spectrum associated to TCF4 mutations to nonspecific ID.

8.
Biol Psychiatry ; 84(4): 239-252, 2018 Aug 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29428674

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure to androgens during brain development in male individuals may participate to increase their susceptibility to develop neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability. However, little is known about the action of androgens in human neural cells. METHODS: We used human neural stem cells differentiated from embryonic stem cells to investigate targets of androgens. RESULTS: RNA sequencing revealed that treatment with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) leads to subtle but significant changes in the expression of about 200 genes, encoding proteins of extracellular matrix or involved in signal transduction of growth factors (e.g., insulin/insulin growth factor 1). We showed that the most differentially expressed genes (DEGs), RGCC, RNF144B, NRCAM, TRIM22, FAM107A, IGFBP5, and LAMA2, are reproducibly regulated by different androgens in different genetic backgrounds. We showed, by overexpressing the androgen receptor in neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y or knocking it down in human neural stem cells, that this regulation involves the androgen receptor. A chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with direct sequencing analysis identified androgen receptor-bound sequences in nearly half of the DHT-DEGs and in numerous other genes. DHT-DEGs appear enriched in genes involved in ASD (ASXL3, NLGN4X, etc.), associated with ASD (NRCAM), or differentially expressed in patients with ASD (FAM107A, IGFBP5). Androgens increase human neural stem cell proliferation and survival in nutrient-deprived culture conditions, with no detectable effect on regulation of neurite outgrowth. CONCLUSIONS: We characterized androgen action in neural progenitor cells, identifying DHT-DEGs that appear to be enriched in genes related to ASD. We also showed that androgens increase proliferation of neuronal precursors and protect them from death during their differentiation in nutrient-deprived conditions.

9.
J Med Syst ; 42(1): 1, 2017 Nov 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29159559

RESUMO

Cohort Study Platforms (CSP) are emerging as a key tool for collecting patient information, providing new research data, and supporting family and patient associations. However they pose new ethics and regulatory challenges since they cross the gap between patients and medical practitioners. One of the critical issues for CSP is to enforce a strict control on access privileges whilst allowing the users to take advantage of the breadth of the available data. We propose Cerberus, a new access control scheme spanning the whole life-cycle of access right management: design, implementation, deployment and maintenance, operations. Cerberus enables switching from a dual world, where CSP data can be accessed either from the users who entered it or fully de-identified, to an access-when-required world, where patients, practitioners and researchers can access focused medical data through explicit authorisation by the data owner. Efficient access control requires application-specific access rights, as well as the ability to restrict these rights when they are not used. Cerberus is implemented and evaluated in the context of the GENIDA project, an international CSP for Genetically determined Intellectual Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders. As a result of this study, the software is made available for the community, and validated specifications for CSPs are given.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Espectro Autista/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Segurança Computacional/normas , Troca de Informação em Saúde/normas , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Anonimização de Dados , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/normas , Pesquisa Empírica , Ética em Pesquisa , Troca de Informação em Saúde/ética , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Pesquisa Qualitativa
10.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 114(44): E9308-E9317, 2017 10 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29078390

RESUMO

The family of WD40-repeat (WDR) proteins is one of the largest in eukaryotes, but little is known about their function in brain development. Among 26 WDR genes assessed, we found 7 displaying a major impact in neuronal morphology when inactivated in mice. Remarkably, all seven genes showed corpus callosum defects, including thicker (Atg16l1, Coro1c, Dmxl2, and Herc1), thinner (Kif21b and Wdr89), or absent corpus callosum (Wdr47), revealing a common role for WDR genes in brain connectivity. We focused on the poorly studied WDR47 protein sharing structural homology with LIS1, which causes lissencephaly. In a dosage-dependent manner, mice lacking Wdr47 showed lethality, extensive fiber defects, microcephaly, thinner cortices, and sensory motor gating abnormalities. We showed that WDR47 shares functional characteristics with LIS1 and participates in key microtubule-mediated processes, including neural stem cell proliferation, radial migration, and growth cone dynamics. In absence of WDR47, the exhaustion of late cortical progenitors and the consequent decrease of neurogenesis together with the impaired survival of late-born neurons are likely yielding to the worsening of the microcephaly phenotype postnatally. Interestingly, the WDR47-specific C-terminal to LisH (CTLH) domain was associated with functions in autophagy described in mammals. Silencing WDR47 in hypothalamic GT1-7 neuronal cells and yeast models independently recapitulated these findings, showing conserved mechanisms. Finally, our data identified superior cervical ganglion-10 (SCG10) as an interacting partner of WDR47. Taken together, these results provide a starting point for studying the implications of WDR proteins in neuronal regulation of microtubules and autophagy.


