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1.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 3927, 2019 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31477735

RESUMO

The duration of pregnancy is influenced by fetal and maternal genetic and non-genetic factors. Here we report a fetal genome-wide association meta-analysis of gestational duration, and early preterm, preterm, and postterm birth in 84,689 infants. One locus on chromosome 2q13 is associated with gestational duration; the association is replicated in 9,291 additional infants (combined P = 3.96 × 10-14). Analysis of 15,588 mother-child pairs shows that the association is driven by fetal rather than maternal genotype. Functional experiments show that the lead SNP, rs7594852, alters the binding of the HIC1 transcriptional repressor. Genes at the locus include several interleukin 1 family members with roles in pro-inflammatory pathways that are central to the process of parturition. Further understanding of the underlying mechanisms will be of great public health importance, since giving birth either before or after the window of term gestation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality.

2.
Int J Paediatr Dent ; 2019 Jul 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31328316

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dental fear/anxiety is associated with numerous negative outcomes. State dental fear is known to be transmitted from parents to their children in the dental setting, but it is not known how trait fear/anxiety might be shared between parents and offspring long term, and especially for adolescents. AIM: This study aimed to: (a) compare dental fear levels of adolescents and their parents; (b) predict adolescent dental fear based on demographic variables, fear of pain, and parental dental fear; and, (c) determine relative contributions of mothers' and fathers' dental fear to adolescent fear. DESIGN: In this cross-sectional study, the Dental Fear Survey and Fear of Pain Questionnaire-9 were administered to 350 adolescents (age range 11-17) and 515 of their parents, with t test and ANOVA used to calculate between-group differences; multiple linear regression was used to predict adolescent fear from parent fear. RESULTS: Adolescents' dental fear was predicted by their own fear of pain and their parents' dental fear, but not their parents' fear of pain nor their own age or gender. When considered together, fathers' but not mothers' dental fear predicted adolescents' dental fear. CONCLUSIONS: Parents' fears/anxieties about dentistry are associated with adolescents' dental fear in a manner suggestive of intergenerational transmission.

3.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 2773, 2019 06 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31235808

RESUMO

Dental caries and periodontitis account for a vast burden of morbidity and healthcare spending, yet their genetic basis remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we identify self-reported dental disease proxies which have similar underlying genetic contributions to clinical disease measures and then combine these in a genome-wide association study meta-analysis, identifying 47 novel and conditionally-independent risk loci for dental caries. We show that the heritability of dental caries is enriched for conserved genomic regions and partially overlapping with a range of complex traits including smoking, education, personality traits and metabolic measures. Using cardio-metabolic traits as an example in Mendelian randomization analysis, we estimate causal relationships and provide evidence suggesting that the processes contributing to dental caries may have undesirable downstream effects on health.


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Periodontite/genética , Cárie Dentária/epidemiologia , Genômica , Hereditariedade , Humanos , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Periodontite/epidemiologia , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética , Autorrelato/estatística & dados numéricos
5.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 2557, 2019 06 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31186421

RESUMO

Facial recognition from DNA refers to the identification or verification of unidentified biological material against facial images with known identity. One approach to establish the identity of unidentified biological material is to predict the face from DNA, and subsequently to match against facial images. However, DNA phenotyping of the human face remains challenging. Here, another proof of concept to biometric authentication is established by using multiple face-to-DNA classifiers, each classifying given faces by a DNA-encoded aspect (sex, genomic background, individual genetic loci), or by a DNA-inferred aspect (BMI, age). Face-to-DNA classifiers on distinct DNA aspects are fused into one matching score for any given face against DNA. In a globally diverse, and subsequently in a homogeneous cohort, we demonstrate preliminary, but substantial true (83%, 80%) over false (17%, 20%) matching in verification mode. Consequences of future efforts include forensic applications, necessitating careful consideration of ethical and legal implications for privacy in genomic databases.


