Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 82
Filtrar
1.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(10): e29764, 2021 Oct 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34665143

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Web-based resources can support people with bipolar disorder (BD) to improve their knowledge and self-management. However, publicly available resources are heterogeneous in terms of their quality and ease of use. Characterizing digital health literacy (the skillset that enable people to navigate and make use of health information in a web-based context) in BD will support the development of educational resources. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to develop understanding of digital health literacy and its predictors in people with BD. METHODS: A web-based survey was used to explore self-reported digital health literacy (as measured by the e-Health Literacy Scale [eHEALS]) in people with BD. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate potential predictors, including demographic/clinical characteristics and technology use. RESULTS: A total of 919 respondents (77.9% female; mean age 36.9 years) completed the survey. Older age (ß=0.09; P=.01), postgraduate education (ß=0.11; P=.01), and current use of self-management apps related to BD (ß=0.13; P<.001) were associated with higher eHEALS ratings. CONCLUSIONS: Levels of self-reported digital health literacy were comparable or higher than other studies in the general population and specific physical/mental health conditions. However, individuals with BD who are younger, have completed less education, or are less familiar with mental health apps may require extra support to safely and productively navigate web-based health resources. Relevant educational initiatives are discussed. Future studies should evaluate skill development interventions for less digitally literate groups.

2.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(5)2021 Sep 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34587377

RESUMO

Objective: To determine the efficacy of measurement-based care (MBC), defined as routinely administered outcome measures with practitioner and patient review to inform clinical decision-making, for adults with depressive disorders.Data Sources: Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, ClinicalTrials.gov, CNKI, and Wanfang Data were searched through July 1, 2020, using search terms for measurement-based care, depression, antidepressant or pharmacotherapy, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs), without language restriction.Study Selection: Of 8,879 articles retrieved, 7 RCTs (2,019 participants) evaluating MBC for depressive disorders, all involving pharmacotherapy, were included.Data Extraction: Two independent reviewers extracted data. The primary outcome was response rate (≥ 50% improvement from baseline to endpoint on a depression scale). Secondary clinical outcomes were remission rate (endpoint score in remission range), difference in endpoint severity, and medication adherence.Results: Meta-analysis with random-effects models found no significant difference between MBC and comparison groups in response rates (3 studies; odds ratio [OR] = 1.66; 95% CI, 0.66-4.17; P = .279). MBC was associated with significantly greater remission rates (5 studies; OR = 1.83; 95% CI, 1.12-2.97; P = .015), lower endpoint severity (5 studies; standardized mean difference = 0.53; CI 0.06-0.99; P = .026), and greater medication adherence (3 studies; OR = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.22-2.30; P = .001).Conclusions: Although benefits for clinical response are unclear, MBC is effective in decreasing depression severity, promoting remission, and improving medication adherence in patients with depressive disorders treated with pharmacotherapy. The results are limited by the small number of included trials, high risk of bias, and significant study heterogeneity.

3.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 430, 2021 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34470624

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Measurement-based care (MBC) is an evidence-based practice for depression, but its use by clinicians remains low. Enhanced MBC (eMBC), which uses digital technologies, can help to facilitate the use of MBC by clinicians and patients. Understanding factors that act as barriers and drivers to the implementation of MBC and eMBC is important to support the design of implementation strategies, promoting uptake by clinicians and patients. OBJECTIVE: This situational analysis identifies barriers and facilitators to the implementation of standard and eMBC at mental health centers in Shanghai, China. METHODS: We used mixed methods to develop a comprehensive understanding of the factors influencing MBC and eMBC implementation in Shanghai. This study took place across three mental health centers in Shanghai. We used situational analysis tools to collect contextual information about the three centers, conducted surveys with n = 116 clinicians and n = 301 patients, conducted semi-structured interviews with n = 30 clinicians and six focus groups with a total of n = 19 patients. Surveys were analysed using descriptive statistics, and semi-structured interviews and focus groups were analysed using framework analysis. RESULTS: Several potential barriers and facilitators to MBC and eMBC implementation were identified. Infrastructure, cost, attitudes and beliefs, and perceptions about feasibility and efficacy emerged as both challenges and drivers to MBC and eMBC implementation in Shanghai. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study will directly inform the design of an implementation strategy for MBC and eMBC in Shanghai, that will be tested via a randomized controlled trial. This study contributes to the emerging body of literature on MBC implementation and, to the best of our knowledge, is the first such study to take place in Asia. This study identifies several factors that are relevant to the equitable delivery of MBC, recognizing the need to explicitly address equity concerns in global mental health implementation research.


