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2.
Anesthesiology ; 2020 Jan 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31929326

RESUMO

WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS TOPIC: Perioperative acute kidney injury is commonIt is unclear whether this merely represents a transient increase in creatinine or has prognostic value WHAT THIS ARTICLE TELLS US THAT IS NEW: Patients with mild postoperative kidney injury (stage I) after noncardiac surgery had an estimated 2.4 times higher odds of having long-term renal dysfunction compared with patients without postoperative kidney injuryA quarter of patients who had stage I acute kidney injury postoperatively still had stage I kidney injury 1 to 2 yr later, and an additional 11% had even worse renal function BACKGROUND:: Perioperative acute kidney injury is common. However, it is unclear whether this merely represents a transient increase in creatinine or has prognostic value. Therefore, the long-term clinical importance of mild postoperative acute kidney injury remains unclear. This study assessed whether adults who do and do not experience mild kidney injury after noncardiac surgery are at similar risk for long-term renal injury. METHODS: This study is a retrospective cohort analysis of adults having noncardiac surgery at the Cleveland Clinic who had preoperative, postoperative, and long-term (1 to 2 yr after surgery) plasma creatinine measurements. The exposure (postoperative kidney injury) and outcome (long-term renal injury) were defined and staged according to the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) initiative criteria. The primary analysis was for lack of association between postoperative kidney injury (stage I vs. no injury) and long-term renal injury. RESULTS: Among 15,621 patients analyzed, 3% had postoperative stage I kidney injury. Long-term renal outcomes were not similar in patients with and without postoperative stage I injury. Specifically, about 26% of patients with stage I postoperative kidney injury still had mild injury 1 to 2 yr later, and 11% had even more severe injury. A full third (37%) of patients with stage I kidney injury therefore had renal injury 1 to 2 yr after surgery. Patients with postoperative stage I injury had an estimated 2.4 times higher odds of having long-term renal dysfunction (KDIGO stage I, II, or III) compared with patients without postoperative kidney injury (odds ratio [95% CI] of 2.4 [2.0 to 3.0]) after adjustment for potential confounding factors. CONCLUSIONS: In adults recovering from noncardiac surgery, even small postoperative increases in plasma creatinine, corresponding to stage I kidney injury, are associated with renal dysfunction 1 to 2 yr after surgery. Even mild postoperative renal injury should therefore be considered a clinically important perioperative outcome.

3.
Anesthesiology ; 132(2): 291-306, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31939844

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Arterial pressure is a complex signal that can be characterized by systolic, mean, and diastolic components, along with pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic pressures). The authors separately evaluated the strength of associations among intraoperative pressure components with myocardial and kidney injury after noncardiac surgery. METHODS: The authors included 23,140 noncardiac surgery patients at Cleveland Clinic who had blood pressure recorded at 1-min intervals from radial arterial catheters. The authors used univariable smoothing and multivariable logistic regression to estimate probabilities of each outcome as function of patients' lowest pressure for a cumulative 5 min for each component, comparing discriminative ability using C-statistics. The authors further assessed the association between outcomes and both area and minutes under derived thresholds corresponding to the beginning of increased risk for the average patient. RESULTS: Out of 23,140 patients analyzed, myocardial injury occurred in 6.1% and acute kidney injury in 8.2%. Based on the lowest patient blood pressure experienced for greater than or equal to 5 min, estimated thresholds below which the odds of myocardial or kidney injury progressively increased (slope P < 0.001) were 90 mmHg for systolic, 65 mmHg for mean, 50 mmHg for diastolic, and 35 mmHg for pulse pressure. Weak discriminative ability was noted between the pressure components, with univariable C-statistics ranging from 0.55 to 0.59. Area under the curve in the highest (deepest) quartile of exposure below the respective thresholds had significantly higher odds of myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery and acute kidney injury compared to no exposure for systolic, mean, and pulse pressure (all P < 0.001), but not diastolic, after adjusting for confounding. CONCLUSIONS: Systolic, mean, and pulse pressure hypotension were comparable in their strength of association with myocardial and renal injury. In contrast, the relationship with diastolic pressure was poor. Baseline factors were much more strongly associated with myocardial and renal injury than intraoperative blood pressure, but pressure differs in being modifiable.

