Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 164
Filtrar
1.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol ; 16(2): 194-203, 2021 Feb 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33468533

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pre-emptive kidney transplantation is advocated as best practice for children with kidney failure who are transplant eligible; however, it is limited by late presentation. We aimed to determine whether socioeconomic deprivation and/or geographic location (distance to the center and rural/urban residence) are associated with late presentation, and to what degree these factors could explain differences in accessing pre-emptive transplantation. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: A cohort study using prospectively collected United Kingdom Renal Registry and National Health Service Blood and Transplant data from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2016 was performed. We included children aged >3 months to ≤16 years at the start of KRT. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine associations between the above exposures and our outcomes: late presentation (defined as starting KRT within 90 days of first nephrology review) and pre-emptive transplantation, with a priori specified covariates. RESULTS: Analysis was performed on 2160 children (41% females), with a median age of 3.8 years (interquartile range, 0.2-9.9 years) at first nephrology review. Excluding missing data, 478 were late presenters (24%); 565 (26%) underwent pre-emptive transplantation, none of whom were late presenting. No association was seen between distance or socioeconomic deprivation with late presentation, in crude or adjusted analyses. Excluding late presenters, greater area affluence was associated with higher odds of pre-emptive transplantation, (odds ratio, 1.20 per quintile greater affluence; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.31), with children of South Asian (odds ratio, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 0.76) or Black ethnicity (odds ratio, 0.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.12 to 0.80) less likely to receive one. A longer distance to the center was associated with pre-emptive transplantation on crude analyses; however, this relationship was attenuated (odds ratio, 1.02 per 10 km; 95% confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.05) in the multivariable model. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic deprivation or geographic location are not associated with late presentation in children in the United Kingdom. Geographic location was not independently associated with pre-emptive transplantation; however, children from more affluent areas were more likely to receive a pre-emptive transplant.

2.
Pediatr Nephrol ; 36(1): 31-40, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31820146

RESUMO

Children with end-stage kidney disease should be offered the best chance for future survival which ideally would be a well-matched pre-emptive kidney transplant. Paediatric and adult practice varies around the world depending on geography, transplant allocation schemes and different emphases on living (versus deceased) donor renal transplantation. Internationally, paediatric patients often have priority in allocation schemes and younger donors are preferentially allocated to paediatric recipients. HLA matching can be difficult and may result in longer waiting times. Additionally, with improved surgical techniques and modern immunosuppressive regimens, how important is the contribution of HLA matching to graft longevity? In this review, we discuss the relative importance of HLA matching compared with donor quality; and long-term patient outcomes including re-transplantation rates. We share empirical evidence that will be useful for clinicians and families to make decisions about best donor options. We discuss why living donation still provides the best allograft survival outcomes and what to do in the scenario of a highly mismatched living donor.

3.
Pediatr Transplant ; : e13955, 2020 Dec 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33378587

RESUMO

Recurrence of primary disease is one of the major risks for allograft loss after pediatric RTx. The risk of recurrence of FSGS/SRNS after pediatric RTx in particular can be up to 86% in idiopathic cases. There is a need for consensus recommendations on its prevention and treatment. The CERTAIN study group has therefore performed a thorough literature search based on the PICO model of clinical questions to formulate educated statements to guide the clinician in the process of decision-making. A set of educated statements on prevention and treatment of FSGS/SRNS after pediatric RTx has been generated after careful evaluation of available evidence and thorough panel discussion. We do not recommend routine nephrectomy prior to transplantation; neither do we recommend abstaining from living donation. Special attendance needs to be given to those patients who had already experienced graft loss due to FSGS/SRNS recurrence. Early PE or IA with or without high-dose CsA and/or rituximab seems to be most promising to induce remission. The educated statements presented here acknowledge that FSGS/SRNS recurrence after pediatric RTx remains a major concern and is associated with shorter graft survival or even graft loss. The value of any recommendation needs to take into account that evidence is based on cohorts that differ in ethnicity, pre-transplant history, immunosuppressive regimen, definition of recurrence (eg, clinical and/or histological diagnosis) and treatment modalities of recurrence.