Assuntos
Depressão , Saúde Mental , China , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
4.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 161, 2021 07 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34253198

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is expected to have profound mental health impact, including in the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) region. Some populations might be at higher risk of experiencing negative mental health impacts and may encounter increased barriers to accessing mental health care. The pandemic and related restrictions have led to changes in care delivery, including a rapid shift to the use of e-mental health and digital technologies. It is therefore essential to consider needs and opportunities for equitable mental health care delivery to the most at-risk populations. This rapid scoping review: 1) identifies populations in the APEC region that are at higher risk of the negative mental health impacts of COVID-19, 2) identifies needs and gaps in access to standard and e-mental health care among these populations, and 3) explores the potential of e-mental health to address these needs. METHODS: We conducted a rapid scoping review following the PRISMA Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR). We searched Medline, Embase and PsychInfo databases and Google Scholar using a search strategy developed in consultation with a biomedical librarian. We included records related to mental health or psychosocial risk factors and COVID-19 among at-risk groups; that referred to one or more APEC member economies or had a global, thus generalizable, scope; English language papers, and papers with full text available. RESULTS: A total of 132 records published between December 2019 and August 2020 were included in the final analysis. Several priority at-risk populations, risk factors, challenges and recommendations for standard and e-mental health care were identified. Results demonstrate that e-mental health care can be a viable option for care delivery but that specific accessibility and acceptability considerations must be considered. Options for in-person, hybrid or "low-tech" care must also remain available. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the urgent need for equitable standard and e-mental health care. It has also highlighted the persistent social and structural inequities that contribute to poor mental health. The APEC region is vast and diverse; findings from the region can guide policy and practice in the delivery of equitable mental health care in the region and beyond.


Assuntos
COVID-19/psicologia , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Pandemias , Telemedicina , Ásia/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Humanos , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Ilhas do Pacífico/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco
5.
J Affect Disord ; 294: 597-604, 2021 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34332361

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Studies exploring disability in bipolar disorder (BD) have primarily assessed clinical samples of full-threshold BD-I and BD-II alongside so-called objective criteria such as unemployment or receipt of government disability payments. This study extends research on disability by examining externally determined and self-identified disability in a community sample and by including subthreshold BD (BDS). METHODS: Data were extracted from the USA Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys about individuals who met recognized criteria for BD-I, BD-II and BDS who had completed self-ratings of physical and mental disability, comorbidities, and health risk factors (e.g., obesity). Rates of disability were estimated, and logistic regression analyses were used to determine demographic and clinical variables associated with externally determined and self-identified of disability. RESULTS: Of 408 individuals who met eligibility criteria (BD-I = 100; BD-II=104; BDS=204), 35% met criteria for externally determined disability, about 40% self-reported mental disability and about 23% self-reported physical disability. The odds were three-fold (Odds Ratio (OR): 3.05; 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 1.69, 5.53) that someone with self-identified physical disability would meet criteria for externally determined disability, but associations with mental disability were non-significant (OR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.80). Regression analyses demonstrated that mental disability was associated with being a current or past smoker and physical disability was associated with BD-I. LIMITATIONS: the adequacy of the assessments of disability and definition of BDS can be questioned. CONCLUSIONS: Future clinical and community studies need to consider both externally determined and self-identified disability across the entire Bd spectrum.

