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1.
Clin Pharmacol Ther ; 2021 Jan 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33405238

RESUMO

Inhibition of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) represents an emerging pharmaceutical approach for the treatment of heart failure. The mechanisms by which SGLT2 inhibitors reduce the risk of heart failure are not well understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the SLC5A2 gene, encoding SGLT2, and heart failure, and to assess potential mediators of this association. Regression and mediation analyses were conducted with individual participant data of the UK Biobank (n = 416,737) and validated in the cardiovascular high-risk cohort of the LUdwigshafen RIsk and Cardiovascular Health study (LURIC; n = 3316). Two intronic SNPs associated with SLC5A2 expression were included in a genetic score, which was associated with lower risk of heart failure in UK Biobank (odds ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval, 0.95-0.99, P = 0.016). This association was also present in participants without type 2 diabetes or coronary artery disease (CAD). The associations of the genetic score with HbA1c, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, uric acid, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and body composition mediated 35% of the effect of the score on heart failure risk. No associations of the genetic SGLT2 score with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease outcomes or markers of volume status were observed, which was confirmed in the LURIC study. Variations in the gene encoding SGLT2 were associated with the risk of prevalent or incident heart failure. This association was mediated by several mechanisms and did not depend on the presence of type 2 diabetes or previous CAD events.

2.
Diabetologia ; 2021 Jan 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33495845

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Our aim was to investigate the relationship between average blood glucose levels and incident CHD in individuals without diabetes mellitus. METHODS: To investigate average blood glucose levels, we studied HbA1c as predicted by 40 variants previously shown to be associated with both type 2 diabetes and HbA1c. Linear and non-linear Mendelian randomisation analyses were performed to investigate associations with incident CHD risk in 324,830 European ancestry individuals from the UK Biobank without diabetes mellitus. RESULTS: Every one mmol/mol increase in genetically proxied HbA1c was associated with an 11% higher CHD risk (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05, 1.18). The dose-response curve increased at all levels of HbA1c, and there was no evidence favouring a non-linear relationship over a linear one. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS: In individuals without diabetes mellitus, lowering average blood glucose levels may reduce CHD risk in a dose-dependent way.

3.
BMC Med ; 18(1): 370, 2020 Dec 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33261611

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Observational studies have shown that milk consumption is inversely associated with colorectal, bladder, and breast cancer risk, but positively associated with prostate cancer. However, whether the associations reflect causality remains debatable. We investigated the potential causal associations of milk consumption with the risk of colorectal, bladder, breast, and prostate cancer using a genetic variant near the LCT gene as proxy for milk consumption. METHODS: We obtained genetic association estimates for cancer from the UK Biobank (n = 367,643 women and men), FinnGen consortium (n = 135,638 women and men), Breast Cancer Association Consortium (n = 228,951 women), and Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome consortium (n = 140,254 men). Milk consumption was proxied by a genetic variant (rs4988235 or rs182549) upstream of the gene encoding lactase, which catalyzes the breakdown of lactose. RESULTS: Genetically proxied milk consumption was associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer. The odds ratio (OR) for each additional milk intake increasing allele was 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-0.99; P = 0.009). There was no overall association of genetically predicted milk consumption with bladder (OR 0.99; 95% CI 0.94-1.05; P = 0.836), breast (OR 1.01; 95% CI 1.00-1.02; P = 0.113), and prostate cancer (OR 1.01; 95% CI 0.99-1.02; P = 0.389), but a positive association with prostate cancer was observed in the FinnGen consortium (OR 1.07; 95% CI 1.01-1.13; P = 0.026). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings strengthen the evidence for a protective role of milk consumption on colorectal cancer risk. There was no or limited evidence that milk consumption affects the risk of bladder, breast, and prostate cancer.

