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1.
J Clin Immunol ; 2019 Nov 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31705452

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The correlation between different methods for the detection of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) responses to diagnose specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SAD) is poor and the criteria for defining a normal response lack consensus. We previously proposed fifth percentile (p5) values of PPV responses as a new cutoff for SAD. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association of SAD (determined by either World Health Organization (WHO)-standardized ELISA or multiplex bead-based assay) with abnormal response to Salmonella (S.) typhi Vi vaccination in a cohort of patients with recurrent infections. METHODS: Ninety-four patients with a clinical history suggestive of antibody deficiency received PPV and S. typhi Vi vaccines. Polysaccharide responses to either 3 or 18 pneumococcal serotypes were measured by either the WHO ELISA or a multiplex in-house bead-based assay. Anti-S. typhi Vi IgG were measured by a commercial ELISA kit. Allohemagglutinins (AHA) were measured by agglutination method. RESULTS: Based on the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) criteria for WHO ELISA, 18/94 patients were diagnosed with SAD and 22/93 based on serotype-specific p5 cutoffs for bead-based assay. The association between the two methods was significant, with 10 subjects showing abnormal response according to both techniques. Abnormal response to S. typhi Vi vaccination was found in 7 patients, 6 of which had SAD. No correlation was found between polysaccharide response and AHA, age, or clinical phenotype. CONCLUSION: The lack of evidence-based gold standards for the diagnosis of SAD represents a challenge in clinical practice. In our cohort, we confirmed the insufficient correlation between different methods of specific PPV response measurement, and showed that the S. typhi Vi response was not contributive. Caution in the interpretation of results is warranted until more reliable diagnostic methods can be validated.

2.
J Exp Med ; 216(9): 2057-2070, 2019 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31270247

RESUMO

Vaccination against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) and yellow fever (YF) with live attenuated viruses can rarely cause life-threatening disease. Severe illness by MMR vaccines can be caused by inborn errors of type I and/or III interferon (IFN) immunity (mutations in IFNAR2, STAT1, or STAT2). Adverse reactions to the YF vaccine have remained unexplained. We report two otherwise healthy patients, a 9-yr-old boy in Iran with severe measles vaccine disease at 1 yr and a 14-yr-old girl in Brazil with viscerotropic disease caused by the YF vaccine at 12 yr. The Iranian patient is homozygous and the Brazilian patient compound heterozygous for loss-of-function IFNAR1 variations. Patient-derived fibroblasts are susceptible to viruses, including the YF and measles virus vaccine strains, in the absence or presence of exogenous type I IFN. The patients' fibroblast phenotypes are rescued with WT IFNAR1 Autosomal recessive, complete IFNAR1 deficiency can result in life-threatening complications of vaccination with live attenuated measles and YF viruses in previously healthy individuals.

3.
4.
J Exp Med ; 216(9): 2038-2056, 2019 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31217193

RESUMO

Autosomal recessive IRF7 and IRF9 deficiencies impair type I and III IFN immunity and underlie severe influenza pneumonitis. We report three unrelated children with influenza A virus (IAV) infection manifesting as acute respiratory distress syndrome (IAV-ARDS), heterozygous for rare TLR3 variants (P554S in two patients and P680L in the third) causing autosomal dominant (AD) TLR3 deficiency. AD TLR3 deficiency can underlie herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (HSE) by impairing cortical neuron-intrinsic type I IFN immunity to HSV-1. TLR3-mutated leukocytes produce normal levels of IFNs in response to IAV. In contrast, TLR3-mutated fibroblasts produce lower levels of IFN-ß and -λ, and display enhanced viral susceptibility, upon IAV infection. Moreover, the patients' iPSC-derived pulmonary epithelial cells (PECs) are susceptible to IAV. Treatment with IFN-α2b or IFN-λ1 rescues this phenotype. AD TLR3 deficiency may thus underlie IAV-ARDS by impairing TLR3-dependent, type I and/or III IFN-mediated, PEC-intrinsic immunity. Its clinical penetrance is incomplete for both IAV-ARDS and HSE, consistent with their typically sporadic nature.