4.
Anesthesiology ; 2020 Jan 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31996555

RESUMO

WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS TOPIC: The fundamental design of perineural catheters has changed little since they were first introduced WHAT THIS ARTICLE TELLS US THAT IS NEW: A novel catheter attached to the back of a suture-shaped needle can be inserted under ultrasound guidance to provide popliteal-sciatic nerve blockadeIn the first two days after foot and ankle surgery, analgesia provided using the suture-type catheters was found to be noninferior to that provided by conventional through-the-needle catheters BACKGROUND:: The basic perineural catheter design has changed minimally since inception, with the catheter introduced through or over a straight needle. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently cleared a novel perineural catheter design comprising a catheter attached to the back of a suture-shaped needle that is inserted, advanced along the arc of its curvature pulling the catheter past the target nerve, and then exited through the skin in a second location. The authors hypothesized that analgesia would be noninferior using the new versus traditional catheter design in the first two days after painful foot/ankle surgery with a primary outcome of average pain measured with the Numeric Rating Scale. METHODS: Subjects undergoing painful foot or ankle surgery with a continuous supraparaneural popliteal-sciatic nerve block 5 cm proximal to the bifurcation were randomized to either a suture-type or through-the-needle catheter and subsequent 3-day 0.2% ropivacaine infusion (basal 6 ml/h, bolus 4 ml, lockout 30 min). Subjects received daily follow-up for the first four days after surgery, including assessment for evidence of malfunction or dislodgement of the catheters. RESULTS: During the first two postoperative days the mean ± SD average pain scores were lower in subjects with the suture-catheter (n = 35) compared with the through-the-needle (n = 35) group (2.7 ± 2.4 vs. 3.4 ± 2.4) and found to be statistically noninferior (95% CI, -1.9 to 0.6; P < 0.001). No suture-style catheter was completely dislodged (0%), whereas the tips of three (9%) traditional catheters were found outside of the skin before purposeful removal on postoperative day 3 (P = 0.239). CONCLUSIONS: Suture-type perineural catheters provided noninferior analgesia compared with traditional catheters for continuous popliteal-sciatic blocks after painful foot and ankle surgery. The new catheter design appears to be a viable alternative to traditional designs used for the past seven decades.

5.
Anesthesiology ; 2020 Jan 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977517

RESUMO

WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS TOPIC: Infusion of large volumes of saline causes hyperchloremic metabolic acidosisA recent Cochrane review based on 18 small trials reported that major morbidity and mortality were comparable with perioperative saline or lactated Ringer's use WHAT THIS ARTICLE TELLS US THAT IS NEW: In a large single-center alternating cohort trial of patients having elective colorectal or orthopedic surgery, there was no clinically meaningful difference in the risk of a composite of in-hospital mortality and major postoperative complications including renal, respiratory, infectious, and hemorrhagic complications BACKGROUND:: Both saline and lactated Ringer's solutions are commonly given to surgical patients. However, hyperchloremic acidosis consequent to saline administration may provoke complications. The authors therefore tested the primary hypothesis that a composite of in-hospital mortality and major postoperative complications is less common in patients given lactated Ringer's solution than normal saline. METHODS: The authors conducted an alternating cohort controlled trial in which adults having colorectal and orthopedic surgery were given either lactated Ringer's solution or normal saline in 2-week blocks between September 2015 and August 2018. The primary outcome was a composite of in-hospital mortality and major postoperative renal, respiratory, infectious, and hemorrhagic complications. The secondary outcome was postoperative acute kidney injury. RESULTS: Among 8,616 qualifying patients, 4,187 (49%) were assigned to lactated Ringer's solution, and 4,429 (51%) were assigned to saline. Each group received a median 1.9 l of fluid. The primary composite of major complications was observed in 5.8% of lactated Ringer's versus 6.1% of normal saline patients, with estimated average relative risk across the components of the composite of 1.16 (95% CI, 0.89 to 1.52; P = 0.261). The secondary outcome, postoperative acute kidney injury, Acute Kidney Injury Network stage I-III versus 0, occurred in 6.6% of lactated Ringer's patients versus 6.2% of normal saline patients, with an estimated relative risk of 1.18 (99.3% CI, 0.99 to 1.41; P = 0.009, significance criterion of 0.007). Absolute differences between the treatment groups for each outcome were less than 0.5%, an amount that is not clinically meaningful. CONCLUSIONS: In elective orthopedic and colorectal surgery patients, there was no clinically meaningful difference in postoperative complications with lactated Ringer's or saline volume replacement. Clinicians can reasonably use either solution intraoperatively.

