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1.
Viruses ; 11(11)2019 Oct 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31671816

RESUMO

Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus associated with fatal disease in progressively infected cats. While testing/removal and vaccination led to a decreased prevalence of FeLV, recently, this decrease has reportedly stagnated in some countries. This study aimed to prospectively determine the prevalence of FeLV viraemia in cats taken to veterinary facilities in 32 European countries. FeLV viral RNA was semiquantitatively detected in saliva, using RT-qPCR as a measure of viraemia. Risk and protective factors were assessed using an online questionnaire to report geographic, demographic, husbandry, FeLV vaccination, and clinical data. The overall prevalence of FeLV viraemia in cats visiting a veterinary facility, of which 10.4% were shelter and rescue cats, was 2.3% (141/6005; 95% CI: 2.0%-2.8%) with the highest prevalences in Portugal, Hungary, and Italy/Malta (5.7%-8.8%). Using multivariate analysis, seven risk factors (Southern Europe, male intact, 1-6 years of age, indoor and outdoor or outdoor-only living, living in a group of ≥5 cats, illness), and three protective factors (Northern Europe, Western Europe, pedigree cats) were identified. Using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis, the origin of cats in Europe, pedigree, and access to outdoors were important predictors of FeLV status. FeLV-infected sick cats shed more viral RNA than FeLV-infected healthy cats, and they suffered more frequently from anaemia, anorexia, and gingivitis/stomatitis than uninfected sick cats. Most cats had never been FeLV-vaccinated; vaccination rates were indirectly associated with the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. In conclusion, we identified countries where FeLV was undetectable, demonstrating that the infection can be eradicated and highlighting those regions where awareness and prevention should be increased.

2.
Ir Vet J ; 72: 13, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31762988

RESUMO

Background: Cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV) is a condition of unknown aetiology involving microvascular thrombosis. It has recently been described in over 160 dogs in the United Kingdom and usually has a grave prognosis. To date, this condition has not been described in dogs residing in the Republic of Ireland. Case presentation: Three dogs presented to University College Dublin Veterinary Hospital (UCDVH) for investigation of rapidly progressive skin lesions. All dogs were diagnosed with CRGV on post-mortem examination. All three dogs had azotaemia on presentation or rapidly developed azotaemia, and all were euthanased because of progression of clinical signs and likelihood of CRGV. One dog was affected by seizure-like episodes and had thrombotic microangiopathy evident within the cerebrum. Conclusions: CRGV occurs in dogs residing in the Republic of Ireland and is a differential for cases presenting with skin lesions and azotaemia. The histopathological lesions of CRGV can also affect the brain leading to neurological signs such as seizures. Owners and veterinarians should be aware that this condition can occur in dogs in Ireland.

3.
Vet J ; 252: 105343, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31554584

RESUMO

Hyperadrenocorticism is a relatively common endocrine disorder in dogs that has been extensively described. However, its diagnosis remains challenging because there is no true reference standard test, and a myriad factors can affect the diagnostic performance of the commonly used adrenal function tests. Ultimately, the diagnosis is based on a combination of signalment, history and clinical findings, and a variety of diagnostic test results. The second part of this review aims to appraise available data on diagnostic performance of adrenal function tests in naturally occurring canine hyperadrenocorticism.


Assuntos
Testes de Função do Córtex Suprarrenal/veterinária , Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/veterinária , Hormônio Adrenocorticotrópico/sangue , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/diagnóstico , Animais , Doenças do Cão/sangue , Cães
4.
Vet J ; 252: 105342, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31554593

RESUMO

Hyperadrenocorticism is a relatively common endocrine disorder in dogs. It occurs as a result of a functional pituitary or adrenal tumour, although other causes have been rarely reported. Canine hyperadrenocorticism has been extensively described but diagnosing this disease remains challenging. Few studies have investigated the clinical and clinicopathological features helpful in differentiating dogs with hyperadrenocorticism from dogs in which the disease is suspected but eventually excluded. Ultimately the diagnosis is based on a combination of multiple pieces of information emanating from the signalment, history, clinical findings, and a variety of diagnostic tests. The first part of this review aims to critically appraise the available data on epidemiology, clinical and laboratory features of naturally occurring canine hyperadrenocorticism.


