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1.
Pancreas ; 2022 Jul 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35877149

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: A minimally invasive step-up (MIS) approach for management of necrotizing pancreatitis (NP) has been associated with reduced morbidity and mortality compared with open surgical techniques. We sought to evaluate bleeding complications in NP patients treated with a MIS approach and to describe the management and outcomes of these events. METHODS: An observational, cohort study was performed using a prospectively maintained NP database at a tertiary referral center from 2013 to 2019. RESULTS: Of 119 NP patients, 13% suffering bleeding events, and 18% underwent an intervention. There was a 6-fold higher mortality rate in patients with bleeding events (n = 3; 18.8%) compared with those without (n = 3; 2.9%) (P = 0.031). The most common intervention for hemorrhage control was endovascular coil embolization (75%), which was successful 88% of the time. Seven patients underwent prophylactic vascular intervention, which was 100% successful in preventing bleeding events from the embolized vessel. CONCLUSIONS: Bleeding events in NP patients treated with a MIS approach are associated with a 6-fold increase in mortality. Endovascular intervention is an effective strategy for the management of bleeding events. Prophylactic embolization may be an effective technique for reducing bleeding complications.

2.
J Intensive Care Med ; : 8850666221094506, 2022 Apr 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35437045

RESUMO

Objective: To determine whether the outcomes of postoperative patients admitted directly to an intensive care unit (ICU) differ based on the academic status of the institution and the total operative volume of the unit. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis using the eICU Collaborative Research Database v2.0, a national database from participating ICUs in the United States. All patients admitted directly to the ICU from the operating room were included. Transfer patients and patients readmitted to the ICU were excluded. Patients were stratified based on admission to an ICU in an academic medical center (AMC) versus non-AMC, and to ICUs with different operative volume experience, after stratification in quartiles (high, medium-high, medium-low, and low volume). Primary outcomes were ICU and hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included the need for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) during ICU stay, ICU length of stay (LOS), and 30-day ventilator free days. Results: Our analysis included 22,180 unique patients; the majority of which (15,085[68%]) were admitted to ICUs in non-AMCs. Cardiac and vascular procedures were the most common types of procedures performed. Patients admitted to AMCs were more likely to be younger and less likely to be Hispanic or Asian. Multivariable logistic regression indicated no meaningful association between academic status and ICU mortality, hospital mortality, initiation of CRRT, duration of ICU LOS, or 30-day ventilator-free-days. Contrarily, medium-high operative volume units had higher ICU mortality (OR = 1.45, 95%CI = 1.10-1.91, p-value = 0.040), higher hospital mortality (OR = 1.33, 95%CI = 1.07-1.66, p-value = 0.033), longer ICU LOS (Coefficient = 0.23, 95%CI = 0.07-0.39, p-value = 0.038), and fewer 30-day ventilator-free-days (Coefficient = -0.30, 95%CI = -0.48 - -0.13, p-value = 0.015) compared to their high operative volume counterparts. Conclusions: This study found that a volume-outcome association in the management of postoperative patients requiring ICU level of care immediately after a surgical procedure may exist. The academic status of the institution did not affect the outcomes of these patients.

3.
Am Surg ; 88(6): 1054-1058, 2022 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35465697

RESUMO

As hospital systems plan for health care utilization surges and stress, understanding the necessary resources of a trauma system is essential for planning capacity. We aimed to describe trends in high-intensity resource utilization (operating room [OR] usage and intensive care unit [ICU] admissions) for trauma care during the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Trauma registry data (2019 pre-COVID-19 and 2020 COVID-19) were collected retrospectively from 4 level I trauma centers. Direct emergency department (ED) disposition to the OR or ICU was used as a proxy for high-intensity resource utilization. No change in the incidence of direct ED to ICU or ED to OR utilization was observed (2019: 24%, 2020 23%; P = .62 and 2019: 11%, 2020 10%; P = .71, respectively). These results suggest the need for continued access to ICU space and OR theaters for traumatic injury during national health emergencies, even when levels of trauma appear to be decreasing.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Pandemias , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Humanos , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Estudos Retrospectivos , Centros de Traumatologia
4.
Surgery ; 172(1): 470-475, 2022 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35489978

