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1.
Braz. j. biol ; 83: e243910, 2023. tab, graf
Artigo em Inglês | LILACS-Express | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1278525

RESUMO

Abstract Nucleotide excision repair (NER) acts repairing damages in DNA, such as lesions caused by cisplatin. Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) protein is involved in recognition of global genome DNA damages during NER (GG-NER) and it has been studied in different organisms due to its importance in other cellular processes. In this work, we studied NER proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma evansi, parasites of humans and animals respectively. We performed three-dimensional models of XPC proteins from T. cruzi and T. evansi and observed few structural differences between these proteins. In our tests, insertion of XPC gene from T. evansi (TevXPC) in T. cruzi resulted in slower cell growth under normal conditions. After cisplatin treatment, T. cruzi overexpressing its own XPC gene (TcXPC) was able to recover cell division rates faster than T. cruzi expressing TevXPC gene. Based on these tests, it is suggested that TevXPC (being an exogenous protein in T. cruzi) interferes negatively in cellular processes where TcXPC (the endogenous protein) is involved. This probably occurred due interaction of TevXPC with some endogenous molecules or proteins from T.cruzi but incapacity of interaction with others. This reinforces the importance of correctly XPC functioning within the cell.


Resumo O reparo por excisão de nucleotídeos (NER) atua reparando danos no DNA, como lesões causadas por cisplatina. A proteína Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) está envolvida no reconhecimento de danos pela via de reparação global do genoma pelo NER (GG-NER) e tem sido estudada em diferentes organismos devido à sua importância em outros processos celulares. Neste trabalho, estudamos proteínas do NER em Trypanosoma cruzi e Trypanosoma evansi, parasitos de humanos e animais, respectivamente. Modelos tridimensionais das proteínas XPC de T. cruzi e T. evansi foram feitos e observou-se poucas diferenças estruturais entre estas proteínas. Durante testes, a inserção do gene XPC de T. evansi (TevXPC) em T. cruzi resultou em crescimento celular mais lento em condições normais. Após o tratamento com cisplatina, T. cruzi superexpressando seu próprio gene XPC (TcXPC) foi capaz de recuperar as taxas de divisão celular mais rapidamente do que T. cruzi expressando o gene TevXPC. Com base nesses testes, sugere-se que TevXPC (sendo uma proteína exógena em T. cruzi) interfere negativamente nos processos celulares em que TcXPC (a proteína endógena) está envolvida. Isso provavelmente ocorreu pois TevXPC é capaz de interagir com algumas moléculas ou proteínas endógenas de T.cruzi, mas é incapaz de interagir com outras. Isso reforça a importância do correto funcionamento de XPC dentro da célula.

2.
Braz J Biol ; 83: e243910, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34190757

RESUMO

Nucleotide excision repair (NER) acts repairing damages in DNA, such as lesions caused by cisplatin. Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) protein is involved in recognition of global genome DNA damages during NER (GG-NER) and it has been studied in different organisms due to its importance in other cellular processes. In this work, we studied NER proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma evansi, parasites of humans and animals respectively. We performed three-dimensional models of XPC proteins from T. cruzi and T. evansi and observed few structural differences between these proteins. In our tests, insertion of XPC gene from T. evansi (TevXPC) in T. cruzi resulted in slower cell growth under normal conditions. After cisplatin treatment, T. cruzi overexpressing its own XPC gene (TcXPC) was able to recover cell division rates faster than T. cruzi expressing TevXPC gene. Based on these tests, it is suggested that TevXPC (being an exogenous protein in T. cruzi) interferes negatively in cellular processes where TcXPC (the endogenous protein) is involved. This probably occurred due interaction of TevXPC with some endogenous molecules or proteins from T.cruzi but incapacity of interaction with others. This reinforces the importance of correctly XPC functioning within the cell.


Assuntos
Trypanosoma cruzi , Xeroderma Pigmentoso , Animais , Biologia Computacional , Dano ao DNA/genética , Reparo do DNA/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/metabolismo , Humanos , Trypanosoma cruzi/genética
3.
DNA Repair (Amst) ; 73: 78-90, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30470509

RESUMO

Genomes are affected by a wide range of damage, which has resulted in the evolution of a number of widely conserved DNA repair pathways. Most of these repair reactions have been described in the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, which is a genetically tractable eukaryotic microbe and important human and animal parasite, but little work has considered how the DNA damage response operates throughout the T. brucei life cycle. Using quantitative PCR we have assessed damage induction and repair in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of the parasite. We show differing kinetics of repair for three forms of DNA damage, and dramatic differences in repair between replicative life cycle forms found in the testse fly midgut and the mammal. We find that mammal-infective T. brucei cells repair oxidative and crosslink-induced DNA damage more efficiently than tsetse-infective cells and, moreover, very distinct patterns of induction and repair of DNA alkylating damage in the two life cycle forms. We also reveal robust repair of DNA lesions in the highly unusual T. brucei mitochondrial genome (the kinetoplast). By examining mutants we show that nuclear alkylation damage is repaired by the concerted action of two repair pathways, and that Rad51 acts in kinetoplast repair. Finally, we correlate repair with cell cycle arrest and cell growth, revealing that induced DNA damage has strikingly differing effects on the two life cycle stages, with distinct timing of alkylation-induced cell cycle arrest and higher levels of damage induced death in mammal-infective cells. Our data reveal that T. brucei regulates the DNA damage response during its life cycle, a capacity that may be shared by many microbial pathogens that exist in variant environments during growth and transmission.


Assuntos
Dano ao DNA , Trypanosoma brucei brucei/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Trypanosoma brucei brucei/genética , Alquilação , Pontos de Checagem do Ciclo Celular/genética , Adutos de DNA/metabolismo , Reparo do DNA , DNA de Protozoário/genética , DNA de Protozoário/metabolismo , Estresse Oxidativo/genética , Rad51 Recombinase/metabolismo , Trypanosoma brucei brucei/citologia , Trypanosoma brucei brucei/metabolismo
4.
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek ; 98(3): 403-13, 2010 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20495870

RESUMO

The bacterial community structures (BCSs) of Cerrado soils cultivated under conventional tillage (CT), no-tillage (NT) and under native Cerrado (NC) vegetation were evaluated using PCR/DGGE of bacterial 16S rRNA (rrs) and rpoB genes and of Pseudomonas group genes. Soil chemical analysis, microbial biomass and the enzyme activities were also evaluated and correlated with the BCS measurements. The multivariate ordinations of DGGE profiles showed differences between the BCS of the NC area and those from cultivated areas. The BCSs of the CT and NT areas also differed in all DGGE fingerprints, including changes in the profile of Pseudomonas populations, indicating that agricultural systems can also be responsible for changes within specific microbial niches, although the clearest differences were found in the rpoB profiles. The MRPP analysis demonstrated significant differences between the BCSs from different soil layers of NT areas based on all gene fingerprints and those of NC areas based on bacterial 16S rRNA and rpoB genes fingerprints. No differences were observed in the microbial fingerprints of CT samples from different depths, indicating that ploughing affected the original BCS stratification. The BCS from NC areas, based on all gene fingerprints, could be related to higher levels of soil acidity and higher amounts of MBC and of phosphatase activity. In contrast, the BCSs from cultivated areas were related to higher levels of Ca + Mg, P and K, likely as a result of a history of chemical fertilisation in these areas. The relationships between rpoB and Pseudomonas BCSs and all chemical and biochemical properties of soils were significant, according to a Mantel test (P < 0.05), indicating that the different changes in soil properties induced by soil use or management may drive the formation of the soil BCS.


Assuntos
Agricultura , Fenômenos Fisiológicos Bacterianos , Ecossistema , Pseudomonas/fisiologia , Microbiologia do Solo , Solo/química , Fosfatase Ácida/análise , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/genética , Biodiversidade , Biomassa , Brasil , Impressões Digitais de DNA , DNA Bacteriano/análise , Concentração de Íons de Hidrogênio , Filogenia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase , RNA Ribossômico 16S/análise , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , beta-Glucosidase/análise
5.
Appl Environ Microbiol ; 64(3): 970-5, 1998 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16349531

RESUMO

A combination of the plant infection-soil dilution technique (most-probable-number [MPN] technique) and immunofluorescence direct count (IFDC) microscopy was used to examine the effects of three winter cover crop treatments on the distribution of a soil population of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii across different size classes of soil aggregates (<0.25, 0.25 to 0.5, 0.5 to 1.0, 1.0 to 2.0, and 2.0 to 5.0 mm). The aggregates were prepared from a Willamette silt loam soil immediately after harvest of broccoli (September 1995) and before planting and after harvest of sweet corn (June and September 1996, respectively). The summer crops were grown in soil that had been either fallowed or planted with a cover crop of red clover (legume) or triticale (cereal) from September to April. The Rhizobium soil population was heterogeneously distributed across the different size classes of soil aggregates, and the distribution was influenced by cover crop treatment and sampling time. On both September samplings, the smallest size class of aggregates (<0.25 mm) recovered from the red clover plots carried between 30 and 70% of the total nodulating R. leguminosarum population, as estimated by the MPN procedure, while the same aggregate size class from the June sampling carried only approximately 6% of the population. In June, IDFC microscopy revealed that the 1.0- to 2.0-mm size class of aggregates from the red clover treatment carried a significantly greater population density of the successful nodule-occupying serotype, AR18, than did the aggregate size classes of <0.5 mm, and 2 to 5 mm. In September, however, the population profile of AR18 had shifted such that the density was significantly greater in the 0.25- to 0.5-mm size class than in aggregates of <0.25 mm and >1.0 mm. The populations of two other Rhizobium serotypes (AR6 and AS36) followed the same trends of distribution in the June and September samplings. These data indicate the existence of structural microsites that vary in their suitabilities to support growth and protection of bacteria and that are influenced by the presence and type of plant grown in the soil.

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