Assuntos
Autofagia/fisiologia , Encéfalo/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Encéfalo/metabolismo , Proteínas dos Microfilamentos/metabolismo , Proteínas Associadas aos Microtúbulos/metabolismo , Repetições WD40/fisiologia , Animais , Movimento Celular/fisiologia , Proliferação de Células/fisiologia , Células Cultivadas , Feminino , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Microtúbulos/metabolismo , Microtúbulos/fisiologia , Neurogênese/fisiologia , Neurônios/metabolismo , Neurônios/fisiologia , Fenótipo , Células-Tronco/metabolismo , Células-Tronco/fisiologia
11.
Nat Rev Dis Primers ; 3: 17065, 2017 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28960184

RESUMO

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading inherited form of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder, and patients can present with severe behavioural alterations, including hyperactivity, impulsivity and anxiety, in addition to poor language development and seizures. FXS is a trinucleotide repeat disorder, in which >200 repeats of the CGG motif in FMR1 leads to silencing of the gene and the consequent loss of its product, fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (FMRP). FMRP has a central role in gene expression and regulates the translation of potentially hundreds of mRNAs, many of which are involved in the development and maintenance of neuronal synaptic connections. Indeed, disturbances in neuroplasticity is a key finding in FXS animal models, and an imbalance in inhibitory and excitatory neuronal circuits is believed to underlie many of the clinical manifestations of this disorder. Our knowledge of the proteins that are regulated by FMRP is rapidly growing, and this has led to the identification of multiple targets for therapeutic intervention, some of which have already moved into clinical trials or clinical practice.


Assuntos
Síndrome do Cromossomo X Frágil , Síndrome do Cromossomo X Frágil/diagnóstico , Síndrome do Cromossomo X Frágil/fisiopatologia , Síndrome do Cromossomo X Frágil/terapia , Humanos
12.
Nat Genet ; 49(4): 511-514, 2017 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28250454

RESUMO

Brain malformations involving the corpus callosum are common in children with developmental disabilities. We identified DCC mutations in four families and five sporadic individuals with isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) without intellectual disability. DCC mutations result in variable dominant phenotypes with decreased penetrance, including mirror movements and ACC associated with a favorable developmental prognosis. Possible phenotypic modifiers include the type and location of mutation and the sex of the individual.


Assuntos
Agenesia do Corpo Caloso/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Mutação/genética , Receptores de Superfície Celular/genética , Proteínas Supressoras de Tumor/genética , Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Encéfalo/patologia , Corpo Caloso/patologia , Receptor DCC , Família , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Malformações do Sistema Nervoso/genética , Células-Tronco Neurais/patologia , Penetrância , Fenótipo
13.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 25(4): 423-431, 2017 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28176767

RESUMO

Fragile-X syndrome (FXS) is a frequent genetic form of intellectual disability (ID). The main recurrent mutagenic mechanism causing FXS is the expansion of a CGG repeat sequence in the 5'-UTR of the FMR1 gene, therefore, routinely tested in ID patients. We report here three FMR1 intragenic pathogenic variants not affecting this sequence, identified using high-throughput sequencing (HTS): a previously reported hemizygous deletion encompassing the last exon of FMR1, too small to be detected by array-CGH and inducing decreased expression of a truncated form of FMRP protein, in three brothers with ID (family 1) and two splice variants in boys with sporadic ID: a de novo variant c.990+1G>A (family 2) and a maternally inherited c.420-8A>G variant (family 3). After clinical reevaluation, the five patients presented features consistent with FXS (mean Hagerman's scores=15). We conducted a systematic review of all rare non-synonymous variants previously reported in FMR1 in ID patients and showed that six of them are convincing pathogenic variants. This study suggests that intragenic FMR1 variants, although much less frequent than CGG expansions, are a significant mutational mechanism leading to FXS and demonstrates the interest of HTS approaches to detect them in ID patients with a negative standard work-up.