6.
Eur Psychiatry ; 64(1): e36, 2021 Jun 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34082855

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Metacognitive knowledge (MK; general awareness of cognitive functioning) and metacognitive experience (ME; awareness of cognitive performance on a specific cognitive task) represent two facets of metacognition that are critical for daily functioning, but are understudied in bipolar disorder. This study was conducted to evaluate MK and ME across multiple cognitive domains in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder and unaffected volunteers, and to investigate the association between metacognition and quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Fifty-seven euthymic participants with bipolar disorder and 55 demographically similar unaffected volunteers provided prediction and postdiction ratings of cognitive task performance across multiple cognitive domains. Self-ratings were compared to objective task performance, and indices of MK and ME accuracy were generated and compared between groups. Participants rated QoL on the Quality of Life in Bipolar Disorder Scale (QoL.BD). RESULTS: Metacognitive inaccuracies in both MK and ME were observed in participants with bipolar disorder, but only in select cognitive domains. Furthermore, most metacognitive inaccuracies involved underestimation of cognitive ability. Metacognitive indices were minimally associated with medication variables and mood symptoms, but several indices were related to QoL. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with bipolar disorder demonstrate inaccuracies in rating their cognitive functioning and in rating their online cognitive task performance, but only on select cognitive functions. The tendency to underestimate performance may reflect a negative information processing bias characteristic of mood disorders. Metacognitive variables were also predictive of QoL, indicating that further understanding of cognitive self-appraisals in persons with bipolar disorder has significant clinical relevance.

7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34108385

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Access to continuing professional development offered at lunchtime is limited by hospital scheduling that has staff members taking their lunch breaks at different times. To overcome this barrier, we developed a three-part training format with (1) a focus group segment soliciting participants' opinions on the training's target behavior, (2) a didactic segment introducing tools to support the behavior, and (3) a question-and-answer segment about the session topic. We rotated through these segments, each 15 minutes long, over 3 hours. Participants could join at any segment and experience the full curriculum after 45 minutes. METHODS: We piloted this training format five times at three hospitals. Our training aimed to encourage clinicians to consistently inform involuntary patients about their Mental Health Act rights. We gauged the effect of the training and participants' opinions of the session using the Continuing Professional Development Reaction questionnaire and a session evaluation, respectively. RESULTS: Continuing Professional Development-Reaction results (n = 80) showed a detectable increase in clinicians' intent to consistently give involuntary patients rights advice. Participants reported finding the training organized, informative, and valuable. DISCUSSION: The open house with rotating short segments is a feasible and adaptable training format to engage clinicians in voluntary continuing professional development.

8.
CNS Drugs ; 35(4): 439-450, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33860922

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Non-response to first-line treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) is common; for such individuals, quality of life (QoL) impairments can be severe. Identifying predictors of QoL changes may support the management of cases with persistent depressive symptoms despite adequate initial pharmacological/psychological treatment. OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to explore predictors of domain-specific QoL improvement following adjunctive aripiprazole treatment for inadequate response to initial antidepressant therapy. METHODS: We evaluated secondary QoL outcomes from a CAN-BIND (Canadian Biomarker Integration Network in Depression) study in patients with MDD who did not respond to an initial 8 weeks of escitalopram and received a further 8 weeks of adjunctive aripiprazole (n = 96). Physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL domains were assessed using the World Health Organization QoL Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF). Clinician-rated depressive symptoms were assessed using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Functioning was measured with the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). Satisfaction with medication was assessed with a single item from the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form (Q-LES-Q-SF). Exploratory t-tests were used to describe domain score changes. A hierarchical linear regression was used to explore demographic, clinical, and treatment-related predictors of improvement. RESULTS: Across domains, QoL improved with adjunctive aripiprazole treatment. Satisfaction with medication and MADRS and SDS scores similarly improved. Symptom reduction was a predictor for positive change to physical and psychological QoL; functioning improvements were predictive of increases to all QoL domains. Satisfaction with medication predicted improvements to physical and psychological domains, whereas number of medication trials was a predictor of worsening QoL in the physical domain. CONCLUSION: The final model explained the most variance in psychological (68%) and physical (67%) QoL. Less variance was explained for environmental (43%) and social QoL (33%), highlighting a need for further exploration of predictors in these domains. Strategies such as functional remediation may have potential to support QoL for individuals with persistent depressive symptoms. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT016557.

9.
Pharmacopsychiatry ; 54(5): 225-231, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33652477

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Many individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) do not respond to initial antidepressant monotherapy. Adjunctive aripiprazole is recommended for treatment non-response; however, the impacts on quality of life (QoL) for individuals who receive this second-line treatment strategy have not been described. METHODS: We evaluated secondary QoL outcomes in patients with MDD (n=179). After 8 weeks of escitalopram, non-responders (<50% decrease in clinician-rated depression) were treated with adjunctive aripiprazole for 8 weeks (n=97); responders continued escitalopram (n=82). A repeated-measures ANOVA evaluated change in Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Short Form scores. QoL was described relative to normative benchmarks. RESULTS: Escitalopram responders experienced the most QoL improvements in the first treatment phase. For non-responders, QoL improved with a large effect during adjunctive aripiprazole treatment. At the endpoint, 47% of patients achieving symptomatic remission still had impaired QoL. DISCUSSION: Individuals who were treated with adjunctive aripiprazole after non-response to escitalopram experienced improved QoL, but a substantial degree of QoL impairment persisted. Since QoL deficits may predict MDD recurrence, attention to ways to support this outcome is required.