4.
Pediatr Nephrol ; 2020 Nov 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33245418

RESUMO

The risk of tuberculosis (TB) disease is increased in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), even higher in stage 5 CKD/kidney failure and especially high after kidney transplantation due to immunosuppression. TB disease may follow recent primary infection, or result from reactivation of latent infection. Reactivation is more common in adults, while progression following primary infection makes up a greater proportion of disease in children. Recommendations for preventing TB disease in some low TB incidence countries have previously included offering Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine to all children listed for kidney transplant if they had not received this as part of previous national immunisation programmes. Based on the available evidence, we recommend modifying this practice, focusing instead on awareness of risk factors for TB exposure, infection and disease and the use of appropriate testing strategies to identify and treat TB infection and disease.

5.
Clin Chem ; 66(10): 1300-1309, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32882007

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The use of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) as a noninvasive biomarker to detect allograft damage is expanding rapidly. However, quantifying the low fraction of donor-derived cfDNA (ddcfDNA) is challenging and requires a highly sensitive technique. ddcfDNA detection through unique donor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a recent new approach, however there are limited data in pediatric solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. METHODS: We developed an assay using a combination of 61 SNPs to quantify the ddcfDNA accurately using a custom R script to model for both the patient and donor genotypes requiring only a single sample from the allograft recipient. Performance of the assay was validated using genomic DNA (gDNA), cfDNA and donor samples where available. RESULTS: The R "genotype-free" method gave results comparable to when using the known donor genotype. applicable to both related and unrelated pairs and can reliably measure ddcfDNA (limit of blank, below 0.12%; limit of detection, above 0.25%; limit of quantification 0.5% resulting in 84% accuracy). 159 pediatric SOT recipients (kidney, heart, and lung) were tested without the need for donor genotyping. Serial sampling was obtained from 82 patients. CONCLUSION: We have developed and validated a new assay to measure the fraction of ddcfDNA in the plasma of pediatric SOT recipients. Our method can be applicable in any donor-recipient pair without the need for donor genotyping and can provide results in 48 h at a low cost. Additional prospective studies are required to demonstrate its clinical validity in a large cohort of pediatric SOT recipients.

6.
Nephrol Dial Transplant ; 35(11): 1924-1937, 2020 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32743664

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its treatment may severely limit the ability of children with CKD to do daily tasks and participate in family, school, sporting and recreational activities. Life participation is critically important to affected children and their families; however, the appropriateness and validity of available measures used to assess this outcome are uncertain. The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics, content and psychometric properties of existing measures for life participation used in children with CKD. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant register to August 2019 for all studies that used a measure to report life participation in children with CKD. For each measure, we extracted and analyzed the characteristics, dimensions of life participation and psychometric properties. RESULTS: From 128 studies, we identified 63 different measures used to assess life participation in children with CKD. Twenty-five (40%) of the measures were patient reported, 7 (11%) were parent proxy reported and 31 (49%) had both self and parent proxy reports available. Twenty-two were used in one study only. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory version 4.0 generic module was used most frequently in 62 (48%) studies. Seven (11%) were designed to assess ability to participate in life, with 56 (89%) designed to assess other constructs (e.g. quality of life) with a subscale or selected questions on life participation. Across all measures, the three most frequent activities specified were social activities with friends and/or family, leisure activities and self-care activities. Validation data in the pediatric CKD population were available for only 19 (30%) measures. CONCLUSIONS: Life participation is inconsistently measured in children with CKD and the measures used vary in their characteristics, content and validity. Validation data supporting these measures in this population are often incomplete and are sparse. A meaningful and validated measure for life participation in children with CKD is needed.

