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2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31733035

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Screening psoriasis patients for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is intended to identify patients at earlier stages of the disease. Early treatment is expected to slow disease progression and delay the need for biologic therapy. This paper determines the cost-effectiveness of screening for PsA in patients with psoriasis in Canada. METHODS: A Markov model was built to estimate the costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of screening tools for PsA in psoriasis patients. The screening tools included the ToPAS, PEST, PASE; and EARP questionnaires. Health states were defined by disability levels as measured by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). State transitions were modelled based on annual disease progression. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and Incremental net monetary benefits (INMBs) were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to account for parameter uncertainty and test model assumptions. RESULTS: Screening was cost-effective compared to 'no screening'. The EARP had the lowest total cost ($2,000 per patient per year saved compared to No Screening) and highest total QALYs (additional 0.18 per patient compared to No Screening). The results were most sensitive to test accuracy and DMARD efficacy. 'No Screening' was cost-effective (at $50,000 per QALY) relative to screening when DMARDs failed to slow disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: If early therapy with DMARDs delays biologic treatment, implementing screening in patients with psoriasis in Canada is expected to represent cost-savings of $220 million per year and improve quality of life.

3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(11): e1914861, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31702800

RESUMO

Importance: Specialist physicians are key members of chronic care management teams; to date, however, little is known about the association between specialist payment models and outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. Objective: To examine the association of payment model with visit frequency, quality of care, and costs for patients with chronic diseases seen by specialists. Design, Setting, and Participants: A retrospective cohort study using propensity-score matching in patients seen by a specialist physician was conducted between April 1, 2011, and September 31, 2014. The study was completed on March 31, 2015, and data analysis was conducted from June 2017 to February 2018 and finalized in August 2019. In a population-based design, 109 839 adults with diabetes or chronic kidney disease newly referred to specialists were included. Because patients seen by independent salary-based and fee-for-service (FFS) specialists were significantly different in observed baseline characteristics, patients were matched 1:1 on demographic, illness, and physician characteristics. Exposures: Specialist physician payment model (salary-based or FFS). Main Outcomes and Measures: Follow-up outpatient visits, guideline-recommended care delivery, adverse events, and costs. Results: A total of 90 605 patients received care from FFS physicians and 19 234 received care from salary-based physicians. Before matching, the patients seen by salary-based physicians had more advanced chronic kidney disease (2630 of 14 414 [18.2%] vs 6627 of 54 489 [12.2%]), and a higher proportion had 5 or more comorbidities (5989 of 19 234 [31.3%] vs 23 326 of 90 605 [25.7%]). Propensity-score matching resulted in a cohort of 31 898 patients (15 949 FFS, 15 949 salary-based) seeing 489 specialists. In the matched cohort, patients were similar (mean [SD] age, 61.3 [18.2] years; 17 632 women [55.3%]; 29 251 residing in urban settings [91.7%]). Patients seen by salary-based specialists had a higher follow-up visit rate compared with those seen by FFS specialists (1.74 visits; 95% CI, 1.58-1.92 visits vs 1.54 visits; 95% CI, 1.41-1.68 visits), but the difference was not significant (rate ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.99-1.28; P = .06). There was no statistical difference in guideline-recommended care delivery, hospital or emergency department visits for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, or costs between patients seeing FFS and salary-based specialists. The median association of physician clustering with health care use and quality outcomes was consistently greater than the association with the physician payment, suggesting variation between physicians (eg, median rate ratio for follow-up outpatient visit rate was 1.74, which is greater than the rate ratio of 1.13). Conclusions and Relevance: Specialist physician payment does not appear to be associated with variation in visits, quality, and costs for outpatients with chronic diseases; however, there is variation in outcomes between physicians. This finding suggests the need to consider other strategies to reduce physician variation to improve the value of care and outcomes for people with chronic diseases.