6.
Anesth Analg ; 130(2): 360-366, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30882520

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We previously reported that the duration of hospitalization was not different between isoflurane and sevoflurane. But more plausible consequences of using soluble volatile anesthetics are delayed emergence from anesthesia and prolonged stays in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). We therefore compared isoflurane and sevoflurane on emergence time and PACU duration. METHODS: We reanalyzed data from 1498 adults who participated in a previous alternating intervention trial comparing isoflurane and sevoflurane. Patients, mostly having colorectal surgery, were assigned to either volatile anesthetic in 2-week blocks that alternated for half a year. Emergence time was defined as the time from minimum alveolar concentration fraction reaching 0.3 at the end of the procedure until patients left the operating room. PACU duration was defined from admission to the end of phase 1 recovery. Treatment effect was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for imbalanced baseline variables. RESULTS: A total of 674 patients were given isoflurane, and 824 sevoflurane. Emergence time was slightly longer for isoflurane with a median (quartiles) of 16 minutes (12-22 minutes) vs 14 minutes (11-19 minutes) for sevoflurane, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.81 (97.5% CI, 0.71-0.92; P < .001). Duration in the PACU did not differ, with a median (quartiles) of 2.6 hours (2.0-3.6 hours) for isoflurane and 2.6 hours (2.0-3.7 hours) hours for sevoflurane. The adjusted hazard ratio for PACU discharge time was 1.04 (97.5% CI, 0.91-1.18; P = .56). CONCLUSIONS: Isoflurane prolonged emergence by only 2 minutes, which is not a clinically important amount, and did not prolong length of stay in the PACU. The more soluble and much less-expensive anesthetic isoflurane thus seems to be a reasonable alternative to sevoflurane.

7.
Anesthesiology ; 2019 Nov 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31789639

RESUMO

WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS TOPIC: Arterial pressure is a complex signal that is characterized by three primary components - systolic, diastolic, and mean pressure, along with a derived component, pulse pressure (systolic minus diastolic pressure)Each blood pressure component reflects distinct hemodynamic variables, and therefore presumably differently influences perfusion of various organsPrevious work identifies associations between intraoperative systolic and mean hypotension with myocardial and kidney injury WHAT THIS ARTICLE TELLS US THAT IS NEW: For each blood pressure component, the authors report significant and clinically meaningful associations between the lowest pressure sustained for 5 min and myocardial and kidney injuryAbsolute population risk thresholds were similar for myocardial and kidney injury, being roughly 90 mmHg for systolic, 65 mmHg for mean, 50 mmHg for diastolic, and 35 mmHg for pulse pressuresThe odds for myocardial and kidney injury progressively increased with duration and severity of hypotension below each threshold, even after adjusting for potential baseline confounding factors BACKGROUND:: Arterial pressure is a complex signal that can be characterized by systolic, mean, and diastolic components, along with pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic pressures). The authors separately evaluated the strength of associations among intraoperative pressure components with myocardial and kidney injury after noncardiac surgery. METHODS: The authors included 23,140 noncardiac surgery patients at Cleveland Clinic who had blood pressure recorded at 1-min intervals from radial arterial catheters. The authors used univariable smoothing and multivariable logistic regression to estimate probabilities of each outcome as function of patients' lowest pressure for a cumulative 5 min for each component, comparing discriminative ability using C-statistics. The authors further assessed the association between outcomes and both area and minutes under derived thresholds corresponding to the beginning of increased risk for the average patient. RESULTS: Out of 23,140 patients analyzed, myocardial injury occurred in 6.1% and acute kidney injury in 8.2%. Based on the lowest patient blood pressure experienced for greater than or equal to 5 min, estimated thresholds below which the odds of myocardial or kidney injury progressively increased (slope P < 0.001) were 90 mmHg for systolic, 65 mmHg for mean, 50 mmHg for diastolic, and 35 mmHg for pulse pressure. Weak discriminative ability was noted between the pressure components, with univariable C-statistics ranging from 0.55 to 0.59. Area under the curve in the highest (deepest) quartile of exposure below the respective thresholds had significantly higher odds of myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery and acute kidney injury compared to no exposure for systolic, mean, and pulse pressure (all P < 0.001), but not diastolic, after adjusting for confounding. CONCLUSIONS: Systolic, mean, and pulse pressure hypotension were comparable in their strength of association with myocardial and renal injury. In contrast, the relationship with diastolic pressure was poor. Baseline factors were much more strongly associated with myocardial and renal injury than intraoperative blood pressure, but pressure differs in being modifiable.