6.
J Clin Immunol ; 39(3): 298-308, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30838481

RESUMO

DOCK2 is a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor for Rac proteins. Activated Rac serves various cellular functions including the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in lymphocytes and neutrophils and production of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils. Since 2015, six unrelated patients with combined immunodeficiency and early-onset severe viral infections caused by bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in DOCK2 have been described. Until now, the function of phagocytes, specifically neutrophils, has not been assessed in human DOCK2 deficiency. Here, we describe a new kindred with four affected siblings harboring a homozygous splice-site mutation (c.2704-2 A > C) in DOCK2. The mutation results in alternative splicing and a complete loss of DOCK2 protein expression. The patients presented with leaky severe combined immunodeficiency or Omenn syndrome. The novel mutation affects EBV-B cell migration and results in NK cell dysfunction similar to previous observations. Moreover, both cytoskeletal rearrangement and reactive oxygen species production are partially impaired in DOCK2-deficient neutrophils.

8.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 144(1): 236-253, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30738173

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in PIK3CD cause a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent respiratory tract infections, susceptibility to herpesvirus infections, and impaired antibody responses. Previous work revealed defects in CD8+ T and B cells that contribute to this clinical phenotype, but less is understood about the role of CD4+ T cells in disease pathogenesis. OBJECTIVE: We sought to dissect the effects of increased phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling on CD4+ T-cell function. METHODS: We performed detailed ex vivo, in vivo, and in vitro phenotypic and functional analyses of patients' CD4+ T cells and a novel murine disease model caused by overactive PI3K signaling. RESULTS: PI3K overactivation caused substantial increases in numbers of memory and follicular helper T (TFH) cells and dramatic changes in cytokine production in both patients and mice. Furthermore, PIK3CD GOF human TFH cells had dysregulated phenotype and function characterized by increased programmed cell death protein 1, CXCR3, and IFN-γ expression, the phenotype of a TFH cell subset with impaired B-helper function. This was confirmed in vivo in which Pik3cd GOF CD4+ T cells also acquired an aberrant TFH phenotype and provided poor help to support germinal center reactions and humoral immune responses by antigen-specific wild-type B cells. The increase in numbers of both memory and TFH cells was largely CD4+ T-cell extrinsic, whereas changes in cytokine production and TFH cell function were cell intrinsic. CONCLUSION: Our studies reveal that CD4+ T cells with overactive PI3K have aberrant activation and differentiation, thereby providing mechanistic insight into dysfunctional antibody responses in patients with PIK3CD GOF mutations.

9.
Immunol Cell Biol ; 97(4): 389-402, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30779216

RESUMO

Inherited defects in genes encoding for proteins that are involved in the assembly and dynamics of the actin skeleton have increasingly been identified in patients presenting with primary immunodeficiencies. In this review, we summarize a subset of the recently described conditions, emphasizing the clinical features as well as the immunophenotype and pathophysiology.

12.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 143(6): 2238-2253, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30660643

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: CD40 ligand (CD40L) deficiency, an X-linked primary immunodeficiency, causes recurrent sinopulmonary, Pneumocystis and Cryptosporidium species infections. Long-term survival with supportive therapy is poor. Currently, the only curative treatment is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). OBJECTIVE: We performed an international collaborative study to improve patients' management, aiming to individualize risk factors and determine optimal HSCT characteristics. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data on 130 patients who underwent HSCT for CD40L deficiency between 1993-2015. We analyzed outcome and variables' relevance with respect to survival and cure. RESULTS: Overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were 78.2%, 58.1%, and 72.3% 5 years after HSCT. Results were better in transplantations performed in 2000 or later and in children less than 10 years old at the time of HSCT. Pre-existing organ damage negatively influenced outcome. Sclerosing cholangitis was the most important risk factor. After 2000, superior OS was achieved with matched donors. Use of myeloablative regimens and HSCT at 2 years or less from diagnosis associated with higher OS and DFS. EFS was best with matched sibling donors, myeloablative conditioning (MAC), and bone marrow-derived stem cells. Most rejections occurred after reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning, which associated with poor donor cell engraftment. Mortality occurred mainly early after HSCT, predominantly from infections. Among survivors who ceased immunoglobulin replacement, T-lymphocyte chimerism was 50% or greater donor in 85.2%. CONCLUSION: HSCT is curative in patients with CD40L deficiency, with improved outcome if performed before organ damage development. MAC is associated with better OS, EFS, and DFS. Prospective studies are required to compare the risks of HSCT with those of lifelong supportive therapy.

