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1.
Qual Health Res ; : 1049732321990360, 2021 Feb 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33554742

RESUMO

The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of people infected with the coronavirus in Denmark during the first phase of the pandemic. An explorative qualitative design underpinned by a phenomenological hermeneutical approach was applied. Fifteen individuals with confirmed COVID-19 infection were included and interviewed individually by telephone. Analyses were inspired by Ricoeur's interpretation theory. The study illuminated how being diagnosed with COVID-19 was experienced not just a virus infecting the participants' biology; it was also a threat to their existence and bodily perception as well as an interference in ordinary social relationships. Beyond a supportive approach, the participants experienced being a special case where people around them acted with excitement and curiosity. Responsibility for existential and emotional care after COVID-19 has been placed with the individual ill person and within their ordinary social circle. We suggest follow-up and rehabilitation for people during and after COVID-19 to support recovery.

2.
J Clin Nurs ; 2021 Feb 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33616272

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the transition from hospital to home and patient experiences of nurse-led postoperative follow-up phone calls after thoracic surgery. BACKGROUND: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery protocol places new demands on patients after hospital. Need for a proactive approach to improve the postoperative follow-up process in the home is required. DESIGN: Qualitative intervention study. METHODS: Interviews were conducted with patients who had received a postoperative phone call after hospital discharge (n=15). The analysis was inspired by Gadamer and Meleis. COREQ guidelines were followed. RESULTS: Two overall themes emerged: 1) The follow-up phone call, which concerns experiences involving the actual call and 2) Transitioning from hospital to home, which through four subthemes illuminates; how patients describe their initial time at home, that patients experience a changed body after surgery, that patients feel alone after returning home and that a call from a nurse can help patients not to feel left out and finally why it is absolutely essential that nurses initiate the phone call. CONCLUSION: Patients are at different stages in their transition process after hospital, making timing of follow-up tricky. Being part of an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery programme has implications for the initial period after discharge; dominated by fatigue, pain and experiences of a changed body. Patients experience being left alone with their illness, and the phone call helps to relieve this isolation. It is essential that the nurse call the patient since the patients want to avoid disturbing the staff. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Healthcare workers can use the findings to understand how patients experience the transition from hospital to home when enrolled in an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery programme. Need for support from a nurse following discharge is suggested.

3.
Cancer Nurs ; 2021 Jan 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33443956

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Research has identified how people living with incurable esophageal cancer experience existential concerns. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the phenomenon of existential anxiety when living with esophageal cancer in the context of receiving general palliative care in a hospital setting. METHODS: This qualitative study is inspired by phenomenological and hermeneutical aspects of the philosophies of Ricoeur and Heidegger. Applying Heidegger's theory of existential anxiety and nostalgia, we interpreted the narratives of 18 patients receiving palliative care due to incurable esophageal cancer. RESULTS: The patients experienced existential anxiety at the loss of a future and homeliness when receiving palliative care. Their existence was reduced to the present, with a break in temporal continuity. An anxious mood permeated their entire being-in-the-world in an unhomelike way. Despite this, patients initiated a restoration of home and meaning expressed as a soothing sense of nostalgia that served as an atmospheric, safe space allowing them to inhabit the borderline between past, present, and future. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests an empirical interpretation of the existential anxiety patients experience when receiving palliation for incurable esophageal cancer. It sheds light on how these patients would benefit from healthcare professionals inviting them to narrate significant aspects of their life stories in which the soothing presence of nostalgia can be supported. IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: Providing care conditions for a life heading toward death, where the patient can live alongside anxiety, involves focusing on "being with" the patient and on incorporating a nostalgic dimension to facilitate soothing restoration of home for patients.