8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31813538

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although observational studies suggest an association between transfusion of older red blood cell (RBC) units and increased postoperative risk, randomized trials have not supported this. The objective of this randomized trial was to test the effect of RBC storage age on outcomes after cardiac surgery. METHODS: From July 2007 to May 2016, 3835 adults undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, cardiac valve procedures, or ascending aorta repair, either alone or in combination, were randomized to transfusion of RBCs stored for ≤14 days (younger units) or for ≥20 days (older units) intraoperatively and throughout the postoperative hospitalization. According to protocol, 2448 patients were excluded because they did not receive RBC transfusions. Among the remaining 1387 modified intent-to-treat patients, 701 were randomized to receive younger RBC units (median age, 11 days) and the remaining 686 to receive older units (median age, 25 days). The primary endpoint was composite morbidity and mortality, analyzed using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) model. The trial was discontinued midway owing to enrollment constraints. RESULTS: A total of 5470 RBC units were transfused, including 2783 in the younger RBC storage group and 2687 in the older RBC storage group. The GEE average relative-effect odds ratio was 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-1.19; P = .083) for the composite morbidity and mortality endpoint. In-hospital mortality was lower for the younger RBC storage group (2.1% [n = 15] vs 3.4% [n = 23]), as was occurrence of other adverse events except for atrial fibrillation, although all CIs crossed 1.0. CONCLUSIONS: This clinical trial, which was stopped at its midpoint owing to enrollment constraints, supports neither the efficacy nor the futility of transfusing either younger or older RBC units. The effects of transfusing RBCs after even more prolonged storage (35-42 days) remains untested.

9.
Anesth Analg ; 129(6): 1456-1458, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31743162
10.
Lancet ; 394(10211): 1807-1815, 2019 11 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31645288