Assuntos
Identificação Biométrica , Face/anatomia & histologia , Reconhecimento Facial , Genótipo , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estatura , Peso Corporal , Estudos de Coortes , Bases de Dados de Ácidos Nucleicos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
6.
Pediatr Dent ; 41(3): 200-205, 2019 May 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31171071

RESUMO

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether perceived social support among mothers with high levels of dental caries was associated with their children experiencing high levels of dental caries. Methods: In West Virginia and Pennsylvania from 2002 to 2009, mothers were interviewed and clinical exams were conducted on their one- to six-year-old children. Two hundred and fifty mother-child dyads were analyzed where the mother had high dental caries. Mothers reported perceived social support across four domains (appraisal, tangible, self-esteem, belonging) from the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List instrument (ISEL), with higher scores representing greater support. The association between each social support domain and the probability of high child dental caries was examined. Results: Twenty-seven percent of children (67 out of 250) had high dental caries, and the odds of children having high caries was lower by seven percent for every one point increase in the ISEL appraisal score (odds ratio equals 0.93; 95 percent confidence interval equals 0.88, 0.99). Tangible, self-esteem, and belonging social support ISEL subscales were not significantly associated with high child dental caries (P>0.05). Conclusions: Among mothers with high dental caries, there was modest evidence that appraisal support-the perceived availability of someone to talk to about problems-was associated with lower odds of their children having high dental caries. (Pediatr Dent 2019;41(3):200-5) Received December 2, 2018 | Last Revision April 19, 2019 | Accepted April 22, 2019.

7.
Genet Epidemiol ; 43(6): 704-716, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31172578

RESUMO

Phenotypic heterogeneity is a hallmark of complex traits, and genetic studies of such traits may focus on them as a single diagnostic entity or by analyzing specific components. For example, in orofacial clefting (OFC), three subtypes-cleft lip (CL), cleft lip and palate (CLP), and cleft palate (CP) have been studied separately and in combination. To further dissect the genetic architecture of OFCs and how a given associated locus may be contributing to distinct subtypes of a trait we developed a framework for quantifying and interpreting evidence of subtype-specific or shared genetic effects in complex traits. We applied this technique to create a "cleft map" of the association of 30 genetic loci with three OFC subtypes. In addition to new associations, we found loci with subtype-specific effects (e.g., GRHL3 [CP], WNT5A [CLP]), as well as loci associated with two or all three subtypes. We cross-referenced these results with mouse craniofacial gene expression datasets, which identified additional promising candidate genes. However, we found no strong correlation between OFC subtypes and expression patterns. In aggregate, the cleft map revealed that neither subtype-specific nor shared genetic effects operate in isolation in OFC architecture. Our approach can be easily applied to any complex trait with distinct phenotypic subgroups.

8.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 150(6): 540-548, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31133175

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mothers play a primary role in the health of their children. This role may be of particular importance for children in Appalachia who have increased caries relative to children in other regions of the United States. The authors examined the degree to which a child's caries experience was in concordance with the mother's perception of the health of her child's teeth, and how concordance varied by sociodemographic factors. METHODS: The authors obtained cross-sectional data on mother-child dyads with children younger than 6 years through the Center for Oral Health Research in Appalachia study. They interviewed and clinically examined a community-based sample of 815 mother-child dyads from Pennsylvania and West Virginia. They used an unadjusted zero-inflated negative binomial model to estimate the association between a mother's perception of her child's oral health status and her child's caries. The authors compared sociodemographic factors between concordant and nonconcordant mother-child dyads using χ2 tests. RESULTS: The mother's perception of her child's oral health status was associated with the child's caries experience (P < .001). Two-thirds of mother-child dyads showed concordance between the mother's perception of her child's oral health status and the child's caries experience (n = 522, 64%). Concordance was associated with younger child age and the child having dental insurance (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS AND PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: On average, mothers accurately perceived their child's caries experience. This accuracy was higher for younger children and children with dental insurance. The mother's awareness of her child's oral health status could be used to develop effective prevention and treatment strategies, particularly for young children vulnerable to caries.

