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1.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 37, 2021 02 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33568158

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Chronic inflammation, which can be modulated by diet, is linked to high white blood cell counts and correlates with higher cardiometabolic risk and risk of more severe infections, as in the case of COVID-19. METHODS: Here, we assessed the association between white blood cell profile (lymphocytes, basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes and total white blood cells) as markers of chronic inflammation, habitual diet and gut microbiome composition (determined by sequencing of the 16S RNA) in 986 healthy individuals from the PREDICT-1 nutritional intervention study. We then investigated whether the gut microbiome mediates part of the benefits of vegetable intake on lymphocyte counts. RESULTS: Higher levels of white blood cells, lymphocytes and basophils were all significantly correlated with lower habitual intake of vegetables, with vegetable intake explaining between 3.59 and 6.58% of variation in white blood cells after adjusting for covariates and multiple testing using false discovery rate (q < 0.1). No such association was seen with fruit intake. A mediation analysis found that 20.00% of the effect of vegetable intake on lymphocyte counts was mediated by one bacterial genus, Collinsella, known to increase with the intake of processed foods and previously associated with fatty liver disease. We further correlated white blood cells to other inflammatory markers including IL6 and GlycA, fasting and post-prandial glucose levels and found a significant relationship between inflammation and diet. CONCLUSION: A habitual diet high in vegetables, but not fruits, is linked to a lower inflammatory profile for white blood cells, and a fifth of the effect is mediated by the genus Collinsella. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The ClinicalTrials.gov registration identifier is NCT03479866 .


Assuntos
Dieta , Frutas , Microbioma Gastrointestinal/genética , Leucócitos , Verduras , Actinobacteria , Adulto , Biomarcadores/sangue , Clostridiales , Clostridium , Jejum , Feminino , Humanos , Interleucina-6/sangue , Contagem de Leucócitos , Contagem de Linfócitos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Ruminococcus
2.
Genome Med ; 13(1): 10, 2021 Jan 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33472701

RESUMO

Personalised dietary modulation of the gut microbiota may be key to disease management. Current investigations provide a broad understanding of the impact of diet on the composition and activity of the gut microbiota, yet detailed knowledge in applying diet as an actionable tool remains limited. Further to the relative novelty of the field, approaches are yet to be standardised and extremely heterogeneous research outcomes have ensued. This may be related to confounders associated with complexities in capturing an accurate representation of both diet and the gut microbiota. This review discusses the intricacies and current methodologies of diet-microbial relations, the implications and limitations of these investigative approaches, and future considerations that may assist in accelerating applications. New investigations should consider improved collection of dietary data, further characterisation of mechanistic interactions, and an increased focus on -omic technologies such as metabolomics to describe the bacterial and metabolic activity of food degradation, together with its crosstalk with the host. Furthermore, clinical evidence with health outcomes is required before therapeutic dietary strategies for microbial amelioration can be made. The potential to reach detailed understanding of diet-microbiota relations may depend on re-evaluation, progression, and unification of research methodologies, which consider the complexities of these interactions.

3.
Br J Nutr ; : 1-26, 2020 Dec 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33298202

RESUMO

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and, after dementia, is the second biggest cause of death for women. In England it accounts for 1 in 4 of all deaths. Lifestyle modifications represent the primary route to both reduce CVD risk factors and prevent CVD outcomes. Diet constitutes one of the key modifiable risk factors in the aetiology of CVD. We investigated the relationship between nine main dietary indices and a comprehensive range of CVD risk factors in 2,590 women from TwinsUK. After adjustment for multiple testing, we found that the DASH diet was inversely correlated with some of the most common CVD risk factors (BMI, visceral fat, triglycerides, insulin HOMA2-IR and ASCVD risk) with PFDR ranging from 6.28*10-7 to 5.63*10-4. Similar association patterns were detected across most of the dietary indices analysed. In our post hoc investigation, to determine if any specific food groups were driving associations between the DASH score and markers of cardiometabolic risk, we found that increased BMI, VF, HOMA2-IR, ASCVD risk, insulin and triglyceride levels were directly correlated to red meat consumption (PFDR ranging from 4.65*10-9 to 7.98*10-3) and inversely correlated to wholegrain cereal consumption (PFDR ranging from 1.26*10-6 to 8.28*10-3).Our findings revealed that DASH diet is associated with a more favourable CVD risk profile suggesting that this diet may be a candidate dietary pattern to supplement current UK dietary recommendations for CVD prevention.

4.
Thorax ; 2020 Dec 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33376145

RESUMO

Understanding the geographical distribution of COVID-19 through the general population is key to the provision of adequate healthcare services. Using self-reported data from 1 960 242 unique users in Great Britain (GB) of the COVID-19 Symptom Study app, we estimated that, concurrent to the GB government sanctioning lockdown, COVID-19 was distributed across GB, with evidence of 'urban hotspots'. We found a geo-social gradient associated with predicted disease prevalence suggesting urban areas and areas of higher deprivation are most affected. Our results demonstrate use of self-reported symptoms data to provide focus on geographical areas with identified risk factors.

6.
Nature ; 588(7836): 135-140, 2020 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33177712

RESUMO

The serum metabolome contains a plethora of biomarkers and causative agents of various diseases, some of which are endogenously produced and some that have been taken up from the environment1. The origins of specific compounds are known, including metabolites that are highly heritable2,3, or those that are influenced by the gut microbiome4, by lifestyle choices such as smoking5, or by diet6. However, the key determinants of most metabolites are still poorly understood. Here we measured the levels of 1,251 metabolites in serum samples from a unique and deeply phenotyped healthy human cohort of 491 individuals. We applied machine-learning algorithms to predict metabolite levels in held-out individuals on the basis of host genetics, gut microbiome, clinical parameters, diet, lifestyle and anthropometric measurements, and obtained statistically significant predictions for more than 76% of the profiled metabolites. Diet and microbiome had the strongest predictive power, and each explained hundreds of metabolites-in some cases, explaining more than 50% of the observed variance. We further validated microbiome-related predictions by showing a high replication rate in two geographically independent cohorts7,8 that were not available to us when we trained the algorithms. We used feature attribution analysis9 to reveal specific dietary and bacterial interactions. We further demonstrate that some of these interactions might be causal, as some metabolites that we predicted to be positively associated with bread were found to increase after a randomized clinical trial of bread intervention. Overall, our results reveal potential determinants of more than 800 metabolites, paving the way towards a mechanistic understanding of alterations in metabolites under different conditions and to designing interventions for manipulating the levels of circulating metabolites.

7.
Oncologist ; 2020 Aug 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32845538

RESUMO

Individuals with cancer may be at high risk for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and adverse outcomes. However, evidence from large population-based studies examining whether cancer and cancer-related therapy exacerbates the risk of COVID-19 infection is still limited. Data were collected from the COVID Symptom Study smartphone application since March 29 through May 8, 2020. Among 23,266 participants with cancer and 1,784,293 without cancer, we documented 10,404 reports of a positive COVID-19 test. Compared with participants without cancer, those living with cancer had a 60% increased risk of a positive COVID-19 test. Among patients with cancer, current treatment with chemotherapy or immunotherapy was associated with a 2.2-fold increased risk of a positive test. The association between cancer and COVID-19 infection was stronger among participants >65 years and males. Future studies are needed to identify subgroups by tumor types and treatment regimens who are particularly at risk for COVID-19 infection and adverse outcomes.

8.
Nutrients ; 12(7)2020 Jul 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32708992

RESUMO

Nutrition plays a key role in blood pressure (BP) regulation. Here, we examine associations between nutrient intakes and BP in a large predominantly female population-based cohort. We assessed the correlation between 45 nutrients (from food frequency questionnaires) and systolic BP/diastolic BP (SBP/DBP) in 3889 individuals from TwinsUK not on hypertensive treatments and replicated in an independent subset of monozygotic twins discordant for nutrient intake (17-242 pairs). Results from both analyses were meta-analysed. For significant nutrients, we calculated heritability using structural equation modelling. We identified and replicated 15 nutrients associated with SBP, 9 also being associated with DBP, adjusting for covariates and multiple testing. 14 of those had a heritable component (h2: 27.1-57.6%). Strong associations with SBP were observed for riboflavin (Beta(SE) = -1.49(0.38), P = 1.00 × 10-4) and tryptophan (-0.31(0.01), P = 5 × 10-4), while with DBP for alcohol (0.05(0.07), P = 1.00 × 10-4) and lactose (-0.05(0.0), P = 1.3 × 10-3). Two multivariable nutrient scores, combining independently SBP/DBP-associated nutrients, explained 22% of the variance in SBP and 13.6% of the variance in DBP. Moreover, bivariate heritability analysis suggested that nutrients and BP share some genetic influences. We confirm current understanding and extend the panel of dietary nutrients implicated in BP regulation underscoring the value of nutrient focused dietary research in preventing and managing hypertension.

10.
Gut Microbes ; 11(6): 1632-1642, 2020 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32576065

RESUMO

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with reduced gut microbiome diversity, although the cause is unclear. Metabolites generated by gut microbes also appear to be causative factors in T2D. We therefore searched for serum metabolites predictive of gut microbiome diversity in 1018 females from TwinsUK with concurrent metabolomic profiling and microbiome composition. We generated a Microbial Metabolites Diversity (MMD) score of six circulating metabolites that explained over 18% of the variance in microbiome alpha diversity. Moreover, the MMD score was associated with a significantly lower odds of prevalent (OR[95%CI] = 0.22[0.07;0.70], P = .01) and incident T2D (HR[95%CI] = 0.31[0.11,0.90], P = .03). We replicated our results in 1522 individuals from the ARIC study (prevalent T2D: OR[95%CI] = 0.79[0.64,0.96], P = .02, incident T2D: HR[95%CI] = 0.87[0.79,0.95], P = .003). The MMD score mediated 28%[15%,94%] of the total effect of gut microbiome on T2D after adjusting for confounders. Metabolites predicting higher microbiome diversity included 3-phenylpropionate(hydrocinnamate), indolepropionate, cinnamoylglycine and 5-alpha-pregnan-3beta,20 alpha-diol monosulfate(2) of which indolepropionate and phenylpropionate have already been linked to lower incidence of T2D. Metabolites correlating with lower microbial diversity included glutarate and imidazole propionate, of which the latter has been implicated in insulin resistance. Our results suggest that the effect of gut microbiome diversity on T2D is largely mediated by microbial metabolites, which might be modifiable by diet.

11.
Nutrients ; 12(6)2020 Jun 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32585900

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Polyphenol consumption is implicated in gut microbiome composition and improved metabolic outcomes, but it is unclear whether the effect is independent of dietary fiber. METHODS: We investigated the links between (poly)phenol intake, gut microbiome composition (16s RNA) and obesity independently of fiber intake in UK women (n = 1810) and in a small group of UK men (n = 64). RESULTS: (Poly)phenol intakes correlated with microbiome alpha diversity (Shannon Index) after adjusting for confounders and fiber intake. Moreover, flavonoid intake was significantly correlated with the abundance of Veillonella, (a genus known to improve physical performance), and stilbene intake with that of butyrate-producing bacteria (Lachnospira and Faecalibacterium). Stilbene and flavonoid intake also correlated with lower odds of prevalent obesity (Stilbenes: Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval) (OR(95%CI)) = 0.80 (0.73, 0.87), p = 4.90 × 10-7; Flavonoids: OR(95%CI) = 0.77 (0.65, 0.91), p = 0.002). Formal mediation analyses revealed that gut microbiome mediates ~11% of the total effect of flavonoid and stilbene intake on prevalent obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the importance of (poly)phenol consumption for optimal human health.

12.
Science ; 368(6497): 1362-1367, 2020 06 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32371477

RESUMO

The rapid pace of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) presents challenges to the robust collection of population-scale data to address this global health crisis. We established the COronavirus Pandemic Epidemiology (COPE) Consortium to unite scientists with expertise in big data research and epidemiology to develop the COVID Symptom Study, previously known as the COVID Symptom Tracker, mobile application. This application-which offers data on risk factors, predictive symptoms, clinical outcomes, and geographical hotspots-was launched in the United Kingdom on 24 March 2020 and the United States on 29 March 2020 and has garnered more than 2.8 million users as of 2 May 2020. Our initiative offers a proof of concept for the repurposing of existing approaches to enable rapidly scalable epidemiologic data collection and analysis, which is critical for a data-driven response to this public health challenge.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Coleta de Dados/métodos , Cooperação Internacional , Aplicativos Móveis , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Big Data , Coleta de Dados/instrumentação , Saúde Global , Humanos , Modelos Teóricos , Pandemias , Reino Unido , Estados Unidos
13.
Nat Med ; 26(7): 1037-1040, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32393804

RESUMO

A total of 2,618,862 participants reported their potential symptoms of COVID-19 on a smartphone-based app. Among the 18,401 who had undergone a SARS-CoV-2 test, the proportion of participants who reported loss of smell and taste was higher in those with a positive test result (4,668 of 7,178 individuals; 65.03%) than in those with a negative test result (2,436 of 11,223 participants; 21.71%) (odds ratio = 6.74; 95% confidence interval = 6.31-7.21). A model combining symptoms to predict probable infection was applied to the data from all app users who reported symptoms (805,753) and predicted that 140,312 (17.42%) participants are likely to have COVID-19.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Notificação de Doenças/métodos , Aplicativos Móveis , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Sintomas Prodrômicos , Autorrelato , Smartphone , Adulto , Idoso , Betacoronavirus/fisiologia , Sistemas Computacionais , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/patologia , Tosse/diagnóstico , Tosse/epidemiologia , Notificação de Doenças/normas , Dispneia/diagnóstico , Dispneia/epidemiologia , Fadiga/diagnóstico , Fadiga/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Aplicativos Móveis/normas , Modelos Biológicos , Transtornos do Olfato/diagnóstico , Transtornos do Olfato/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/patologia , Prognóstico , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Distúrbios do Paladar/diagnóstico , Distúrbios do Paladar/epidemiologia , Reino Unido/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
14.
Am J Hypertens ; 33(6): 473-481, 2020 05 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32060494

RESUMO

Epidemiologic and genomic studies have progressively improved our understanding of the causation of hypertension and the complex relationship with diet and environment. The majority of Mendelian forms of syndromic hypotension and hypertension (HTN) have all been linked to mutations in genes whose encoded proteins regulate salt-water balance in the kidney, supporting the primacy of the kidneys in blood pressure regulation. There are more than 1,477 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with blood pressure and hypertension and the challenge is establishing a causal role for these variants. Hypertension is a complex multifactorial phenotype and it is likely to be influenced by multiple factors including interactions between diet and lifestyle factors, microbiome, and epigenetics. Given the finite genetic variability that is possible in humans, it is likely that incremental gains from single marker analyses have now plateaued and a greater leap in our understanding of the genetic basis of disease will come from integration of other omics and the interacting environmental factors. In this review, we focus on emerging results from the microbiome and metabolomics and discuss how leveraging these findings may facilitate a deeper understanding of the interrelationships between genomics, diet, and microbial ecology in humans in the causation of essential hypertension.

15.
Hum Mol Genet ; 29(5): 864-875, 2020 Mar 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31960908

RESUMO

Saliva, as a biofluid, is inexpensive and non-invasive to obtain, and provides a vital tool to investigate oral health and its interaction with systemic health conditions. There is growing interest in salivary biomarkers for systemic diseases, notably cardiovascular disease. Whereas hundreds of genetic loci have been shown to be involved in the regulation of blood metabolites, leading to significant insights into the pathogenesis of complex human diseases, little is known about the impact of host genetics on salivary metabolites. Here we report the first genome-wide association study exploring 476 salivary metabolites in 1419 subjects from the TwinsUK cohort (discovery phase), followed by replication in the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-2) cohort. A total of 14 distinct locus-metabolite associations were identified in the discovery phase, most of which were replicated in SHIP-2. While only a limited number of the loci that are known to regulate blood metabolites were also associated with salivary metabolites in our study, we identified several novel saliva-specific locus-metabolite associations, including associations for the AGMAT (with the metabolites 4-guanidinobutanoate and beta-guanidinopropanoate), ATP13A5 (with the metabolite creatinine) and DPYS (with the metabolites 3-ureidopropionate and 3-ureidoisobutyrate) loci. Our study suggests that there may be regulatory pathways of particular relevance to the salivary metabolome. In addition, some of our findings may have clinical significance, such as the utility of the pyrimidine (uracil) degradation metabolites in predicting 5-fluorouracil toxicity and the role of the agmatine pathway metabolites as biomarkers of oral health.

16.
Twin Res Hum Genet ; 23(6): 316-321, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33558003

RESUMO

Susceptibility to infection such as SARS-CoV-2 may be influenced by host genotype. TwinsUK volunteers (n = 3261) completing the C-19 COVID-19 symptom tracker app allowed classical twin studies of COVID-19 symptoms, including predicted COVID-19, a symptom-based algorithm to predict true infection, derived from app users tested for SARS-CoV-2. We found heritability of 49% (32-64%) for delirium; 34% (20-47%) for diarrhea; 31% (8-52%) for fatigue; 19% (0-38%) for anosmia; 46% (31-60%) for skipped meals and 31% (11-48%) for predicted COVID-19. Heritability estimates were not affected by cohabiting or by social deprivation. The results suggest the importance of host genetics in the risk of clinical manifestations of COVID-19 and provide grounds for planning genome-wide association studies to establish specific genes involved in viral infectivity and the host immune response.

17.
Twin Res Hum Genet ; 23(6): 330-337, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33455612

RESUMO

A healthy diet is associated with the improvement or maintenance of health parameters, and several indices have been proposed to assess diet quality comprehensively. Twin studies have found that some specific foods, nutrients and food patterns have a heritable component; however, the heritability of overall dietary intake has not yet been estimated. Here, we compute heritability estimates of the nine most common dietary indices utilized in nutritional epidemiology. We analyzed 2590 female twins from TwinsUK (653 monozygotic [MZ] and 642 dizygotic [DZ] pairs) who completed a 131-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Heritability estimates were computed using structural equation models (SEM) adjusting for body mass index (BMI), smoking status, Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD), physical activity, menopausal status, energy and alcohol intake. The AE model was the best-fitting model for most of the analyzed dietary scores (seven out of nine), with heritability estimates ranging from 10.1% (95% CI [.02, .18]) for the Dietary Reference Values (DRV) to 42.7% (95% CI [.36, .49]) for the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (A-HEI). The ACE model was the best-fitting model for the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI) and Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010) with heritability estimates of 5.4% (95% CI [-.17, .28]) and 25.4% (95% CI [.05, .46]), respectively. Here, we find that all analyzed dietary indices have a heritable component, suggesting that there is a genetic predisposition regulating what you eat. Future studies should explore genes underlying dietary indices to further understand the genetic disposition toward diet-related health parameters.

18.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 15088, 2019 10 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31636301

RESUMO

Electrolytes have a crucial role in maintaining health and their serum levels are homeostatically maintained within a narrow range by multiple pathways involving the kidneys. Here we use metabolomics profiling (592 fasting serum metabolites) to identify molecular markers and pathways associated with serum electrolyte levels in two independent population-based cohorts. We included 1523 adults from TwinsUK not on blood pressure-lowering therapy and without renal impairment to look for metabolites associated with chloride, sodium, potassium and bicarbonate by running linear mixed models adjusting for covariates and multiple comparisons. For each electrolyte, we further performed pathway enrichment analysis (PAGE algorithm). Results were replicated in an independent cohort. Chloride, potassium, bicarbonate and sodium associated with 10, 58, 36 and 17 metabolites respectively (each P < 2.1 × 10-5), mainly lipids. Of all the electrolytes, serum potassium showed the most significant associations with individual fatty acid metabolites and specific enrichment of fatty acid pathways. In contrast, serum sodium and bicarbonate showed associations predominantly with amino-acid related species. In the first study to examine systematically associations between serum electrolytes and small circulating molecules, we identified novel metabolites and metabolic pathways associated with serum electrolyte levels. The role of these metabolic pathways on electrolyte homeostasis merits further studies.


Assuntos
Equilíbrio Ácido-Base , Eletrólitos/metabolismo , Homeostase , Metabolômica , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Redes e Vias Metabólicas , Metaboloma , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Gêmeos , Reino Unido
19.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 11(18): 7694-7706, 2019 09 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31557729

RESUMO

Glucuronic acid is a metabolite of glucose that is involved in the detoxification of xenobiotic compounds and the structure/remodeling of the extracellular matrix. We report for the first time that circulating glucuronic acid is a robust biomarker of mortality that is conserved across species. We find that glucuronic acid levels are significant predictors of all-cause mortality in three population-based cohorts from different countries with 4-20 years of follow-up (HR=1.44, p=2.9×10-6 in the discovery cohort; HR=1.13, p=0.032 and HR=1.25, p=0.017, respectively in the replication cohorts), as well as in a longitudinal study of genetically heterogenous mice (HR=1.29, p=0.018). Additionally, we find that glucuronic acid levels increase with age and predict future healthspan-related outcomes. Together, these results demonstrate glucuronic acid as a robust biomarker of longevity and healthspan.


Assuntos
Ácido Glucurônico/sangue , Envelhecimento Saudável/sangue , Longevidade/fisiologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Animais , Biomarcadores/sangue , Pressão Sanguínea/fisiologia , Índice de Massa Corporal , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Metabolômica , Camundongos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
20.
Twin Res Hum Genet ; 22(6): 523-529, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31526404

RESUMO

TwinsUK is the largest cohort of community-dwelling adult twins in the UK. The registry comprises over 14,000 volunteer twins (14,838 including mixed, single and triplets); it is predominantly female (82%) and middle-aged (mean age 59). In addition, over 1800 parents and siblings of twins are registered volunteers. During the last 27 years, TwinsUK has collected numerous questionnaire responses, physical/cognitive measures and biological measures on over 8500 subjects. Data were collected alongside four comprehensive phenotyping clinical visits to the Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London. Such collection methods have resulted in very detailed longitudinal clinical, biochemical, behavioral, dietary and socioeconomic cohort characterization; it provides a multidisciplinary platform for the study of complex disease during the adult life course, including the process of healthy aging. The major strength of TwinsUK is the availability of several 'omic' technologies for a range of sample types from participants, which includes genomewide scans of single-nucleotide variants, next-generation sequencing, metabolomic profiles, microbiomics, exome sequencing, epigenetic markers, gene expression arrays, RNA sequencing and telomere length measures. TwinsUK facilitates and actively encourages sharing the 'TwinsUK' resource with the scientific community - interested researchers may request data via the TwinsUK website (http://twinsuk.ac.uk/resources-for-researchers/access-our-data/) for their own use or future collaboration with the study team. In addition, further cohort data collection is planned via the Wellcome Open Research gateway (https://wellcomeopenresearch.org/gateways). The current article presents an up-to-date report on the application of technological advances, new study procedures in the cohort and future direction of TwinsUK.


Assuntos
Doenças em Gêmeos/epidemiologia , Marcadores Genéticos , Metaboloma , Metagenoma , Sistema de Registros/estatística & dados numéricos , Gêmeos/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Doenças em Gêmeos/genética , Doenças em Gêmeos/metabolismo , Doenças em Gêmeos/microbiologia , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Incidência , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reino Unido/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
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