4.
J Adv Nurs ; 77(3): 1442-1452, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33314377

RESUMO

AIM: To explore and gain in-depth understanding of how out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors experience the short- and long-term consequences on daily life. DESIGN: A qualitative exploratory design. METHODS: A purposive sample of 32 survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data from six audiotaped focus group interviews were collected in either November 2018 or in March 2019. Analysis and interpretation of the transcribed texts was performed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach guided by Ricoeur for unfolding lived experiences. RESULTS: Three narratives were identified. The survivors narrated how they in the early phase after the cardiac arrest experienced: (a) 'a fragmented memory at the mercy of the system'. The analysis further showed how the participants were: (b) 'living in the shadow of anxiety and mixed feelings' and with the: (c) 'lost sense of self' up to several years after survival. CONCLUSION: The participants in our study experienced distinct bodily impairments, suffering, and the lost sense of self in the return to daily life from early on to several years after resuscitation. There seem to be an urgent need for an early initiated post-arrest transitional care program led by an expert cardiac arrest nurse. In particular, the healthcare professionals need to pay attention to survivors in employment and with children living at home. Facilitated cardiac arrest peer support groups might minimize the long-term suffering, heighten the self-image, and install a new hope for the future. IMPACT: To ease the post-arrest return to daily life for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors it seems important that a transitional care program from the inhospital setting to the community consist of: (a) screening for and education on bodily losses at an early stage, (b) provision of support on the often prolonged emotional reactions, and (c) referring for further individual and targeted psychological and neurological follow-up and rehabilitation if needed.

5.
Patient Educ Couns ; 2020 Nov 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33257200

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore patients' and spouses' perception and attitudes towards participating in a patient and family advisory council. METHODS: A qualitative study with interviews conducted within a phenomenological-hermeneutical frame, inspired by Ricoeur were conducted with current and former participants (patients and/or spouses) of a patient and family advisory council in Denmark. RESULTS: In total, 16 participants were interviewed (12 former patients/four spouses) with a mean age of 68 (range 49-79) and 44 % women. After the analysis, perceptions and attitudes towards participating in a patient advisory council emerged in four themes; "Payback", "A personal invitation", "A safe and equal atmosphere", and "Sharing, caring, and healing". CONCLUSION: Participants of an advisory council express a need for "paying it back" to the health care system. When being part of the advisory council, the participants expressed feeling a genuine engagement and interest from the health-care professionals - leading to a feeling of being equal and taken seriously. The advisory council increased the process of recovery by sharing narratives with peers. PRACTICAL VALUE: Experiences of being part of an advisory council lead to an understanding of "why" former patients and spouses participate. This knowledge can help others to recruit members.

6.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 20(1): 1031, 2020 Nov 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33176771

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Extensive measures to reduce person-to-person transmission of COVID-19 are required to control the current outbreak. Special attention is directed at healthcare professionals as reducing the risk of infection in healthcare is essential. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' experiences of awaiting a test result for a potential COVID-19 infection. METHODS: Qualitative interviews with 15 healthcare professionals were performed, underpinned by a phenomenological hermeneutical analytical framework. RESULTS: The participating healthcare professionals' experiences of awaiting a COVID-19 test result were found to be associated with a stoic and altruistic orientation towards their work. These healthcare professionals presented a strong professional identity overriding most concerns about their own health. The result of the coronavirus test was a decisive parameter for whether healthcare professionals could return to work. The healthcare professionals were aware that their family and friends were having a hard time knowing that the COVID-19 infection risk was part of their jobs. This concern did not, however, cause the healthcare professionals to falter in their belief that they were doing the right thing by focusing on their core area. The threat to own health ran through the minds of the healthcare professionals occasionally, which makes access to testing particularly important. CONCLUSION: The participating healthcare professionals had a strong professional identity. However, a discrepancy between an altruistic role as a healthcare professional and the expectations that come from the community was illuminated. A mental health coronavirus hotline for healthcare professionals is suggested.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Adulto , Altruísmo , Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Filosofia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Adulto Jovem
7.
BMC Palliat Care ; 19(1): 168, 2020 Nov 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33138799

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: End-of-life (EOL) conversations are highly important for patients living with life-threatening diseases and for their relatives. Talking about the EOL is associated with reduced costs and better quality of care in the final weeks of life. However, there is therefore a need for further clarification of the actual wishes of patients and their relatives concerning EOL conversations in an acute hospital setting. AIM: The purpose of this study was to explore the wishes of patients and their relatives with regard to talking about the EOL in an acute hospital setting when living with a life-threatening disease. METHODS: This study is a qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews. A total of 17 respondents (11 patients and six spouses) participated. The patients were identified by the medical staff in a medical and surgical ward using SPICT™. The interview questions were focused on the respondents' thoughts on and wishes about their future lives, as well as on their wishes regarding talking about the EOL in a hospital setting. RESULTS: This study revealed that the wish to talk about the EOL differed widely between respondents. Impairment to the patients' everyday lives received the main focus, whereas talking about EOL was secondary. Conversations on EOL were an individual matter and ranged from not wanting to think about the EOL, to being ready to plan the funeral and expecting the healthcare professionals to be very open about the EOL. The conversations thus varied between superficial communication and crossing boundaries. CONCLUSION: The wish to talk about the EOL in an acute hospital setting is an individual matter and great diversity exists. This individualistic stance requires the development of conversational tools that can assist both the patients and the relatives who wish to have an EOL conversation and those who do not. At the same time, staff should be trained in initiating and facilitating EOL discussions.

8.
Scand J Caring Sci ; 2020 Sep 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32969065

RESUMO

Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition with mortality up to 75%. In the acute phase, patients are constrained with total bed rest until pain relief and blood pressure has been stabilised. Some need surgery. Aortic dissection is associated with anxiety and poor health-related quality of life. However, no study has explored the experience of living through aortic dissection. The aim of this study was to explore the patient experience of living through aortic dissection. Data were collected in interviews with 10 patients who lived through aortic dissection. Data were gathered and analysed using a phenomenological approach. The qualitative analysis revealed four themes; 'Am I going to die now? - the existential turning point when diagnosed with life-threatening aortic dissection', 'compromised integrity during admission - experiences of hospitalisation', 'Signals from my body - a new awareness of the body after discharge', 'What can I do? - uncertainties about physical activity in daily life posthospitalisation'. Experiences of aortic dissection are a life-threatening and overwhelming existential life situation which includes a period of constraining hospitalisation and experiences a compromised integrity. Patients have substantial concerns regarding body signals and a constantly uncertainty about what kind of activity level they can sustain which affect their mental well-being and their daily life. These findings contribute to understanding and elaborating a more nuanced description of being diagnosed with aortic dissection, which is essential when planning high-quality treatment and care, developing sufficient follow-up and preventing adverse events.

9.
Eur J Oncol Nurs ; 48: 101800, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32746000

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to explore the lived experiences of patients in terms of eating and consequences in everyday life in the first year after oesophageal cancer surgery. METHODS: Thirteen patients participated in qualitative interviews one year after surgery for oesophageal cancer. Descriptions capturing the meaning of the lived experiences of patients were then derived from subsequent analysis and interpretation of the interviews. A phenomenological hermeneutical approach comprised the epistemological stance, and theoretical perspectives were drawn from Schutz' theory of everyday life. RESULTS: Patient descriptions of their experiences with food, eating and everyday life in the first year after oesophageal cancer surgery fell into four themes: Adjusting to a different anatomy - food and eating as a dominant and difficult activity; changed body - food and eating as an underlying shadow; feeling different - social consequences of changed eating; a nutritional jungle - guidance and support in an uncertain time. CONCLUSION: The physical and social consequences of oesophageal cancer resection upend everyday structures, requiring patients to adopt a new, conscious and reflexive approach to food and eating as a social activity. Continuous support from healthcare professionals and patient-to-patient interaction can help redefine everyday life.

10.
Cancer Nurs ; 2020 Jul 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32649336

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dignity is an inherent value in palliative care, but understanding dignity among people living with and hospitalized for incurable esophageal cancer has not been explored. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to empirically explore the meaning of dignity in people hospitalized with incurable esophageal cancer. METHODS: A qualitative hermeneutic approach, inspired by Gadamer, guided the research process and interpretation of the transcribed interviews. Eighteen patients participated in the study. RESULTS: The meaning of dignity was revealed as reverential response in care relationships and eating as an undignifying activity. A balance of the healthcare system's framework with the lifeworld of the patient was significant in preserving dignity and gave patients a sense of reverent response. Patients were unable to eat ordinary daily meals, which affected their perception of own body and identity, including interactions with others. The resulting bodily changes and social consequences were of crucial importance to the perceived dignity. CONCLUSIONS: A dialogical and understanding approach is significant in making the patient feel worthy, consequently helping to uphold a sense of dignity. The changing and decaying body due to eating difficulties bears witness to illness, altering the individual's sense of self, in turn threatening the dignity of identity. IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: The care should be based on a reverential response based on the patients' lifeworld. In doing so, storytelling might be a way. Palliative care for these people needs to stress that patients share other aspects of life that is not totally dominated by their illness, inability to eat, and unrecognizable body.