9.
Laryngoscope ; 2019 Apr 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30977521

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Individuals with orofacial clefts often experience respiratory problems because of nasopharyngeal abnormalities. Pharyngeal airway morphology is thought to differ among the various cleft types. We measured three-dimensional (3D) airway volume using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis to evaluate and compare pharyngeal airways in Japanese preschoolers with and without orofacial clefts. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. METHODS: We enrolled 83 subjects (37 boys, 46 girls; mean age = 4.66 ± 0.56 years) with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts and 16 noncleft healthy subjects (seven boys, nine girls; mean age = 5.30 ± 0.52 years) as controls. The subjects were divided into five groups. Four groups were based on the cleft type: isolated cleft palate, unilateral cleft lip and alveolus), unilateral cleft lip and palate, and bilateral cleft lip and palate. The fifth group included the noncleft controls. All subjects were examined with CBCT, and the 3D airway volume was measured. We analyzed group differences statistically using analysis of covariance with the Bonferroni post hoc pairwise comparison tests for the corrected means. RESULTS: Compared with the noncleft group, each cleft group exhibited significantly decreased total and nasal airway volumes and increased superior and inferior pharyngeal airway volumes. The differences were all statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that anatomical differences exist in pharyngeal airway volumes among various cleft groups and in those without a cleft. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3b.

10.
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol ; 47(4): 283-290, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30993747

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Dental utilization is an important determinant of oral health and well-being. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential associations between a variety of biopsychosocial factors and dental utilization in north-central Appalachia, USA, a region where oral health disparities are profound. METHODS: This study used household-based data from the Center for Oral Health Research in Appalachia (COHRA1) study in north-central Appalachia, including 449 families with 868 adults. The generalized estimating equation (GEE) approach was used to determine the best-fitting predictor model for dental utilization among adult family members. RESULTS: On average across West Virginia and Pennsylvania, having dental insurance was associated with greater dental utilization over a 3-year time period (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.54, 3.14). When stratified by state, the association held for only West Virginia (OR = 2.41, 95% CI = 1.54, 3.79) and was nonsignificant for Pennsylvania residents (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 0.80, 2.79). Individuals from Pennsylvania were more likely to utilize dental care and participants from West Virginia less so (2.31, 95% CI = 1.57, 3.40). Females from Pennsylvania were more likely than males to regularly seek dental care (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.00, 2.05), and a higher income was associated with greater frequency of regular dental visits (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.09, 1.34) in West Virginia. Individuals from Pennsylvania who scored higher on the Physiological Arousal subscale of the Dental Fear Survey were more likely to attend routine care visits (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.35). Across both states, more fatalistic beliefs related to oral health care also predicted less routine care (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.81, 0.94), and more investment in or more positive attitudes towards one's oral health also was associated with higher utilization (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.13, 1.23). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the findings of this study suggest state residency, sex, insurance, income, fatalistic beliefs, health values, and aspects of dental care-related anxiety and fear predicted dental care utilization in north-central Appalachia. These findings reinforce the need to address insurance and other economic factors affecting utilization and to consider how individual-level fatalistic beliefs and oral health values may affect utilization of routine oral health care.

11.
Cleft Palate Craniofac J ; 56(7): 867-876, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30696259

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Subclinical phenotypes of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL ± P) may be identified from clinically "unaffected" relatives and could be associated with specific cleft-related gene mutations. It has been hypothesized that velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) may be a subclinical phenotype of interest in this population, but this has not been explored quantitatively with appropriate control cohorts. The aim of this case-control study was to compare VPI in at-risk clinically unaffected relatives of individuals with nonsyndromic CL ± P with a low-risk matched normative Australian cohort. PARTICIPANTS: Clinically unaffected (ie, with no overt cleft) first-degree relatives of a proband with nonsyndromic CL ± P (n = 189) and noncleft controls (n = 207). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Perceptual measures of VPI encompassing resonance, nasal emission, and articulation were evaluated using the Great Ormond Street Speech Assessment. Quantitative measures of VPI were obtained from the Nasometer II using standardized adult and pediatric speech stimuli. RESULTS: Both perceptual and instrumental measures showed no significant difference (P > .01) between the VPI in unaffected relatives and the noncleft comparison group. Mean nasalance scores for both groups were calculated and reported according to speech stimuli, age, and sex. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that VPI, measured through speech, is not a significant subclinical phenotype of nonsyndromic CL ± P. Therefore, further familial genetic investigations exploring VPI may not yield meaningful results. Exploration across multiple subclinical phenotypes in larger cohorts may enable researchers to better understand the multifaceted nature of this complex and heterogeneous anomaly.