4.
Clin Nutr ; 2020 Nov 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33199044

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Arachidonic acid (AA) is metabolized by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases to pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, which according to experimental research modulate tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. We employed the Mendelian randomization design to test the hypothesis that higher plasma phospholipid AA concentrations are associated with increased risk of 10 site-specific cancers. METHODS: Two genetic variants associated with plasma phospholipid concentrations of AA (rs174547 in FADS1 [P = 3.0 × 10-971] and rs16966952 in PDXDC1 [P = 2.4 × 10-10]) in the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium were used as genetic instruments. The associations of those variants with cancer were taken from the UK Biobank (n = 367,643), FinnGen consortium (n = 135,638), International Lung Cancer Consortium (n = 27,209), Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome consortium (n = 140,254), Breast Cancer Association Consortium (n = 228,951), Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (n = 66,450), and BioBank Japan (n = 212,453). RESULTS: Higher genetically predicted plasma phospholipid AA concentrations were associated with increased risk of colorectal and lung cancer. Results were consistent across data sources and variants. The combined odds ratios per standard deviation increase of AA concentrations were 1.08 (95% CI 1.05-1.11; P = 6.3 × 10-8) for colorectal cancer and 1.07 (95%CI 1.05-1.10; P = 3.5 × 10-7) for lung cancer. Genetically predicted AA concentrations had a suggestive positive association with esophageal cancer (odds ratio 1.09; 95% CI 1.02-1.17; P = 0.016) but were not associated with cancers of the stomach, pancreas, bladder, prostate, breast, uterus, or ovary. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that AA may be implicated in the development of colorectal and lung cancer and possibly esophageal cancer. Treatments with plasma AA-lowering properties should be evaluated for clinical benefit.

6.
Elife ; 92020 10 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33046214

RESUMO

Laboratory studies have suggested oncogenic roles of lipids, as well as anticarcinogenic effects of statins. Here we assess the potential effect of statin therapy on cancer risk using evidence from human genetics. We obtained associations of lipid-related genetic variants with the risk of overall and 22 site-specific cancers for 367,703 individuals in the UK Biobank. In total, 75,037 individuals had a cancer event. Variants in the HMGCR gene region, which represent proxies for statin treatment, were associated with overall cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] per one standard deviation decrease in low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65-0.88, p=0.0003) but variants in gene regions representing alternative lipid-lowering treatment targets (PCSK9, LDLR, NPC1L1, APOC3, LPL) were not. Genetically predicted LDL-cholesterol was not associated with overall cancer risk (OR per standard deviation increase 1.01, 95% CI 0.98-1.05, p=0.50). Our results predict that statins reduce cancer risk but other lipid-lowering treatments do not. This suggests that statins reduce cancer risk through a cholesterol independent pathway.

7.
Int J Cancer ; 2020 Sep 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32895918

RESUMO

Studies of sleep duration in relation to the risk of site-specific cancers other than breast cancer are scarce. Furthermore, the available results are inconclusive and the causality remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the potential causal associations of sleep duration with overall and site-specific cancers using the Mendelian randomization (MR) design. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with the sleep traits identified from a genome-wide association study were used as instrumental variables to estimate the association with overall cancer and 22 site-specific cancers among 367 586 UK Biobank participants. A replication analysis was performed using data from the FinnGen consortium (up to 121 579 individuals). There was suggestive evidence that genetic liability to short-sleep duration was associated with higher odds of cancers of the stomach (odds ratio [OR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-4.30; P = .018), pancreas (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.32-3.62; P = .002) and colorectum (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.12-1.95; P = .006), but with lower odds of multiple myeloma (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.22-0.99; P = .047). Suggestive evidence of association of genetic liability to long-sleep duration with lower odds of pancreatic cancer (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.25-0.79; P = .005) and kidney cancer (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.21-0.90; P = .025) was observed. However, none of these associations passed the multiple comparison threshold and two-sample MR analysis using FinnGen data did not confirm these findings. In conclusion, this MR study does not provide strong evidence to support causal associations of sleep duration with risk of overall and site-specific cancers. Further MR studies are required.