10.
J Psychiatr Res ; 137: 22-28, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33647725

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Smartphone apps have recognized potential for improving access to evidence-based care in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD). Healthcare providers are well-positioned to play a role in guiding patients to access safe, evidence-supported, and trustworthy apps. However, little is known about whether and how clinicians use apps with people with BD: understanding practices and attitudes of healthcare providers is essential to support the implementation of mHealth interventions in a real-world context. METHODS: A web-based survey was used to explore clinicians' attitudes towards, and use of apps when working with people with BD. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize quantitative findings. Free text responses were investigated using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Eighty healthcare providers completed the survey. Approximately half of the respondents reported discussing or recommending apps in clinical practice with BD populations. Recommended apps were most commonly related to mood, sleep, and exercise. Barriers to discussing apps included a lack of healthcare provider knowledge/confidence, concerns about patients' ability to access apps, and beliefs that patients lacked interest in apps. CONCLUSION: Although research suggests that people with BD are interested in using apps, uptake of such technology among clinicians is more limited. A lack of clinician knowledge regarding apps, combined with concerns about the digital divide and patient interest, may account for this relatively limited integration of apps into the management of BD. These findings emphasise the importance of considering the information needs of healthcare providers when planning dissemination strategies for app-based interventions for BD.


Assuntos
Transtorno Bipolar , Aplicativos Móveis , Telemedicina , Transtorno Bipolar/terapia , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0247268, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33735273

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In British Columbia (BC), Canada, clinicians are responsible for giving involuntary psychiatric patients rights information upon admission. Yet an investigation by the BC Office of the Ombudsperson found that clinicians are not always fulfilling this responsibility. The Ombudsperson recommended that the provincial government fund an independent body to give rights advice to patients. METHODS: To understand how clinicians feel about this recommendation, focus groups of clinicians who may give psychiatric patients rights information (n = 81) were conducted in Vancouver, BC, to probe their attitudes toward independent rights advisors. The focus group transcripts were thematically analyzed. RESULTS: Most clinicians believe that giving rights information is within their scope of practice, although some acknowledge that it poses a conflict of interest when the patient wishes to challenge the treatment team's decisions. Participants' chief concerns about an independent rights-advice service were that (a) patients may experience a delay in receiving their rights information, (b) integrating rights advisors into the workflow would complicate an already chaotic admission process, and (c) more patients would be counselled to challenge their hospitalization, leading to an increased administrative workload for clinical staff. However, many participants believed that independent rights advisors would be a positive addition to the admission process, both allowing clinicians to focus on treatment and serving as a source of rights-related information. CONCLUSIONS: Participants were generally amenable to an independent rights-advice service, suggesting that the introduction of rights advisors need not result in an adversarial relationship between treatment team and patient, as opponents of the proposal fear. Clearly distinguishing between basic rights information and in-depth rights advice could address several of the clinicians' concerns about the role that independent rights advisors would play in the involuntary admission process. Clinicians' and other stakeholders' concerns should be considered as the province develops its rights-advice service.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Pessoas Mentalmente Doentes/legislação & jurisprudência , Relações Profissional-Paciente/ética , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Colúmbia Britânica , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Pessoal de Saúde/ética , Pessoal de Saúde/legislação & jurisprudência , Humanos , Internação Involuntária/ética , Internação Involuntária/legislação & jurisprudência , Masculino , Pessoas Mentalmente Doentes/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Direitos do Paciente/ética , Direitos do Paciente/legislação & jurisprudência , Pacientes , Pesquisa Qualitativa
12.
Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat ; 17: 79-90, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33469295

RESUMO

Measurement-based care (MBC) can be defined as the clinical practice in which care providers collect patient data through validated outcome scales and use the results to guide their decision-making processes. Despite growing evidence supporting the effectiveness of MBC for depression and other mental health conditions, many physicians and mental health clinicians have yet to adopt MBC practice. In part, this is due to individual and organizational barriers to implementing MBC in busy clinical settings. In this paper, we briefly review the evidence for the efficacy of MBC focusing on pharmacological management of depression and provide example clinical scenarios to illustrate its potential clinical utility in psychiatric settings. We discuss the barriers and challenges for MBC adoption and then address these by suggesting simple solutions to implement MBC for depression care, including recommended outcome scales, monitoring tools, and technology solutions such as cloud-based MBC services and mobile health apps for mood tracking. The availability of MBC tools, ranging from paper-pencil questionnaires to mobile health technology, can allow psychiatrists and clinicians in all types of practice settings to easily incorporate MBC into their practices and improve outcomes for their patients with depression.

13.
Can J Psychiatry ; 66(3): 298-305, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32783472

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to validate the French version of the Quality of Life in Bipolar Disorder (QoL.BD) scale, a condition-specific measure for bipolar disorder (BD). METHOD: The QoL.BD scale was translated into French in accordance with the recommendations for transcultural adaptation. It was administered to 125 participants with BD living in Quebec, Canada. Construct validity was evaluated through correlations with other measures of self-reported quality of life (QoL), functioning, and symptoms. Factorial structure was examined through an exploratory factor analysis. RESULTS: Internal reliability and test-retest reliability standards were met. Correlations in expected directions with other QoL, functioning, and depressive symptom scales supported convergent validity. The item loadings structure of the French QoL.BD largely replicated the original English version, with some modifications. CONCLUSION: The French version of the QoL.BD (full and brief) is comparable in its psychometric properties to the English version. It is a valid and sound measure for the evaluation of the QoL of French-speaking patients with BD.

14.
Can J Psychiatry ; 66(3): 289-297, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32573396

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Bright light therapy is increasingly recommended (alone or in combination with antidepressant medication) to treat symptoms of nonseasonal major depressive disorder (MDD). However, little is known about its impacts on quality of life (QoL), a holistic, patient-valued outcome. METHODS: This study utilizes secondary outcome data from an 8-week randomized, controlled, double blind trial comparing light monotherapy (n = 32), fluoxetine monotherapy (n = 30), and the combination of these (n = 27) to placebo (n = 30). QoL was assessed using the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form (Q-LES-Q-SF). Treatment-related differences in QoL improvements were assessed using a repeated measures analysis of variance. The influence of potential predictors of QoL (demographic variables and change in depressive symptoms) were investigated via hierarchical linear regression. RESULTS: Q-LES-Q-SF scores significantly improved across all treatment conditions; however, no significant differences were observed between treatment arms. QoL remained poor relative to community norms by the end of the trial period: Across conditions, 70.6% of participants had significantly impaired QoL at the 8-week assessment. Reduction in depressive scores was a significant predictor of improved QoL, with the final model accounting for 54% of variance in QoL change scores. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study emphasize that improvement in QoL and reduction in depressive symptoms in MDD, while related, cannot be taken to be synonymous. Adjunctive therapies may be required to address unmet QoL needs in patients with MDD receiving antidepressant or light therapies. Further research is required to explore additional predictors of QoL in order to better refine treatments for MDD.

15.
J Affect Disord ; 278: 33-45, 2021 01 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32949871

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Condition-specific quality of life (QoL) instruments are more representative of the priorities of people with lived experience. As such, the development of the first and only bipolar disorder (BD) specific measurement instrument, the Quality of Life in Bipolar Disorder (QoL.BD) questionnaire, marked an important step forward for the literature. The present systematic review aims to characterise applications of the QoL.BD in the BD literature and review empirical findings obtained from studies using this measure. METHODS: A systematic search identified 37 peer-reviewed publications which reported original empirical data using the QoL.BD in a BD population. No restrictions were placed on language/study type. RESULTS: Adaptations to the QoL.BD displayed appropriate psychometric properties. Although clinical trials were typically underpowered, promising effect sizes for a number of treatment modalities were reported. QoL.BD scores were moderately correlated with depressive symptoms; a number of candidate predictors were identified. LIMITATIONS: Due to resource limitations, the present review used one database (Google Scholar), and a single author reviewed articles for eligibility. On balance the risks of missing relevant studies were deemed minimal. CONCLUSION: A sizeable, international body of evidence now exists regarding the measurement, presentation, and treatment of condition-specific aspects of QoL in BD. Key avenues for future research include large scale, randomized control clinical trials using the QoL.BD as a primary outcome, and granular exploration of potential correlates of QoL.BD domain scores. Finally, longer follow-up periods are required to inform understanding of the dynamic relationship between clinical variables and condition-specific aspects of QoL in BD.


Assuntos
Transtorno Bipolar , Qualidade de Vida , Humanos , Psicometria , Inquéritos e Questionários
16.
J Particip Med ; 12(3): e19475, 2020 Sep 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33044943

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We describe the methodological dimensions of community-based participatory research through a description of study design, youth engagement, and methods/processes in the cocreation of knowledge within a Canadian study, the Bipolar Youth Action Project. This collaborative partnership-carried out by a team composed of academic, community, and youth partners-was designed to investigate self-management and wellness strategies for young adults living with bipolar disorder. OBJECTIVE: The aim is to describe the opportunities and challenges of this collaboration and to reflect upon the process of involving youth with bipolar disorder in health research that concerns them, and share lessons learned. METHODS: The project was conducted in multiple phases over 2 years: (1) grant-writing, with youth contributing to the process; (2) recruitment, in which 12 youth were selected and trained to help shape and conduct two research forums; (3) the first research forum, where more youth were consulted about the strategies they apply to stay well (self-management strategies); (4) data analysis of Forum I findings; (5) research Forum II, which consulted youth with bipolar disorder about knowledge translation of Forum I findings; and (6) data analysis of Forum II findings. Youth peer researchers with bipolar disorder were involved in a significant capacity at every stage in the process. RESULTS: Of the initial 12 youth peer researchers, 7 remained on the project from the recruitment phase until the project ended. They collaborated in the creation of two youth research forums that consulted youth with bipolar disorder on their self-management strategies. CONCLUSIONS: This article shares what was learned from the process of partnering with youth with bipolar disorder in a community-based participatory research study.

17.
BJPsych Open ; 6(5): e86, 2020 Aug 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32778200

RESUMO

Downloading a mobile health (m-health) app on your smartphone does not mean you will ever use it. Telling another person about an app does not mean you like it. Using an online intervention does not mean it has had an impact on your well-being. Yet we consistently rely on downloads, clicks, 'likes' and other usage and popularity metrics to measure m-health app engagement. Doing so misses the complexity of how people perceive and use m-health apps in everyday life to manage mental health conditions. This article questions commonly used behavioural metrics of engagement in mental health research and care, and proposes a more comprehensive approach to measuring in-app engagement.

20.
Can J Psychiatry ; 65(5): 290-300, 2020 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31826657

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Bipolar disorder (BD) is challenging to treat, and fewer treatments are available for depressive episodes compared to mania. Light therapy is an evidence-based nonpharmacological treatment for seasonal and nonseasonal major depression, but fewer studies have examined its efficacy for patients with BD. Hence, we reviewed the evidence for adjunctive light therapy as a treatment for bipolar depression. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of databases from inception to June 30, 2019, for randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of light therapy in patients with BD (CRD42019128996). The primary outcome was change in clinician-rated depressive symptom score; secondary outcomes included clinical response, remission, acceptability, and treatment-emergent mood switches. We quantitatively pooled outcomes using meta-analysis with random-effects models. RESULTS: We identified seven trials representing 259 patients with BD. Light therapy was associated with a significant improvement in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score (standardized mean difference = 0.43, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04 to 0.82, P = 0.03). There was also a significant difference in favor of light therapy for clinical response (odds ratio [OR] = 2.32; 95% CI, 1.12 to 4.81; P = 0.024) but not for remission. There was no difference in affective switches between active light and control conditions (OR = 1.30; 95% CI, 0.38 to 4.44; P = 0.67). Study limitations included different light treatment parameters, small sample sizes, short treatment durations, and variable quality across trials. CONCLUSION: There is positive but nonconclusive evidence that adjunctive light therapy reduces symptoms of bipolar depression and increases clinical response. Light therapy is well tolerated with no increased risk of affective switch.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...