Assuntos
Proteína do X Frágil de Retardo Mental/genética , Síndrome do Cromossomo X Frágil/genética , Mutação , Feminino , Síndrome do Cromossomo X Frágil/diagnóstico , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Processamento de RNA , Irmãos
14.
Am J Hum Genet ; 100(1): 105-116, 2017 Jan 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27939639

RESUMO

Intellectual disability (ID) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder exhibiting extreme genetic heterogeneity, and more than 500 genes have been implicated in Mendelian forms of ID. We performed exome sequencing in a large family affected by an autosomal-dominant form of mild syndromic ID with ptosis, growth retardation, and hypotonia, and we identified an inherited 2 bp deletion causing a frameshift in BRPF1 (c.1052_1053del) in five affected family members. BRPF1 encodes a protein modifier of two histone acetyltransferases associated with ID: KAT6A (also known as MOZ or MYST3) and KAT6B (MORF or MYST4). The mRNA transcript was not significantly reduced in affected fibroblasts and most likely produces a truncated protein (p.Val351Glyfs∗8). The protein variant shows an aberrant cellular location, loss of certain protein interactions, and decreased histone H3K23 acetylation. We identified BRPF1 deletions or point mutations in six additional individuals with a similar phenotype. Deletions of the 3p25 region, containing BRPF1 and SETD5, cause a defined ID syndrome where most of the clinical features are attributed to SETD5 deficiency. We compared the clinical symptoms of individuals carrying mutations or small deletions of BRPF1 alone or SETD5 alone with those of individuals with deletions encompassing both BRPF1 and SETD5. We conclude that both genes contribute to the phenotypic severity of 3p25 deletion syndrome but that some specific features, such as ptosis and blepharophimosis, are mostly driven by BRPF1 haploinsufficiency.


Assuntos
Proteínas Adaptadoras de Transdução de Sinal/genética , Blefaroptose/genética , Genes Dominantes/genética , Histona Acetiltransferases/metabolismo , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Mutação , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Acetilação , Adulto , Blefarofimose/genética , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Deleção Cromossômica , Cromossomos Humanos Par 3/genética , Feminino , Mutação da Fase de Leitura , Haploinsuficiência/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Metiltransferases/deficiência , Metiltransferases/genética , Hipotonia Muscular/genética , Fenótipo , Síndrome
16.
Am J Med Genet A ; 170(8): 2103-10, 2016 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27256868