8.
Bioinformatics ; 2020 Sep 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32915962

RESUMO

MOTIVATION: Mendelian randomization is an epidemiological technique that uses genetic variants as instrumental variables to estimate the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome. We consider a scenario in which causal estimates based on each variant in turn differ more strongly than expected by chance alone, but the variants can be divided into distinct clusters, such that all variants in the cluster have similar causal estimates. This scenario is likely to occur when there are several distinct causal mechanisms by which a risk factor influences an outcome with different magnitudes of causal effect. We have developed an algorithm MR-Clust that finds such clusters of variants, and so can identify variants that reflect distinct causal mechanisms. Two features of our clustering algorithm are that it accounts for differential uncertainty in the causal estimates, and it includes 'null' and 'junk' clusters, to provide protection against the detection of spurious clusters. RESULTS: Our algorithm correctly detected the number of clusters in a simulation analysis, outperforming methods that either do not account for uncertainty or do not include null and junk clusters. In an applied example considering the effect of blood pressure on coronary artery disease risk, the method detected four clusters of genetic variants. A post hoc hypothesis-generating search suggested that variants in the cluster with a negative effect of blood pressure on coronary artery disease risk were more strongly related to trunk fat percentage and other adiposity measures than variants not in this cluster. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: MR-Clust can be downloaded from https://github.com/cnfoley/mrclust. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

10.
EBioMedicine ; 59: 102956, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32805626

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors are used in the treatment of certain autoimmune diseases but given the role of TNF in tumour biology and atherosclerosis, such therapies may influence the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease. We conducted a Mendelian randomization study to explore whether TNF levels are causally related to cardiovascular disease and cancer. METHODS: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with TNF levels at genome-wide significance were identified from a genome-wide association study of 30 912 European-ancestry individuals. Three TNF-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with higher risk of autoimmune diseases were used as instrumental variables. Summary-level data for 14 cardiovascular diseases, overall cancer and 14 site-specific cancers were obtained from UK Biobank and consortia. FINDINGS: Genetically-predicted TNF levels were positively associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio (OR) 2.25; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50, 3.37) and ischaemic stroke (OR 2.27; 95% CI 1.50, 3.43), and inversely associated with overall cancer (OR 0.54; 95% CI 0.42, 0.69), breast cancer (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.39, 0.67), and colorectal cancer (OR 0.20; 95% CI 0.09, 0.45). There were suggestive associations of TNF with venous thromboembolism (OR 2.18; 95% CI 1.32, 3.59), endometrial cancer (OR 0.25; 95% CI 0.07, 0.94), and lung cancer (OR 0.45; 95% CI 0.21, 0.94). INTERPRETATION: This study found evidence of causal associations of increased TNF levels with higher risk of common cardiovascular diseases and lower risk of overall and certain cancers.

12.
Cancer Med ; 9(18): 6836-6842, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32717139

RESUMO

Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is involved in several processes relevant to carcinogenesis. We used 416 single-nucleotide polymorphisms robustly associated with serum IGF-1 levels to assess the potential causal associations between this hormone and site-specific cancers through Mendelian randomization. Summary-level genetic association estimates for prostate, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer were obtained from large-scale consortia including individuals of European-descent. Furthermore, we estimated genetic associations with 14 site-specific cancers in European-descent individuals in UK Biobank. Supplementary analyses were conducted for six site-specific cancers using summary-level data from the BioBank Japan Project. Genetically predicted serum IGF-1 levels were associated with colorectal cancer. The odds ratio (OR) per standard deviation increase of IGF-1 levels was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.22; P = .03) in UK Biobank and 1.22 (95% CI 1.09-1.36; P = 3.9 × 10-4 ) in the BioBank Japan Project. For prostate cancer, the corresponding OR was 1.10 (95% CI 1.01-1.21; P = .04) in UK Biobank, 1.03 (95% CI 0.97-1.09; P = .41) in the prostate cancer consortium, and 1.08 (95% CI 0.95-1.22; P = .24) in the BioBank Japan Project. For breast cancer, the corresponding OR was 0.99 (95% CI 0.92-1.07; P = .85) in UK Biobank and 1.08 (95% CI 1.02-1.13; P = 4.4 × 10-3 ) in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. There was no statistically significant association between genetically predicted IGF-1 levels and 14 other cancers. This study found some support for a causal association between elevated serum IGF-1 levels and increased risk of colorectal cancer. There was inconclusive or no evidence of a causal association of IGF-1 levels with prostate, breast, and other cancers.

13.
PLoS Med ; 17(7): e1003178, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32701947

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Smoking is a well-established cause of lung cancer and there is strong evidence that smoking also increases the risk of several other cancers. Alcohol consumption has been inconsistently associated with cancer risk in observational studies. This mendelian randomisation (MR) study sought to investigate associations in support of a causal relationship between smoking and alcohol consumption and 19 site-specific cancers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used summary-level data for genetic variants associated with smoking initiation (ever smoked regularly) and alcohol consumption, and the corresponding associations with lung, breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer from genome-wide association studies consortia, including participants of European ancestry. We additionally estimated genetic associations with 19 site-specific cancers among 367,643 individuals of European descent in UK Biobank who were 37 to 73 years of age when recruited from 2006 to 2010. Associations were considered statistically significant at a Bonferroni corrected p-value below 0.0013. Genetic predisposition to smoking initiation was associated with statistically significant higher odds of lung cancer in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (odds ratio [OR] 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.59-2.03; p = 2.26 × 10-21) and UK Biobank (OR 2.26; 95% CI 1.92-2.65; p = 1.17 × 10-22). Additionally, genetic predisposition to smoking was associated with statistically significant higher odds of cancer of the oesophagus (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.34-2.49; p = 1.31 × 10-4), cervix (OR 1.55; 95% CI 1.27-1.88; p = 1.24 × 10-5), and bladder (OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.92-2.65; p = 9.40 × 10-5) and with statistically nonsignificant higher odds of head and neck (OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.13-1.74; p = 0.002) and stomach cancer (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.05-2.03; p = 0.024). In contrast, there was an inverse association between genetic predisposition to smoking and prostate cancer in the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome consortium (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.83-0.98; p = 0.011) and in UK Biobank (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.80-1.02; p = 0.104), but the associations did not reach statistical significance. We found no statistically significant association between genetically predicted alcohol consumption and overall cancer (n = 75,037 cases; OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.84-1.07; p = 0.376). Genetically predicted alcohol consumption was statistically significantly associated with lung cancer in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.41-2.68; p = 4.68 × 10-5) but not in UK Biobank (OR 1.12; 95% CI 0.65-1.93; p = 0.686). There was no statistically significant association between alcohol consumption and any other site-specific cancer. The main limitation of this study is that precision was low in some analyses, particularly for analyses of alcohol consumption and site-specific cancers. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the well-established relationship between smoking and lung cancer and suggest that smoking may also be a risk factor for cancer of the head and neck, oesophagus, stomach, cervix, and bladder. We found no evidence supporting a relationship between alcohol consumption and overall or site-specific cancer risk.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/genética , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana/métodos , Neoplasias/etiologia , Fumar/genética , Bancos de Espécimes Biológicos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Neoplasias/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Reino Unido
15.
Circ Genom Precis Med ; 13(3): e002814, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32367730

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The causal role of alcohol consumption for cardiovascular disease remains unclear. We used Mendelian randomization (MR) to predict the effect of alcohol consumption on 8 cardiovascular diseases. METHODS: Up to 94 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were used as instrumental variables for alcohol consumption. Genetic association estimates for cardiovascular diseases were obtained from large-scale consortia and UK Biobank. Analyses were conducted using the inverse variance-weighted, weighted median, MR-PRESSO, MR-Egger, and multivariable MR methods. RESULTS: Genetically predicted alcohol consumption was consistently associated with stroke and peripheral artery disease across the different analyses. The odds ratios (ORs) per 1-SD increase of log-transformed alcoholic drinks per week were 1.27 ([95% CI, 1.12-1.45] P=2.87×10-4) for stroke and 3.05 ([95% CI, 1.92-4.85] P=2.30×10-6) for peripheral artery disease in the inverse variance-weighted analysis. There was some evidence for positive associations of genetically predicted alcohol consumption with coronary artery disease (OR, 1.16 [95% CI, 1.00-1.36]; P=0.052), atrial fibrillation (OR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.00-1.37]; P=0.050), and abdominal aortic aneurysm (OR, 2.60 [95% CI, 1.15-5.89]; P=0.022) in the inverse variance-weighted analysis. These associations were somewhat attenuated in multivariable MR analysis adjusted for smoking initiation. There was no evidence of associations of genetically predicted alcohol consumption with heart failure (OR, 1.00 [95% CI, 0.68-1.47]; P=0.996), venous thromboembolism (OR, 1.04 [95% CI, 0.77-1.39]; P=0.810), and aortic valve stenosis (OR, 1.03 [95% CI, 0.56-1.90]; P=0.926). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence of a causal relationship between higher alcohol consumption and increased risk of stroke and peripheral artery disease. The causal role of alcohol consumption for other cardiovascular diseases requires further research.

16.
Diabetes ; 69(7): 1588-1596, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32349989

RESUMO

We conducted a two-sample Mendelian randomization study to investigate the causal associations of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with risk of overall cancer and 22 site-specific cancers. Summary-level data for cancer were extracted from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium and UK Biobank. Genetic predisposition to T2DM was associated with higher odds of pancreatic, kidney, uterine, and cervical cancer and lower odds of esophageal cancer and melanoma but not associated with 16 other site-specific cancers or overall cancer. The odds ratios (ORs) were 1.13 (95% CI 1.04, 1.22), 1.08 (1.00, 1.17), 1.08 (1.01, 1.15), 1.07 (1.01, 1.15), 0.89 (0.81, 0.98), and 0.93 (0.89, 0.97) for pancreatic, kidney, uterine, cervical, and esophageal cancer and melanoma, respectively. The association between T2DM and pancreatic cancer was also observed in a meta-analysis of this and a previous Mendelian randomization study (OR 1.08; 95% CI 1.02, 1.14; P = 0.009). There was limited evidence supporting causal associations between fasting glucose and cancer. Genetically predicted fasting insulin levels were positively associated with cancers of the uterus, kidney, pancreas, and lung. The current study found causal detrimental effects of T2DM on several cancers. We suggest reinforcing the cancer screening in T2DM patients to enable the early detection of cancer.

17.
Eur Heart J ; 41(35): 3304-3310, 2020 Sep 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32300774

RESUMO

AIMS: The aim of this study was to use Mendelian randomization (MR) to determine the causality of the association between smoking and 14 different cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). METHODS AND RESULTS: Our primary genetic instrument comprised 361 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with smoking initiation (ever smoked regularly) at genome-wide significance. Data on the associations between the SNPs and 14 CVDs were obtained from the UK Biobank study (N = 367 643 individuals), CARDIoGRAMplusC4D consortium (N = 184 305 individuals), Atrial Fibrillation Consortium (2017 dataset; N = 154 432 individuals), and Million Veteran Program (MVP; N = 190 266 individuals). The main analyses were conducted using the random-effects inverse-variance weighted method and complemented with multivariable MR analyses and the weighted median and MR-Egger approaches. Genetic predisposition to smoking initiation was most strongly and consistently associated with higher odds of coronary artery disease, heart failure, abdominal aortic aneurysm, ischaemic stroke, transient ischaemic attack, peripheral arterial disease, and arterial hypertension. Genetic predisposition to smoking initiation was additionally associated with higher odds of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in the UK Biobank but not with venous thromboembolism in the MVP. There was limited evidence of causal associations of smoking initiation with atrial fibrillation, aortic valve stenosis, thoracic aortic aneurysm, and intracerebral and subarachnoid haemorrhage. CONCLUSION: This MR study supports a causal association between smoking and a broad range of CVDs, in particular, coronary artery disease, heart failure, abdominal aortic aneurysm, ischaemic stroke, transient ischaemic attack, peripheral arterial disease, and arterial hypertension.

18.
Int J Cancer ; 147(7): 1895-1903, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32215913

RESUMO

Whether thyroid dysfunction plays a causal role in the development of cancer remains inconclusive. We conducted a two-sample Mendelian randomization study to investigate the associations between genetic predisposition to thyroid dysfunction and 22 site-specific cancers. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with four traits of thyroid function were selected from a genome-wide association meta-analysis with up to 72,167 European-descent individuals. Summary-level data for breast cancer and 21 other cancers were extracted from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (122,977 breast cancer cases and 105,974 controls) and UK Biobank (367,643 individuals). For breast cancer, a meta-analysis was performed using data from both sources. Genetically predicted thyroid dysfunction was associated with breast cancer, with similar patterns of associations in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium and UK Biobank. The combined odds ratios of breast cancer were 0.94 (0.91-0.98; p = 0.007) per genetically predicted one standard deviation increase in TSH levels, 0.96 (0.91-1.00; p = 0.053) for genetic predisposition to hypothyroidism, 1.04 (1.01-1.07; p = 0.005) for genetic predisposition to hyperthyroidism and 1.07 (1.02-1.12; p = 0.003) per genetically predicted one standard deviation increase in free thyroxine levels. Genetically predicted TSH levels and hypothyroidism were inversely with thyroid cancer; the odds ratios were 0.47 (0.30-0.73; p = 0.001) and 0.70 (0.51-0.98; p = 0.038), respectively. Our study provides evidence of a causal association between thyroid dysfunction and breast cancer (mainly ER-positive tumors) risk. The role of TSH and hypothyroidism for thyroid cancer and the associations between thyroid dysfunction and other cancers need further exploration.

19.
Nutrients ; 12(2)2020 Feb 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32092884

RESUMO

We conducted a two-sample Mendelian randomization study to explore the associations of iron status with overall cancer and 22 site-specific cancers. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms for iron status were obtained from a genome-wide association study of 48,972 European-descent individuals. Summary-level data for breast and other cancers were obtained from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium and UK Biobank. Genetically predicted iron status was positively associated with liver cancer and inversely associated with brain cancer but not associated with overall cancer or the other 20 studied cancer sites at p < 0.05. The odds ratios of liver cancer were 2.45 (95% CI, 0.81, 7.45; p = 0.11), 2.11 (1.16, 3.83; p = 0.02), 10.89 (2.44, 48.59; p = 0.002) and 0.30 (0.17, 0.53; p = 2 × 10-5) for one standard deviation increment of serum iron, transferrin saturation, ferritin and transferrin levels, respectively. For brain cancer, the corresponding odds ratios were 0.69 (0.48, 1.00; p = 0.05), 0.75 (0.59, 0.97; p = 0.03), 0.41 (0.20, 0.88; p = 0.02) and 1.49 (1.04, 2.14; p = 0.03). Genetically high iron status was positively associated with liver cancer and inversely associated with brain cancer.

20.
Mol Psychiatry ; 25(7): 1477-1486, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30886334

RESUMO

While comorbidity between coronary heart disease (CHD) and depression is evident, it is unclear whether the two diseases have shared underlying mechanisms. We performed a range of analyses in 367,703 unrelated middle-aged participants of European ancestry from UK Biobank, a population-based cohort study, to assess whether comorbidity is primarily due to genetic or environmental factors, and to test whether cardiovascular risk factors and CHD are likely to be causally related to depression using Mendelian randomization. We showed family history of heart disease was associated with a 20% increase in depression risk (95% confidence interval [CI] 16-24%, p < 0.0001), but a genetic risk score that is strongly associated with CHD risk was not associated with depression. An increase of 1 standard deviation in the CHD genetic risk score was associated with 71% higher CHD risk, but 1% higher depression risk (95% CI 0-3%; p = 0.11). Mendelian randomization analyses suggested that triglycerides, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) are likely causal risk factors for depression. The odds ratio for depression per standard deviation increase in genetically-predicted triglycerides was 1.18 (95% CI 1.09-1.27; p = 2 × 10-5); per unit increase in genetically-predicted log-transformed IL-6 was 0.74 (95% CI 0.62-0.89; p = 0.0012); and per unit increase in genetically-predicted log-transformed CRP was 1.18 (95% CI 1.07-1.29; p = 0.0009). Our analyses suggest that comorbidity between depression and CHD arises largely from shared environmental factors. IL-6, CRP and triglycerides are likely to be causally linked with depression, so could be targets for treatment and prevention of depression.

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