Assuntos
Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/diagnóstico , Animais , Doenças do Cão/etiologia , Doenças do Cão/patologia , Doenças do Cão/fisiopatologia , Cães
5.
Can Vet J ; 60(9): 964-971, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31523082

RESUMO

In humans, increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW) values are associated with higher morbidity and mortality in a variety of pathological processes. The main objective of this study was to evaluate RDW in dogs with a diverse range of pathologies. Clinical data from 276 dogs were retrospectively evaluated. Significantly higher RDW values were found in dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (P < 0.0001), immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (P < 0.0004), hyperadrenocorticism (P < 0.0001), hypothyroidism (P = 0.0220), hepatic vascular anomaly (P < 0.0001), pneumonia (P < 0.0001), chronic kidney disease (P = 0.0005), multi-centric lymphoma (P = 0.0002), and myxomatous mitral valve degeneration (P = 0.0032). However, there was extensive overlap with the values from healthy dogs, limiting the diagnostic value of RDW in this setting. Although RDW may have a role as a potential prognostic indicator, further studies would be necessary to address this.

6.
BMC Vet Res ; 15(1): 228, 2019 Jul 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31277644

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Thyroid neoplasia is a common endocrine neoplasm in dogs. The boxer is one of the reported breeds predisposed to malignant thyroid neoplasia. However, the association between thyroid neoplasia, malignancy and breed should be considered with caution. CASES PRESENTATION: This article describes the presentation, clinical pathological findings, computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and histopathological features of benign cystic thyroid tumour (cystadenoma) diagnosed in three boxers. These three dogs were presented for investigation of unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 1) cervical masses with no associated clinical signs of thyroid dysfunction. In each case, post-contrast CT scan identified a large, lateralised, non-invasive, well-defined homogeneous cystic structure with a hyperattenuating contrast-enhancing capsule of suspected thyroid origin displacing the surrounding cervical tissues. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of the cysts yielded fluid with a high thyroxine concentration in each case. Histopathology was consistent with thyroid cystadenoma in all cases. One dog was concurrently diagnosed with oral melanoma and euthanased. Two dogs underwent surgical excision with one lost to follow-up after 36 months and the other euthanased after 16 months following diagnosis of mast cell tumour. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first detailed report of non-functional benign thyroid cystadenoma in dogs and provides relevant information about case management for this type of tumour. The presence of a large cystic structure associated with benign non-functional thyroid neoplasia may be a condition to which boxer dogs are predisposed.


Assuntos
Cistadenoma/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Neoplasias da Glândula Tireoide/veterinária , Animais , Cistadenoma/diagnóstico , Cistadenoma/cirurgia , Doenças do Cão/genética , Doenças do Cão/cirurgia , Cães , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Masculino , Neoplasias da Glândula Tireoide/diagnóstico , Neoplasias da Glândula Tireoide/cirurgia , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X/veterinária , Resultado do Tratamento
8.
J Vet Intern Med ; 32(3): 967-977, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29498108

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dogs with hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) may be more mildly affected at the time of diagnosis today, which could influence the prevalence of associated clinical and clinicopathological abnormalities and diagnostic test performance. Different low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST) result patterns have not been evaluated individually. OBJECTIVES: To assess the current features of HAC and evaluate if the diagnostic test performance of individual LDDST result patterns differ. ANIMALS: One hundred and twenty-three dogs undergoing investigation for HAC. METHODS: Retrospective evaluation of dogs in which a LDDST was performed and HAC confirmed or excluded by alternative means. Cases with basal cortisol concentrations (t0 ) < 1 µg/dL were excluded. Each LDDST result was classified as (a) complete suppression (t3 and t8 < 1 µg/dL), (b) lack of suppression (t3 and t8 > 1 µg/dL and both > 50% t0 ), (c) partial suppression (t3 and t8 > 1 µg/dL but either < 50% t0 ), (d) escape (t8 > 1 µg/dL and t3 < 1 µg/dL) or (e) inverse (t3 > 1 µg/dL and t8 < 1 µg/dL) pattern. RESULTS: Fifty-nine (48%) dogs were diagnosed with HAC and 64 (52%) with non-adrenal illness. Hyperadrenocorticism cases had similar clinicopathological abnormalities compared to previous reports. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) (95% confidence interval [CI]) of the LDDST for diagnosing HAC were 96.6 (91.9-100)%, 67.2 (55.7-78.7)%, 73.1 (63.2-82.9)%, and 95.6 (89.5-100)%, respectively. Lack of suppression pattern had the highest PPV (93.9 [85.8-100]%) followed by the partial suppression pattern (67.9 [50.6-85.2]%) and escape or inverse pattern (36.8 [15.1-58.5]%). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: A lack of suppression LDDST pattern has the highest PPV for diagnosing HAC followed by a partial suppression pattern. By contrast, the escape or inverse pattern provided limited support of HAC.