7.
Pediatr Nephrol ; 35(12): 2361-2367, 2020 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32627055

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Many children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibiting symptoms of poor appetite, gastro-oesophageal reflux and vomiting are reliant on enteral tube feeds (ETF) to achieve adequate nutritional intake. Following a successful renal transplant (RT), some of these symptoms may resolve and ETF then discontinued. There are only a few studies reporting the time taken to transition from ETF to complete oral feeding after transplantation. This study aimed to investigate the time taken to discontinue ETF following RT in children attending a large tertiary nephrology unit. METHODS: A retrospective review of medical and dietetic records between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2017. RESULTS: The study included 20 paediatric renal transplant recipients (70% male) aged 1 to 17 years. Seventy percent discontinued ETF at a median of 6 (0-70) weeks post-transplantation. Patients had ETF from a median of 0.45 (0-10.8) years of age, for a median of 3.9 (1.1-10.9) years prior to receiving a transplant. Four (20%) were referred to the Feeding and Eating Disorder team at a median of 20 (2-44) months post-renal transplantation. Mean body mass index (BMI) Z-score of 0.43 at 12 months pre-transplant was found to be significantly associated with shorter duration of ETF post-transplant (r = 0.8, p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Seventy percent of children stopped ETF by a median of 6 weeks post-renal transplant. A good nutritional status pre-transplant may reduce the duration of ETF following transplantation. Four children experienced behavioural feeding issues post-transplant and required further specialist support. Future multi-centre research is required to support these findings to provide a more robust indication of time to achieve full oral feeding. Graphical abstract.

8.
EBioMedicine ; 58: 102899, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32707447

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) with "operational tolerance" (OT) maintain a functioning graft without immunosuppressive (IS) drugs, thus avoiding treatment complications. Nevertheless, IS drugs can influence gene-expression signatures aiming to identify OT among treated KTRs. METHODS: We compared five published signatures of OT in peripheral blood samples from 18 tolerant, 183 stable, and 34 chronic rejector KTRs, using gene-expression levels with and without adjustment for IS drugs and regularised logistic regression. FINDINGS: IS drugs explained up to 50% of the variability in gene-expression and 20-30% of the variability in the probability of OT predicted by signatures without drug adjustment. We present a parsimonious consensus gene-set to identify OT, derived from joint analysis of IS-drug-adjusted expression of five published signature gene-sets. This signature, including CD40, CTLA4, HSD11B1, IGKV4-1, MZB1, NR3C2, and RAB40C genes, showed an area under the curve 0⋅92 (95% confidence interval 0⋅88-0⋅94) in cross-validation and 0⋅97 (0⋅93-1⋅00) in six months follow-up samples. INTERPRETATION: We advocate including adjustment for IS drug therapy in the development stage of gene-expression signatures of OT to reduce the risk of capturing features of treatment, which could be lost following IS drug minimisation or withdrawal. Our signature, however, would require further validation in an independent dataset and a biomarker-led trial. FUNDING: FP7-HEALTH-2012-INNOVATION-1 [305147:BIO-DrIM] (SC,IR-M,PM,DSt); MRC [G0801537/ID:88245] (MPH-F); MRC [MR/J006742/1] (IR-M); Guy's&StThomas' Charity [R080530]&[R090782]; CONICYT-Bicentennial-Becas-Chile (EN-L); EU:FP7/2007-2013 [HEALTH-F5-2010-260687: The ONE Study] (MPH-F); Czech Ministry of Health [NV19-06-00031] (OV); NIHR-BRC Guy's&StThomas' NHS Foundation Trust and KCL (SC); UK Clinical Research Networks [portfolio:7521].

9.
Kidney Int ; 98(2): 464-475, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32709294

RESUMO

One of the main objectives of the European health policy framework is to ensure equitable access to high-quality health services across Europe. Here we examined country-specific kidney transplantation and graft failure rates in children and explore their country- and patient-level determinants. Patients under 20 years of age initiating kidney replacement therapy from January 2007 through December 2015 in 37 European countries participating in the ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry were included in the analyses. Countries were categorized as low-, middle-, and high-income based on gross domestic product. At five years of follow-up, 4326 of 6909 children on kidney replacement therapy received their first kidney transplant. Overall median time from kidney replacement therapy start to first kidney transplantation was 1.4 (inter quartile range 0.3-4.3) years. The five-year kidney transplantation probability was 48.8% (95% confidence interval: 45.9-51.7%) in low-income, 76.3% (72.8-79.5%) in middle-income and 92.3% (91.0-93.4%) in high-income countries and was strongly associated with macro-economic factors. Gross domestic product alone explained 67% of the international variation in transplantation rates. Compared with high-income countries, kidney transplantation was 76% less likely to be performed in low-income and 58% less likely in middle-income countries. Overall five-year graft survival in Europe was 88% and showed little variation across countries. Thus, despite large disparities transplantation access across Europe, graft failure rates were relatively similar. Hence, graft survival in low-risk transplant recipients from lower-income countries seems as good as graft survival among all (low-, medium-, and high-risk) graft recipients from high-income countries.