12.
Am J Med Genet A ; 179(3): 467-474, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30582786

RESUMO

Genome-wide scans have shown that common risk alleles for orofacial clefts (OFC) tend to be located in noncoding regulatory elements and cumulatively explain only part of the heritability of OFCs. Low-frequency variants may account for some of the "missing" heritability. Therefore, we scanned low-frequency variants located within putative craniofacial enhancers to identify novel OFC risk variants and implicate new regulatory elements in OFC pathogenesis. Analyses were performed in a multiethnic sample of 1,995 cases of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), 221 cases with cleft palate (CP) only, and 1,576 unaffected controls. One hundred and nineteen putative craniofacial enhancers identified from ChIP-Seq studies in craniofacial tissues or cell lines contained multiple low-frequency (0.01-1%) variants, which we genotyped in participants using a custom Illumina panel. Two complementary statistical approaches, sequence kernel association test and combined multivariate and collapsing, were used to test association of the aggregated low-frequency variants across each enhancer region with CL/P and CP. We discovered a significant association between CP and a branchial arch enhancer near FOXP1 (mm60; p-value = .0002). Additionally, we observed a suggestive association between CL/P and a forebrain enhancer near FOXE1 (hs1717; p-value = .001). These findings suggest that low-frequency variants in craniofacial enhancer regions contribute to the complex etiology of nonsyndromic OFCs.

13.
Front Genet ; 9: 502, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30410503

RESUMO

Objectives: Orofacial clefting is one of the most prevalent craniofacial malformations. Previous research has demonstrated that unaffected relatives of patients with non-syndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (NSCL/P) show distinctive facial features, which can be an expression of underlying NSCL/P susceptibility genes. These results support the hypothesis that genes involved in the occurrence of a cleft also play a role in normal craniofacial development. In this study, we investigated the influence of genetic variants associated with NSCL/P on normal-range variation in facial shape. Methods: A literature review of genome wide association studies (GWAS) investigating the genetic etiology of NSCL/P was performed, resulting in a list of 75 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in 38 genetic loci. Genotype data were available for 65 of these selected SNPs in three datasets with a combined sample size of 7,418 participants of European ancestry, whose 3D facial images were also available. The effect of each SNP was tested using a multivariate canonical correlation analysis (CCA) against 63 hierarchically-constructed facial segments in each of the three datasets and meta-analyzed. This allowed for the investigation of associations between SNPs known to be involved in NSCL/P and normal-range facial shape variations in a global-to-local perspective, without preselecting specific facial shape features or characteristics. Results: Six NSCL/P SNPs showed significant associations with variation in normal-range facial morphology. rs6740960 showed significant effects in the chin area (p = 3.71 × 10-28). This SNP lies in a non-coding area. Another SNP, rs227731 near the NOG gene, showed a significant effect in the philtrum area (p = 1.96 × 10-16). Three SNPs showed significant effects on the shape of the nose. rs742071 (p = 8.71 × 10-14), rs34246903 (p = 6.87 × 10-12), and rs10512248 (p = 8.4 × 10-9). Respectively, these SNPs are annotated to PAX7, MSX1, and PTCH1. Finally, rs7590268, an intron variant of THADA, showed an effect in the shape of the supraorbital ridge (p = 3.84 × 10-7). Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence NSCL/P-associated genetic variants influence normal-range craniofacial morphology, with significant effects observed for the chin, the nose, the supraorbital ridges and the philtrum area.