4.
CMAJ ; 191(47): E1299-E1305, 2019 Nov 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31767705
5.
JAMA Intern Med ; 2019 Oct 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31589276

RESUMO

Importance: Nonadherence to treatment with medicines is common globally, even for life-saving treatments. Cost is one important barrier to access, and only some jurisdictions provide medicines at no charge to patients. Objective: To determine whether providing essential medicines at no charge to outpatients who reported not being able to afford medicines improves adherence. Design, Setting, and Participants: A multicenter, unblinded, parallel, 2-group, superiority, outcomes assessor-blinded, individually randomized clinical trial conducted at 9 primary care sites in Ontario, Canada, enrolled 786 patients between June 1, 2016, and April 28, 2017, who reported cost-related nonadherence. Follow-up occurred at 12 months. The primary analysis was performed using an intention-to-treat principle. Interventions: Patients were randomly allocated to receive free medicines on a list of essential medicines in addition to otherwise usual care (n = 395) or usual medicine access and usual care (n = 391). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was adherence to treatment with all medicines that were appropriately prescribed for 1 year. Secondary outcomes were hemoglobin A1c level, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels 1 year after randomization in participants taking corresponding medicines. Results: Among the 786 participants analyzed (439 women and 347 men; mean [SD] age, 51.7 [14.3] years), 764 completed the trial. Adherence to treatment with all medicines was higher in those randomized to receive free distribution (151 of 395 [38.2%]) compared with usual access (104 of 391 [26.6%]; difference, 11.6%; 95% CI, 4.9%-18.4%). Control of type 1 and 2 diabetes was not significantly improved by free distribution (hemoglobin A1c, -0.38%; 95% CI, -0.76% to 0.00%), systolic blood pressure was reduced (-7.2 mm Hg; 95% CI, -11.7 to -2.8 mm Hg), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were not affected (-2.3 mg/dL; 95% CI, -14.7 to 10.0 mg/dL). Conclusions and Relevance: The distribution of essential medicines at no charge for 1 year increased adherence to treatment with medicines and improved some, but not other, disease-specific surrogate health outcomes. These findings could help inform changes to medicine access policies such as publicly funding essential medicines. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02744963.

6.
Trials ; 20(1): 577, 2019 Oct 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31590686

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: One of the most challenging parts of running clinical trials is recruiting enough participants. Our objective was to determine which recruitment strategies were effective in reaching specific subgroups. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We assessed the efficacy and costs of the recruitment strategies used in the Assessing Outcomes of Enhanced Chronic Disease Care Through Patient Education and a Value-based Formulary Study (ACCESS) in Alberta, Canada. RESULTS: Twenty percent of the study budget ($354,330 CAD) was spent on recruiting 4013 participants, giving an average cost per enrolled of $88 CAD. Pharmacies recruited the most participants (n = 1217), at a cost of $128/enrolled. "Paid media" had the highest cost ($806/enrolled), whereas "word of mouth" and "unpaid media" had the lowest (~$3/enrolled). Participants enrolled from "seniors outreach" had the lowest baseline quality of life and income, while participants from "word of mouth" had the lowest educational attainment. CONCLUSION: The "health care providers" strategies were especially successful - at a moderate cost per enrolled. The "media" strategies were less effective, short lasting, and more costly. No strategy was singularly effective in recruiting our targeted groups, emphasizing the importance of utilizing a variety of strategies to reach recruitment goals. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02579655 . Registered on 19 October 2015.

7.
Value Health ; 22(10): 1128-1136, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31563255

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A randomized trial (the Alberta Vascular Risk Reduction Community Pharmacy Project) showed that a community pharmacist-led intervention was efficacious for reducing cardiovascular (CV) risk. However, the cost of this strategy is unknown. OBJECTIVES: We examined the short- and long-term cost of a pharmacist-led intervention to reduce CV risk compared to usual care. METHODS: We conducted a trial-based cost analysis from the perspective of a publicly funded healthcare system. Over 3 and 12 months of follow-up, we examined specific intervention costs (pharmacy claims), related intervention costs (laboratory tests and medications), and ongoing healthcare costs (physician claims, emergency department visits, and hospital admissions). We also used the validated CV Disease Policy Model-Canada to estimate the long-term effects. RESULTS: A total of 684 participants (mean age 62, 57% male) were included. Overall, there were no significant differences in healthcare costs at 3 or 12 months between the usual care and intervention groups (P = .127). The CV disease-related healthcare cost of managing a patient over a lifetime was estimated to be Can$45 530 (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 45 460-45 580) and Can$40 750 (95% UI, 37 780-43 620) in usual care and intervention groups, respectively, an incremental cost savings of Can$4770 per patient (95% UI, 1900-7760). The intervention dominated usual care (better outcomes and lower costs) across 3-year, 5-year, 10-year, and lifetime horizons. CONCLUSION: This economic analysis suggests that a clinical pathway-driven pharmacist-led intervention (previously shown to reduce CV risk) was associated with similar measured healthcare costs over 1 year, and lower extrapolated healthcare costs over a patient lifetime. This strategy could be broadly implemented to realize its benefits.