RESUMO

Using targeted next generation sequencing, we have identified a splicing mutation (c.526-9_526-5del) in the SLC9A6 gene in a 9-year-old boy with mild intellectual disability (ID), microcephaly, and social interaction disabilities. This intronic microdeletion leads to the skipping of exon 3 and to an in-frame deletion of 26 amino acids in the TM4 domain. It segregates with cognitive impairment or learning difficulties in other members of the family. Mutations in SLC9A6 have been reported in X-linked Christianson syndrome associating severe to profound intellectual deficiency and an Angelman-like phenotype with microcephaly, absent speech, ataxia with progressive cerebellar atrophy, ophthalmoplegia, epilepsy, and neurological regression. The proband and his maternal uncle both have an attenuated phenotype with mild ID, attention deficit disorder, speech difficulties, and mild asymptomatic cerebellar atrophy. The proband also have microcephaly. The mutation cosegregated with learning disabilities and speech difficulties in the female carriers (mother and three sisters of the proband). Detailed neuropsychological, speech, and occupational therapy investigations in the female carriers revealed impaired oral and written language acquisition, with dissociation between verbal and performance IQ. An abnormal phenotype, ranging from learning disability with predominant speech difficulties to mild intellectual deficiency, has been described previously in a large proportion of female carriers. Besides broadening the clinical spectrum of SLC9A6 gene mutations, we present an example of a monogenic origin of mild learning disability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Ataxia/diagnóstico , Ataxia/genética , Epilepsia/diagnóstico , Epilepsia/genética , Doenças Genéticas Ligadas ao Cromossomo X/diagnóstico , Doenças Genéticas Ligadas ao Cromossomo X/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Microcefalia/diagnóstico , Microcefalia/genética , Mutação , Transtornos da Motilidade Ocular/diagnóstico , Transtornos da Motilidade Ocular/genética , Fenótipo , Trocadores de Sódio-Hidrogênio/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Encéfalo/anormalidades , Criança , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Facies , Família , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Linhagem , Sítios de Splice de RNA , Deleção de Sequência , Inativação do Cromossomo X
17.
J Neurol ; 263(7): 1314-22, 2016 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27142713

RESUMO

Establishing a molecular diagnosis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) is challenging due to phenotype and genotype heterogeneity. We report the validation of a previously published clinical practice-based algorithm to diagnose ARCA. Two assessors performed a blind analysis to determine the most probable mutated gene based on comprehensive clinical and paraclinical data, without knowing the molecular diagnosis of 23 patients diagnosed by targeted capture of 57 ataxia genes and high-throughput sequencing coming from a 145 patients series. The correct gene was predicted in 61 and 78 % of the cases by the two assessors, respectively. There was a high inter-rater agreement [K = 0.85 (0.55-0.98) p < 0.001] confirming the algorithm's reproducibility. Phenotyping patients with proper clinical examination, imaging, biochemical investigations and nerve conduction studies remain crucial for the guidance of molecular analysis and to interpret next generation sequencing results. The proposed algorithm should be helpful for diagnosing ARCA in clinical practice.


Assuntos
Algoritmos , Ataxia Cerebelar/diagnóstico , Ataxia Cerebelar/genética , Genes Recessivos/genética , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Adolescente , Adulto , Idade de Início , Idoso , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Estudos Retrospectivos , Adulto Jovem
18.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 113(26): E3619-28, 2016 06 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27233938

RESUMO

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the absence of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) in neurons. In the mouse, the lack of FMRP is associated with an excessive translation of hundreds of neuronal proteins, notably including postsynaptic proteins. This local protein synthesis deregulation is proposed to underlie the observed defects of glutamatergic synapse maturation and function and to affect preferentially the hundreds of mRNA species that were reported to bind to FMRP. How FMRP impacts synaptic protein translation and which mRNAs are most important for the pathology remain unclear. Here we show by cross-linking immunoprecipitation in cortical neurons that FMRP is mostly associated with one unique mRNA: diacylglycerol kinase kappa (Dgkκ), a master regulator that controls the switch between diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways. The absence of FMRP in neurons abolishes group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent DGK activity combined with a loss of Dgkκ expression. The reduction of Dgkκ in neurons is sufficient to cause dendritic spine abnormalities, synaptic plasticity alterations, and behavior disorders similar to those observed in the FXS mouse model. Overexpression of Dgkκ in neurons is able to rescue the dendritic spine defects of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 gene KO neurons. Together, these data suggest that Dgkκ deregulation contributes to FXS pathology and support a model where FMRP, by controlling the translation of Dgkκ, indirectly controls synaptic proteins translation and membrane properties by impacting lipid signaling in dendritic spine.


