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1.
J Sleep Res ; : e13789, 2022 Nov 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36398720

RESUMO

Recent investigations show that many people affected by SARS-CoV2 (COVID-19) report persistent symptoms 2-3 months from the onset of the infection. Here, we report the Italian findings from the second International COVID-19 Sleep Study survey, aiming to investigate sleep and dream alterations in participants with post-acute symptoms, and identify the best determinants of these alterations among patients with long-COVID. Data from 383 participants who have had COVID-19 were collected through a web-survey (May-November 2021). Descriptive analyses were performed to outline the sociodemographic characteristics of long-COVID (N = 270, with at least two long-lasting symptoms) and short-COVID (N = 113, with none or one long-lasting symptom) participants. They were then compared concerning sleep and dream measures. We performed multiple linear regressions considering as dependent variables sleep and dream parameters discriminating the long-COVID group. Age, gender, work status, financial burden, COVID-19 severity and the level of care were significantly different between long-COVID and short-COVID subjects. The long-COVID group showed greater sleep alterations (sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, sleep inertia, naps, insomnia, sleep apnea, nightmares) compared with the short-COVID group. We also found that the number of long-COVID symptoms, psychological factors and age were the best explanatory variables of sleep and oneiric alterations. Our findings highlight that sleep alterations are part of the clinical presentation of the long-COVID syndrome. Moreover, psychological status and the number of post-acute symptoms should be considered as state-like variables modulating the sleep problems in long-COVID individuals. Finally, according to previous investigations, oneiric alterations are confirmed as a reliable mental health index.

2.
J Clin Med ; 11(22)2022 Nov 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36431126

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Based on the most common psychological difficulties of the evacuees from the 2016 Fort McMurray wildfires in Alberta, Canada, a therapist-guided cognitive behavioral self-treatment was developed. This study aimed to explore how gender influences the usage and subjective appreciation of the RESILIENT online treatment. METHODS: Our study included 81 English-speaking evacuees with significant posttraumatic symptoms, or with some posttraumatic symptoms accompanied by at least mild depression symptoms or subclinical insomnia, and who logged into the platform at least once. Various usage and subjective appreciation variables were analyzed, including number of completed sessions, number of logins, number of words per session, perceived efforts, perception of usefulness and intention to continue using the different strategies. RESULTS: No difference was detected in most objective usage indicators. The number of words written in sessions 7 and 10 was significantly greater for women than for men. Regarding subjective appreciation, men had a greater perception of having put strong efforts in the cognitive restructuring strategy, while women reported in a greater proportion that they wanted to continue using physical exercise as a behavioral activation strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Our study offers a first look into how women and men use online treatments, and what their preferences are.

3.
Chronobiol Int ; : 1-9, 2022 Nov 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36412198

RESUMO

The present study had two main aims. First, to investigate whether shift/night workers had a higher prevalence and severity of COVID-19 compared with day workers. Second, to investigate whether people regularly working in face-to-face settings during the pandemic exhibited a higher prevalence and severity of COVID-19 compared with those having no need to be in close contact with others at work. Data consisted of 7141 workers from 15 countries and four continents who participated in the International COVID Sleep Study-II (ICOSS-II) between May and December 2021. The associations between work status and a positive COVID-19 test and several indications of disease severity were tested with chi-square tests and logistic regressions adjusted for relevant confounders. In addition, statistical analyses were conducted for the associations between face-to-face work and COVID-19 status. Results showed that shift/night work was not associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 compared to day work. Still, shift/night workers reported higher odds for moderate to life-threatening COVID-19 (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.71, 95%-confidence interval = 1.23-5.95) and need for hospital care (aOR = 5.66, 1.89-16.95). Face-to-face work was associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 (aOR = 1.55, 1.12-2.14) but not with higher disease severity. In conclusion, shift/night work was not associated with an increased risk of COVID-19, but when infected, shift/night workers reported more severe disease. Impaired sleep and circadian disruption commonly seen among shift/night workers may be mediating factors. Working face-to-face increased the risk of COVID-19, likely due to increased exposure to the virus. However, face-to-face work was not associated with increased disease severity.