8.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 30(11): 2219-2227, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31540963

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most kidney failure risk calculators are based on methods that censor for death. Because mortality is high in people with severe, nondialysis-dependent CKD, censoring for death may overestimate their risk of kidney failure. METHODS: Using 2002-2014 population-based laboratory and administrative data for adults with stage 4 CKD in Alberta, Canada, we analyzed the time to the earliest of kidney failure, death, or censoring, using methods that censor for death and methods that treat death as a competing event factoring in age, sex, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, eGFR, and albuminuria. Stage 4 CKD was defined as a sustained eGFR of 15-30 ml/min per 1.73 m2. RESULTS: Of the 30,801 participants (106,447 patient-years at risk; mean age 77 years), 18% developed kidney failure and 53% died. The observed risk of the combined end point of death or kidney failure was 64% at 5 years and 87% at 10 years. By comparison, standard risk calculators that censored for death estimated these risks to be 76% at 5 years and >100% at 7.5 years. Censoring for death increasingly overestimated the risk of kidney failure over time from 7% at 5 years to 19% at 10 years, especially in people at higher risk of death. For example, the overestimation of 5-year absolute risk ranged from 1% in a woman without diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or albuminuria and with an eGFR of 25 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (9% versus 8%), to 27% in a man with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, albuminuria >300 mg/d, and an eGFR of 20 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (78% versus 51%). CONCLUSIONS: Kidney failure risk calculators should account for death as a competing risk to increase their accuracy and utility for patients and providers.

9.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 19(1): 177, 2019 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31484516

RESUMO

Following publication of the original manuscript [1], the authors noted several errors in Table 1. Details of the requested corrections are shown below.

10.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 32(6): 313-322, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31394938

RESUMO

Clinical networks are groups of clinicians, patients, operational leaders, and other stakeholders who work together to solve health challenges, translate evidence into practice, and improve health outcomes and clinical care. Networks enable health, community, and academic partners to align their efforts, address priority issues, and advance quality improvements, health innovation, and transformational change on a local and system-wide scale. Clinical networks have existed in some countries for nearly 20 years. Alberta first implemented clinical networks in 2012 in specific areas of health. There are now 16 Strategic Clinical Networks (SCNs) in Alberta, embedded within a province-wide health system. The SCNs have developed an action plan that builds on their experience and identifies common areas of focus. This article describes the SCNs, their impact to date, and the objectives, areas of focus, and processes Alberta's SCNs will use to improve health outcomes and health system performance over the next 5 years.

11.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(8): e199910, 2019 Aug 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31441939

RESUMO

Importance: A population-based study using validated algorithms to estimate the costs of treating people with chronic disease with and without mental health disorders is needed. Objective: To determine the association of mental health disorders with health care costs among people with chronic diseases. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study in the Canadian province of Alberta collected data from April 1, 2012, to March 31, 2015, among 991 445 adults 18 years and older with a chronic disease (ie, asthma, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, diabetes, epilepsy, hypertension, chronic pulmonary disease, or chronic kidney disease). Data analysis was conducted from October 2017 to August 2018. Exposures: Mental health disorder (ie, depression, schizophrenia, alcohol use disorder, or drug use disorder). Main Outcomes and Measures: Resource use, mean total unadjusted and adjusted 3-year health care costs, and mean total unadjusted 3-year costs for hospitalization and emergency department visits for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. Results: Among 991 445 participants, 156 296 (15.8%) had a mental health disorder. Those with no mental health disorder were older (mean [SD] age, 58.1 [17.6] years vs 55.4 [17.0] years; P < .001) and less likely to be women (50.4% [95% CI, 50.3%-50.5%] vs 57.7% [95% CI, 57.4%-58.0%]; P < .001) than those with mental health disorders. For those with a mental health disorder, mean total 3-year adjusted costs were $38 250 (95% CI, $36 476-$39 935), and for those without a mental health disorder, mean total 3-year adjusted costs were $22 280 (95% CI, $21 780-$22 760). Having a mental health disorder was associated with significantly higher resource use, including hospitalization and emergency department visit rates, length of stay, and hospitalization for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. Higher resource use by patients with mental health disorders was not associated with health care presentations owing to chronic diseases compared with patients without a mental health disorder (chronic disease hospitalization rate per 1000 patient days, 0.11 [95% CI, 0.11-0.12] vs 0.06 [95% CI, 0.06-0.06]; P < .001; overall hospitalization rate per 1000 patient days, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.87-0.88] vs 0.43 [95% CI, 0.43-0.43]; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: This study suggests that mental health disorders are associated with substantially higher resource utilization and health care costs among patients with chronic diseases. These findings have clinical and health policy implications.

