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3.
Acta Derm Venereol ; 99(12): 1105-1109, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31386166

RESUMO

Managing extracranial arteriovenous malformations is challenging. Sirolimus (rapamycin) is increasingly being used when surgery and embolization are not advised. Because of its anti-angiogenic properties here we report all extracranial arteriovenous malformation cases treated with sirolimus in 2 French tertiary centers for vascular anomalies. The outcomes were efficacy (complete, partial, no response) based on arteriovenous malformation volume and necrosis/hemorrhage and side effects. We retrospectively included 10 patients (7 children). The sirolimus dose ranged from 0.6 to 3.5 mg/m2. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) treatment time was 24.5 (4.5; 35) months. Five patients showed no response and 5 showed partial response at a median (IQR) of 3 (1; 5) months followed in 2 cases by therapeutic resistance (i.e., progressive disease after 9 and 24 months of treatment). The most frequent side effect was mouth ulcers. This study shows poor efficacy of sirolimus for treating extracranial arteriovenous malformations.

6.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 4: CD011541, 2019 04 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30958563

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Guttate psoriasis displays distinctive epidemiological and clinical features, making it a separate entity within the heterogeneous group of cutaneous psoriasis types. It is associated with genetic, immune, and environmental factors (such as stress and infections) and usually arises in younger age groups (including children, teenagers, and young adults). There is currently no cure for psoriasis, but various treatments can help to relieve the symptoms and signs. The objectives of treatment when managing an acute flare of guttate psoriasis are to reduce time to clearance and induction of long-term remission after resolution. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2000; since then, new treatments have expanded the therapeutic spectrum of systemic treatments used for psoriasis. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of non-antistreptococcal interventions for acute guttate psoriasis or an acute guttate flare of chronic psoriasis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases up to June 2018: the Cochrane Skin Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS. We searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials. We checked the proceedings of key dermatology conferences from 2004 to 2018, and also searched for trials in the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) database for drug registration. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of treatments for acute guttate psoriasis or an acute guttate flare of chronic psoriasis clinically diagnosed in children and adults. This included all topical and systemic drugs, biological therapy, phototherapy (all forms: topical and systemic), and complementary and alternative therapies. We compared these treatments against placebo or against another treatment. We did not include studies on drugs that aim to eradicate streptococcal infection. We did not include studies when separate results for guttate psoriasis participants were not available. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility and methodological quality and extracted data. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Our primary outcomes were 'percentage of participants clear or almost clear (i.e. obtaining Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) 100/90 and/or Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) of 0 or 1)' and 'percentage of participants with adverse effects and severe adverse effects'. Our secondary outcomes were 'number of relapses of guttate psoriasis or flares within a period of six months after the treatment has finished', 'percentage of participants achieving a PASI 75 or PGA of 1 or 2', and 'improvement in participant satisfaction measures and quality of life assessment measures'. We used GRADE to assess the quality of the evidence for each outcome. MAIN RESULTS: This review included only one trial (21 participants), which compared fish oil-derived (n-3) fatty acid-based lipid emulsion (50 mL per infusion (1.05 g eicosapentaenoic and 10.5 g docosahexaenoic acid)) (10 participants) to soya oil-derived (n-6) fatty acid-based lipid emulsion (50 mL per infusion (1.05 g eicosapentaenoic and 10.5 g docosahexaenoic acid)) (11 participants) administered intravenously twice daily for 10 days, with a total follow-up of 40 days. The study was conducted in a single centre in Germany in 18 men and three women, aged between 21 and 65 years, who were in hospital with acute guttate psoriasis and had mean total body surface involvement of 25.7% ± 20.4% (range 10 to 90). The study was funded by a company that produces the oil emulsions. We found no other evidence regarding non-antistreptococcal interventions used in clinical practice for guttate psoriasis, such as topical treatments (corticosteroids, vitamin D3 analogues), systemic drugs, biological therapy, and phototherapy.The primary outcomes of the review were not measured, and only one of our secondary outcomes was measured: improvement in participant satisfaction measures and quality of life assessment measures. However, the study authors did report that there was rare skin irritation at the site of peripheral intravenous route, but the number of affected participants was not provided.Improvement between baseline and day 10, using a non-validated score assessed by participants themselves daily based on five items (appearance of lesions, impairment of daily life, pruritus, burning, and pain), was greater in the group that received the fish oil-derived (n-3) fatty acid-based lipid emulsion (75%) than in the group receiving the soya oil-derived (n-6) fatty acid-based lipid emulsion (18%) (one trial, 21 participants). However, these results are uncertain as they are based on very low-quality evidence. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence regarding topical and systemic drugs, biotherapy, or phototherapy in guttate psoriasis (we did not consider drugs that aimed to eradicate streptococcal infection because these are assessed in another Cochrane Review). We are uncertain of the effect of intravenously administered lipid emulsion on guttate psoriasis because the quality of the evidence is very low, due to risk of bias (unclear risk of bias for all domains), indirectness (the trial only included adults, and the follow-up from baseline was only 10 days), and imprecision (small number of participants).This review highlights the need for trials assessing the efficacy and safety of phototherapy and topical and systemic drugs for guttate psoriasis. There is also a need for studies that clearly distinguish the specific population with guttate psoriasis from the larger group of people with chronic plaque psoriasis, and children and young adults should be assessed as a distinct group.