11.
Lung Cancer ; 146: 285-289, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32593918

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Patients with lung cancer report a lower degree of Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) compared with other cancer patients. HRQoL reflects how patients experience the impact of their disease and its treatment on their quality of daily living. A widely used questionnaire in lung cancer patients is the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Lung (FACT-L) questionnaire. Here we report the secondary outcomes on FACT-L data from the Postoperative Rehabilitation in Operation for Lung CAncer (PROLUCA) study, which describes the effect of early (14 days) versus late initiated (14 weeks) postoperative rehabilitation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The PROLUCA study was designed as a two-armed randomized controlled trial with an early rehabilitation group (14 days after surgery (ERG)) or a control arm with a late rehabilitation group (14 weeks after surgery (LRG)). The results for seven domain scores obtained using the FACT-L at the following time-points: baseline, 14 weeks, 26 weeks and 52 weeks after surgery are presented here. RESULTS: 119 patients were randomized to the ERG and 116 to the LRG. In the ERG, HRQoL measured by both FACT-L and FACT-G (general core instrument) showed a continuous improvement up to 26 weeks after which HRQoL decreased after further 26 weeks without structured intervention. In the LRG a non-significant deterioration was detected over the first 14 weeks after surgery. After participation in the 12 weeks rehabilitation program, an increase in HRQoL was seen, without reaching the same level as the early group. CONCLUSION: Analyses of the seven domain scores obtained using FACT-L and FACT-G reflect the importance of starting exercise early after surgery since the ERG avoid a temporary decrease in HRQoL. It is therefore recommended to start up a structured rehabilitation program 14 days after surgery, containing high intensity interval training and strength exercise twice a week for 12 weeks.

12.
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs ; 19(7): 600-608, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32324044

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patient participation in treatment and care is often encouraged and is desirable because of its proven positive impact on treatment, quality of care and patient safety. AIMS: To develop an instrument to measure patient participation in health care and to investigate the measurement properties of the Patient Participation Questionnaire (PPQ). METHODS: A literature review was conducted to develop a model of patient participation. The PPQ was constructed consisting of 17 items organized into four subscales. Psychometric evaluation of factor structure, convergent construct validity by hypothesis testing and analyses of internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha were performed on data from a hospitalised mixed group of patients with cardiac disease, pulmonary disease and cancer (N=378 patients). RESULTS: Confirmatory factor analysis did not show a clear model fit, which is why an exploratory factor analysis was performed, suggesting a different four subscale structure consisting of a total of 16 items. The four subscales were labelled Shared decision power, Adapted and individualized knowledge, Collaboration and Human approach. There were strong ceiling effects on all items. Analysis of convergent construct validity showed a moderate correlation (0.59) between the PPQ and another instrument measuring patient participation. Internal consistency for the total PPQ score was high: 0.89. CONCLUSION: In a mixed group of patients with cardiac disease, pulmonary disease and cancer, the PPQ showed promising psychometric properties in terms of factor structure, convergent construct validity and internal consistency. The PPQ may be used to shed light on the experience of patient participation and guide quality improvements.