Assuntos
Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/veterinária , Dexametasona/farmacologia , Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/diagnóstico , Hormônio Adrenocorticotrópico/farmacologia , Animais , Doenças do Cão , Cães , Feminino , Hidrocortisona/sangue , Masculino , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sensibilidade e Especificidade
9.
Ir Vet J ; 71: 2, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29372047

RESUMO

Background: Hyperthyroidism is common in older cats. Prevalence varies geographically, but is anecdotally considered low in Ireland. The aim of this study was to document prevalence of hyperthyroidism in older cats in the greater Dublin area of Ireland and to assess environmental and clinical associations for development and identification of the disease. Methods: Primary-care veterinary practices were requested to select cats aged 10 years or older where blood sampling was being performed for health screening or clinical investigations. Surplus serum/plasma samples were submitted to University College Dublin Diagnostic Endocrine Laboratory for total thyroxine (T4) measurement. Cats were classified as hyperthyroid, equivocal or euthyroid based on a total T4 concentration (reference interval, 15-60 nmol/L), of >60 nmol/L, 30-60 nmol/L or <30 nmol/L, respectively. Simultaneous free T4 or repeat (after 4-6 weeks) total T4 measurement was recommended in all equivocal cases. Animals receiving treatment for hyperthyroidism were excluded. A questionnaire completed by the client and veterinarian detailing historical and physical information was also required. Associations between categorical variables were analysed by Chi-square or Fisher's exact test and odds ratio (OR) calculated. A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Samples were submitted from 507 cats including 107 (21.1%) hyperthyroid, 54 (10.6%) equivocal and 346 (68.2%) euthyroid. The presence of goitre (P < 0.0001), tachypnoea (P = 0.0378), tachycardia (P = 0.002), polyphagia (P = 0.0003) and weight loss (P < 0.0001) were significantly associated with hyperthyroidism. Cats with goitre were more likely to be diagnosed as hyperthyroid [OR 2.85, (95% CI 1.75-4.62] compared to those without. However, goitre was only palpated in 40 of 102 (39.2%) hyperthyroid cats. Increasing age was the only significant (P < 0.002) risk factor for development of hyperthyroidism. A relationship between hyperthyroidism and sex, breed, lifestyle, parasite control, vaccination status or feeding habits was not identified. Conclusions: Hyperthyroidism is not uncommon in Irish cats. Age was the only significant risk factor for its development. The high proportion of hyperthyroid cats without palpable goitre (> 60%) may reflect failure to detect goitre and account for the perceived low prevalence of this condition in Ireland.