4.
Sleep Health ; 2022 Oct 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36319579

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To estimate health care and productivity costs associated with insomnia symptoms in Canadian adults. METHODS: Three pieces of information were needed to calculate estimates based on a prevalence-based approach: (1) the pooled relative risk estimates of health outcomes consistently associated with insomnia symptoms obtained from recent meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies; (2) the direct (health care) and indirect (lost productivity due to premature mortality) costs of these health outcomes using the Economic Burden of Illness in Canada information; and (3) the prevalence of insomnia symptoms in Canadian men (18.1%) and women (29.5%) obtained from a nationally-representative survey. RESULTS: The direct, indirect, and total costs of insomnia symptoms in Canada in 2021 were $1.9 billion, $12.6 million, and $1.9 billion, respectively. This value represents 1.9% of the overall burden of illness costs for 2021 in Canada. The 2 most expensive chronic diseases attributable to insomnia symptoms were type 2 diabetes ($754 million) and depression ($706 million). The main contributor to the costs for type 2 diabetes and depression was prescription drugs. A 5% decrease in insomnia symptoms (from 23.8% to 18.8%) would result in an estimated $353 million in avoided costs while a 5% increase in insomnia symptoms (from 23.8% to 28.8%) would result in an estimated $333 million in additional expenditures yearly. CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia symptoms greatly contribute to the economic burden of illness in Canada. Reducing the prevalence of insomnia symptoms would reduce its societal burden.

5.
Sleep Breath ; 2022 Nov 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36414783

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The emergence of sleep disturbances in response to major stressful events has been previously documented. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an objective marker that provides insight into autonomic nervous system dynamics. The aim of the present study was to examine the preliminary effectiveness of a one-shot session of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) for frontline healthcare providers with acute insomnia. METHODS: This study was conducted from 2020 to 2021 on healthcare workers with insomnia. The healthcare workers were randomly allocated to receive either one-shot cognitive behavioral therapy or routine care. Insomnia severity index (ISI) and heart rate variability were assessed before and 1 month after the interventions. RESULTS: Among 57 patients (n = 31 in the intervention group and n = 26 in the control group), mean (± SD) age of both groups were 34.6 (± 9.5) and 36.6 (± 6.9), respectively. Most participants in both groups were female (81% and 65% in the intervention and control groups, respectively; p-value = 0.10). Insomnia severity index score decreased in the intervention group from 13.3 to 6.7 (p < 0.001). The change before and after the intervention was significant between the two groups for HF-normalized unit (high-frequency power band [0.15-0.40 Hz] in the normalized unit) and LF/HF (the ratio of low frequency to high frequency). HF-normalized unit increased in the intervention group (35.8 ± 21.5 vs. 45.6 ± 19.8 before and after the intervention, respectively), and decreased in the control group (43.9 ± 16.5 vs. 39.8 ± 18.5, before and after the intervention, respectively). CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that a single-shot session of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is effective in managing acute insomnia symptoms in healthcare workers.

6.
J Sleep Res ; : e13754, 2022 Oct 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36208038

RESUMO

Many people report suffering from post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 or "long-COVID", but there are still open questions on what actually constitutes long-COVID and how prevalent it is. The current definition of post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 is based on voting using the Delphi-method by the WHO post-COVID-19 working group. It emphasizes long-lasting fatigue, shortness of breath and cognitive dysfunction as the core symptoms of post-acute sequelae of COVID-19. In this international survey study consisting of 13,628 subjects aged 18-99 years from 16 countries of Asia, Europe, North America and South America (May-Dec 2021), we show that post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 symptoms were more prevalent amongst the more severe COVID-19 cases, i.e. those requiring hospitalisation for COVID-19. We also found that long-lasting sleep symptoms are at the core of post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 and associate with the COVID-19 severity when COVID-19 cases are compared with COVID-negative cases. Specifically, fatigue (61.3%), insomnia symptoms (49.6%) and excessive daytime sleepiness (35.8%) were highly prevalent amongst respondents reporting long-lasting symptoms after hospitalisation for COVID-19. Understanding the importance of sleep-related symptoms in post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 has a clinical relevance when diagnosing and treating long-COVID.

