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1.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(38)2021 09 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34479991

RESUMO

COVID-19 induces a robust, extended inflammatory "cytokine storm" that contributes to an increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Macrophages are a key innate immune cell population responsible for the cytokine storm that has been shown, in T2D, to promote excess inflammation in response to infection. Using peripheral monocytes and sera from human patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and a murine hepatitis coronavirus (MHV-A59) (an established murine model of SARS), we identified that coronavirus induces an increased Mφ-mediated inflammatory response due to a coronavirus-induced decrease in the histone methyltransferase, SETDB2. This decrease in SETDB2 upon coronavirus infection results in a decrease of the repressive trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3) at NFkB binding sites on inflammatory gene promoters, effectively increasing inflammation. Mφs isolated from mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of SETDB2 displayed increased pathologic inflammation following coronavirus infection. Further, IFNß directly regulates SETDB2 in Mφs via JaK1/STAT3 signaling, as blockade of this pathway altered SETDB2 and the inflammatory response to coronavirus infection. Importantly, we also found that loss of SETDB2 mediates an increased inflammatory response in diabetic Mϕs in response to coronavirus infection. Treatment of coronavirus-infected diabetic Mφs with IFNß reversed the inflammatory cytokine production via up-regulation of SETDB2/H3K9me3 on inflammatory gene promoters. Together, these results describe a potential mechanism for the increased Mφ-mediated cytokine storm in patients with T2D in response to COVID-19 and suggest that therapeutic targeting of the IFNß/SETDB2 axis in T2D patients may decrease pathologic inflammation associated with COVID-19.


Assuntos
Coronavirus/metabolismo , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/metabolismo , Histona-Lisina N-Metiltransferase/metabolismo , Mediadores da Inflamação/metabolismo , Inflamação/virologia , Macrófagos/metabolismo , Animais , COVID-19/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Síndrome da Liberação de Citocina , Citocinas/metabolismo , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Feminino , Histona-Lisina N-Metiltransferase/genética , Humanos , Inflamação/metabolismo , Inflamação/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , NF-kappa B/metabolismo , SARS-CoV-2/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais
2.
Semin Cell Dev Biol ; 119: 111-118, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34183242

RESUMO

Non-healing wounds in Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) patients represent the most common cause of amputation in the US, with an associated 5-year mortality of nearly 50%. Our lab has examined tissue from both T2D murine models and human wounds in order to explore mechanisms contributing to impaired wound healing. Current published data in the field point to macrophage function serving a pivotal role in orchestrating appropriate wound healing. Wound macrophages in mice and patients with T2D are characterized by a persistent inflammatory state; however, the mechanisms that control this persistent inflammatory state are unknown. Current literature demonstrates that gene regulation through histone modifications, DNA modifications, and microRNA can influence macrophage plasticity during wound healing. Further, accumulating studies reveal the importance of cells such as adipocytes, infiltrating immune cells (PMNs and T cells), and keratinocytes secrete factors that may help drive macrophage polarization. This review will examine the role of macrophages in the wound healing process, along with their function and interactions with other cells, and how it is perturbed in T2D. We also explore epigenetic factors that regulate macrophage polarization in wounds, while highlighting the emerging role of other cell types that may influence macrophage phenotype following tissue injury.

3.
J Exp Med ; 218(6)2021 06 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33779682

RESUMO

Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a life-threatening disease for which there is a lack of effective therapy preventing aortic rupture. During AAA formation, pathological vascular remodeling is driven by macrophage infiltration, and the mechanisms regulating macrophage-mediated inflammation remain undefined. Recent evidence suggests that an epigenetic enzyme, JMJD3, plays a critical role in establishing macrophage phenotype. Using single-cell RNA sequencing of human AAA tissues, we identified increased JMJD3 in aortic monocyte/macrophages resulting in up-regulation of an inflammatory immune response. Mechanistically, we report that interferon-ß regulates Jmjd3 expression via JAK/STAT and that JMJD3 induces NF-κB-mediated inflammatory gene transcription in infiltrating aortic macrophages. In vivo targeted inhibition of JMJD3 with myeloid-specific genetic depletion (JMJD3f/fLyz2Cre+) or pharmacological inhibition in the elastase or angiotensin II-induced AAA model preserved the repressive H3K27me3 on inflammatory gene promoters and markedly reduced AAA expansion and attenuated macrophage-mediated inflammation. Together, our findings suggest that cell-specific pharmacologic therapy targeting JMJD3 may be an effective intervention for AAA expansion.


Assuntos
Aneurisma da Aorta Abdominal/metabolismo , Histona Desmetilases/metabolismo , Histona Desmetilases com o Domínio Jumonji/metabolismo , Macrófagos/metabolismo , Angiotensina II/farmacologia , Animais , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Inflamação/metabolismo , Mediadores da Inflamação/metabolismo , Macrófagos/efeitos dos fármacos , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , NF-kappa B/metabolismo , Regulação para Cima/efeitos dos fármacos , Regulação para Cima/fisiologia
4.
JCI Insight ; 5(17)2020 09 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32879137

RESUMO

Macrophages are a primary immune cell involved in inflammation, and their cell plasticity allows for transition from an inflammatory to a reparative phenotype and is critical for normal tissue repair following injury. Evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play a critical role in establishing macrophage phenotype and function during normal and pathologic wound repair. Here, we find in human and murine wound macrophages that cyclooxygenase 2/prostaglandin E2 (COX-2/PGE2) is elevated in diabetes and regulates downstream macrophage-mediated inflammation and host defense. Using single-cell RNA sequencing of human wound tissue, we identify increased NF-κB-mediated inflammation in diabetic wounds and show increased COX-2/PGE2 in diabetic macrophages. Further, we identify that COX-2/PGE2 production in wound macrophages requires epigenetic regulation of 2 key enzymes in the cytosolic phospholipase A2/COX-2/PGE2 (cPLA2/COX-2/PGE2) pathway. We demonstrate that TGF-ß-induced miRNA29b increases COX-2/PGE2 production via inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 3b-mediated hypermethylation of the Cox-2 promoter. Further, we find mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) upregulates cPLA2 expression and drives COX-2/PGE2. Inhibition of the COX-2/PGE2 pathway genetically (Cox2fl/fl Lyz2Cre+) or with a macrophage-specific nanotherapy targeting COX-2 in tissue macrophages reverses the inflammatory macrophage phenotype and improves diabetic tissue repair. Our results indicate the epigenetically regulated PGE2 pathway controls wound macrophage function, and cell-targeted manipulation of this pathway is feasible to improve diabetic wound repair.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Experimental/fisiopatologia , Diabetes Mellitus/fisiopatologia , Dinoprostona/farmacologia , Epigênese Genética , Regulação da Expressão Gênica/efeitos dos fármacos , Inflamação/prevenção & controle , Macrófagos/efeitos dos fármacos , Cicatrização , Idoso , Animais , Ciclo-Oxigenase 2/metabolismo , Humanos , Inflamação/genética , Inflamação/imunologia , Inflamação/patologia , Macrófagos/metabolismo , Macrófagos/patologia , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Camundongos Knockout , NF-kappa B/metabolismo , Ocitócicos/farmacologia , Fenótipo , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/efeitos dos fármacos , Transdução de Sinais
5.
Eur J Immunol ; 50(12): 1929-1940, 2020 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32662520

RESUMO

Chronic macrophage inflammation is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and linked to the development of secondary diabetic complications. T2D is characterized by excess concentrations of saturated fatty acids (SFA) that activate innate immune inflammatory responses, however, mechanism(s) by which SFAs control inflammation is unknown. Using monocyte-macrophages isolated from human blood and murine models, we demonstrate that palmitate (C16:0), the most abundant circulating SFA in T2D, increases expression of the histone demethylase, Jmjd3. Upregulation of Jmjd3 results in removal of the repressive histone methylation (H3K27me3) mark on NFκB-mediated inflammatory gene promoters driving macrophage-mediated inflammation. We identify that the effects of palmitate are fatty acid specific, as laurate (C12:0) does not regulate Jmjd3 and the associated inflammatory profile. Further, palmitate-induced Jmjd3 expression is controlled via TLR4/MyD88-dependent signaling mechanism, where genetic depletion of TLR4 (Tlr4-/- ) or MyD88 (MyD88-/- ) negated the palmitate-induced changes in Jmjd3 and downstream NFκB-induced inflammation. Pharmacological inhibition of Jmjd3 using a small molecule inhibitor (GSK-J4) reduced macrophage inflammation and improved diabetic wound healing. Together, we conclude that palmitate contributes to the chronic Jmjd3-mediated activation of macrophages in diabetic peripheral tissue and a histone demethylase inhibitor-based therapy may represent a novel treatment for nonhealing diabetic wounds.


Assuntos
Histona Desmetilases/metabolismo , Histona Desmetilases com o Domínio Jumonji/metabolismo , Macrófagos/metabolismo , Palmitatos/metabolismo , Receptor 4 Toll-Like/metabolismo , Cicatrização/fisiologia , Animais , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Humanos , Inflamação/metabolismo , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Monócitos/metabolismo , NF-kappa B/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais/fisiologia , Regulação para Cima/fisiologia
6.
J Immunol ; 204(9): 2503-2513, 2020 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32205424

RESUMO

Macrophages are critical for the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory phase of wound healing. In diabetes, macrophages display a prolonged inflammatory phenotype preventing tissue repair. TLRs, particularly TLR4, have been shown to regulate myeloid-mediated inflammation in wounds. We examined macrophages isolated from wounds of patients afflicted with diabetes and healthy controls as well as a murine diabetic model demonstrating dynamic expression of TLR4 results in altered metabolic pathways in diabetic macrophages. Further, using a myeloid-specific mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) knockout (Mll1f/fLyz2Cre+ ), we determined that MLL1 drives Tlr4 expression in diabetic macrophages by regulating levels of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation on the Tlr4 promoter. Mechanistically, MLL1-mediated epigenetic alterations influence diabetic macrophage responsiveness to TLR4 stimulation and inhibit tissue repair. Pharmacological inhibition of the TLR4 pathway using a small molecule inhibitor (TAK-242) as well as genetic depletion of either Tlr4 (Tlr4-/- ) or myeloid-specific Tlr4 (Tlr4f/fLyz2Cre+) resulted in improved diabetic wound healing. These results define an important role for MLL1-mediated epigenetic regulation of TLR4 in pathologic diabetic wound repair and suggest a target for therapeutic manipulation.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/imunologia , Epigênese Genética/genética , Macrófagos/fisiologia , Receptor 4 Toll-Like/genética , Cicatrização/genética , Idoso , Animais , Epigênese Genética/imunologia , Feminino , Histonas/genética , Histonas/imunologia , Humanos , Inflamação/genética , Inflamação/imunologia , Mediadores da Inflamação/imunologia , Macrófagos/imunologia , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Camundongos Knockout , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteína de Leucina Linfoide-Mieloide/genética , Proteína de Leucina Linfoide-Mieloide/imunologia , Regiões Promotoras Genéticas/genética , Regiões Promotoras Genéticas/imunologia , Receptor 4 Toll-Like/imunologia , Cicatrização/imunologia
7.
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol ; 39(11): 2353-2366, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31644352

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Sepsis represents an acute life-threatening disorder resulting from a dysregulated host response. For patients who survive sepsis, there remains long-term consequences, including impaired inflammation, as a result of profound immunosuppression. The mechanisms involved in this long-lasting deficient immune response are poorly defined. Approach and Results: Sepsis was induced using the murine model of cecal ligation and puncture. Following a full recovery period from sepsis physiology, mice were subjected to our wound healing model and wound macrophages (CD11b+, CD3-, CD19-, Ly6G-) were sorted. Post-sepsis mice demonstrated impaired wound healing and decreased reepithelization in comparison to controls. Further, post-sepsis bone marrow-derived macrophages and wound macrophages exhibited decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines vital for wound repair (IL [interleukin]-1ß, IL-12, and IL-23). To evaluate if decreased inflammatory gene expression was secondary to epigenetic modification, we conducted chromatin immunoprecipitation on post-sepsis bone marrow-derived macrophages and wound macrophages. This demonstrated decreased expression of Mll1, an epigenetic enzyme, and impaired histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (activation mark) at NFκB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells)-binding sites on inflammatory gene promoters in bone marrow-derived macrophages and wound macrophages from postcecal ligation and puncture mice. Bone marrow transplantation studies demonstrated epigenetic modifications initiate in bone marrow progenitor/stem cells following sepsis resulting in lasting impairment in peripheral macrophage function. Importantly, human peripheral blood leukocytes from post-septic patients demonstrate a significant reduction in MLL1 compared with nonseptic controls. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that severe sepsis induces stable mixed-lineage leukemia 1-mediated epigenetic modifications in the bone marrow, which are passed to peripheral macrophages resulting in impaired macrophage function and deficient wound healing persisting long after sepsis recovery.


Assuntos
Epigênese Genética , Inflamação/fisiopatologia , Macrófagos/fisiologia , Sepse/genética , Sepse/fisiopatologia , Cicatrização/fisiologia , Animais , Células da Medula Óssea/fisiologia , Células Cultivadas , Citocinas/metabolismo , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Feminino , Histona-Lisina N-Metiltransferase/genética , Histonas/genética , Humanos , Tolerância Imunológica , Masculino , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Camundongos Endogâmicos , Proteína de Leucina Linfoide-Mieloide/genética , NF-kappa B/genética , Regiões Promotoras Genéticas , Sepse/metabolismo
8.
Viruses ; 7(6): 3035-52, 2015 Jun 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26075508

RESUMO

Interferon induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) found in vertebrates restrict infections by specific viruses. IFITM3 is known to be essential for restriction of influenza virus infections in both mice and humans. Vertebrate IFITMs are hypothesized to have derived from a horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to a primitive unicellular eukaryote. Since bacterial IFITMs share minimal amino acid identity with human IFITM3, we hypothesized that examination of bacterial IFITMs in human cells would provide insight into the essential characteristics necessary for antiviral activity of IFITMs. We examined IFITMs from Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium abscessus for potential antiviral activity. Both of these IFITMs conferred a moderate level of resistance to influenza virus in human cells, identifying them as functional homologues of IFITM3. Analysis of sequence elements shared by bacterial IFITMs and IFITM3 identified two hydrophobic domains, putative S-palmitoylation sites, and conserved phenylalanine residues associated with IFITM3 interactions, which are all necessary for IFITM3 antiviral activity. We observed that, like IFITM3, bacterial IFITMs were S-palmitoylated, albeit to a lesser degree. We also demonstrated the ability of a bacterial IFITM to co-immunoprecipitate with IFITM3 suggesting formation of a complex, and also visualized strong co-localization of bacterial IFITMs with IFITM3. However, the mycobacterial IFITMs lack the endocytic-targeting motif conserved in vertebrate IFITM3. As such, these bacterial proteins, when expressed alone, had diminished colocalization with cathepsin B-positive endolysosomal compartments that are the primary site of IFITM3-dependent influenza virus restriction. Though the precise evolutionary origin of vertebrate IFITMs is not known, our results support a model whereby transfer of a bacterial IFITM gene to eukaryotic cells may have provided a selective advantage against viral infection that was refined through the course of vertebrate evolution to include more robust signals for S-palmitoylation and localization to sites of endocytic virus trafficking.


Assuntos
Antivirais/metabolismo , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Expressão Gênica , Indutores de Interferon/metabolismo , Mycobacterium/imunologia , Orthomyxoviridae/imunologia , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Linhagem Celular , Sequência Conservada , Endossomos/química , Células Epiteliais/química , Células Epiteliais/imunologia , Células Epiteliais/virologia , Humanos , Lipoilação , Mycobacterium/genética , Processamento de Proteína Pós-Traducional , Transporte Proteico , Proteínas Recombinantes/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes/metabolismo , Homologia de Sequência de Aminoácidos
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