12.
BMC Surg ; 19(1): 119, 2019 Aug 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31455337

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As it may be argued that many surgical interventions provide obvious patient benefits, formal, staged assessment of the efficacy and safety of surgical procedures has historically been and remains uncommon. The majority of innovative surgical procedures have therefore often been developed based on anatomical and pathophysiological principles in an attempt to better manage clinical problems. MAIN BODY: In this manuscript, we sought to review and contrast the models for pharmaceutical and surgical innovation in North America, including their stages of development and methods of evaluation, monitoring, and regulation. We also aimed to review the present structure of academic surgery, the role of methodological experts and funding in conducting surgical research, and the current system of regulation of innovative surgical procedures. Finally, we highlight the influence that evidence and surgical history, education, training, and culture have on elective and emergency surgical decision-making. The above discussion is used to support the argument that the model used for assessment of innovative pharmaceuticals cannot be applied to that for evaluating surgical innovations. It is also used to support our position that although the evaluation and monitoring of innovative surgical procedures requires a rigorous, fit-for-purpose, and formal system of assessment to protect patient safety and prevent unexpected adverse health outcomes, it will only succeed if it is supported and championed by surgical practice leaders and respects surgical history, education, training, and culture. CONCLUSION: We conclude the above debate by providing a recommended approach to the evaluation, monitoring, and regulation of surgical innovations, which we hope may be used as a guide for all stakeholders involved in interpreting and/or conducting future surgical research.


Assuntos
Tomada de Decisões , Segurança do Paciente , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios/métodos , Humanos
13.
BMJ Open ; 9(7): e030333, 2019 Jul 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31366664

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Fatigue is a pervasive symptom of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that is associated with low quality of life, disability and mortality, and has been identified as a top research priority by patients. We developed a personalised, web-supported educational programme (the Personal Energy Planning (PEP) programme) to teach people with ESRD to use energy management to manage fatigue. Preliminary studies have demonstrated positive effects on fatigue and life participation (ie, the ability to participate in valued day-to-day activities), which justifies the need for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to better understand the efficacy of the programme. The objectives of the pilot RCT are to estimate RCT eligibility, recruitment and attrition rates, to inform the primary outcome measure and sample size for the RCT and to evaluate treatment fidelity among programme administrators. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A parallel-arm, 1:1 pilot RCT will be conducted at four in-centre haemodialysis units in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. People on haemodialysis who report moderate or severe fatigue on the Fatigue Severity Scale, and meet other study eligibility criteria, will be invited to participate. Consenting participants will be randomised to undergo the 7-9 week 'PEP' programme or an active control, and followed for 12 weeks after the programme concludes. Information on eligibility, recruitment and attrition rates will be collected, and questionnaires assessing fatigue and life participation will be administered preintervention, midintervention, immediately postintervention and 12 weeks postintervention. Analyses will include calculation of eligibility, recruitment and attrition rates; power considerations for the full-scale RCT and evaluation of treatment fidelity of programme administrators. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Risks associated with this study are minor. Patients may experience emotional discomfort while filling out study questionnaires. They will be advised to skip any questions that make them uncomfortable. Potential benefits of participating include any benefit derived from the study intervention, and contributing to research that may benefit people with kidney disease in the future. Trial results will be disseminated via publication in an academic journal and presentation at academic conferences. The study has been approved by the Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board at the University of Calgary (ID #18-1657).