10.
J Feline Med Surg ; 19(10): 1103-1109, 2017 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28826266

RESUMO

Objectives Hyperthyroidism is a disorder of older cats that may have a geographical variation in prevalence. Prevalence studies have not yet been performed in South Africa, a geographical area where hyperthyroidism in cats has recently been observed and where, reportedly, the incidence appears to be increasing. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of feline hyperthyroidism in South Africa and to identify any potential risk factors. Further information on the worldwide prevalence and possible causative factors would increase our understanding of the aetiology of this disease and help identify any preventive measures. Methods Serum total thyroxine (tT4) and canine thyroid-stimulating hormone (cTSH) were measured in 302 cats aged 9 years and older that were presented at various veterinary clinics throughout South Africa. In cats with equivocal tT4 and undetectable cTSH values, serum free thyroxine (fT4) was also measured. At the time of blood sampling a questionnaire was completed regarding vaccination history, internal and external parasite control, diet and environment. Results Prevalence of hyperthyroidism (tT4 >50 nmol/l or tT4 between 30 and 50 nmol/l with TSH <0.03 ng/ml and fT4 >50 pmol/l) was 7% (95% confidence interval 4.4-10.4), with no significant difference between healthy (5%) and sick (8%) cats. Cats ⩾12 years of age (odds ratio [OR] 4.3, P = 0.02) and cats eating canned food (OR 2.1, P = 0.1) were more likely to be diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. No significant relationship between vaccinations, parasite control or indoor environment and hyperthyroidism was observed. Hyperthyroid cats were more likely to present with weight loss (OR 3.2, P = 0.01) and with a heart rate ⩾200 beats per min (OR 5, P = 0.01) than cats without the disease. Conclusions and relevance Hyperthyroidism does not appear to be uncommon in the South African cat population. Risk factors for hyperthyroidism, specifically older age and eating canned food, were present in this as in other reported populations.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Hipertireoidismo/veterinária , Fatores Etários , Animais , Gatos , Hipertireoidismo/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , África do Sul/epidemiologia
11.
Anim Genet ; 46(2): 175-84, 2015 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25644216

RESUMO

An X-linked muscular dystrophy, with deficiency of full-length dystrophin and expression of a low molecular weight dystrophin-related protein, has been described in Japanese Spitz dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation and develop a specific test to identify affected cases and carrier animals. Gene expression studies in skeletal muscle of an affected animal indicated aberrant expression of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (dystrophin) gene and an anomaly in intron 19 of the gene. Genome-walking experiments revealed an inversion that interrupts two genes on the X chromosome, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene and the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene. All clinically affected dogs and obligate carriers that were tested had the mutant chromosome, and it is concluded that the inversion is the causative mutation for X-linked muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz breed. A PCR assay that amplifies mutant and wild-type alleles was developed and proved capable of identifying affected and carrier individuals. Unexpectedly, a 7-year-old male animal, which had not previously come to clinical attention, was shown to possess the mutant allele and to have a relatively mild form of the disease. This observation indicates phenotypic heterogeneity in Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, a feature described previously in humans and Golden Retrievers. With the availability of a simple, fast and accurate test for Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, detection of carrier animals and selected breeding should help eliminate the mutation from the breed.


Assuntos
Inversão Cromossômica , Doenças do Cão/genética , Cães/genética , Distrofina/genética , Proteínas do Olho/genética , Distrofia Muscular de Duchenne/genética , Animais , Cruzamento , Feminino , Fatores de Troca do Nucleotídeo Guanina/genética , Heterozigoto , Masculino
12.
Ir Vet J ; 67(1): 17, 2014.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25132957

RESUMO

A three year old male entire Staffordshire bull terrier was referred to University College Dublin Veterinary Hospital, with a two week history of fever, inflammation of the right hock, lameness on the right hindlimb, peripheral lymphadenopathy and gastrointestinal signs (vomiting and diarrhoea). For the preceding three months the dog had been treated for atopic dermatitis with oral ciclosporin (5 mg/kg, PO, q 24 hours). Cytological analysis of the affected lymph nodes demonstrated fungal-like organisms predominantly contained within macrophages. Subsequent fungal culture and microscopic identification confirmed the presence of a Byssochlamys sp. This fungus is a saprophytic organism which has been associated with mycotoxin production. It has not previously been identified as a cause of systemic infection in animals or humans. Ciclosporin was discontinued, and a second generation triazole, voriconazole prescribed at a dose of 6 mg/kg for the first two doses, and continued at 3 mg/kg every 12 hours for six months. There was an excellent response. Follow-up examination five weeks after treatment was completed confirmed remission of the disease. The dog remains alive and well three years later. The present case represents an unusual fungal infection in a dog secondary to immunosuppressive therapy with ciclosporin. Such a possibility should be considered in animals presenting with signs consistent with systemic infection when receiving immunosuppressive medication.

13.
Ir Vet J ; 66(1): 12, 2013 Jul 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23842571

RESUMO

Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is described for the first time in three apparently unrelated West Highland white terriers (WHWT) from Ireland and the UK. All three dogs were diagnosed with markedly regenerative but persistent anaemia and had been treated for presumed immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA) before hereditary erythrocyte PK-deficiency was confirmed by breed-specific DNA mutation analysis. This hereditary erythroenzymopathy causes haemolytic anaemia and affects several canine breeds with varying degrees of severity. Although eventually causing osteosclerosis, haemosiderosis and death, PK-deficient dogs can adapt to their anaemia for many years.PK-deficiency should be considered in anaemic WHWTs worldwide particularly in dogs with haemolytic anaemia where evidence for an immune-mediated, infectious or toxic underlying cause is lacking.