13.
Trials ; 21(1): 105, 2020 Jan 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31964402

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Intermittent claudication (IC) caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common cardiovascular disease. Patients with IC have reduced walking capacity, restricted activity levels and mobility, and reduced health-related quality of life. The disease leads to social isolation, the risk of cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Non-operative management of IC requires exercise therapy and studies show that supervised exercise training is more effective than unsupervised training, yet many patients with IC lack motivation for changes in health behaviour. No studies investigating the effects of existing cardiac rehabilitation targeted patients with IC have been published. The aim of this article is to present the rationale and design of the CIPIC Rehab Study, which examines the effect of a cross-sectoral rehabilitation programme versus usual care for patients in non-operative management for IC. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A randomised clinical trial aims to investigate whether cardiac rehabilitation for patients with IC in non-operative management versus usual care is superior to treatment as usual. The trial will allocate 118 patients, with a 1:1 individual randomisation to either the intervention or control group. The primary outcome is maximal walking distance measured by the standardised treadmill walking test. The secondary outcome is pain-free walking distance measured by the standardised treadmill walking test, healthy diet measured by a fat-fish-fruit-green score, and level of physical activity measured by an activity score within official recommendations. Statistical analyses will be blinded. Several exploratory analyses will be performed. A mixed-method design is used to evaluate qualitative and quantitative findings. A qualitative and a survey-based complementary study will be undertaken to investigate patients' post-discharge experiences. A qualitative post-intervention study will explore experiences of participation in rehabilitation. DISCUSSION: The study is the first to assess the effect of a cardiac rehabilitation programme designed for patients with IC. The study will describe how to monitor and improve rehabilitation programmes for patients with IC in a real-world setting. Mixed-method strategies can allow for both exploration and generalisation in the same study, but the research design is a complex intervention and any effects found cannot be awarded a specific component. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Retrospectively registered in Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT03730623.


Assuntos
Terapia por Exercício , Claudicação Intermitente/reabilitação , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Apoio Social , Adaptação Psicológica , Humanos , Claudicação Intermitente/fisiopatologia , Doença Arterial Periférica/reabilitação , Autoeficácia , Teste de Caminhada
14.
Scand J Caring Sci ; 34(2): 370-379, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31313855

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this project was to explore the lived experience of participating in a nonpharmacological sexual rehabilitation programme. BACKGROUND: In the healthcare system, patients are important stakeholders, and their experience and knowledge are essential to include when evaluating rehabilitation programmes. Patient experiences with participating in sexual rehabilitation for cardiovascular patients have not yet been investigated. METHODS: Ten qualitative interviews were conducted with male patients from a randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of a 12-week rehabilitation programme focusing on sexuality. The analysis was inspired by Paul Ricoeur's theory of interpretation. Analysis consisted of three levels: (i) naive reading, (ii) structural analysis and (iii) critical interpretation and discussion. The theoretical framework reflects aspects of behavioural theory of social cognitive theory developed by Albert Bandura and his concept of self-efficacy. RESULTS: The findings are presented as themes extracted from the structural analysis and interpreted in the critical interpretation and express the way in which cardiovascular patients experience participating in a sexual rehabilitation programme. Three themes were identified reflecting the intervention to be a special place of understanding, describing the intervention as a supporting atmosphere and finally expressing the intervention as empowering sexuality. CONCLUSIONS: Participating in the sexual rehabilitation programme was experienced as efficient, valuable, motivating and safe, but dependent on a professional setting. The intervention developed participants' self-efficacy with regard to their sexual performance and relationship. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings highlight the importance of a professional setting including certain competencies such as humour and professional skills when handling the after-care of cardiovascular patients with sexual problems.

15.
J Clin Nurs ; 29(1-2): 85-93, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31512796

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to examine patients' experience of dietary habits and nutritional counselling in the early period during hospitalisation after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). BACKGROUND: Undergoing CABG, patients have two different nutritional needs, extra proteins and calories for the first period after surgery and a heart-healthy diet when the recovery period is over. These needs can be difficult to manage for the patients. DESIGN: Qualitative study. METHODS: Interviews were conducted and analysed within a phenomenological-hermeneutic frame inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Patients undergoing CABG were interviewed 4-5 days after surgery at Odense University Hospital from March to May, 2017. The study adhered to the COREQ guidelines. RESULTS: In total, 15 patients were interviewed (mean age 65 years, 87% men). After analysing the interviews following themes emerged, "Different needs-the nutritional jungle", "Food and heart-the lacking attention," and "The force of habits-being under the influence from spouses on dietary habits". CONCLUSION: The interviewed patients had no or only a little knowledge about how to eat after heart surgery. In general, they experienced a lack of attention to nutritional counselling by the nursing staff during hospitalisation. Furthermore, the health behaviour of men seems to be different from women's, and therefore, interventions aiming at optimising men's health might be prioritised. Finally, spouses have a great influence on eating habits, why they should be involved in nutritional counselling. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This study provides important and relevant knowledge about patients' lacking knowledge about nutrition. When planning nutritional measures, whether it is promoting healing after heart surgery or preventing progression of arteriosclerosis, the study contributes with suggestions as to which factors should be considered in this process-men's health behaviour and spouses' influence on dietary habits in the household.


Assuntos
Ponte de Artéria Coronária/enfermagem , Comportamento Alimentar/psicologia , Educação em Saúde/métodos , Idoso , Ponte de Artéria Coronária/psicologia , Aconselhamento Diretivo/métodos , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Período Pós-Operatório , Pesquisa Qualitativa
16.
Nurs Philos ; 21(2): e12254, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31087495

RESUMO

Patient-centred care has gained ground in health service following a health policy initiative aimed at changing the paternalistic culture towards one with more patient involvement. Development of knowledge relating to people's lived experiences of illness is important in this context. Literature in the field of health science describes methods for exploring what is at stake for people affected by illness, and the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur has been a significant source of inspiration. Especially, Ricoeur's interpretation theory has been construed and applied in different, often schematic, methodological variations, whereas his narrative philosophy is a little used source of inspiration. Health science has been characterized by a biomedical awareness of method and the idea that there is a direct and immediate path to patients' experiences, a viewpoint that can be traced back to Descartes and the philosophy of subjectivism. Opposed to Descartes, Ricoeur says that we are already embedded in a world of traditions and meanings over which we have no control. According to Ricoeur, we leave traces when we express ourselves, and traces are formed by the world of meanings and traditions to which we belong. Often, the sense in the traces is hidden, making it impossible to directly understand individual's experiences. Reflection on an individual's lived experiences must take place via the narratives in which the individual expresses themselves. The centrepiece of Ricoeur's narrative philosophy is the threefold mimesis, which is an approach to understanding the meaning of peoples' lived experiences. The philosophical hermeneutics of Gadamer plays an important role in Ricoeur's theory of interpretation, although he has criticized Gadamer for failing to include one dimension in his philosophy; he finds this dimension in Habermas' ideology critique. Ricoeur's ideology critique is absent in health science research, which is why it has been made a focal point in this article.


Assuntos
Hermenêutica , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/ética , Filosofia em Enfermagem , Humanos , Pesquisa Metodológica em Enfermagem/tendências , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/métodos , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/tendências
17.
Qual Health Res ; 30(5): 760-771, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31729930

RESUMO

The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences, perceptions, and considerations of individuals who declined participation in a randomized clinical trial involving exercise rehabilitation after surgery for lung cancer. An interpretive phenomenological approach was applied comprising interviews with 15 individuals who did not wish to participate in the trial. The findings shed light on a discrepancy between their freedom to act and make decisions and the limitations of having to act in a certain way. The participants found themselves in a gray area between a healthy life and a good life, as influenced by societal norms and taking responsibility for one's own health and rehabilitation. When including patients in rehabilitation after lung cancer, having insight into the underlying narrative on values and the good life, priorities in daily life, social context and the norms embedded in people's self-understanding is crucial.

18.
Palliat Med ; 33(10): 1255-1271, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31368845

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: People living with life-threatening illness experience unmet existential needs despite the growing research and clinical field of palliative care. Narrative interventions show promise in managing these problems, but more knowledge is needed on the characteristics of narrative interventions and the feasibility of using personal narratives in a hospital. AIM: To review the literature on personal narratives in hospital-based palliative care interventions and to strengthen palliative care practices. DESIGN: We conducted a systematic integrative review with qualitative analysis and narrative synthesis in accordance with PRISMA where applicable (PROSPERO#:CRD42018089202). DATA SOURCES: We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cinahl, SocINDEX and PsychInfo for primary research articles published until June 2018. We assessed full-text articles against the eligibility criteria followed by a discussion of quality using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. RESULTS: Of 480 articles, we found 24 eligible for this review: 8 qualitative, 14 quantitative and 2 mixed methods. The articles reported on dignity therapy, legacy building, outlook, short-term life review and life review. Data analysis resulted in five themes: core principles, theoretical framework, content of narrative, outcome and, finally, acceptability and feasibility. CONCLUSION: Various types of systematic palliative care interventions use personal narratives. Common to these is a shared psychotherapeutic theoretical understanding and aim. Clinical application in a hospital setting is both feasible and acceptable but requires flexibility regarding the practices of the setting and the needs of the patient.