14.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 40(10): 1135-1143, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31342884

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the attributable cost and length of stay of hospital-acquired Clostridioides difficile infection (HA-CDI) from the healthcare payer perspective using linked clinical, administrative, and microcosting data. DESIGN: A retrospective, population-based, propensity-score-matched cohort study. SETTING: Acute-care facilities in Alberta, Canada. PATIENTS: Admitted adult (≥18 years) patients with incident HA-CDI and without CDI between April 1, 2012, and March 31, 2016. METHODS: Incident cases of HA-CDI were identified using a clinical surveillance definition. Cases were matched to noncases of CDI (those without a positive C. difficile test or without clinical CDI) on propensity score and exposure time. The outcomes were attributable costs and length of stay of the hospitalization where the CDI was identified. Costs were expressed in 2018 Canadian dollars. RESULTS: Of the 2,916 HA-CDI cases at facilities with microcosting data available, 98.4% were matched to 13,024 noncases of CDI. The total adjusted cost among HA-CDI cases was 27% greater than noncases of CDI (ratio, 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-1.33). The mean attributable cost was $18,386 (CAD 2018; USD $14,190; 95% CI, $14,312-$22,460; USD $11,046-$17,334). The adjusted length of stay among HA-CDI cases was 13% greater than for noncases of CDI (ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.07-1.19), which corresponds to an extra 5.6 days (95% CI, 3.10-8.06) in length of hospital stay per HA-CDI case. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based, propensity score matched analysis using microcosting data, HA-CDI was associated with substantial attributable cost.

15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31338160

RESUMO

Background: While decolonization of Staphylococcus aureus reduces surgical site infection (SSI) rates following hip and knee arthroplasty, its cost-effectiveness is uncertain. We sought to examine the cost-effectiveness of a decolonization protocol for Staphylococcus aureus prior to hip and knee replacement in Alberta compared to standard care - no decolonization. Methods: Decision analytic models and a probabilistic sensitivity analysis were used for a cost-effectiveness analysis, with the effectiveness of decolonization based on a large published pre- and post- intervention trial. The primary outcomes of the models were infections prevented and health care costs. We modelled the cost-effectiveness of decolonization in a hypothetical cohort of adult patients undergoing hip and knee replacement in Alberta, Canada. Information on the incidence of complex surgical site infections (SSIs), as well as the cost of care for patients with and without SSIs was taken from a provincial infection control database, and health administrative data. Results: Use of the decolonization bundle was cost saving compared to usual care ($153/person), and resulted in 16 complex Staphylococcus aureus SSIs annually as opposed to 32 (with approximately 8000 hip or knee arthroplasties performed). The probabilistic sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the majority (84%) of the time the decolonization bundle was cost saving. The model was robust to one-way sensitivity analyses conducted within plausible ranges. There were small upfront costs associated with using a decolonization protocol, however, this model demonstrated cost savings over one year. In a Markov model that considered the impact of a decolonization bundle over a lifetime as it pertained to the need for subsequent joint replacements and patient quality of life, the bundle still resulted in cost savings ($161/person). Conclusions: Decolonization for Staphylococcus aureus prior to hip and knee replacements resulted in cost savings and fewer SSIs, and should be considered prior to these procedures.

16.
BMC Nephrol ; 20(1): 204, 2019 Jun 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31170925

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite the interrelationships between obesity, eGFR and albuminuria, few large studies examine how obesity modifies the association between these markers of kidney function and adverse clinical outcomes. METHODS: We examined the joint associations between obesity, eGFR and albuminuria on four clinical outcomes (death, end-stage renal disease [ESRD], myocardial infarction [MI], and placement in a long-term care facility) using a population-based cohort with procedures from Alberta. Obesity was defined by body mass index ≥35 kg/m2 as defined by a fee modifier applied to an eligible procedure. RESULTS: We studied 1,293,362 participants, of whom 171,650 (13.3%) had documented obesity (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 based on claims data) and 1,121,712 (86.7%) did not. The association between eGFR and death was J-shaped for participants with and without documented obesity. After full adjustment, obesity tended to be associated with slightly lower odds of mortality (OR range 0.71-1.02; p for interaction between obesity and eGFR 0.008). For participants with and without obesity, the adjusted odds of ESRD were lowest for participants with eGFR > 90 mL/min*1.73m2 and increased with lower eGFR, with no evidence of an interaction with obesity (p = 0.37). Although albuminuria and obesity were both associated with higher odds of ESRD, the excess risk associated with obesity was substantially attenuated at higher levels of albuminuria (p for interaction 0.0006). The excess risk of MI associated with obesity was observed at eGFR > 60 mL/min*1.73m2 but not at lower eGFR (p for interaction < 0.0001). Participants with obesity had a higher adjusted likelihood of placement in long-term care than those without, and the likelihood of such placement was higher at lower eGFR for those with and without obesity (p for interaction = 0.57). CONCLUSIONS: We found significant interactions between obesity and eGFR and/or albuminuria on the likelihood of adverse outcomes including death and ESRD. Since obesity is common, risk prediction tools for people with CKD might be improved by adding information on BMI or other proxies for body size in addition to eGFR and albuminuria.