16.
Ir Vet J ; 65(1): 5, 2012 Mar 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22433388

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Angiostrongylus vasorum infection is associated with high morbidity and mortality in dogs. Although recognised in Ireland, there are no large series of cases reported. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify pertinent clinical and geographical features in Irish dogs. RESULTS: The case records of dogs presenting to the University College Dublin Veterinary Hospital (1999-2010) were reviewed. A contemporaneous review of external faecal parasitology and post mortem submissions was also performed. A positive diagnosis of angiostrogylosis was identified in 49 dogs including 24 clinical, 10 post mortem and 15 external faecal sample cases. The majority (n = 44 (90%)) resided on the East Coast.In the clinical cases, the median age was 20 months, 29% of cases were older than 2 years. Clinical features included cardiorespiratory (63%), coagulopathic (71%) and other (63%) signs. Cough (n = 10), dyspnoea (n = 5) and tachypnoea (n = 3) were the most common cardiorespiratory abnormalities. Of animals with evidence of coagulopathy, excessive haemorrhage from a wound (n = 5), airway haemorrhage (n = 9), epistaxis (n = 3), haematoma (n = 4), suspected haemarthrosis (n = 3), neurological signs (n = 2) and haematuria (n = 1) were found. Ten dogs were anaemic, of which two were severe (haematocrit ≤ 0.20 L/L). Ten animals had thrombocytopenia, with four severely affected (≤50 × 109/L). PT and APTT values were prolonged in 4 (24%) of 17 and a BMBT was prolonged in 5 (63%) of 8 cases. Vague signs of exercise intolerance (n = 6), lethargy (n = 6) and weakness (n = 2) were identified, with two (8%) animals having only these signs. In one animal the diagnosis appeared to be incidental. Thoracic radiographs (n = 19) identified abnormalities in 100% of cases. Four (17%) animals died before or within 24 hours of treatment and post mortem examinations confirmed angiostrongylosis. Fenbendazole was administered in 19 cases, 18 (95%) recovered. Two animals were euthanised, one which failed to respond to therapy and another in which an ante mortem diagnosis had not been made. CONCLUSIONS: Angiostrongylosis is not uncommon in Ireland, is not confined to young dogs or the East Coast and can present with a wide variety of signs, particularly coagulopathic, respiratory or neurological signs.

17.
Am J Vet Res ; 72(9): 1204-8, 2011 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21879978

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of Hct on blood glucose readings of dogs obtained by use of 2 point-of-care (POC) blood glucometers and a laboratory analyzer. ANIMALS: 184 dogs, including 139 Greyhounds. PROCEDURES: Venous blood samples collected from 184 dogs with a range of Hcts (measured in EDTA-anticoagulated blood) were immediately analyzed with a handheld glucometer specifically developed for veterinary use and a glucometer developed for use in humans. The remainder of each blood sample was placed in fluoride oxalate tubes, and plasma glucose concentration was measured with a laboratory analyzer. Agreement between results for the POC glucometers and laboratory analyzer and effect of Hct on glucometer accuracy was assessed via regression analysis. RESULTS: Significant differences were detected between results of the glucometers and the reference laboratory analyzer. The Hct affected the correlation between results for the glucometers and the laboratory analyzer. Deviations of the glucometers from the reference interval varied with Hct. The glucometer for veterinary use more closely correlated with the glucose concentration when Hct was within or above its reference interval. The glucometer for use in humans more closely approximated laboratory reference glucose concentrations in anemic dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Hct had a relevant impact on the correlation between whole blood and plasma glucose concentrations in dogs. Significant variations between results obtained with the 2 glucometers could be critical when interpreting blood glucose measurements or selecting a POC glucometer for an intensive care setting and precise glycemic control in critically ill dogs.