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Three perioperative factors impair host defence against recurrence during cancer surgery: the surgical stress response, use of volatile anaesthetic, and opioids for analgesia. All factors are ameliorated by regional anaesthesia-analgesia. We tested the primary hypothesis that breast cancer recurrence after potentially curative surgery is lower with regional anaesthesia-analgesia using paravertebral blocks and the anaesthetic propofol than with general anaesthesia with the volatile anaesthetic sevoflurane and opioid analgesia. A second hypothesis was that regional anaesthesia-analgesia reduces persistent incisional pain. METHODS: We did a randomised controlled trial at 13 hospitals in Argentina, Austria, China, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Singapore, and the USA. Women (age <85 years) having potentially curative primary breast cancer resections were randomised by computer to either regional anaesthesia-analgesia (paravertebral blocks and propofol) or general anaesthesia (sevoflurane) and opioid analgesia. The primary outcome was local or metastatic breast cancer recurrence. The secondary outcome was incisional pain at 6 months and 12 months. Primary analyses were done under intention-to-treat principles. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00418457. The study was stopped after a preplanned futility boundary was crossed. FINDINGS: Between Jan 30, 2007, and Jan 18, 2018, 2132 women were enrolled to the study, of whom 24 were excluded before surgery. 1043 were assigned to regional anaesthesia-analgesia and 1065 were allocated to general anaesthesia. Baseline characteristics were well balanced between study groups. Median follow-up was 36 (IQR 24-49) months. Among women assigned regional anaesthesia-analgesia, 102 (10%) recurrences were reported, compared with 111 (10%) recurrences among those allocated general anaesthesia (hazard ratio 0·97, 95% CI 0·74-1·28; p=0·84). Incisional pain was reported by 442 (52%) of 856 patients assigned to regional anaesthesia-analgesia and 456 (52%) of 872 patients allocated to general anaesthesia at 6 months, and by 239 (28%) of 854 patients and 232 (27%) of 852 patients, respectively, at 12 months (overall interim-adjusted odds ratio 1·00, 95% CI 0·85-1·17; p=0·99). Neuropathic breast pain did not differ by anaesthetic technique and was reported by 87 (10%) of 859 patients assigned to regional anaesthesia-analgesia and 89 (10%) of 870 patients allocated to general anaesthesia at 6 months, and by 57 (7%) of 857 patients and 57 (7%) of 854 patients, respectively, at 12 months. INTERPRETATION: In our study population, regional anaesthesia-analgesia (paravertebral block and propofol) did not reduce breast cancer recurrence after potentially curative surgery compared with volatile anaesthesia (sevoflurane) and opioids. The frequency and severity of persistent incisional breast pain was unaffected by anaesthetic technique. Clinicians can use regional or general anaesthesia with respect to breast cancer recurrence and persistent incisional pain. FUNDING: Sisk Healthcare Foundation (Ireland), Eccles Breast Cancer Research Fund, British Journal of Anaesthesia International, College of Anaesthetists of Ireland, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Science Fund for Junior Faculty 2016, Central Bank of Austria, and National Healthcare Group.


Assuntos
Anestesia por Condução/métodos , Anestesia Geral/métodos , Neoplasias da Mama/cirurgia , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Analgésicos Opioides/efeitos adversos , Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Anestesia por Condução/efeitos adversos , Anestesia Geral/efeitos adversos , Anestésicos Inalatórios/efeitos adversos , Neoplasias da Mama/patologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Metástase Linfática , Mastectomia/métodos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gradação de Tumores , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/etiologia , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Bloqueio Nervoso/métodos , Dor Pós-Operatória/prevenção & controle , Sevoflurano/efeitos adversos
11.
Anesth Analg ; 2019 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31490816

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Continuous blood pressure monitoring may facilitate early detection and prompt treatment of hypotension. We tested the hypothesis that area under the curve (AUC) mean arterial pressure (MAP) <65 mm Hg is reduced by continuous invasive arterial pressure monitoring. METHODS: Adults having noncardiac surgery were randomly assigned to continuous invasive arterial pressure or intermittent oscillometric blood pressure monitoring. Arterial catheter pressures were recorded at 1-minute intervals; oscillometric pressures were typically recorded at 5-minute intervals. We estimated the arterial catheter effect on AUC-MAP <65 mm Hg using a multivariable proportional odds model adjusting for imbalanced baseline variables and duration of surgery. Pressures <65 mm Hg were categorized as 0, 1-17, 18-91, and >91 mm Hg × minutes of AUC-MAP <65 mm Hg (ie, no hypotension and 3 equally sized groups of increasing hypotension). RESULTS: One hundred fifty-two patients were randomly assigned to arterial catheter use and 154 to oscillometric monitoring. For various clinical reasons, 143 patients received an arterial catheter, while 163 were monitored oscillometrically. There were a median [Q1, Q3] of 246 [187, 308] pressure measurements in patients with arterial catheters versus 55 (46, 75) measurements in patients monitored oscillometrically. In the primary intent-to-treat analysis, catheter-based monitoring increased detection of AUC-MAP <65 mm Hg, with an estimated proportional odds ratio (ie, odds of being in a worse hypotension category) of 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.70; P = .006). The result was robust over an as-treated analysis and for sensitivity analyses with thresholds of 60 and 70 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative blood pressure monitoring with arterial catheters detected nearly twice as much hypotension as oscillometric measurements.