13.
Immunol Rev ; 287(1): 62-72, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30565235

RESUMO

Human adenosine deaminase 1 deficiency was described in the 1970s to cause severe combined immunodeficiency. The residual adenosine deaminase activity in these patients was attributed to adenosine deaminase 2. Human adenosine deaminase type 2 deficiency (DADA2), due to biallelic deleterious mutations in the ADA2 gene, is the first described monogenic type of small- and medium-size vessel vasculitis. The phenotype of DADA2 also includes lymphoproliferation, cytopenia, and variable degrees of immunodeficiency. The physiological role of ADA2 is still enigmatic hence the pathophysiology of the condition is unclear. Preliminary data showed that in the absence of ADA2, macrophage differentiation is skewed to a pro-inflammatory M1 subset, which is detrimental for endothelial integrity. The inflammatory phenotype responds well to anti-TNF therapy with etanercept and that is the first-line treatment for prevention of severe vascular events including strokes. The classic immunosuppressive drugs are not successful in controlling the disease activity. However, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been shown to be a definitive cure in DADA2 patients who present with a severe cytopenia. HSCT can also cure the vascular phenotype and is the treatment modality for patients' refractory to anti-cytokine therapies. In this review, we describe what is currently known about the molecular mechanisms of DADA2. Further research on the pathophysiology of this multifaceted condition is needed to fine-tune and steer future therapeutic strategies.


Assuntos
Adenosina Desaminase/genética , Transplante de Células-Tronco Hematopoéticas , Síndromes de Imunodeficiência/genética , Peptídeos e Proteínas de Sinalização Intercelular/genética , Macrófagos/imunologia , Animais , Diferenciação Celular , Humanos , Síndromes de Imunodeficiência/imunologia , Síndromes de Imunodeficiência/terapia , Poliarterite Nodosa , Acidente Vascular Cerebral Lacunar
14.
J Clin Immunol ; 39(1): 45-54, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30547383

RESUMO

Studies of chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with primary antibody deficiency syndromes (ADS) suggest a broad range of bronchial pathology. However, there are as yet no multicentre studies to assess the variety of bronchial pathology in this patient group. One of the underlying reasons is the lack of a consensus methodology, a prerequisite to jointly document chest CT findings. We aimed to establish an international platform for the evaluation of bronchial pathology as assessed by chest CT and to describe the range of bronchial pathologies in patients with antibody deficiency. Ffteen immunodeficiency centres from 9 countries evaluated chest CT scans of patients with ADS using a predefined list of potential findings including an extent score for bronchiectasis. Data of 282 patients with ADS were collected. Patients with common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVID) comprised the largest subgroup (232 patients, 82.3%). Eighty percent of CVID patients had radiological evidence of bronchial pathology including bronchiectasis in 61%, bronchial wall thickening in 44% and mucus plugging in 29%. Bronchiectasis was detected in 44% of CVID patients aged less than 20 years. Cough was a better predictor for bronchiectasis than spirometry values. Delay of diagnosis as well as duration of disease correlated positively with presence of bronchiectasis. The use of consensus diagnostic criteria and a pre-defined list of bronchial pathologies allows for comparison of chest CT data in multicentre studies. Our data suggest a high prevalence of bronchial pathology in CVID due to late diagnosis or duration of disease.


Assuntos
Brônquios/patologia , Síndromes de Imunodeficiência/patologia , Parede Torácica/patologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Bronquiectasia/patologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Imunodeficiência de Variável Comum/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Espirometria/métodos , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X/métodos , Adulto Jovem
15.
J Clin Immunol ; 39(1): 55-64, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30552536

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but severe demyelinating disease caused by the polyomavirus JC (JCV) in immunocompromised patients. We report a series of patients with primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) who developed PML. METHODS: Retrospective observational study including PID patients with PML. Clinical, immunological, imaging features, and outcome are provided for each patient. RESULTS: Eleven unrelated patients with PIDs developed PML. PIDs were characterized by a wide range of syndromic or genetically defined defects, mostly with combined B and T cell impairment. Genetic diagnosis was made in 7 patients. Before the development of PML, 10 patients had recurrent infections, 7 had autoimmune and/or inflammatory manifestations, and 3 had a history of malignancies. Immunologic investigations showed CD4+ lymphopenia (median 265, range 50-344) in all cases. Six patients received immunosuppressive therapy in the year before PML onset, including prolonged steroid therapy in 3 cases, rituximab in 5 cases, anti-TNF-α therapy, and azathioprine in 1 case each. Despite various treatments, all but 1 patient died after a median of 8 months following PML diagnosis. CONCLUSION: PML is a rare but fatal complication of PIDs. Many cases are secondary to immunosuppressive therapy warranting careful evaluation before initiation subsequent immunosuppression during PIDs.


Assuntos
Síndromes de Imunodeficiência/complicações , Síndromes de Imunodeficiência/imunologia , Leucoencefalopatia Multifocal Progressiva/etiologia , Leucoencefalopatia Multifocal Progressiva/imunologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Azatioprina/uso terapêutico , Linfócitos B/imunologia , Feminino , Humanos , Imunoterapia/métodos , Vírus JC/imunologia , Leucoencefalopatia Multifocal Progressiva/terapia , Linfopenia/imunologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Rituximab/uso terapêutico , Linfócitos T/imunologia , Fator de Necrose Tumoral alfa/imunologia , Adulto Jovem
17.
J Clin Immunol ; 2018 Nov 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30430354

RESUMO

The original version of this article unfortunately did not display the appropriate captions in the figure. The correct version is displayed below.

19.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 115(34): E8007-E8016, 2018 08 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30072435

RESUMO

Isolated congenital asplenia (ICA) is the only known human developmental defect exclusively affecting a lymphoid organ. In 2013, we showed that private deleterious mutations in the protein-coding region of RPSA, encoding ribosomal protein SA, caused ICA by haploinsufficiency with complete penetrance. We reported seven heterozygous protein-coding mutations in 8 of the 23 kindreds studied, including 6 of the 8 multiplex kindreds. We have since enrolled 33 new kindreds, 5 of which are multiplex. We describe here 11 new heterozygous ICA-causing RPSA protein-coding mutations, and the first two mutations in the 5'-UTR of this gene, which disrupt mRNA splicing. Overall, 40 of the 73 ICA patients (55%) and 23 of the 56 kindreds (41%) carry mutations located in translated or untranslated exons of RPSA. Eleven of the 43 kindreds affected by sporadic disease (26%) carry RPSA mutations, whereas 12 of the 13 multiplex kindreds (92%) carry RPSA mutations. We also report that 6 of 18 (33%) protein-coding mutations and the two (100%) 5'-UTR mutations display incomplete penetrance. Three mutations were identified in two independent kindreds, due to a hotspot or a founder effect. Finally, RPSA ICA-causing mutations were demonstrated to be de novo in 7 of the 23 probands. Mutations in RPSA exons can affect the translated or untranslated regions and can underlie ICA with complete or incomplete penetrance.


Assuntos
Éxons , Síndromes de Imunodeficiência/genética , Mutação , Penetrância , Biossíntese de Proteínas/genética , Processamento de RNA/genética , Receptores de Laminina/genética , Proteínas Ribossômicas/genética , Baço/anormalidades , Regiões 5' não Traduzidas , Feminino , Efeito Fundador , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Síndromes de Imunodeficiência/metabolismo , Masculino , Receptores de Laminina/biossíntese , Proteínas Ribossômicas/biossíntese , Baço/metabolismo
20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30075154

RESUMO

Innate immunity contributes to host defense through all cell types and relies on their shared germline genetic background, whereas adaptive immunity operates through only 3 main cell types, αß T cells, γδ T cells, and B cells, and relies on their somatic genetic diversification of antigen-specific responses. Human inborn errors of innate immunity often underlie infectious diseases. The range and nature of infections depend on the mutated gene, the deleteriousness of the mutation, and other ill-defined factors. Most known inborn errors of innate immunity to infection disrupt the development or function of leukocytes other than T and B cells, but a growing number of inborn errors affect cells other than circulating and tissue leukocytes. Here we review inborn errors of innate immunity that have been recently discovered or clarified. We highlight the immunologic implications of these errors.

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