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Delays in admitting high-risk emergency surgery patients to the intensive care unit result in worse outcomes and increased health care costs. We aimed to use interpretable artificial intelligence technology to create a preoperative predictor for postoperative intensive care unit need in emergency surgery patients. METHODS: A novel, interpretable artificial intelligence technology called optimal classification trees was leveraged in an 80:20 train:test split of adult emergency surgery patients in the 2007-2017 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Demographics, comorbidities, and laboratory values were used to develop, train, and then validate optimal classification tree algorithms to predict the need for postoperative intensive care unit admission. The latter was defined as postoperative death or the development of 1 or more postoperative complications warranting critical care (eg, unplanned intubation, ventilator requirement ≥48 hours, cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and septic shock). An interactive and user-friendly application was created. C statistics were used to measure performance. RESULTS: A total of 464,861 patients were included. The mean age was 55 years, 48% were male, and 11% developed severe postoperative complications warranting critical care. The Predictive OpTimal Trees in Emergency Surgery Risk Intensive Care Unit application was created as the user-friendly interface of the complex optimal classification tree algorithms. The number of questions (ie, tree depths) needed to predict intensive care unit admission ranged from 2 to 11. The Predictive OpTimal Trees in Emergency Surgery Risk Intensive Care Unit application had excellent discrimination for predicting the need for intensive care unit admission (C statistics: 0.89 train, 0.88 test). CONCLUSION: We recommend the Predictive OpTimal Trees in Emergency Surgery Risk Intensive Care Unit application as an accurate, artificial intelligence-based tool for predicting severe complications warranting intensive care unit admission after emergency surgery. The Predictive OpTimal Trees in Emergency Surgery Risk Intensive Care Unit application can prove useful to triage patients to the intensive care unit and to potentially decrease failure to rescue in emergency surgery patients.


Assuntos
Inteligência Artificial , Smartphone , Adulto , Cuidados Críticos , Feminino , Humanos , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos
5.
Injury ; 53(6): 1979-1986, 2022 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35232568

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Results from single-region studies suggest that stay at home orders (SAHOs) had unforeseen consequences on the volume and patterns of traumatic injury during the initial months of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this study was to describe, using a multi-regional approach, the effects of COVID-19 SAHOs on trauma volume and patterns of traumatic injury in the US. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was performed at four verified Level I trauma centers spanning three geographical regions across the United States (US). The study period spanned from April 1, 2020 - July 31, 2020 including a month-matched 2019 cohort. Patients were categorized into pre-COVID-19 (PCOV19) and first COVID-19 surge (FCOV19S) cohorts. Patient demographic, injury, and outcome data were collected via Trauma Registry queries. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS: A total 5,616 patients presented to participating study centers during the PCOV19 (2,916) and FCOV19S (2,700) study periods.  Blunt injury volume decreased (p = 0.006) due to a significant reduction in the number of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) (p = 0.003). Penetrating trauma experienced a significant increase, 8% (246/2916) in 2019 to 11% (285/2,700) in 2020 (p = 0.007), which was associated with study site (p = 0.002), not SAHOs. Finally, study site was significantly associated with changes in nearly all injury mechanisms, whereas SAHOs accounted for observed decreases in calculated weekly averages of blunt injuries (p < 0.02) and MVCs (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Results of this study suggest that COVID-19 and initial SAHOs had variable consequences on patterns of traumatic injury, and that region-specific shifts in traumatic injury ensued during initial SAHOs. These results suggest that other factors, potentially socioeconomic or cultural, confound trauma volumes and types arising from SAHOs. Future analyses must consider how regional changes may be obscured with pooled cohorts, and focus on characterizing community-level changes to aid municipal preparation for future similar events.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Ferimentos Penetrantes , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias , Estudos Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2 , Centros de Traumatologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Ferimentos Penetrantes/epidemiologia
7.
J Surg Res ; 269: 94-102, 2022 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34537533

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Balanced blood product transfusion improves the outcomes of trauma patients with exsanguinating hemorrhage, but it remains unclear whether administering cryoprecipitate improves mortality. We aimed to examine the impact of early cryoprecipitate transfusion on the outcomes of the trauma patients needing massive transfusion (MT). METHODS: All MT patients 18 years or older in the 2017 Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) were retrospectively reviewed. MT was defined as the transfusion of ≥10 units of blood within 24 hours. Propensity score analysis (PSA) was used to 1:1 match then compare patients who received and those who did not receive cryoprecipitate in the first 4 hours after injury. Outcomes included in-hospital mortality, 1-day mortality, in-hospital complications and transfusion needs at 24 hours. RESULTS: Of 1,004,440 trauma patients, 1,454 MT patients received cryoprecipitate and 2,920 did not. After PSA, 877 patients receiving cryoprecipitate were matched to 877 patients who did not. In-hospital mortality was lower among patients who received cryoprecipitate (49.4% v. 54.9%, P = 0.022), as was 1-day mortality. Sub-analyses showed that mortality was lower with cryoprecipitate in patients with penetrating (37.5% versus. 48%, adjusted P = 0.008), but not blunt trauma (58.5% versus. 59.8%, adjusted P = 1.000). In penetrating trauma, the cryoprecipitate group also had lower 1-day mortality (21.8% versus. 38.6%, P <0.001) and a higher rate of hemorrhage control surgeries performed within 24 hours (71.4% versus. 63.3%, P = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: Cryoprecipitate in MT is associated with improved survival in penetrating, but not blunt, trauma. Randomized trials are needed to better define the role of cryoprecipitate in MT.


Assuntos
Ferimentos e Lesões , Ferimentos não Penetrantes , Ferimentos Penetrantes , Transfusão de Sangue , Hemorragia/complicações , Hemorragia/terapia , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Centros de Traumatologia , Ferimentos e Lesões/complicações , Ferimentos não Penetrantes/complicações , Ferimentos não Penetrantes/terapia , Ferimentos Penetrantes/complicações , Ferimentos Penetrantes/terapia
8.
J Surg Res ; 270: 178-186, 2022 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34688989

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients with limited English proficiency have barriers to accessing care. Rather than a binary use or no use, this study uses granular data on frequency of interpreting services to determine if this frequency is associated with differences in peri-operative length of stay for patients with limited English proficiency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross sectional study on length of stay for peri-operative admissions of at least one night during 2018, for patients who used medical interpreting services in an academic medical center in Boston, Massachusetts. The participants are split into quartiles of ascending number of interpreting events per day. The exposure for the primary outcome is the frequency of interpreting events per day during peri-operative admission. The primary study outcome measurement is peri-operative length of stay in days. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant decrease in length of stay for patients in the highest two quartiles of interpreting service frequency, compared to the lowest quartile: quartile 2 trended shorter by 1.4 d (95% CI -4.5 to 1.7, P = 0.37), quartile 3 was 4.2 d shorter (95% CI -7.6 to -0.7, P = 0.02), and quartile 4 was 4.6 d shorter (95% CI -8.1 to -1.1, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: More frequent interpreting services per day during peri-operative admission are associated with shorter length of stay in adjusted analysis. The findings merit further study in an intervention to increase use of interpreting services for surgical patients with limited English proficiency to study the impact of increased frequency of culturally competent care.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente , Hospitalização , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Massachusetts
9.
JPRAS Open ; 31: 22-28, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34869817

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols are effective at reducing inpatient opiate use. There is a paucity of studies on the effects of an ERAS protocol on outpatient opiate prescriptions. The aim of this study was to determine whether an ERAS protocol for plastic and reconstructive surgery would reduce opiate use in the outpatient postoperative setting. METHODS: A statewide (Massachusetts, USA) controlled substance prescription monitoring database was retrospectively reviewed to assess the prescribing patterns of a single academic plastic surgeon performing common plastic surgical outpatient operations. The time period prior to implementation of the ERAS protocol was then compared with the time period following protocol implementation. An additional three months of post-implementation data were then compared with those of each of the previous time periods to investigate whether the results were sustained. RESULTS: A comparison of opiate prescriptions in pre-ERAS, immediate post-ERAS procedures, and follow-up ERAS implementation procedures revealed a statistically significant decrease in opiate prescriptions after ERAS protocol implementation. This decrease in the quantity of opiates prescribed was sustained over time . CONCLUSIONS: ERAS protocols are effective at reducing outpatient opiate prescriptions after a variety of plastic surgery operations. Appropriate patient and physician education is paramount for success.

10.
Surgery ; 171(6): 1687-1694, 2022 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34955288

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Trauma Outcomes Predictor tool was recently derived using a machine learning methodology called optimal classification trees and validated for prediction of outcomes in trauma patients. The Trauma Outcomes Predictor is available as an interactive smartphone application. In this study, we sought to assess the performance of the Trauma Outcomes Predictor in the elderly trauma patient. METHODS: All patients aged 65 years and older in the American College of Surgeons-Trauma Quality Improvement Program 2017 database were included. The performance of the Trauma Outcomes Predictor in predicting in-hospital mortality and combined and specific morbidity based on incidence of 9 specific in-hospital complications was assessed using the c-statistic methodology, with planned subanalyses for patients 65 to 74, 75 to 84, and 85+ years. RESULTS: A total of 260,505 patients were included. Median age was 77 (71-84) years, 57% were women, and 98.8% had a blunt mechanism of injury. The Trauma Outcomes Predictor accurately predicted mortality in all patients, with excellent performance for penetrating trauma (c-statistic: 0.92) and good performance for blunt trauma (c-statistic: 0.83). Its best performance was in patients 65 to 74 years (c-statistic: blunt 0.86, penetrating 0.93). Among blunt trauma patients, the Trauma Outcomes Predictor had the best discrimination for predicting acute respiratory distress syndrome (c-statistic 0.75) and cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (c-statistic 0.75). Among penetrating trauma patients, the Trauma Outcomes Predictor had the best discrimination for deep and organ space surgical site infections (c-statistics 0.95 and 0.84, respectively). CONCLUSION: The Trauma Outcomes Predictor is a novel, interpretable, and highly accurate predictor of in-hospital mortality in the elderly trauma patient up to age 85 years. The Trauma Outcomes Predictor could prove useful for bedside counseling of elderly patients and their families and for benchmarking the quality of geriatric trauma care.


Assuntos
Ferimentos não Penetrantes , Ferimentos Penetrantes , Idoso , Inteligência Artificial , Benchmarking , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Escala de Gravidade do Ferimento , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Ferimentos Penetrantes/cirurgia
11.
Ann Surg ; 2021 Dec 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34913899

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To characterize the rates and variability in substance screening among adult trauma patients in the U.S. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Emergency Department trauma visits provide a unique opportunity to identify patients with substance use disorders. Despite the existence of screening guidelines, underscreening and variability in screening practices remain. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study including adult trauma patients (18-64-year-old) from the ACS-TQIP 2017-18 database. Multivariable logistic regressions were performed to adjust for demographics, clinical, and facility factors, and marginal probabilities were calculated using these multivariable models. The primary outcomes were substance screening and positivity, which were defined relative to the observation-weighted grand mean. RESULTS: 2,048,176 patients were contained in the TQIP dataset, 809,878 (39.5%) were screened for alcohol (20.8% positive), and 617,129 (30.1%) were screened for drugs (37.3% positive). After all exclusion criteria were applied, 765,897 patients were included in the analysis, 394,391 (52.9%) were screened for alcohol (22.1% tested positive), and 279,531 (36.5%) were screened for drugs (44.3% tested positive). Among the patients included in our study, significant variability in screening rates existed with respect to demographic, trauma mechanism, injury severity, and facility factors. Furthermore, in several cases, patient subpopulations who were less likely to be screened were in fact more likely to screen positive or vice versa. CONCLUSIONS: Effective substance screening guidelines should be predicated on achieving universal screening. Current lapses in screening, along with the observed variability likely affect different patient populations in disparate manners and lead to both under-detection as well as waste of valuable resources.

12.
J Surg Res ; 268: 643-649, 2021 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34474213

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Language barriers can limit access to care for patients with a non-English primary language (NEPL). The objective of this study was to define the association between primary language and emergency versus elective surgery among diverticulitis patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of adult patients from the 2009-2014 New Jersey State Inpatient Database. Patients were included if they had primary language data and underwent a partial colon resection for diverticulitis. Primary language was dichotomized into NEPL versus English primary language (EPL). The primary outcome was surgical admission type - urgent/emergent (referred to as "emergency") versus elective. Descriptive and multivariable analyses were performed. RESULTS: A total of 9,453 patients underwent surgery for diverticulitis, of which 592 (6.3%) had NEPL. Among NEPL patients, 300 (51%) had Spanish as primary language and 292 (49%) had another non-Spanish primary language. Patients with NEPL and EPL were similar in age (median age 58 versus 59 years; P = 0.54) and sex (52% versus 53% female; P = 0.45). Patients with NEPL were less likely to have commercial insurance (45% versus 59%; P <0.001). On multivariable analysis, compared to patients with EPL, NEPL was associated with increased odds of emergency surgery for diverticulitis (OR 1.35; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13-1.62; P = 0.001) CONCLUSION: Patients with NEPL have higher odds of emergency versus elective surgery for diverticulitis compared to patients with EPL. Further research is needed to examine differences in referral pathways, patient-provider communication, and health literacy that may hinder access to elective surgery in patients with diverticulitis.


Assuntos
Diverticulite , Idioma , Adulto , Colectomia , Diverticulite/cirurgia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Eletivos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos
13.
Surg Infect (Larchmt) ; 22(6): 626-634, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34270361

RESUMO

Background: The use of machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) in medical research continues to grow as the amount and availability of clinical data expands. These techniques allow complex interpretation of data and capture non-linear relations not immediately apparent by classic statistical techniques. Methods: This review of the ML/AI literature provides a brief overview for practicing surgeons and clinicians of the current and future roles these methods will have within surgical infection research. Results: A conceptual overview of the techniques is provided along with concrete examples in the surgical infections literature. Further examples of ML/AI techniques in clinical decision support as well as therapy discovery with model-based deep reinforcement learning are illustrated. Conclusions: Artificial intelligence and ML are important and increasingly utilized techniques within the expanding body of surgical infection research. This article provides a minimal baseline literacy in ML/AI to be able to view such projects in an appropriately critical fashion.


Assuntos
Inteligência Artificial , Tomada de Decisões , Aprendizado de Máquina , Cirurgiões/psicologia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios/tendências , Difusão de Inovações , Humanos , Cirurgia Assistida por Computador
14.
Ann Surg ; 2021 Jul 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34225295

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to compare discharge opioid prescriptions pre- and post-Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) implementation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: ERAS programs decrease inpatient opioid use, but their relationship with post-discharge opioids remains unclear. METHODS: All patients undergoing hysterectomy between October 2016-November 2020 and pancreatectomy or hepatectomy between April 2017-November 2020 at one tertiary care center were included. For each procedure, ERAS was implemented during the study period. Propensity-score matching (PSM) was performed to compare pre- vs. post-ERAS patients on discharge opioids (number of pills and oral morphine equivalents [OME]). Patients were matched on age, gender, race, payor, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, prior opioid use, and procedure. Sensitivity analyses in open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS) cohorts were performed. RESULTS: 3,983 patients were included (1929 pre-ERAS; 2054 post-ERAS). Post-ERAS patients were younger (56.0 vs. 58.4 years; p<0.001), more often female (95.8% vs. 78.1%; p<0.001), less often white (77.2% vs. 82.0%; p<0.001), less often had prior opioid use (20.1% vs. 28.1%; p<0.001), and more often underwent hysterectomy (91.1% vs. 55.7%; p<0.001). After PSM, there were no significant differences between cohorts in baseline characteristics. Matched post-ERAS patients were prescribed fewer opioid pills (17.4 pills vs. 22.0 pills; p<0.001) and lower OMEs (129.4 mg vs. 167.6 mg; p<0.001) than pre-ERAS patients. Sensitivity analyses confirmed these findings [Open (18.8 pills vs. 25.4 pills; p<0.001 | 138.9 mg vs. 198.7 mg; p<0.001); MIS (17.2 pills vs. 21.1 pills; p<0.001 | 127.1 mg vs. 160.1 mg; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Post-ERAS patients were prescribed significantly fewer opioids at discharge compared to matched pre-ERAS patients.

15.
J Surg Res ; 266: 35-43, 2021 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33975028

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Bedside experience and studies of critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) indicate COVID-19 to be a devastating multisystem disease. We aim to describe the incidence, associated variables, and outcomes of rhabdomyolysis in critically ill COVID-19 patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data for all critically ill adult patients (≥18 years old) admitted to the ICU at a large academic medical center with confirmed COVID-19 between March 13, 2020 and April 18, 2020 were prospectively collected. Patients with serum creatine kinase (CK) concentrations greater than 1000 U/L were diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis. Patients were further stratified as having moderate (serum CK concentration 1000-4999 U/L) or severe (serum CK concentration ≥5000 U/L) rhabdomyolysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify outcomes and variables associated with the development of rhabdomyolysis. RESULTS: Of 235 critically ill COVID-19 patients, 114 (48.5%) met diagnostic criteria for rhabdomyolysis. Patients with rhabdomyolysis more often required mechanical ventilation (P < 0.001), prone positioning (P < 0.001), pharmacological paralysis (P < 0.001), renal replacement therapy (P = 0.010), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) (P = 0.025). They also had longer median ICU length of stay (LOS) (P < 0.001) and hospital LOS (P < 0.001). No difference in mortality was observed. Male sex, patients with morbid obesity, SOFA score, and prone positioning were independently associated with rhabdomyolysis. CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of critically ill COVID-19 patients in our cohort met diagnostic criteria for rhabdomyolysis. Male sex, morbid obesity, SOFA score, and prone position were independently associated with rhabdomyolysis.


Assuntos
COVID-19/complicações , Obesidade Mórbida/epidemiologia , Rabdomiólise/epidemiologia , Idoso , Índice de Massa Corporal , COVID-19/diagnóstico , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/virologia , Comorbidade , Creatina Quinase/sangue , Estado Terminal , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Incidência , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva/estatística & dados numéricos , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade Mórbida/complicações , Obesidade Mórbida/diagnóstico , Escores de Disfunção Orgânica , Decúbito Ventral , Estudos Prospectivos , Rabdomiólise/sangue , Rabdomiólise/diagnóstico , Rabdomiólise/etiologia , Medição de Risco/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2/isolamento & purificação , Fatores Sexuais
16.
Am J Surg ; 222(3): 492-498, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33840445

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Our aim was to examine differences in clinical outcomes between Hispanic subgroups who underwent emergency general surgery (EGS). METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of the HCUP State Inpatient Database from New Jersey (2009-2014), including Hispanic and non-Hispanic White (NHW) adult patients who underwent EGS. Multivariable analyses were performed on outcomes including 7-day readmission and length of stay (LOS). RESULTS: 125,874 patients underwent EGS operations. 22,971 were Hispanic (15,488 with subgroup defined: 7,331 - Central/South American; 4,254 - Puerto Rican; 3,170 - Mexican; 733 - Cuban). On multivariable analysis, patients in the Central/South American subgroup were more likely to be readmitted compared to the Mexican subgroup (OR 2.02; p < 0.001, respectively). Puerto Rican and Central/South American subgroups had significantly shorter LOS than Mexican patients (Puerto Rico -0.58 days; p < 0.001; Central/South American -0.30 days; p = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: There are significant differences in EGS outcomes between Hispanic subgroups. These differences could be missed when data are aggregated at Hispanic ethnicity.


Assuntos
Tratamento de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , América Central/etnologia , Cuba/etnologia , Bases de Dados Factuais , Tratamento de Emergência/mortalidade , Feminino , Cirurgia Geral/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , México/etnologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , New Jersey , Readmissão do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Porto Rico/etnologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , América do Sul/etnologia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios/mortalidade
17.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 90(5): 880-890, 2021 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33891572

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We sought to describe characteristics, multisystem outcomes, and predictors of mortality of the critically ill COVID-19 patients in the largest hospital in Massachusetts. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study. All patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection between March 14, 2020, and April 28, 2020, were included; hospital and multisystem outcomes were evaluated. Data were collected from electronic records. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined as PaO2/FiO2 ratio of ≤300 during admission and bilateral radiographic pulmonary opacities. Multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusting for available confounders were performed to identify predictors of mortality. RESULTS: A total of 235 patients were included. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score was 5 (3-8), and the median (IQR) PaO2/FiO2 was 208 (146-300) with 86.4% of patients meeting criteria for ARDS. The median (IQR) follow-up was 92 (86-99) days, and the median ICU length of stay was 16 (8-25) days; 62.1% of patients were proned, 49.8% required neuromuscular blockade, and 3.4% required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The most common complications were shock (88.9%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (69.8%), secondary bacterial pneumonia (70.6%), and pressure ulcers (51.1%). As of July 8, 2020, 175 patients (74.5%) were discharged alive (61.7% to skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility), 58 (24.7%) died in the hospital, and only 2 patients were still hospitalized, but out of the ICU. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.12), higher median Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at ICU admission (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06-1.43), elevated creatine kinase of ≥1,000 U/L at hospital admission (OR, 6.64; 95% CI, 1.51-29.17), and severe ARDS (OR, 5.24; 95% CI, 1.18-23.29) independently predicted hospital mortality.Comorbidities, steroids, and hydroxychloroquine treatment did not predict mortality. CONCLUSION: We present here the outcomes of critically ill patients with COVID-19. Age, acuity of disease, and severe ARDS predicted mortality rather than comorbidities. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic, level III.


Assuntos
COVID-19/complicações , COVID-19/mortalidade , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Gravidade do Paciente , Injúria Renal Aguda/virologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Antimaláricos/uso terapêutico , Boston/epidemiologia , COVID-19/fisiopatologia , COVID-19/terapia , Comorbidade , Creatina Quinase/sangue , Cuidados Críticos , Estado Terminal , Oxigenação por Membrana Extracorpórea , Feminino , Gastroenteropatias/virologia , Humanos , Hidroxicloroquina/uso terapêutico , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Bloqueio Neuromuscular , Escores de Disfunção Orgânica , Pneumonia Bacteriana/virologia , Lesão por Pressão/etiologia , Decúbito Ventral , Estudos Prospectivos , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório/fisiopatologia , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório/virologia , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2 , Choque/virologia , Esteroides/uso terapêutico , Taxa de Sobrevida , Tromboembolia/virologia , Resultado do Tratamento
18.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 91(1): 93-99, 2021 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33755641

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Classic risk assessment tools often treat patients' risk factors as linear and additive. Clinical reality suggests that the presence of certain risk factors can alter the impact of other factors; in other words, risk modeling is not linear. We aimed to use artificial intelligence (AI) technology to design and validate a nonlinear risk calculator for trauma patients. METHODS: A novel, interpretable AI technology called Optimal Classification Trees (OCTs) was used in an 80:20 derivation/validation split of the 2010 to 2016 American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program database. Demographics, emergency department vital signs, comorbidities, and injury characteristics (e.g., severity, mechanism) of all blunt and penetrating trauma patients 18 years or older were used to develop, train then validate OCT algorithms to predict in-hospital mortality and complications (e.g., acute kidney injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, sepsis). A smartphone application was created as the algorithm's interactive and user-friendly interface. Performance was measured using the c-statistic methodology. RESULTS: A total of 934,053 patients were included (747,249 derivation; 186,804 validation). The median age was 51 years, 37% were women, 90.5% had blunt trauma, and the median Injury Severity Score was 11. Comprehensive OCT algorithms were developed for blunt and penetrating trauma, and the interactive smartphone application, Trauma Outcome Predictor (TOP) was created, where the answer to one question unfolds the subsequent one. Trauma Outcome Predictor accurately predicted mortality in penetrating injury (c-statistics: 0.95 derivation, 0.94 validation) and blunt injury (c-statistics: 0.89 derivation, 0.88 validation). The validation c-statistics for predicting complications ranged between 0.69 and 0.84. CONCLUSION: We suggest TOP as an AI-based, interpretable, accurate, and nonlinear risk calculator for predicting outcome in trauma patients. Trauma Outcome Predictor can prove useful for bedside counseling of critically injured trauma patients and their families, and for benchmarking the quality of trauma care.


Assuntos
Inteligência Artificial , Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Smartphone , Ferimentos não Penetrantes/mortalidade , Ferimentos Penetrantes/mortalidade , Adulto , Idoso , Bases de Dados Factuais , Emergências , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Escala de Gravidade do Ferimento , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Medição de Risco/métodos , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
19.
J Surg Res ; 264: A1-A9, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33743995

RESUMO

Artificial intelligence (AI) has made increasing inroads in clinical medicine. In surgery, machine learning-based algorithms are being studied for use as decision aids in risk prediction and even for intraoperative applications, including image recognition and video analysis. While AI has great promise in surgery, these algorithms come with a series of potential pitfalls that cannot be ignored as hospital systems and surgeons consider implementing these technologies. The aim of this review is to discuss the progress, promise, and pitfalls of AI in surgery.


Assuntos
Cirurgia Geral/métodos , Aprendizado de Máquina/tendências , Tomada de Decisão Clínica/métodos , Cirurgia Geral/tendências , Humanos , Medição de Risco/métodos
20.
J Am Coll Surg ; 232(6): 912-919.e1, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33705983

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Predictive Optimal Trees in Emergency Surgery Risk (POTTER) tool is an artificial intelligence-based calculator for the prediction of 30-day outcomes in patients undergoing emergency operations. In this study, we sought to assess the performance of POTTER in the emergency general surgery (EGS) population in particular. METHODS: All patients who underwent EGS in the 2017 American College of Surgeons NSQIP database were included. The performance of POTTER in predicting 30-day postoperative mortality, morbidity, and 18 specific complications was assessed using the c-statistic metric. As a subgroup analysis, the performance of POTTER in predicting the outcomes of patients undergoing emergency laparotomy was assessed. RESULTS: A total of 59,955 patients were included. Median age was 50 years and 51.3% were women. POTTER predicted mortality (c-statistic = 0.93) and morbidity (c-statistic = 0.83) extremely well. Among individual complications, POTTER had the highest performance in predicting septic shock (c-statistic = 0.93), respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation for 48 hours or longer (c-statistic = 0.92), and acute renal failure (c-statistic = 0.92). Among patients undergoing emergency laparotomy, the c-statistic performances of POTTER in predicting mortality and morbidity were 0.86 and 0.77, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: POTTER is an interpretable, accurate, and user-friendly predictor of 30-day outcomes in patients undergoing EGS. POTTER could prove useful for bedside counseling of patients and their families and for benchmarking of EGS care.


Assuntos
Inteligência Artificial , Benchmarking/métodos , Tratamento de Emergência/efeitos adversos , Laparotomia/efeitos adversos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Benchmarking/estatística & dados numéricos , Bases de Dados Factuais/estatística & dados numéricos , Árvores de Decisões , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos , Tratamento de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Laparotomia/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Medição de Risco/métodos , Medição de Risco/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Risco
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