12.
Anesth Analg ; 2019 Sep 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31490254

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Perioperative hyperoxia has been recommended by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the prevention of surgical site infections. Based on animal studies and physiological concerns, the kidneys and heart may be at risk from hyperoxia. We therefore conducted 2 unplanned subanalyses of a previous alternating cohort trial in which patients having colorectal surgery were assigned to either 30% or 80% inspired intraoperative oxygen. Specifically, we tested 2 coprimary hypotheses: (1) hyperoxia increases the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) within 7 postoperative days (PODs); and (2) hyperoxia worsens a composite of myocardial injury, in-hospital cardiac arrest, and 30-day mortality. METHODS: The underlying controlled trial included 5749 colorectal surgeries in 4481 patients, with the exposure alternating between 30% and 80% fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) during general anesthesia at 2-week intervals over a period of 39 months. AKI was defined as a 1.5-fold increase in creatinine from the preoperative level to the highest value measured during the initial 7 PODs. Myocardial injury was defined by fourth-generation troponin-T level >0.03 ng/mL. We assessed the effect of 80% vs 30% oxygen on the outcomes using generalized estimating equation (GEE) logistic models that adjusted for the possible within-patient correlation across multiple potential operations for a patient on different visits. RESULTS: For the AKI outcome, 2522 surgeries were allocated to 80% oxygen and 2552 to 30% oxygen. Hyperoxia had no effect on the primary outcome of postoperative AKI, with an incidence of 7.7% in the 80% oxygen group and 7.7% in the 30% oxygen group (relative risk = 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-1.2; P = .95). One thousand six hundred forty-seven surgeries (all with scheduled troponin monitoring) were analyzed for the composite cardiovascular outcome. Hyperoxia had no effect on the collapsed composite of myocardial injury, cardiac arrest, and 30-day mortality, nor on any of its components (estimated relative risk = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.44-1.16; P = .17). CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence that intraoperative hyperoxia causes AKI or cardiovascular complications in adults undergoing colorectal surgery. Consequently, we suggest that clinicians select intraoperative inspired oxygen fraction based on other considerations.

13.
Anesthesiology ; 131(4): 883-893, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31365367

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sympathetic dysfunction may be present in complex regional pain syndrome, and sympathetic blocks are routinely performed in practice. To investigate the therapeutic and predictive values of sympathetic blocks, the authors test the hypotheses that sympathetic blocks provide analgesic effects that may be associated with the temperature differences between the two extremities before and after the blocks and that the effects of sympathetic blocks may predict the success (defined as achieving more than 50% pain reduction) of spinal cord stimulation trials. METHODS: The authors performed a retrospective study of 318 patients who underwent sympathetic blocks in a major academic center (2009 to 2016) to assess the association between pain reduction and preprocedure temperature difference between the involved and contralateral limbs. The primary outcome was pain improvement by more than 50%, and the secondary outcome was duration of more than 50% pain reduction per patient report. The authors assessed the association between pain reduction and the success rate of spinal cord stimulation trials. RESULTS: Among the 318 patients, 255 were diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome and others with various sympathetically related disorders. Successful pain reduction (more than 50%) was observed in 155 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (155 of 255, 61%). The majority of patients (132 of 155, 85%) experienced more than 50% pain relief for 1 to 4 weeks or longer. The degree and duration of pain relief were not associated with preprocedure temperature parameters with estimated odds ratio of 1.03 (97.5% CI, 0.95-1.11) or 1.01 (97.5% CI, 0.96-1.06) for one degree decrease (P = 0.459 or 0.809). There was no difference in the success rate of spinal cord stimulation trials between patients with or without more than 50% pain relief after sympathetic blocks (35 of 40, 88% vs. 26 of 29, 90%, P > 0.990). CONCLUSIONS: The authors conclude that sympathetic blocks may be therapeutic in patients with complex regional pain syndrome regardless of preprocedure limb temperatures. The effects of sympathetic blocks do not predict the success of spinal cord stimulation.