Assuntos
Análise Química do Sangue/métodos , Glicemia/análise , Cães/sangue , Hematócrito/métodos , Sistemas Automatizados de Assistência Junto ao Leito , Análise de Variância , Animais , Análise Química do Sangue/instrumentação , Análise Química do Sangue/veterinária , Hematócrito/instrumentação , Hematócrito/veterinária , Humanos , Modelos Lineares , Valores de Referência , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
19.
J Feline Med Surg ; 12(6): 476-82, 2010 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20472484

RESUMO

Vector-borne bacterial and rickettsial agents and Toxoplasma gondii, are common organisms in cats. Some are potentially zoonotic or may be transmitted via blood transfusion. The current study investigated the prevalence of these agents in cats from Dublin, Ireland, for which no published data exists. Whole blood (n=116) and sera (n=83) samples were obtained from 121 cats. DNA was extracted from blood and assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques for Anaplasma species, Bartonella species, Ehrlichia species, Mycoplasma haemofelis, 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum', 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' and Rickettsia species. IgG and T gondii IgG and IgM serum antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DNA consistent with B henselae (3.4%), B clarridgeiae (0.8%), both Bartonella species (0.8%), C M haemominutum (12.9%), or M haemofelis (2.5%) was amplified from 24/116 blood samples (20.6%). Antibodies to T gondii and Bartonella species were detected in 28 (33.7%) and 22 (26.5%) of 83 sera, respectively.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis/veterinária , Anaplasma/isolamento & purificação , Anaplasmose/epidemiologia , Animais , Bartonella/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Bartonella/epidemiologia , Infecções por Bartonella/veterinária , Candida/isolamento & purificação , Candidíase/epidemiologia , Candidíase/veterinária , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Doenças Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis/microbiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis/parasitologia , Ehrlichia/isolamento & purificação , Ehrlichiose/epidemiologia , Ehrlichiose/veterinária , Feminino , Irlanda/epidemiologia , Masculino , Mycoplasma/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Mycoplasma/epidemiologia , Infecções por Mycoplasma/veterinária , Prevalência , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Rickettsia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/veterinária , Toxoplasma/isolamento & purificação , Toxoplasmose Animal/epidemiologia
20.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 236(3): 302-8, 2010 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20113242

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess use of serum thyroid hormone concentrations by veterinarians to diagnose hypothyroidism in sighthounds and to evaluate serum thyroid hormone concentrations in healthy Salukis. DESIGN: Retrospective case series and cross-sectional study. ANIMALS: 398 sighthounds of various breeds with a diagnosis of hypothyroidism and 283 healthy Salukis. PROCEDURES: Pretreatment thyroid hormone assay results from sighthounds subsequently classified as hypothyroid by practitioners were retrieved from a laboratory database. In healthy Salukis, serum concentrations of total thyroxine (T(4)), free T(4), total triiodothyronine (T(3)), free T(3), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and antibodies against thyroglobulin and thyroid hormones were assayed. RESULTS: Records indicated hypothyroidism had been diagnosed in 303 (76.1%) sight-hounds on the basis of low serum thyroid hormone concentrations alone and in 30 (7.5%) others despite all thyroid hormone indices being within reference limits. Only 65 (16.3%) dogs had a high TSH concentration or positive thyroglobulin autoantibody result to support the diagnosis. In healthy Salukis, median (reference limits) serum concentrations of total T(4), free T(4), total T(3), free T(3), and TSH were 13.0 nmol/L (2.8 to 40.0 nmol/L), 12.0 pmol/L (2.0 to 30.3 pmol/L), 1.0 nmol/L (0.4 to 2.1 nmol/L), 4.0 pmol/L (1.6 to 7.7 pmol/L), and 0.18 ng/mL (0 to 0.86 ng/mL), respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Diagnosis of hypothyroidism by practitioners was most often made without adequate supportive laboratory evidence. Thyroid hormone values in healthy Salukis differed markedly from standard reference limits for some, but not all, thyroid hormone indices. Breed-specific reference limits should be used when interpreting thyroid hormone profiles of sighthounds.


Assuntos
Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Hipotireoidismo/veterinária , Tireotropina/sangue , Tiroxina/sangue , Tri-Iodotironina/sangue , Animais , Estudos Transversais , Doenças do Cão/sangue , Cães , Feminino , Hipotireoidismo/sangue , Hipotireoidismo/diagnóstico , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos
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