Assuntos
Psoríase/terapia , Administração Oral , Administração Tópica , Terapia Biológica , Humanos , Imunossupressores/uso terapêutico , Fototerapia , Resultado do Tratamento
7.
Presse Med ; 48(4): 388-397, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31006564

RESUMO

Beta-blockers are efficient for treating complicated infantile hemangiomas; propranolol is currently the first-line treatment. Superficial vascular malformations have to be managed by multidisciplinary teams. T2 FAT-SAT MRI is the most interesting sequence to explore superficial vascular malformations. Recent advances in molecular biology allow exploring new genetic mutations which could be involved in vascular malformations and be the target of new drugs. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are promising drugs for slow-flow malformations. Arteriovenous malformations are aggressive lesions with very few treatment options.


Assuntos
Hemangioma/terapia , Dermatopatias Vasculares/terapia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/terapia , Malformações Vasculares/terapia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
8.
BMJ Open ; 9(4): e024974, 2019 04 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31005913

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting 10%-15% of children in Europe. There is a need for new primary preventive therapeutic strategies in at-risk populations. Recent research has indicated that atopic diseases are associated with a disrupted gut microbial 'balance' in early life raising the possibility that interventions which yield optimal patterns of microflora could improve host's health. Prebiotics, sugars with immunomodulatory properties that stimulate the diversity of the digestive microbiota, are ideal candidates for such research. So far, most clinical trials have focused on improving infant gut colonisation postnatally. However, prenatal life is a crucial period during which different tolerance mechanisms are put in place. We aim to determine whether antenatal prebiotics supplementation prevents AD in high-risk children. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, trial to evaluate the effectiveness of antenatal prebiotic maternal supplementation (galacto-oligosaccharide/inulin) in pregnant women versus placebo on the occurrence of AD at 1 year of age in at-risk children (defined as having a maternal history of atopic disease). Participating women will be randomised to daily ingestion of a prebiotics or placebo (maltodextrin) from 20 weeks' gestation until delivery. The primary outcome is the prevalence of AD at 1 year of age, using the version of the UK Working Party Diagnostic Criteria optimised for preventive studies. Key secondary endpoints are AD severity, quality of life and prebiotics tolerance. The target sample size is 376 women (188 patients per group) which will provide 80% power to detect a 33% reduction of the risk of AD in the verum group (α=0.05). The primary analysis will be based on the intention-to-treat principle. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Results will be presented in peer-reviewed journals and at international conferences. Ethics approval for the study was obtained from the institutional ethical review board of 'Comité de Protection des Personnes Sud Ouest-Outre-Mer III' of the University Hospital Centre of Bordeaux (2017/13). TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03183440; Pre-results.

9.
J Pediatr ; 209: 254-254.e1, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30857778
10.
Trials ; 20(1): 184, 2019 Mar 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30909923

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis is a highly prevalent, chronic, relapsing disease in both adults and children. On the severity spectrum, lower-end patients benefit from small amounts of topical anti-inflammatory treatments (TAT), whereas higher-end patients need systemic immunosuppressants; in-between patients are treated with TAT and phototherapy. The major therapeutic challenge in this population is the long-term control of disease activity, and the current TAT-based pro-active strategy does not meet all their needs. Immunosuppressants are used as long-term control add-on treatments, but they are restricted to the most severely affected patients because of safety concerns. In addition, neither immunosuppressants nor other strategies have been properly evaluated in the long term despite long-term control having been acknowledged as one of the most important core outcome domains to be targeted in atopic dermatitis trials. Safe add-on therapies, rigorously evaluated for long-term control of the disease, are therefore needed. Phototherapy and vitamin D supplementation are both good candidates. METHODS: This is a multicenter, national, randomized, superiority, crossover trial testing add-on phototherapy (one winter under spaced sessions of phototherapy and one winter under observation) among subjects receiving standard care (i.e., TAT). On the same population, we will test the long-term control provided by oral supplementation of vitamin D versus placebo in a randomized, superiority, double-blind, parallel-group trial. The primary outcomes are (1) repeat measures of the PO-SCORAD severity score over 1 year and (2) cumulate consumption of TAT (number of tubes) during the winter. They will be tested following a hierarchical testing procedure. The secondary outcomes will be measures repeated over 2 years of investigator-based severity scores, patient-reported severity and quality of life scores, serum vitamin D levels, weeks during which the disease is well-controlled, inter-visit cumulate consumption of TAT, and synthetic patient-reported satisfaction at the end of each winter. DISCUSSION: This study includes two separate 2-year pragmatic trials designed to evaluate the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation and pro-active phototherapy for primary care atopic dermatitis patients receiving TAT on long-term control of disease activity. The experimental design enables the study of both interventions and exploration of the interaction between vitamin D and phototherapy. A pragmatic trial is particularly suited to the assessment of long-term control. This study explores the possibility of new and safe therapeutic strategies for the control of long-term atopic dermatitis, and is an example of efficacy research that is unlikely to be sponsored by industrialists. A potentially effective low-cost therapeutic strategy for long-term control is essential for patients and public health. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02537509 , first received: 1 September 2015.


Assuntos
Anti-Inflamatórios/administração & dosagem , Colecalciferol/administração & dosagem , Dermatite Atópica/terapia , Suplementos Nutricionais , Estações do Ano , Terapia Ultravioleta/métodos , Administração Cutânea , Administração Oral , Anti-Inflamatórios/efeitos adversos , Colecalciferol/efeitos adversos , Terapia Combinada , Estudos Cross-Over , Dermatite Atópica/diagnóstico , Suplementos Nutricionais/efeitos adversos , Método Duplo-Cego , França , Humanos , Estudos Multicêntricos como Assunto , Ensaios Clínicos Pragmáticos como Assunto , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento , Terapia Ultravioleta/efeitos adversos
11.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 80(3): 735-742, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30744877

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Systemic mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are currently used in many dermatologic indications. Their topical use is recent and poorly codified. OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of the topical use of mTOR inhibitors in dermatologic conditions and evaluate their efficacy and safety. METHODS: A literature search was performed in January 2017. Reports of all studies investigating the use of topical mTOR inhibitors in any dermatology diseases were included. The exclusion criteria were systemic use and mucosal administration. RESULTS: We included 40 studies with a total of 262 patients. In all, 11 dermatologic conditions were found, the most frequent being angiofibromas linked to tuberous sclerosis complex (157 patients). Topical mTOR inhibitors were significantly more efficient than placebo for angiofibromas (relative risk, 2.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-5.00; I2 = 0%). The median concentration of sirolimus was 0.1%, with a median treatment duration of 12 weeks. Topical mTOR inhibitors were well tolerated, with only mild or moderate local side effects (mostly irritative) reported. Blood level of sirolimus was not detected in 90% of patients. LIMITATIONS: High heterogeneity in most studies. CONCLUSION: This systematic review supports the efficacy of topical sirolimus for angiofibromas linked to tuberous sclerosis complex, with only local side effects reported. Other indications require further research.


Assuntos
Angiofibroma/tratamento farmacológico , Antibióticos Antineoplásicos/uso terapêutico , Sirolimo/uso terapêutico , Neoplasias Cutâneas/tratamento farmacológico , Serina-Treonina Quinases TOR/antagonistas & inibidores , Esclerose Tuberosa/tratamento farmacológico , Administração Cutânea , Angiofibroma/complicações , Antibióticos Antineoplásicos/administração & dosagem , Humanos , Mancha Vinho do Porto/tratamento farmacológico , Psoríase/tratamento farmacológico , Sirolimo/administração & dosagem , Neoplasias Cutâneas/complicações , Esclerose Tuberosa/complicações
19.
Virchows Arch ; 2018 Sep 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30187166

RESUMO

Cutaneous spindle-cell neoplasms in adults as well as children represent a frequent dilemma for pathologists. Along this neoplasm spectrum, the differential diagnosis with CD34-positive proliferations can be challenging, particularly concerning neoplasms of fibrohistiocytic and fibroblastic lineages. In children, cutaneous and superficial soft-tissue neoplasms with CD34-positive spindle cells are associated with benign to intermediate malignancy potential and include lipofibromatosis, plaque-like CD34-positive dermal fibroma, fibroblastic connective tissue nevus, and congenital dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Molecular biology has been valuable in showing dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and infantile fibrosarcoma that are characterized by COL1A1-PDGFB and ETV6-NTRK3 rearrangements respectively. We report a case of congenital CD34-positive dermohypodermal spindle-cell neoplasm occurring in a female infant and harboring a novel KHDRBS1-NTRK3 fusion. This tumor could belong to a new subgroup of pediatric cutaneous spindle-cell neoplasms, be an atypical presentation of a plaque-like CD34-positive dermal fibroma, of a fibroblastic connective tissue nevus, or represent a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans with an alternative gene rearrangement.

20.
Acta Derm Venereol ; 2018 Aug 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30085322

RESUMO

Strategies for diets in chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) are controversial. This systematic review assessed the interest in diet for managing CSU. We searched for original reports in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and LILACS. Among the 278 reports screened, 20 were included, involving 1,734 patients. Reports described 3 types of systematic diet: pseudoallergen-free diet (n = 1,555 patients), low-histamine diet (n = 223) and diet without fish products (n = 47), which induced complete remission in 4.8%, 11.7% and 10.6% of patients, respectively, and partial remission in 37.0%, 43.9% and 4.3%. Eight reports described personalized exclusion diets (66 patients) adapted to symptoms/allergological test results and led to complete remission in 74.6% of patients, although the diagnosis of CSU was doubtful. No comparative randomized studies of diets were available. The only randomized studies were based on oral provocation tests with the suspected responsible diet. Population and outcomes were heterogeneous. In conclusion, there is evidence for the benefit of diets in CSU only in individual patients with clinical symptoms. However, the level of evidence is low for the benefit of systematic diets in CSU because systematic double-blind controlled trials of diet are lacking.

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