14.
Front Genet ; 9: 497, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30405702

RESUMO

Many factors influence human facial morphology, including genetics, age, nutrition, biomechanical forces, and endocrine factors. Moreover, facial features clearly differ between males and females, and these differences are driven primarily by the influence of sex hormones during growth and development. Specific genetic variants are known to influence circulating sex hormone levels in humans, which we hypothesize, in turn, affect facial features. In this study, we investigated the effects of testosterone-related genetic variants on facial morphology. We tested 32 genetic variants across 22 candidate genes related to levels of testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHGB) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) in three cohorts of healthy individuals for which 3D facial surface images were available (Pittsburgh 3DFN, Penn State and ALSPAC cohorts; total n = 7418). Facial shape was described using a recently developed extension of the dense-surface correspondence approach, in which the 3D facial surface was partitioned into a set of 63 hierarchically organized modules. Each variant was tested against each of the facial surface modules in a multivariate genetic association-testing framework and meta-analyzed. Additionally, the association between these candidate SNPs and five facial ratios was investigated in the Pittsburgh 3DFN cohort. Two significant associations involving intronic variants of SHBG were found: both rs12150660 (p = 1.07E-07) and rs1799941 (p = 6.15E-06) showed an effect on mandible shape. Rs8023580 (an intronic variant of NR2F2-AS1) showed an association with the total and upper facial width to height ratios (p = 9.61E-04 and p = 7.35E-04, respectively). These results indicate that testosterone-related genetic variants affect normal-range facial morphology, and in particular, facial features known to exhibit strong sexual dimorphism in humans.

15.
Hum Genet ; 2018 Nov 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30392061

RESUMO

Appendicitis affects 9% of Americans and is the most common diagnosis requiring hospitalization of both children and adults. We performed a genome-wide association study of self-reported appendectomy with 18,773 affected adults and 114,907 unaffected adults of European American ancestry. A significant association with appendectomy was observed at 4q25 near the gene PITX2 (rs2129979, p value = 8.82 × 10-14) and was replicated in an independent sample of Caucasians (59 affected, 607 unaffected; p value = 0.005). Meta-analysis of the associated variant across our two cohorts and cohorts from Iceland and the Netherlands (in which this association had previously been reported) showed strong cumulative evidence of association (OR = 1.12; 95% CI 1.09-1.14; p value = 1.81 × 10-23) and some evidence for effect heterogeneity (p value = 0.03). Eight other loci were identified at suggestive significance in the discovery GWAS. Associations were followed up by measuring gene expression across resected appendices with varying levels of inflammation (N = 75). We measured expression of 27 genes based on physical proximity to the GWAS signals, evidence of being targeted by eQTLs near the signals according to RegulomeDB (score = 1), or both. Four of the 27 genes (including PITX2) showed significant evidence (p values < 0.0033) of differential expression across categories of appendix inflammation. An additional ten genes showed nominal evidence (p value < 0.05) of differential expression, which, together with the significant genes, is more than expected by chance (p value = 6.6 × 10-12). PITX2 impacts morphological development of intestinal tissue, promotes an anti-oxidant response, and its expression correlates with levels of intestinal bacteria and colonic inflammation. Further studies of the role of PITX2 in appendicitis are warranted.

16.
Genet Epidemiol ; 42(7): 664-672, 2018 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30277614

RESUMO

Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is the most common craniofacial birth defect in humans and is notable for its apparent sexual dimorphism where approximately twice as many males are affected as females. The sources of this disparity are largely unknown, but interactions between genetic and sex effects are likely contributors. We examined gene-by-sex (G × S) interactions in a worldwide sample of 2,142 NSCL/P cases and 1,700 controls recruited from 13 countries. First, we performed genome-wide joint tests of the genetic (G) and G × S effects genome-wide using logistic regression assuming an additive genetic model and adjusting for 18 principal components of ancestry. We further interrogated loci with suggestive results from the joint test ( p < 1.00 × 10 -5 ) by examining the G × S effects from the same model. Out of the 133 loci with suggestive results ( p < 1.00 × 10 -5 ) for the joint test, we observed one genome-wide significant G × S effect in the 10q21 locus (rs72804706; p = 6.69 × 10 -9 ; OR = 2.62 CI [1.89, 3.62]) and 16 suggestive G × S effects. At the intergenic 10q21 locus, the risk of NSCL/P is estimated to increase with additional copies of the minor allele for females, but the opposite effect for males. Our observation that the impact of genetic variants on NSCL/P risk differs for males and females may further our understanding of the genetic architecture of NSCL/P and the sex differences underlying clefts and other birth defects.