17.
JAMA Intern Med ; 179(7): 934-941, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31135821

RESUMO

Importance: Published in 2010, the Initiating Dialysis Early and Late (IDEAL) randomized clinical trial, which randomized patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) between 10 and 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 to planned initiation of dialysis with an estimated GFR between 10 and 14 mL/min/1.73 m2 (early start) or an estimated GFR between 5 and 7 mL/min/1.73 m2 (late start), concluded that early initiation was not associated with improved survival or clinical outcomes. Objective: To assess the association between the IDEAL trial results and the proportion of early dialysis starts over time. Design, Setting, and Participants: This interrupted time series analysis used data from the Canadian Organ Replacement Register to study adult (≥18 years of age) patients with incident chronic dialysis between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2015, in Canada, which has a universal health care system. Patients from the province of Quebec were excluded because its privacy laws preclude submission of deidentified data without first-person consent. The patients included in the study (n = 28 468) had at least 90 days of nephrologist care before starting dialysis and a recorded estimated GFR at dialysis initiation. Data analyses were performed from November 2016 to January 2019. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was the proportion of early dialysis starts (estimated GFR >10.5 mL/min/1.73 m2), and the secondary outcomes included the proportions of acute inpatient dialysis starts, patients who started dialysis using a home modality, and patients receiving hemodialysis who started with an arteriovenous access. Measures included the trend prior to the IDEAL trial publication, the change in this trend after publication, and the immediate consequence of publication. Results: The final cohort comprised 28 468 patients, of whom 17 342 (60.9%) were male and the mean (SD) age was 64.8 (14.6) years. Before the IDEAL trial, a statistically significant increasing trend was observed in the monthly proportion of early dialysis starts (adjusted rate ratio, 1.002; 95% CI, 1.001-1.004; P = .004). After the IDEAL trial, an immediate decrease was observed in the proportion of early dialysis starts (rate ratio, 0.874; 95% CI, 0.818-0.933; P < .001), along with a statistically significant change in trend between the pretrial and posttrial periods (rate ratio, 0.994; 95% CI, 0.992-0.996; P < .001). No statistically significant differences were found in acute inpatient dialysis initiations, the proportion of patients receiving home dialysis as the initial modality, or the proportion of arteriovenous access creation at hemodialysis initiation after the IDEAL trial publication. Conclusions and Relevance: The publication of the IDEAL trial appeared to be associated with an immediate and meaningful change in the timing of dialysis initiation in Canada.

18.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(4): e191795, 2019 Apr 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30951162