Assuntos
Diacilglicerol Quinase/metabolismo , Proteína do X Frágil de Retardo Mental/metabolismo , Síndrome do Cromossomo X Frágil/metabolismo , Neurônios/enzimologia , Idoso , Animais , Espinhas Dendríticas/enzimologia , Espinhas Dendríticas/metabolismo , Diacilglicerol Quinase/genética , Diglicerídeos/metabolismo , Proteína do X Frágil de Retardo Mental/genética , Síndrome do Cromossomo X Frágil/enzimologia , Síndrome do Cromossomo X Frágil/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Camundongos Knockout , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neurônios/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais
19.
Am J Med Genet A ; 170(6): 1626-9, 2016 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27061120

RESUMO

The cardinal features of Primrose syndrome (MIM 259050) are dysmorphic facial features, macrocephaly, and intellectual disability, as well as large body size, height and weight, and calcified pinnae. A variety of neurological signs and symptoms have been reported including hearing loss, autism, behavioral abormalities, hypotonia, cerebral calcifications, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Recently, heterozygous de novo missense mutations in ZBTB20, coding for a zing finger protein, have been identified in Primrose syndrome patients. We report a boy with intellectual disability carrying two de novo missense mutations in the last exon of ZBTB20 (Ser616Phe and Gly741Arg; both previously unreported). One of them, Ser616Phe, affects an amino acid located in one of the C2H2 zing-fingers involved in DNA-binding and close to other missense mutations already described. Reverse phenotyping showed that this patient presents with classic features of Primrose syndrome (dysmorphic facies, macrocephaly, hearing loss, hypotonia, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum) and, in addition, congenital hypothyroidism. Review of the literature reveals another Primrose syndrome patient with hypothyroidism and thus, this may represent an under recognized component that should be investigated in other patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Múltiplas/diagnóstico , Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Calcinose/diagnóstico , Calcinose/genética , Hipotireoidismo Congênito/diagnóstico , Hipotireoidismo Congênito/genética , Otopatias/diagnóstico , Otopatias/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Atrofia Muscular/diagnóstico , Atrofia Muscular/genética , Mutação , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Biomarcadores , Hibridização Genômica Comparativa , Facies , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Linhagem , Fenótipo
20.
Orphanet J Rare Dis ; 11: 26, 2016 Mar 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27004399

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Deficient nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity causes a variety of autosomal recessive diseases including xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) a disorder which pre-disposes to skin cancer, and the severe multisystem condition known as Cockayne syndrome (CS). In view of the clinical overlap between NER-related disorders, as well as the existence of multiple phenotypes and the numerous genes involved, we developed a new diagnostic approach based on the enrichment of 16 NER-related genes by multiplex amplification coupled with next-generation sequencing (NGS). METHODS: Our test cohort consisted of 11 DNA samples, all with known mutations and/or non pathogenic SNPs in two of the tested genes. We then used the same technique to analyse samples from a prospective cohort of 40 patients. Multiplex amplification and sequencing were performed using AmpliSeq protocol on the Ion Torrent PGM (Life Technologies). RESULTS: We identified causative mutations in 17 out of the 40 patients (43%). Four patients showed biallelic mutations in the ERCC6(CSB) gene, five in the ERCC8(CSA) gene: most of them had classical CS features but some had very mild and incomplete phenotypes. A small cohort of 4 unrelated classic XP patients from the Basque country (Northern Spain) revealed a common splicing mutation in POLH (XP-variant), demonstrating a new founder effect in this population. Interestingly, our results also found ERCC2(XPD), ERCC3(XPB) or ERCC5(XPG) mutations in two cases of UV-sensitive syndrome and in two cases with mixed XP/CS phenotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms that NGS is an efficient technique for the analysis of NER-related disorders on a molecular level. It is particularly useful for phenotypes with combined features or unusually mild symptoms. Targeted NGS used in conjunction with DNA repair functional tests and precise clinical evaluation permits rapid and cost-effective diagnosis in patients with NER-defects.


Assuntos
Reparo do DNA/genética , Síndrome de Cockayne/genética , DNA Helicases/genética , Enzimas Reparadoras do DNA/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , DNA Polimerase Dirigida por DNA/genética , Endonucleases/genética , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/métodos , Humanos , Mutação , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Fenótipo , Proteínas de Ligação a Poli-ADP-Ribose , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Proteína Grupo D do Xeroderma Pigmentoso/genética
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA