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1.
J Genet Couns ; 2019 Sep 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31478310

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite growing evidence of diagnostic yield and clinical utility of whole exome sequencing (WES) in patients with undiagnosed diseases, there remain significant cost and reimbursement barriers limiting access to such testing. The diagnostic yield and resulting clinical actions of WES for patients who previously faced insurance coverage barriers have not yet been explored. METHODS: We performed a retrospective descriptive analysis of clinical WES outcomes for patients facing insurance coverage barriers prior to clinical WES and who subsequently enrolled in the Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN). Clinical WES was completed as a result of participation in the UDN. Payer type, molecular diagnostic yield, and resulting clinical actions were evaluated. RESULTS: Sixty-six patients in the UDN faced insurance coverage barriers to WES at the time of enrollment (67% public payer, 26% private payer). Forty-two of 66 (64%) received insurance denial for clinician-ordered WES, 19/66 (29%) had health insurance through a payer known not to cover WES, and 5/66 (8%) had previous payer denial of other genetic tests. Clinical WES results yielded a molecular diagnosis in 23 of 66 patients (35% [78% pediatric, 65% neurologic indication]). Molecular diagnosis resulted in clinical actions in 14 of 23 patients (61%). CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that a substantial proportion of patients who encountered insurance coverage barriers to WES had a clinically actionable molecular diagnosis, supporting the notion that WES has value as a covered benefit for patients who remain undiagnosed despite objective clinical findings.

2.
Nat Med ; 25(6): 911-919, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31160820

RESUMO

It is estimated that 350 million individuals worldwide suffer from rare diseases, which are predominantly caused by mutation in a single gene1. The current molecular diagnostic rate is estimated at 50%, with whole-exome sequencing (WES) among the most successful approaches2-5. For patients in whom WES is uninformative, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has shown diagnostic utility in specific tissues and diseases6-8. This includes muscle biopsies from patients with undiagnosed rare muscle disorders6,9, and cultured fibroblasts from patients with mitochondrial disorders7. However, for many individuals, biopsies are not performed for clinical care, and tissues are difficult to access. We sought to assess the utility of RNA-seq from blood as a diagnostic tool for rare diseases of different pathophysiologies. We generated whole-blood RNA-seq from 94 individuals with undiagnosed rare diseases spanning 16 diverse disease categories. We developed a robust approach to compare data from these individuals with large sets of RNA-seq data for controls (n = 1,594 unrelated controls and n = 49 family members) and demonstrated the impacts of expression, splicing, gene and variant filtering strategies on disease gene identification. Across our cohort, we observed that RNA-seq yields a 7.5% diagnostic rate, and an additional 16.7% with improved candidate gene resolution.


Assuntos
Doenças Raras/genética , Ceramidase Ácida/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Variação Genética , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Genéticos , Mutação , Oxirredutases atuantes sobre Doadores de Grupo CH-CH/genética , Canais de Potássio/genética , RNA/sangue , RNA/genética , Processamento de RNA/genética , Doenças Raras/sangue , Análise de Sequência de RNA , Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma
3.
J Gen Intern Med ; 34(6): 1058-1062, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30887439

RESUMO

We discuss a challenging case of a 58-year-old Vietnamese-American woman who presented to her new primary care provider with an 8-year history of slowly progressive dysphagia, hoarseness, muscle weakness with associated frequent falls, and weight loss. She eventually reported dry eyes and dry mouth, and she was diagnosed with Sjogren's syndrome. Subsequently, she was additionally diagnosed with inclusion body myositis and gastric light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. Although inclusion body myositis has been previously associated with Sjogren's syndrome, inclusion body myositis is rare in non-Caucasians, and the trio of Sjogren's syndrome, inclusion body myositis, and AL amyloidosis has not been previously reported. Sjogren's syndrome is a systemic autoimmune condition characterized by ocular and oral dryness. It is one of the most common rheumatologic disorders in the USA and worldwide. Early diagnosis of Sjogren's is particularly important given the frequency and variety of associated autoimmune diseases and extraglandular manifestations. Furthermore, although inclusion body myositis has a low prevalence, it is the most common inflammatory myopathy in older adults and is unfortunately associated with long delays in diagnosis, so knowledge of this disorder is also crucial for practicing internists.

4.
NPJ Schizophr ; 3: 30, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28904993

RESUMO

Schizophrenia is a serious neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by disruptions of brain cell metabolism, microstructure, and neurotransmission. All of these processes require coordination of multiple kinase-mediated signaling events. We hypothesize that imbalances in kinase activity propagate through an interconnected network of intracellular signaling with potential to simultaneously contribute to many or all of the observed deficits in schizophrenia. We established a workflow distinguishing schizophrenia-altered kinases in anterior cingulate cortex using a previously published kinome array data set. We compared schizophrenia-altered kinases to haloperidol-altered kinases, and identified systems, functions, and regulators predicted using pathway analyses. We used kinase inhibitors with the kinome array to test hypotheses about imbalance in signaling and conducted preliminary studies of kinase proteins, phosphoproteins, and activity for kinases of interest. We investigated schizophrenia-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in one of these kinases, AKT, for genotype-dependent changes in AKT protein or activity. Kinome analyses identified new kinases as well as some previously implicated in schizophrenia. These results were not explained by chronic antipsychotic treatment. Kinases identified in our analyses aligned with cytoskeletal arrangement and molecular trafficking. Of the kinases we investigated further, AKT and (unexpectedly) JNK, showed the most dysregulation in the anterior cingulate cortex of schizophrenia subjects. Changes in kinase activity did not correspond to protein or phosphoprotein levels. We also show that AKT single nucleotide polymorphism rs1130214, previously associated with schizophrenia, influenced enzyme activity but not protein or phosphoprotein levels. Our data indicate subtle changes in kinase activity and regulation across an interlinked kinase network, suggesting signaling imbalances underlie the core symptoms of schizophrenia.