Assuntos
Terapia Narrativa/métodos , Cuidados Paliativos/normas , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Humanos , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Pesquisa Qualitativa
19.
BMC Palliat Care ; 18(1): 62, 2019 Jul 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31345196

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: End-of-life (EOL) conversations in hospital should serve to give patients the opportunity to consider future treatment options and help them clarify their values and wishes before it becomes relevant to make decisions about treatment. However, it is known that EOL conversations are not performed systematically in hospital. This may mean that patients and their relatives do not address EOL issues. There is a lack of knowledge about who is responsible for conducting these conversations, and when and under what circumstances they are conducted. The aim of this study was to explore the existing practices regarding EOL conversations in an acute care hospital setting. METHODS: The design was Interpretive Description and the methods for the data collection included: 1. Participatory observational studies in a pulmonary medical and surgical ward (a total of 66 h); 2. Four focus group interviews with healthcare professionals (n = 14) from the wards. The analysis followed Spradley's ethnosemantic analysis. RESULTS: The results revealed three cultural categories related to: 1. The physical and organizational setting; 2. The timing of EOL conversations and competencies and roles in addressing EOL issues and 3. Topics addressed in EOL conversations. The EOL conversations were part of daily clinical practice, but there was a lack of competencies, roles were unclear and the physical and organizational environment was not conducive to the conversations. The topics of the EOL conversations revolved around a "here-and-now" status of the patient's disease progression and decisions about the level of treatment. To a lesser extent, the conversations included the patient's and relatives' thoughts and wishes concerning EOL, which allowed long-term care planning. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that there are several barriers to talking about EOL in an acute care hospital setting, and future strategies must address an overall approach. In order to provide patients and their relatives with better opportunities to express their EOL wishes, there is a need for clearer roles and guidelines in an interdisciplinary approach to EOL conversations, alongside improved staff competencies and changes to the organizational and physical environment.


Assuntos
Relações Profissional-Paciente , Assistência Terminal/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Dinamarca , Feminino , Grupos Focais/métodos , Hospitais , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Assistência Terminal/métodos
20.
BMC Palliat Care ; 18(1): 60, 2019 Jul 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31331302

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Incurable oesophageal cancer patients are often affected by existential distress and deterioration of quality of life. Knowledge about the life situation of this patient group is important to provide relevant palliative care and support. The purpose of this study is to illuminate the ways in which incurable oesophageal cancer disrupts the patients' lives and how the patients experience and adapt to life with the disease. METHODS: Seventeen patients receiving palliative care for oesophageal cancer were interviewed 1-23 months after diagnosis. The epistemological approach was inspired by phenomenology and hermeneutics, and the method of data collection, analysis and interpretation consisted of individual qualitative interviews and meaning condensation, inspired by Kvale and Brinkmann. RESULTS: The study reveals how patients with incurable oesophageal cancer experience metaphorically to end up at a "table in the corner". The patients experience loss of dignity, identity and community. The study illuminated how illness and symptoms impact and control daily life and social relations, described under these subheadings: "sense of isolation"; "being in a zombie-like state"; "one day at a time"; and "at sea". Patients feel alone with the threat to their lives and everyday existence; they feel isolated due to the inhibiting symptoms of their illness, anxiety, worry and daily losses and challenges. CONCLUSIONS: The patients' lives are turned upside down, and they experience loss of health, function and familiar, daily habits. The prominent issues for the patients are loneliness and lack of continuity. As far as their normal everyday lives, social networks and the health system are concerned, patients feel they have been banished to a "table in the corner". These patients have a particular need for healthcare professionals who are dedicated to identifying what can be done to support the patients in their everyday lives, preserve dignity and provide additional palliative care.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Esofágicas/psicologia , Cuidados Paliativos/normas , Percepção , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Adaptação Psicológica , Adulto , Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente/tendências , Neoplasias Esofágicas/complicações , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Satisfação do Paciente , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Estresse Psicológico/etiologia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia
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