Assuntos
Alelos , Encéfalo/anormalidades , Fenda Labial/genética , Fissura Palatina/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Caracteres Sexuais , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Epistasia Genética , Feminino , Frequência do Gene/genética , Loci Gênicos , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Genéticos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco
17.
Genet Epidemiol ; 2018 Sep 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30246882

RESUMO

We previously demonstrated how sharing of rare variants (RVs) in distant affected relatives can be used to identify variants causing a complex and heterogeneous disease. This approach tested whether single RVs were shared by all sequenced affected family members. However, as with other study designs, joint analysis of several RVs (e.g., within genes) is sometimes required to obtain sufficient statistical power. Further, phenocopies can lead to false negatives for some causal RVs if complete sharing among affected is required. Here, we extend our methodology (Rare Variant Sharing, RVS) to address these issues. Specifically, we introduce gene-based analyses, a partial sharing test based on RV sharing probabilities for subsets of affected relatives and a haplotype-based RV definition. RVS also has the desirable feature of not requiring external estimates of variant frequency or control samples, provides functionality to assess and address violations of key assumptions, and is available as open source software for genome-wide analysis. Simulations including phenocopies, based on the families of an oral cleft study, revealed the partial and complete sharing versions of RVS achieved similar statistical power compared with alternative methods (RareIBD and the Gene-Based Segregation Test), and had superior power compared with the pedigree Variant Annotation, Analysis, and Search Tool (pVAAST) linkage statistic. In studies of multiplex cleft families, analysis of rare single nucleotide variants in the exome of 151 affected relatives from 54 families revealed no significant excess sharing in any one gene, but highlighted different patterns of sharing revealed by the complete and partial sharing tests.

18.
Arch Oral Biol ; 96: 33-38, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30172943

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study is to explore genetic factors determining difference of cleft side using whole-genome sequencing and evaluation of craniofacial morphology using cephalometric analysis between Japanese monozygotic (MZ) twins with mirror-image cleft lip and palate (CLP). DESIGN: We selected a Japanese MZ twin pair (MZ-A and MZ-B) affected with unilateral CLP who are discordant for cleft side (left/right) and conducted whole-genome sequencing to identify genetic factors determining cleft side. Moreover, we compared their craniofacial morphologies using cephalograms. RESULTS: Whole-genome sequencing results suggested that no discordant DNA variants were found between MZ-A and MZ-B. The comparison of craniofacial morphology between the MZ twins revealed that MZ-B had maxillary deficiency and slightly more mandibular protrusion than MZ-A. CONCLUSIONS: It is indicated that environmental factors might be a critical factor that influences the determination of difference of cleft side in orofacial clefts. In addition, we found some differences in craniofacial morphology between MZ-A and MZ-B. Our findings suggest that various environmental factors, such as epigenetics, might be a critical factor that influences the determination of difference of cleft side in CLP rather than inherited genetic factors.

19.
Bioinformatics ; 2018 Aug 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30084993

RESUMO

Motivation: De novo copy number deletions have been implicated in many diseases, but there is no formal method to date that identifies de novo deletions in parent-offspring trios from capture-based sequencing platforms. Results: We developed Minimum Distance for Targeted Sequencing (MDTS) to fill this void. MDTS has similar sensitivity (recall), but a much lower false positive rate compared to less specific CNV callers, resulting in amuch higher positive predictive value (precision). MDTS also exhibitedmuch better scalability. Availability: MDTS is freely available as open source software from the Bioconductor repository. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30141273

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Orofacial clefts are the most common malformations of the head and neck region. Genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the etiology of these traits. METHODS: We recently conducted genotyping of individuals from the African population using the multiethnic genotyping array (MEGA) to identify common genetic variation associated with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts. The data cleaning of this dataset allowed for screening of annotated sex versus genetic sex, confirmation of identify by descent and identification of large chromosomal anomalies. RESULTS: We identified the first reported orofacial cleft case associated with paternal uniparental disomy (patUPD) on chromosome 22. We also identified a de novo deletion on chromosome 18. In addition to chromosomal anomalies, we identified cases with molecular karyotypes suggesting Klinefelter syndrome, Turner syndrome and Triple X syndrome. CONCLUSION: Observations from our study support the need for genetic testing when clinically indicated in order to exclude chromosomal anomalies associated with clefting. The identification of these chromosomal anomalies and sex aneuploidies is important in genetic counseling for families that are at risk. Clinicians should share any identified genetic findings and place them in context for the families during routine clinical visits and evaluations.

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