Assuntos
Bloqueio Nervoso Autônomo/métodos , Síndromes da Dor Regional Complexa/terapia , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
14.
Trials ; 20(1): 255, 2019 May 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31053082

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hypotension is associated with serious complications, including myocardial infarction, acute kidney injury, and mortality. Consequently, predicting and preventing hypotension may improve outcomes. We will therefore determine if use of a novel hypotension prediction tool reduces the duration and severity of hypotension in patients having non-cardiac surgery. METHODS/DESIGN: We will conduct a two-center, pragmatic, randomized controlled trial (N = 213) in noncardiac surgical patients > 45 years old who require intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring. All participating patients will be connected to a Flortrac IQ sensor and EV1000 platform (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine). They will be randomly assigned to blinded or unblinded arms. The Hypotension Prediction Index (HPI) and advanced hemodynamic information will be universally recorded, but will only be available to clinicians when patients are assigned to unblinded monitoring. The primary outcome will be the effect of HPI software guidance on intraoperative time-weighted average mean arterial pressure under a threshold of 65 mmHg, which will be assessed with a Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney 2-sample, two-tailed test. DISCUSSION: Our trial will determine whether the Hypotension Prediction Index and associated hemodynamic information substantively reduces hypotension during non-cardiac surgery. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03610165 . Registered on 1 August 2018.


Assuntos
Pressão Arterial , Determinação da Pressão Arterial , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Cardíacos/efeitos adversos , Hipotensão/prevenção & controle , Monitorização Intraoperatória/métodos , Software , Feminino , Humanos , Hipotensão/diagnóstico , Hipotensão/etiologia , Hipotensão/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Multicêntricos como Assunto , Ohio , Ensaios Clínicos Pragmáticos como Assunto , Fatores de Risco , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
15.
Anesth Analg ; 129(2): 618-633, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31008746

RESUMO

Perioperative investigators and professionals increasingly seek to evaluate whether implementing systematic practice changes improves outcomes compared to a previous routine. Cluster randomized trials are the optimal design to assess a systematic practice change but are often impractical; investigators, therefore, often select a before-after design. In this Statistical Grand Rounds, we first discuss biases inherent in a before-after design, including confounding due to periods being completely separated by time, regression to the mean, the Hawthorne effect, and others. Many of these biases can be at least partially addressed by using appropriate designs and analyses, which we discuss. Our focus is on segmented regression of an interrupted time series, which does not require a concurrent control group; we also present alternative designs including difference-in-difference, stepped wedge, and cluster randomization. Conducting segmented regression well requires a sufficient number of time points within each period, along with a robust set of potentially confounding variables. This method compares preintervention and postintervention changes over time, divergences in the outcome when an intervention begins, and trends observed with the intervention compared to trends projected without it. Difference-in-difference methods add a concurrent control, enabling yet stronger inference. When done well, the discussed methods permit robust inference on the effect of an intervention, albeit still requiring assumptions and having limitations. Methods are demonstrated using an interrupted time series study in which anesthesiologists took responsibility for an adult medical emergency team from internal medicine physicians in an attempt to improve outcomes.

17.
J Clin Anesth ; 56: 77-84, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30703672

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Muscular tone that inhibits anesthetic or surgical care characterizes insufficient neuromuscular block. The incidence of insufficient neuromuscular block is unknown, therefore we developed novel electronic search strategies to identify occurrences of insufficient neuromuscular block. Our primary goal was to determine the incidence of intraoperative insufficient neuromuscular block in abdominal and neurovascular surgery. Our secondary goal was to assess factors independently associated with insufficient block. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort. SETTING: Operating rooms in a tertiary care center. PATIENTS: Adults having abdominal, laparoscopic, and interventional neurovascular procedures under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation between April 2005 and February 2013. MEASUREMENTS: An expert panel of anesthesiologists used a Delphi process to develop criteria to identify insufficient intraoperative neuromuscular block. 10 final criteria were agreed upon and used to determine the incidence of insufficient neuromuscular block. MAIN RESULTS: 48,315 surgeries met our inclusion requirements. Intraoperative insufficient neuromuscular block was identified in 13,538 cases, representing 28% (95% CI: 27.6%, 28.4%) of the operations. Younger age, male sex, type of surgery, longer duration of surgery, pre-existing conditions, and use of volatile anesthetics were independently associated with insufficient block after Bonferroni correction. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that episodes of insufficient block occur in over a quarter of operations that are generally thought to require muscle relaxation. Without neuromuscular monitoring, it is difficult to separate inadequate anesthesia from inadequate neuromuscular block, and both presumably contributed in many cases.