11.
Am J Transplant ; 2020 May 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32406111

RESUMO

CRADLE was a 36-month multicenter study in pediatric (≥1 to <18 years) kidney transplant recipients randomized at 4 to 6 weeks posttransplant to receive everolimus + reduced-exposure tacrolimus (EVR + rTAC; n = 52) with corticosteroid withdrawal at 6-month posttransplant or continue mycophenolate mofetil + standard-exposure TAC (MMF + sTAC; n = 54) with corticosteroids. The incidence of composite efficacy failure (biopsy-proven acute rejection [BPAR], graft loss, or death) at month 36 was 9.8% vs 9.6% (difference: 0.2%; 80% confidence interval: -7.3 to 7.7) for EVR + rTAC and MMF + sTAC, respectively, which was driven by BPARs. Graft loss was low (2.1% vs 3.8%) with no deaths. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate at month 36 was comparable between groups (68.1 vs 67.3 mL/min/1.73 m2 ). Mean changes (z-score) in height (0.72 vs 0.39; P = .158) and weight (0.61 vs 0.82; P = .453) from randomization to month 36 were comparable, whereas growth in prepubertal patients on EVR + rTAC was better (P = .050) vs MMF + sTAC. The overall incidence of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs was comparable between groups. Rejection was the leading AE for study drug discontinuation in the EVR + rTAC group. In conclusion, though AE-related study drug discontinuation was higher, an EVR + rTAC regimen represents an alternative treatment option that enables withdrawal of steroids as well as reduction of CNIs for pediatric kidney transplant recipients. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01544491.

12.
Kidney Int ; 97(6): 1260-1274, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32386968

RESUMO

Recessive mutations in diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DGKE) display genetic pleiotropy, with pathological features reported as either thrombotic microangiopathy or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), and clinical features of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), nephrotic syndrome or both. Pathophysiological mechanisms and optimal management strategies have not yet been defined. In prospective and retrospective studies of aHUS referred to the United Kingdom National aHUS service and prospective studies of MPGN referred to the National Registry of Rare Kidney Diseases for MPGN we defined the incidence of DGKE aHUS as 0.009/million/year and so-called DGKE MPGN as 0.006/million/year, giving a combined incidence of 0.015/million/year. Here, we describe a cohort of sixteen individuals with DGKE nephropathy. One presented with isolated nephrotic syndrome. Analysis of pathological features reveals that DGKE mutations give an MPGN-like appearance to different extents, with but more often without changes in arterioles or arteries. In 15 patients presenting with aHUS, ten had concurrent substantial proteinuria. Identified triggering events were rare but coexistent developmental disorders were seen in six. Nine with aHUS experienced at least one relapse, although in only one did a relapse of aHUS occur after age five years. Persistent proteinuria was seen in the majority of cases. Only two individuals have reached end stage renal disease, 20 years after the initial presentation, and in one, renal transplantation was successfully undertaken without relapse. Six individuals received eculizumab. Relapses on treatment occurred in one individual. In four individuals eculizumab was withdrawn, with one spontaneously resolving aHUS relapse occurring. Thus we suggest that DGKE-mediated aHUS is eculizumab non-responsive and that in individuals who currently receive eculizumab therapy it can be safely withdrawn. This has important patient safety and economic implications.

13.
Arch Dis Child ; 2020 Apr 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32241783

RESUMO

AIMS: To investigate access to paediatric renal transplantation and examine potential barriers within the process. METHODS: Cross-sectional, multicentre, observational study where paediatric nephrology centres in the UK were requested to provide data on transplantation plans for all children (<18 years) with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). RESULTS: 308 children with ESKD were included in this study from 12 out of 13 UK paediatric nephrology centres. 139 (45%) were being prepared for living donor transplantation and 82 (27%) were listed for deceased donor transplantation. The most common cited factors delaying transplantation from occurring in children were disease factors (36%), donor availability (27%) and size of the child (20%). Psychosocial factors were listed as a barrier in 19% of children. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we have documented the main barriers to renal transplantation in children. Some identified factors may be modifiable through local or national intervention, including donor availability and patient psychosocial factors.

14.
Pediatr Transplant ; 24(4): e13704, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32255548

RESUMO

Transplant ureteric stent insertion reduces the incidence of MUCs, but it is not known whether routine PSRGU is needed to detect unmasked MUCs. This study evaluated whether routine PSRGU in the pRTR is a useful tool to identify MUCs before they become clinically apparent. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of the clinical outcomes following elective stent removal from pediatric kidney-only transplant recipients at two London centers between 2012 and 2016. Our policy was to perform PSRGU either routinely or urgently if there were concerning symptoms or biochemical evidence of renal allograft dysfunction. Elective stent removal was performed in 86% (97 of 113 pRTR), and 75 (77%) of whom had routine PSRGU at a median (IQR) of 6 (2-8) days after stent removal. There were changes to management in 3 (4%) of pRTR with PSRGU identifying no MUC. Nineteen patients (25%) had urgent PSRGU, most commonly due to renal allograft dysfunction, at a median (IQR) of 5.5 (2.7-12.3) days after stent removal. Of these, two pRTR required ureteric intervention. For our current practice of removing transplant stents at 4-6 weeks post-transplantation, our study has found no evidence to support routine PSRGU after elective stent removal.

15.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 79(6): 713-723, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32220834

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To update the 2012 EULAR/ERA-EDTA recommendations for the management of lupus nephritis (LN). METHODS: Following the EULAR standardised operating procedures, a systematic literature review was performed. Members of a multidisciplinary Task Force voted independently on their level of agreeement with the formed statements. RESULTS: The changes include recommendations for treatment targets, use of glucocorticoids and calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) and management of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). The target of therapy is complete response (proteinuria <0.5-0.7 g/24 hours with (near-)normal glomerular filtration rate) by 12 months, but this can be extended in patients with baseline nephrotic-range proteinuria. Hydroxychloroquine is recommended with regular ophthalmological monitoring. In active proliferative LN, initial (induction) treatment with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF 2-3 g/day or mycophenolic acid (MPA) at equivalent dose) or low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (CY; 500 mg × 6 biweekly doses), both combined with glucocorticoids (pulses of intravenous methylprednisolone, then oral prednisone 0.3-0.5 mg/kg/day) is recommended. MMF/CNI (especially tacrolimus) combination and high-dose CY are alternatives, for patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria and adverse prognostic factors. Subsequent long-term maintenance treatment with MMF or azathioprine should follow, with no or low-dose (<7.5 mg/day) glucocorticoids. The choice of agent depends on the initial regimen and plans for pregnancy. In non-responding disease, switch of induction regimens or rituximab are recommended. In pure membranous LN with nephrotic-range proteinuria or proteinuria >1 g/24 hours despite renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade, MMF in combination with glucocorticoids is preferred. Assessment for kidney and extra-renal disease activity, and management of comorbidities is lifelong with repeat kidney biopsy in cases of incomplete response or nephritic flares. In ESKD, transplantation is the preferred kidney replacement option with immunosuppression guided by transplant protocols and/or extra-renal manifestations. Treatment of LN in children follows the same principles as adult disease. CONCLUSIONS: We have updated the EULAR recommendations for the management of LN to facilitate homogenization of patient care.