5.
NPJ Schizophr ; 3(1): 30, 2017 Sep 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28900113

RESUMO

Schizophrenia is a serious neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by disruptions of brain cell metabolism, microstructure, and neurotransmission. All of these processes require coordination of multiple kinase-mediated signaling events. We hypothesize that imbalances in kinase activity propagate through an interconnected network of intracellular signaling with potential to simultaneously contribute to many or all of the observed deficits in schizophrenia. We established a workflow distinguishing schizophrenia-altered kinases in anterior cingulate cortex using a previously published kinome array data set. We compared schizophrenia-altered kinases to haloperidol-altered kinases, and identified systems, functions, and regulators predicted using pathway analyses. We used kinase inhibitors with the kinome array to test hypotheses about imbalance in signaling and conducted preliminary studies of kinase proteins, phosphoproteins, and activity for kinases of interest. We investigated schizophrenia-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in one of these kinases, AKT, for genotype-dependent changes in AKT protein or activity. Kinome analyses identified new kinases as well as some previously implicated in schizophrenia. These results were not explained by chronic antipsychotic treatment. Kinases identified in our analyses aligned with cytoskeletal arrangement and molecular trafficking. Of the kinases we investigated further, AKT and (unexpectedly) JNK, showed the most dysregulation in the anterior cingulate cortex of schizophrenia subjects. Changes in kinase activity did not correspond to protein or phosphoprotein levels. We also show that AKT single nucleotide polymorphism rs1130214, previously associated with schizophrenia, influenced enzyme activity but not protein or phosphoprotein levels. Our data indicate subtle changes in kinase activity and regulation across an interlinked kinase network, suggesting signaling imbalances underlie the core symptoms of schizophrenia. DISEASE MECHANISMS: A SIGNALING IMBALANCE: A study by US scientists indicates that changes in the activity of key signaling proteins may underlie core symptoms of schizophrenia. Protein kinases mediate the activation of intracellular signaling events and analyses of the kinome, the complete set of protein kinases encoded in the genome, previously revealed significant changes in phosphorylation patterns in postmortem brain tissue from patients with schizophrenia. Based on these findings, Jennifer McGuire at the University of Cincinnati and colleagues investigated the upstream regulation of these proteins. They identified both established and novel proteins associated with schizophrenia in the anterior cingulate cortex, with JNK and AKT activity being the most disrupted in schizophrenia patients. Their findings highlight how subtle changes in the activity of a small number of signaling proteins can propagate and have major consequences for mental health.

6.
PLoS One ; 9(11): e111338, 2014.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25364910

RESUMO

Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric tissue results in an immune response dominated by Th1 cytokines and has also been linked with dysregulation of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway in gastric tissue. However, since interactions between the cytokines and SHH during H. pylori infection are not well understood, any mechanistic understanding achieved through interpretation of the statistical analysis of experimental results in the context of currently known circuit must be carefully scrutinized. Here, we use mathematical modeling aided by restraints of experimental data to evaluate the consistency between experimental results and temporal behavior of H. pylori activated cytokine circuit model. Statistical analysis of qPCR data from uninfected and H. pylori infected wild-type and parietal cell-specific SHH knockout (PC-SHHKO) mice for day 7 and 180 indicate significant changes that suggest role of SHH in cytokine regulation. The experimentally observed changes are further investigated using a mathematical model that examines dynamic crosstalks among pro-inflammatory (IL1ß, IL-12, IFNγ, MIP-2) cytokines, anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines and SHH during H. pylori infection. Response analysis of the resulting model demonstrates that circuitry, as currently known, is inadequate for explaining of the experimental observations; suggesting the need for additional specific regulatory interactions. A key advantage of a computational model is the ability to propose putative circuit models for in-silico experimentation. We use this approach to propose a parsimonious model that incorporates crosstalks between NFĸB, SHH, IL-1ß and IL-10, resulting in a feedback loop capable of exhibiting cyclic behavior. Separately, we show that analysis of an independent time-series GEO microarray data for IL-1ß, IFNγ and IL-10 in mock and H. pylori infected mice further supports the proposed hypothesis that these cytokines may follow a cyclic trend. Predictions from the in-silico model provide useful insights for generating new hypothesis and design of subsequent experimental studies.


Assuntos
Citocinas/metabolismo , Proteínas Hedgehog/metabolismo , Infecções por Helicobacter/metabolismo , Helicobacter pylori , Modelos Biológicos , Animais , Biologia Computacional/métodos , Citocinas/genética , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Feminino , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genótipo , Proteínas Hedgehog/genética , Infecções por Helicobacter/genética , Infecções por Helicobacter/imunologia , Camundongos , Camundongos Knockout , Mapeamento de Interação de Proteínas , Mapas de Interação de Proteínas
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