RESUMO

Importance: Abnormal measurements of kidney function or structure may be identified that do not meet criteria for acute kidney injury (AKI) or chronic kidney disease (CKD) but nonetheless may require medical attention. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Practice Guideline for AKI proposed criteria for the definition of acute kidney diseases and disorders (AKD), which include AKI; however, the incidence and prognosis of AKD without AKI remain unknown. Objective: To characterize the incidence and outcomes of AKD without AKI, with or without CKD. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective cohort study including all adult residents in a universal health care system in Alberta, Canada, without end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and with at least 1 serum creatinine measurement between January 1 and December 31, 2008, in a community or hospital setting. Data analysis took place in 2018. Main Outcomes and Measures: The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guideline definitions for CKD, AKI, and AKD based on serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and albuminuria criteria were applied to estimate the proportion of patients with CKD, AKI, and AKD without AKI, and combinations of the conditions. Patients were followed up for up to 8 years (study end date, June 31, 2016) to characterize their risks of mortality, development of new CKD, progression of preexisting CKD, and ESKD. Results: Among 1 109 099 Alberta residents included in the cohort, the mean (SD) age was 52.3 (17.6) years, and 43.0% were male. Findings showed that AKD without AKI was common (3.8 individuals without preexisting CKD and 0.6 with preexisting CKD per 100 population tested). In Cox proportional hazards and competing risks models over a median (interquartile range) of 6.0 (5.7-6.3) years of follow-up, AKD without AKI (compared with no kidney disease) was associated with higher risks of developing new CKD (37.4% vs 7.4%%; adjusted sub-hazard ratio [sHR], 3.17; 95% CI, 3.10-3.23), progression of preexisting CKD (49.5% vs 34.6%; adjusted sHR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.33-1.44), ESKD (0.6% vs 0.1%; adjusted sHR, 8.56; 95% CI, 7.32-10.01), and death (25.8% vs 7.3%; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.39-1.45). Conclusions and Relevance: Criteria for AKD identified many patients who did not meet the criteria for CKD or AKI but had overall modestly increased risks of incident and progressive CKD, ESKD, and death. The clinical importance of AKD remains to be determined.

19.
BMC Nephrol ; 20(1): 103, 2019 03 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30909872

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As more patients at lower cardiovascular (CV) risk are treated with statins, the balance between cardiovascular benefits and the risk of adverse events becomes increasingly important. METHODS: We did a population-based cohort study (May 1, 2002 to March 30, 2013) using province-wide laboratory and administrative data in Alberta. We studied new statin users aged 66 years of age and older who were not receiving renal replacement therapy at baseline. We assessed statin use at 30-day intervals to allow time-varying assessment of statin exposure in Cox proportional hazards models that examined the relation between statin use and hospitalization with acute kidney injury (AKI). RESULTS: Of the 128,140 new statin users, 47 and 46% were prescribed high- and medium-intensity regimens at the index date. During median follow-up of 4.6 years (interquartile range 2.2, 7.4), 9118 individuals were hospitalized for AKI. Compared to non-use, the use of high- and medium-intensity statin regimens was associated with significant increases in the adjusted risks of hospitalization with AKI: hazard ratios 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10, 1.23] and 1.07 (95% CI 1.01, 1.13), respectively. Risks of AKI were higher among women than men, and among users of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers than non-users, and among diuretic users (p for interaction 0.002, 0.01, and 0.04 respectively). CONCLUSIONS: We found a graded, independent association between the intensity of statin use and the risk of hospitalization with AKI, although the absolute magnitude of the excess risk was small.

20.
CMAJ ; 191(10): E274-E282, 2019 03 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30858183

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend nephrology referral for people with advanced non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease, based mostly on survival benefits seen in retrospective studies of dialysis patients, which may not be generalizable to the broader population with chronic kidney disease. We aimed to examine the association between outpatient nephrology consultation and survival in adults with stage 4 chronic kidney disease. METHODS: We linked population-based laboratory and administrative data from 2002 to 2014 in Alberta, Canada, on adults with stage 4 chronic kidney disease (sustained estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥ 15 to < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 for > 90 d), who had never had kidney failure and had had no outpatient nephrology encounter in the 2 years preceding study entry. Participants who had never had an outpatient nephrology visit before renal replacement treatment were considered "unexposed." Participants who saw a nephrologist during follow-up were considered "unexposed" before the first outpatient nephrology visit and "exposed" thereafter. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Of the 14 382 study participants (median follow-up 2.7 yr), 64% were aged ≥ 80 years, 35% saw a nephrologist and 66% died during follow-up. Nephrology consultation was associated with lower mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82-0.93). The association was strongest in people < 70 years (HR 0.78, 95% CI, 0.65-0.92), progressively weaker with increasing age, and absent in people ≥ 90 years (HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.88-1.25). INTERPRETATION: The survival benefit of nephrology consultation in adults with stage 4 chronic kidney disease may be smaller than expected and appears to attenuate with increasing age. These findings should inform recommendations for nephrology referral considering the advanced age of the patient population meeting current referral criteria.

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