19.
Anesthesiology ; 130(1): 72-82, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30312182

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Triple-low events (mean arterial pressure less than 75 mmHg, Bispectral Index less than 45, and minimum alveolar fraction less than 0.8) are associated with mortality but may not be causal. This study tested the hypothesis that providing triple-low alerts to clinicians reduces 90-day mortality. METHODS: Adults having noncardiac surgery with volatile anesthesia and Bispectral Index monitoring were electronically screened for triple-low events. Patients having triple-low events were randomized in real time, with clinicians either receiving an alert, "consider hemodynamic support," or not. Patients were blinded to treatment. Helpful responses to triple-low events were defined by administration of a vasopressor within 5 min or a 20% reduction in end-tidal volatile anesthetic concentration within 15 min. RESULTS: Of the qualifying patients, 7,569 of 36,670 (20%) had triple-low events and were randomized. All 7,569 were included in the primary analysis. Ninety-day mortality was 8.3% in the alert group and 7.3% in the nonalert group. The hazard ratio (95% CI) for alert versus nonalert was 1.14 (0.96, 1.35); P = 0.12, crossing a prespecified futility boundary. Clinical responses were helpful in about half the patients in each group, with 51% of alert patients and 47% of nonalert patients receiving vasopressors or having anesthetics lowered after start of triple low (P < 0.001). There was no relationship between the response to triple-low events and adjusted 90-day mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time alerts to triple-low events did not lead to a reduction in 90-day mortality, and there were fewer responses to alerts than expected. However, similar mortality with and without responses suggests that there is no strong relationship between responses to triple-low events and mortality.


Assuntos
Pressão Arterial/fisiologia , Monitores de Consciência/estatística & dados numéricos , Hipotensão/diagnóstico , Hipotensão/mortalidade , Complicações Intraoperatórias/diagnóstico , Complicações Intraoperatórias/mortalidade , Monitorização Intraoperatória/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Hipotensão/fisiopatologia , Complicações Intraoperatórias/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
20.
Anesthesiology ; 129(6): 1101-1110, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30300157

RESUMO

WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS TOPIC: WHAT THIS ARTICLE TELLS US THAT IS NEW: BACKGROUND:: Beta (ß) blockers reduce the risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation and should be restarted after surgery, but it remains unclear when best to resume ß blockers postoperatively. The authors thus evaluated the relationship between timing of resumption of ß blockers and atrial fibrillation in patients recovering from noncardiothoracic and nonvascular surgery. METHODS: The authors evaluated 8,201 adult ß-blocker users with no previous history of atrial fibrillation who stayed at least two nights after noncardiothoracic and nonvascular surgery as a retrospective observational cohort. After propensity score matching on baseline and intraoperative variables, 1,924 patients who did resume ß blockers by the end of postoperative day 1 were compared with 973 patients who had not resumed by that time on postoperative atrial fibrillation using logistic regression. A secondary matched analysis compared 3,198 patients who resumed ß blockers on the day of surgery with 3,198 who resumed thereafter. RESULTS: Of propensity score-matched patients who resumed ß blockers by end of postoperative day 1, 4.9% (94 of 1,924) developed atrial fibrillation, compared with 7.0% (68 of 973) of those who resumed thereafter (adjusted odds ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50-0.95; P = 0.026). Patients who resumed ß blockers on day of surgery had an atrial fibrillation incidence of 4.9% versus 5.8% for those who started thereafter (odds ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.67-1.04; P = 0.104). CONCLUSIONS: Resuming ß blockers in chronic users by the end of the first postoperative day may be associated with lower odds of in-hospital atrial fibrillation. However, there seems to be little advantage to restarting on the day of surgery itself.


Assuntos
Antagonistas Adrenérgicos beta/uso terapêutico , Fibrilação Atrial/prevenção & controle , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/prevenção & controle , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios , Idoso , Fibrilação Atrial/epidemiologia , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Pontuação de Propensão , Estudos Retrospectivos
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