Assuntos
Imunossupressores/uso terapêutico , Nefrite Lúpica/tratamento farmacológico , Sociedades Médicas , Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Azatioprina/uso terapêutico , Inibidores de Calcineurina/uso terapêutico , Quimioterapia Combinada , Europa (Continente) , Taxa de Filtração Glomerular , Glucocorticoides/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Hidroxicloroquina/uso terapêutico , Falência Renal Crônica/etiologia , Falência Renal Crônica/terapia , Nefrite Lúpica/complicações , Nefrite Lúpica/patologia , Nefrite Lúpica/fisiopatologia , Ácido Micofenólico/uso terapêutico , Proteinúria/etiologia , Proteinúria/terapia
17.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 31(2): 365-373, 2020 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31919107

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Primary membranoproliferative GN, including complement 3 (C3) glomerulopathy, is a rare, untreatable kidney disease characterized by glomerular complement deposition. Complement gene mutations can cause familial C3 glomerulopathy, and studies have reported rare variants in complement genes in nonfamilial primary membranoproliferative GN. METHODS: We analyzed whole-genome sequence data from 165 primary membranoproliferative GN cases and 10,250 individuals without the condition (controls) as part of the National Institutes of Health Research BioResource-Rare Diseases Study. We examined copy number, rare, and common variants. RESULTS: Our analysis included 146 primary membranoproliferative GN cases and 6442 controls who were unrelated and of European ancestry. We observed no significant enrichment of rare variants in candidate genes (genes encoding components of the complement alternative pathway and other genes associated with the related disease atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome; 6.8% in cases versus 5.9% in controls) or exome-wide. However, a significant common variant locus was identified at 6p21.32 (rs35406322) (P=3.29×10-8; odds ratio [OR], 1.93; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.53 to 2.44), overlapping the HLA locus. Imputation of HLA types mapped this signal to a haplotype incorporating DQA1*05:01, DQB1*02:01, and DRB1*03:01 (P=1.21×10-8; OR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.66 to 2.89). This finding was replicated by analysis of HLA serotypes in 338 individuals with membranoproliferative GN and 15,614 individuals with nonimmune renal failure. CONCLUSIONS: We found that HLA type, but not rare complement gene variation, is associated with primary membranoproliferative GN. These findings challenge the paradigm of complement gene mutations typically causing primary membranoproliferative GN and implicate an underlying autoimmune mechanism in most cases.


Assuntos
Complemento C3/imunologia , Glomerulonefrite Membranoproliferativa/genética , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma , Fator Nefrítico do Complemento 3/análise , Feminino , Glomerulonefrite Membranoproliferativa/etiologia , Antígenos HLA-DQ/genética , Antígenos HLA-DR/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Sorogrupo
20.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 18(2): 157-163, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31424359

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Renal allograft thrombosis is an important cause of early renal allograft loss. A previous study from our unit showed thrombosis rates in patients who received heparin that were similar to those who did not receive any thromboprophylaxis. This study evaluated the impact of aspirin prophylaxis on renal allograft thrombosis rates in pediatric renal transplant recipients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 456 consecutive pediatric allografts from deceased and living related donors over age 22 years in a single center. Routine perioperative heparin was introduced in 1994 and was subsequently changed to aspirin prophylaxis in 2000. Group 1 comprised 126 patients who did not receive any thromboprophylaxis, group 2 comprised 128 patients who received heparin, and group 3 comprised 202 patients who received aspirin therapy. Variables associated with increased risk of renal allograft loss were examined using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Thrombosis occurred in 11% (14/126) of grafts in group 1, 9% (11/128) of grafts in group 2, and 1% (2/202) of grafts in group 3 (odds ratio for aspirin group = 0.38, 95% confidence interval, 0.22-0.64; P = .02). In patients who received aspirin (group 3), there was only one renal allograft loss secondary to hemorrhage, and no grafts were lost in patients younger than 5 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: After our center introduced a change from heparin to aspirin prophylaxis, the thrombosis rate in pediatric renal allografts fell from 9% to 1%. Although there are a number of possible confounding variables, the introduction of aspirin has led to a reduced rate of renal allograft thrombosis.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA