Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 160
Filtrar
1.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 8(1)2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34819323

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by exacerbations of respiratory disease, frequently requiring hospital admission. Pulmonary rehabilitation can reduce the likelihood of future hospitalisation, but programme uptake is poor. This study aims to compare hospital readmission rates, clinical outcomes and costs between people with COPD who undertake a home-based programme of pulmonary rehabilitation commenced early (within 2 weeks) of hospital discharge with usual care. METHODS: A multisite randomised controlled trial, powered for superiority, will be conducted in Australia. Eligible patients admitted to one of the participating sites for an exacerbation of COPD will be invited to participate. Participants will be randomised 1:1. Intervention group participants will undertake an 8-week programme of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation commencing within 2 weeks of hospital discharge. Control group participants will receive usual care and a weekly phone call for attention control. Outcomes will be measured by a blinded assessor at baseline, after the intervention (week 9-10 posthospital discharge), and at 12 months follow-up. The primary outcome is hospital readmission at 12 months follow-up. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Human Research Ethics approval for all sites provided by Alfred Health (Project 51216). Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and lay publications. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12619001122145.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34774618

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Asthma epidemics associated with thunderstorms have had catastrophic impacts on individuals and emergency services. Seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) is present in the vast majority of people who develop thunderstorm asthma (TA), but there is little evidence regarding risk factors for TA among the SAR population. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify risk factors for a history of TA and hospital presentation in a cohort of individuals with SAR. METHODS: This multi-centre study recruited adults from Melbourne (Australia) with a past diagnosis of TA and/or self-reported SAR. Clinical information, spirometry, white blood-cell count, ryegrass pollen specific IgE (RGP-spIgE) and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) were measured to identify risk factors for a history of TA in individuals with SAR. RESULTS: From a total of 228 individuals with SAR, 35% (80/228) reported SAR only (I-SAR), 37% (84/228) reported TA symptoms but had not attended hospital for treatment (O-TA) and 28% (64/228) had presented to hospital for TA (H-TA). All H-TA patients reported a previous asthma diagnosis. Logistic regression analysis of factors associated with O-TA and H-TA indicated that lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and asthma control questionnaire (ACQ) score >1.5 were associated with H-TA. Higher blood RGP-spIgE, eosinophil counts, and FeNO were significantly associated with both O-TA and H-TA. Receiver-operating curve (ROC) analysis showed RGP-spIgE >10·1 kU/L and pre-bronchodilator FEV1 ≤90% to be biomarkers of increased H-TA risk. CONCLUSION: Clinical tests can identify risk for a history of TA in individuals with SAR and thereby inform patient-specific treatment recommendations.

3.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 361, 2021 Nov 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34758808

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Interstitial lung disease is a debilitating condition associated with significant dyspnoea, fatigue, and poor exercise tolerance. Pulmonary rehabilitation is an effective and key intervention in people with interstitial lung disease. However, despite the best efforts of patients and clinicians, many of those who participate are not achieving clinically meaningful benefits. This assessor-blinded, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial aims to compare the clinical benefits of high intensity interval exercise training versus the standard pulmonary rehabilitation method of continuous training at moderate intensity in people with fibrotic interstitial lung disease. METHODS: Eligible participants will be randomised to either a standard pulmonary rehabilitation group using moderate intensity continuous exercise training or high intensity interval exercise training. Participants in both groups will undertake an 8-week pulmonary rehabilitation program of twice-weekly supervised exercise training including aerobic (cycling) and strengthening exercises. In addition, participants in both groups will be prescribed a home exercise program. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, upon completion of the intervention and at six months following the intervention by a blinded assessor. The primary outcome is endurance time on a constant work rate test. Secondary outcomes are functional capacity (6-min walk distance), health-related quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ), St George's Respiratory Questionnaire idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis specific version (SGRQ-I), breathlessness (Dyspnoea 12, Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale), fatigue (fatigue severity scale), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), physical activity level (GeneActiv), skeletal muscle changes (ultrasonography) and completion and adherence to pulmonary rehabilitation. DISCUSSION: The standard exercise training strategies used in pulmonary rehabilitation may not provide an optimal exercise training stimulus for people with interstitial lung disease. This study will determine whether high intensity interval training can produce equivalent or even superior changes in exercise performance and symptoms. If high intensity interval training proves effective, it will provide an exercise training strategy that can readily be implemented into clinical practice for people with interstitial lung disease. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Registry (NCT03800914). Registered 11 January 2019, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03800914 Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12619000019101. Registered 9 January 2019, https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=376050&isReview=true.

4.
Thorax ; 2021 Oct 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34650004

RESUMO

RATIONALE: Pulmonary rehabilitation is an effective treatment for people with chronic respiratory disease but is delivered to <5% of eligible individuals. This study investigated whether home-based telerehabilitation was equivalent to centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation in people with chronic respiratory disease. METHODS: A multicentre randomised controlled trial with assessor blinding, powered for equivalence was undertaken. Individuals with a chronic respiratory disease referred to pulmonary rehabilitation at four participating sites (one rural) were eligible and randomised using concealed allocation to pulmonary rehabilitation or telerehabilitation. Both programmes were two times per week for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was change in Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire Dyspnoea (CRQ-D) domain at end-rehabilitation, with a prespecified equivalence margin of 2.5 points. Follow-up was at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, symptoms, self-efficacy and psychological well-being. RESULTS: 142 participants were randomised to pulmonary rehabilitation or telerehabilitation with 96% and 97% included in the intention-to-treat analysis, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups for any outcome at either time point. Both groups achieved meaningful improvement in dyspnoea and exercise capacity at end-rehabilitation. However, we were unable to confirm equivalence of telerehabilitation for the primary outcome ΔCRQ-D at end-rehabilitation (mean difference (MD) (95% CI) -1 point (-3 to 1)), and inferiority of telerehabilitation could not be excluded at either time point (12-month follow-up: MD -1 point (95% CI -4 to 1)). At end-rehabilitation, telerehabilitation demonstrated equivalence for 6-minute walk distance (MD -6 m, 95% CI -26 to 15) with possibly superiority of telerehabilitation at 12 months (MD 14 m, 95% CI -10 to 38). CONCLUSION: telerehabilitation may not be equivalent to centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation for all outcomes, but is safe and achieves clinically meaningful benefits. When centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation is not available, telerehabilitation may provide an alternative programme model. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACtelerehabilitationN12616000360415.

5.
Pharmacol Ther ; : 108017, 2021 Oct 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34626675

RESUMO

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major incurable global health burden and currently the 3rd largest cause of death in the world, with approximately 3.23 million deaths per year. Globally, the financial burden of COPD is approximately €82 billion per year and causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Importantly, much of the disease burden and health care utilisation in COPD is associated with the management of its comorbidities and viral and bacterial-induced acute exacerbations (AECOPD). Recent clinical studies have shown that cognitive dysfunction is present in up to 60% of people with COPD, with impairments in executive function, memory, and attention, impacting on important outcomes such as quality of life, hospitalisation and survival. The high prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in COPD may also help explain the insufficient adherence to therapeutic plans and strategies, thus worsening disease progression in people with COPD. However, the mechanisms underlying the impaired neuropathology and cognition in COPD remain largely unknown. In this review, we propose that the observed pulmonary oxidative burden and inflammatory response of people with COPD 'spills over' into the systemic circulation, resulting in damage to the brain and leading to cognitive dysfunction. As such, drugs targeting the lungs and comorbidities concurrently represent an exciting and unique therapeutic opportunity to treat COPD and cognitive impairments, which may lead to the production of novel targets to prevent and reverse the debilitating and life-threatening effects of cognitive dysfunction in COPD.

7.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(9): JC98, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34487451

RESUMO

SOURCE CITATION: Qaseem A, Etxeandia-Ikobaltzeta I, Fitterman N, et al. Appropriate use of high-flow nasal oxygen in hospitalized patients for initial or postextubation management of acute respiratory failure: a clinical guideline from the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2021;174:977-84. 33900796.


Assuntos
Ventilação não Invasiva , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório , Insuficiência Respiratória , Humanos , Oxigênio , Insuficiência Respiratória/terapia
8.
Intern Med J ; 51(8): 1324-1327, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34423548

RESUMO

Pulmonary embolus (PE) is a known complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The diagnosis of PE in our hospitalised patients with COVID-19 correlated with more severe disease and occurred despite the use of routine thromboprophylaxis. Higher D-dimers were seen on admission in patients who developed PE and rose at PE diagnosis, suggesting a role for D-dimer in risk stratification.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Embolia Pulmonar , Tromboembolia Venosa , Anticoagulantes , Austrália/epidemiologia , COVID-19/complicações , Produtos de Degradação da Fibrina e do Fibrinogênio , Humanos , Embolia Pulmonar/diagnóstico por imagem , Embolia Pulmonar/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Tromboembolia Venosa/diagnóstico por imagem , Tromboembolia Venosa/epidemiologia
10.
Chest ; 2021 Aug 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34390709

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Domiciliary oxygen therapy (DOT) is a complex intervention and has significant impact on patients' daily activities, quality of life, and mental well-being. Suitable education is pertinent in improving patients' understanding and use of DOT, because those receiving appropriate education have a better knowledge of their prescription, clearer expectations, and improved adherence to DOT. RESEARCH QUESTION: Do currently available online patient resources on DOT provide high-quality information for patients? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We evaluated the first 100 results of three major search engines (Google, Yahoo, and Bing) using the terms home oxygen therapy and information or education. Website content was assessed based on Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand and British Thoracic Society domiciliary oxygen guidelines. Validated tools were used to evaluate resource quality (DISCERN instrument), suitability (Suitability Assessment of Materials [SAM]), reliability (Journal of the American Medical Association [JAMA] benchmarks and the Health on the Net [HON] code], and readability (Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level). RESULTS: Thirty-six websites met study inclusion criteria. Websites from foundation or advocacy organizations scored the highest in quality and suitability, with a median DISCERN total score of 48.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 43.5-60.0), or fair, and a median SAM suitability score of 70% (IQR, 53.0%-71.0%), or superior. Industry or for-profit websites had the best content score of 7.8 (IQR, 5.0-8.6). The HON accreditation seal was present on 14% of the websites, and only five websites met the four JAMA benchmarks. The median readability scores exceeded the recommended reading grades of sixth to eighth level for consumer health-related educational resources. INTERPRETATION: The overall quality, suitability, reliability, and content of online health resources for DOT are of a low to moderate standard, with the reading grade at an unsuitable level for the general population. Health professionals should be aware of the limitations of currently available online DOT patient resources.

11.
COPD ; 18(5): 533-540, 2021 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34424802

RESUMO

Little is known regarding community participation in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to explore community participation in individuals with COPD and to determine whether there is an association between community participation and activity-related outcome variables commonly collected during pulmonary rehabilitation assessment. We also sought to investigate which of these variables might influence community participation in people with COPD. Ninety-nine individuals with COPD were enrolled (67 ± 9 years, FEV1: 55 ± 22% predicted). We assessed community participation (Community Participation Indicator (CPI) and European Social Survey (ESS) for formal and informal community participation), daily physical activity levels (activity monitor), exercise capacity (6-minute walk test), breathlessness (Modified Medical Research Council, MMRC scale), self-efficacy (Pulmonary Rehabilitation Adapted Index of Self-Efficacy) and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Higher levels of community participation on the CPI were associated with older age and greater levels of physical activity (total, light and moderate-to-vigorous) (all rs = 0.30, p < 0.05). Older age and more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity independently predicted greater community participation measured by CPI. Higher levels of depression symptoms were associated with less formal and informal community participation on ESS (rs = -0.25). More formal community participation on ESS was weakly (rs = 0.2-0.3) associated with older age, better lung function, exercise capacity and self-efficacy, and less breathlessness. Self-efficacy, exercise capacity, and age independently predicted formal community participation in individuals with COPD. Strategies to optimize self-efficacy and improve exercise capacity may be useful to enhance community participation in people with COPD.

12.
COPD ; 18(3): 281-287, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34060968

RESUMO

The "contingent valuation" method is used to quantify the value of services not available in traditional markets, by assessing the monetary value an individual ascribes to the benefit provided by an intervention. The aim of this study was to determine preferences for home or center-based pulmonary rehabilitation for participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using the "willingness to pay" (WTP) approach, the most widely used technique to elicit strengths of individual preferences. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled equivalence trial comparing center-based and home-based pulmonary rehabilitation. At their final session, participants were asked to nominate the maximum that they would be willing to pay to undertake home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in preference to a center-based program. Regression analyses were used to investigate relationships between participant features and WTP values. Data were available for 141/163 eligible study participants (mean age 69 [SD 10] years, n = 82 female). In order to undertake home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in preference to a conventional center-based program, participants were willing to pay was mean $AUD176 (SD 255) (median $83 [IQR 0 to 244]). No significant difference for WTP values was observed between groups (p = 0.98). A WTP value above zero was related to home ownership (odds ratio [OR] 2.95, p = 0.02) and worse baseline SF-36 physical component score (OR 0.94, p = 0.02). This preliminary evidence for WTP in the context of pulmonary rehabilitation indicated the need for further exploration of preferences for treatment location in people with COPD to inform new models of service delivery.

14.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 549, 2021 03 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33743642

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although it is known that winter inclusive of the Christmas holiday period is associated with an increased risk of dying compared to other times of the year, very few studies have specifically examined this phenomenon within a population cohort subject to baseline profiling and prospective follow-up. In such a cohort, we sought to determine the specific characteristics of mortality occuring during the Christmas holidays. METHODS: Baseline profiling and outcome data were derived from a prospective population-based cohort with longitudinal follow-up in Central Norway - the Trøndelag Health (HUNT) Study. From 1984 to 1986, 88% of the target population comprising 39,273 men and 40,353 women aged 48 ± 18 and 50 ± 18 years, respectively, were profiled. We examined the long-term pattern of mortality to determine the number of excess (all-cause and cause-specific) deaths that occurred during winter overall and, more specifically, the Christmas holidays. RESULTS: During 33.5 (IQR 17.1-34.4) years follow-up, 19,879 (50.7%) men and 19,316 (49.3%) women died at age-adjusted rate of 5.3 and 4.6 deaths per 1000/annum, respectively. Overall, 1540 (95% CI 43-45 deaths/season) more all-cause deaths occurred in winter (December to February) versus summer (June to August), with 735 (95% CI 20-22 deaths per season) of these cardiovascular-related. December 25th-27th was the deadliest 3-day period of the year; being associated with 138 (95% CI 96-147) and 102 (95% CI 72-132) excess all-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths, respectively. Accordingly, compared to 1st-21st December (equivalent winter conditions), the incidence rate ratio of all-cause mortality increased to 1.22 (95% CI 1.16-1.27) and 1.17 (95% 1.11-1.22) in men and women, respectively, during the next 21 days (Christmas/New Year holidays). All observed differences were highly significant (P < 0.001). A less pronounced pattern of mortality due to respiratory illnesses (but not cancer) was also observed. CONCLUSION: Beyond a broader pattern of seasonally-linked mortality characterised by excess winter deaths, the deadliest time of year in Central Norway coincides with the Christmas holidays. During this time, the pattern and frequency of cardiovascular-related mortality changes markedly; contrasting with a more stable pattern of cancer-related mortality. Pending confirmation in other populations and climates, further research to determine if these excess deaths are preventable is warranted.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Causas de Morte , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Férias e Feriados , Humanos , Masculino , Mortalidade , Noruega/epidemiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6874, 2021 03 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33767311

RESUMO

Dyspnoea is a cardinal symptom of fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD), with a lack of proven effective therapies. With emerging evidence of the role of facial and nasal airflow for relieving breathlessness, this pilot study was conducted to examine the feasibility of conducting a clinical trial of a handheld fan (HHF) for dyspnoea management in patients with fibrotic ILD. In this mixed-methods, randomised, assessor-blinded, controlled trial, 30 participants with fibrotic ILD who were dyspnoeic with a modified Medical Research Council Dyspnoea grade ≥ 2 were randomised to a HHF for symptom control or no intervention for 2 weeks. Primary outcomes were trial feasibility, change in Dyspnoea-12 scores at Week 2, and participants' perspectives on using a HHF for dyspnoea management. Study recruitment was completed within nine months at a single site. Successful assessor blinding was achieved in the fan group [Bang's Blinding Index - 0.08 (95% CI - 0.45, 0.30)] but not the control group [0.47 (0.12, 0.81)]. There were no significant between-group differences for the change in Dyspnoea-12 or secondary efficacy outcomes. During qualitative interviews, participants reported that using the HHF relieved breathlessness and provided relaxation, despite initial scepticism about its therapeutic benefit. Oxygen-experienced participants described the HHF being easier to use, but not as effective for symptomatic relief, compared to oxygen therapy. Our results confirmed the feasibility of a clinical trial of a HHF in fibrotic ILD. There was a high level of patient acceptance of a HHF for managing dyspnoea, with patients reporting both symptomatic benefits and ease of use.


Assuntos
Dispneia/terapia , Doenças Pulmonares Intersticiais/complicações , Oxigenoterapia/instrumentação , Oxigenoterapia/métodos , Qualidade de Vida , Autogestão/métodos , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Dispneia/etiologia , Dispneia/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Projetos Piloto , Método Simples-Cego
16.
Eur Respir J ; 58(4)2021 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33737407

RESUMO

AIMS: Advanced nonmalignant respiratory diseases are associated with significant patient morbidity, yet access to palliative care occurs late, if at all. Our aim was to examine referral criteria for palliative care among patients with advanced nonmalignant respiratory disease, with a view to developing a standardised set of referral criteria. METHODS: We performed a systematic review of all studies reporting on referral criteria to palliative care in advanced nonmalignant respiratory disease, with a focus on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The systematic review was conducted and reported according to the PRISMA guidelines, and was undertaken using electronic databases (Ovid, MEDLINE, Ovid Embase and PubMed). RESULTS: Searches yielded 2052 unique titles, which were screened for eligibility and resulted in 62 studies addressing referral criteria to palliative care in advanced nonmalignant respiratory disease. Of 18 categories put forward for referral to palliative care, the most commonly discussed factors were hospital use (69% of papers), indicators of poor respiratory status (47%), physical and emotional symptoms (37%), functional decline (29%), need for advanced respiratory therapies (27%), and disease progression (26%). CONCLUSION: Clinicians consider referral to specialist palliative care for a wide range of disease- and needs-based criteria. Our findings highlight the need to standardise palliative care access by developing consensus referral criteria for patients with advanced nonmalignant respiratory illnesses.


Assuntos
Doenças Pulmonares Intersticiais , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica , Atenção à Saúde , Humanos , Cuidados Paliativos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia , Encaminhamento e Consulta
18.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 1: CD013040, 2021 01 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33511633

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pulmonary rehabilitation is a proven, effective intervention for people with chronic respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease (ILD) and bronchiectasis. However, relatively few people attend or complete a program, due to factors including a lack of programs, issues associated with travel and transport, and other health issues. Traditionally, pulmonary rehabilitation is delivered in-person on an outpatient basis at a hospital or other healthcare facility (referred to as centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation). Newer, alternative modes of pulmonary rehabilitation delivery include home-based models and the use of telehealth. Telerehabilitation is the delivery of rehabilitation services at a distance, using information and communication technology. To date, there has not been a comprehensive assessment of the clinical efficacy or safety of telerehabilitation, or its ability to improve uptake and access to rehabilitation services, for people with chronic respiratory disease. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of telerehabilitation for people with chronic respiratory disease. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Airways Trials Register, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; six databases including MEDLINE and Embase; and three trials registries, up to 30 November 2020. We checked reference lists of all included studies for additional references, and handsearched relevant respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials of telerehabilitation for the delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation were eligible for inclusion. The telerehabilitation intervention was required to include exercise training, with at least 50% of the rehabilitation intervention being delivered by telerehabilitation. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methods recommended by Cochrane. We assessed the risk of bias for all studies, and used the ROBINS-I tool to assess bias in non-randomised controlled clinical trials. We assessed the certainty of evidence with GRADE. Comparisons were telerehabilitation compared to traditional in-person (centre-based) pulmonary rehabilitation, and telerehabilitation compared to no rehabilitation. We analysed studies of telerehabilitation for maintenance rehabilitation separately from trials of telerehabilitation for initial primary pulmonary rehabilitation. MAIN RESULTS: We included a total of 15 studies (32 reports) with 1904 participants, using five different models of telerehabilitation. Almost all (99%) participants had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Three studies were controlled clinical trials. For primary pulmonary rehabilitation, there was probably little or no difference between telerehabilitation and in-person pulmonary rehabilitation for exercise capacity measured as 6-Minute Walking Distance (6MWD) (mean difference (MD) 0.06 metres (m), 95% confidence interval (CI) -10.82 m to 10.94 m; 556 participants; four studies; moderate-certainty evidence). There may also be little or no difference for quality of life measured with the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score (MD -1.26, 95% CI -3.97 to 1.45; 274 participants; two studies; low-certainty evidence), or for breathlessness on the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) dyspnoea domain score (MD 0.13, 95% CI -0.13 to 0.40; 426 participants; three studies; low-certainty evidence). Participants were more likely to complete a program of telerehabilitation, with a 93% completion rate (95% CI 90% to 96%), compared to a 70% completion rate for in-person rehabilitation. When compared to no rehabilitation control, trials of primary telerehabilitation may increase exercise capacity on 6MWD (MD 22.17 m, 95% CI -38.89 m to 83.23 m; 94 participants; two studies; low-certainty evidence) and may also increase 6MWD when delivered as maintenance rehabilitation (MD 78.1 m, 95% CI 49.6 m to 106.6 m; 209 participants; two studies; low-certainty evidence). No adverse effects of telerehabilitation were noted over and above any reported for in-person rehabilitation or no rehabilitation. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This review suggests that primary pulmonary rehabilitation, or maintenance rehabilitation, delivered via telerehabilitation for people with chronic respiratory disease achieves outcomes similar to those of traditional centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation, with no safety issues identified. However, the certainty of the evidence provided by this review is limited by the small number of studies, of varying telerehabilitation models, with relatively few participants. Future research should consider the clinical effect of telerehabilitation for individuals with chronic respiratory diseases other than COPD, the duration of benefit of telerehabilitation beyond the period of the intervention, and the economic cost of telerehabilitation.


Assuntos
Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/reabilitação , Transtornos Respiratórios/reabilitação , Telerreabilitação/métodos , Viés , Doença Crônica , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos , Dispneia/reabilitação , Tolerância ao Exercício/fisiologia , Humanos , Internet/estatística & dados numéricos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados não Aleatórios como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos , Cooperação do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Qualidade de Vida , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos , Telefone/estatística & dados numéricos , Telerreabilitação/estatística & dados numéricos , Comunicação por Videoconferência/estatística & dados numéricos , Teste de Caminhada/estatística & dados numéricos
20.
Braz J Phys Ther ; 25(1): 97-102, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32499168

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to determine, in Australian pulmonary rehabilitation programs for people with COPD: (1) whether oxygen saturation (SpO2) was monitored during exercise testing; (2) whether supplemental oxygen was available during exercise testing and/or training; (3) whether oxygen was prescribed during exercise training; and the reason for providing oxygen; (4) whether a protocol was available for supplemental oxygen prescription during exercise training. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional multi-center study using a purposed-designed survey. De-identified survey data were analyzed and the absolute number and percentage of responses were recorded for each question. RESULTS: The survey was sent to 261 pulmonary rehabilitation programs and 142 surveys (54%) were available for analysis. Oxygen saturation was monitored during exercise testing in 92% of programs. Supplemental oxygen was available in the majority of programs during exercise testing (82%) and training (84%). The rationale cited by 87 programs (73%) for prescribing oxygen during exercise training was maintaining SpO2 above a threshold ranging from SpO2 80-88%. Forty-five (32%) programs had a protocol for oxygen prescription during exercise training. CONCLUSION: While monitoring of SpO2 during exercise testing and using supplemental oxygen during testing and training is common in Australian pulmonary rehabilitation programs, few programs had a protocol in place for the prescription of supplemental oxygen for people with COPD who were not on long-term oxygen therapy. This may be due to lack of strong evidence to support the use of supplemental oxygen during exercise training.


Assuntos
Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/fisiopatologia , Austrália , Estudos Transversais , Teste de Esforço , Tolerância ao Exercício , Humanos , Oxigenoterapia , Qualidade de Vida
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...