9.
Nat Sci Sleep ; 14: 1469-1483, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36052103

RESUMO

Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic affects mental health and sleep, resulting in frequent nightmares. Therefore, identifying factors associated with nightmare frequency is important, as it can indicate mental health issues. The study aimed to investigate increases in nightmare frequency comparing the pre-pandemic and pandemic period, and identify its risk factors. Further, the mediating role of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms between the pandemic and nightmares is explored. Patients and Methods: For this cross-sectional survey data were obtained via self-rating online survey (ICOSS: details in Partinen et al, 2021), which was open to anyone older than 18 years. The final volunteer sample consisted of 15,292 participants, divided according to their nightmare frequency (high: ≥1-2 nights/week; low: <1-2 nights/week). A total of 9100 participants were excluded if answers on variables of interest were missing or receiving rewards for participation. Chi-square tests identified changes of nightmare frequency. Predictors of high nightmare frequency were assessed using logistic regression and presented as Odds Ratios. Post-hoc mediation models were used to investigate the role of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Results: The mean age was 41.63 (SD=16.55) with 64.05% females. High nightmare frequency increased significantly from 13.24% to 22.35% during the pandemic. Factors associated with it included self-reported PTSS (OR=2.11), other mental disorders and various sleep disorders or problems. Financial burden due to the pandemic, confinement, having had COVID-19, and work situation during the pandemic were associated with nightmare frequency, those relations were partly mediated through PTSS. Conclusion: Our results display the pandemic influence on nightmare frequency, which in turn connects to multiple mental health and sleep factors. These relations were partly mediated through PTSS. The COVID-19 pandemic appears to have caused traumatization of a substantial proportion of society. Health care workers should consider nightmares in their screening routines, as it might indicate PTSS and/or other mental and sleep disorders.

11.
Sleep Health ; 8(5): 551-563, 2022 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35963823

RESUMO

Scientists in sleep and circadian rhythms, public health experts, healthcare providers, partners, and stakeholders convened in 2020 for a 2-day meeting organized by the Canadian Sleep and Circadian Network to develop a national strategy for integrating sleep and circadian rhythms into public health and policies in Canada. The objective of this paper is to present the national strategy that emerged from this meeting of 60 participants from across Canada. The meeting focused on 4 key target priorities: (1) atypical working schedules, (2) sleep and circadian rhythms of children and adolescents, (3) insomnia, and (4) impact of sleep apnea on health. Following constructive discussions, it was decided that the following 4 strategic objectives should be prioritized to accelerate the integration of sleep and circadian rhythms into public health policies in Canada: (1) increase public health sleep and circadian rhythm research, (2) increase public health education and knowledge mobilization on sleep, (3) inform and support public health sleep interventions and policies, and (4) promote sleep health training. Participants recommended that research and public health efforts address needs along the continuum of sleep health. The committee noted that strategies and interventions could differ across contexts, settings, sectors, and jurisdictions. The national strategy also identified high-priority research questions in public health and recommended mechanisms to build research capacity, providing a path forward for the integration of sleep and circadian rhythms into public health research and policies.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano , Saúde Pública , Adolescente , Criança , Humanos , Canadá , Sono , Políticas
12.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e058212, 2022 08 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35922096

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: It is unclear how internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) can be integrated into healthcare systems, and little is known about the optimal level of therapist guidance. The aim of this study is to investigate three different versions of a stepped care model for insomnia (IG1, IG2, IG3) versus treatment as usual (TAU). IG1, IG2 and IG3 rely on treatment by general practitioners (GPs) in the entry level and differ in the amount of guidance by e-coaches in internet-delivered CBT-I. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: In this randomised controlled trial, 4268 patients meeting International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) criteria for insomnia will be recruited. The study will use cluster randomisation of GPs with an allocation ratio of 3:3:3:1 (IG1, IG2, IG3, TAU). In step 1 of the stepped care model, GPs will deliver psychoeducational treatment; in step 2, an internet-delivered CBT-I programme will be used; in step 3, GPs will refer patients to specialised treatment. Outcomes will be collected at baseline, and 4 weeks, 12 weeks and 6 months after baseline assessment. The primary outcome is insomnia severity at 6 months. An economic evaluation will be conducted and qualitative interviews will be used to explore barriers and facilitators of the stepped care model. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Centre-University of Freiburg. The results of the study will be published irrespective of the outcome. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: DRKS00021503.


Assuntos
Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono , Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental/métodos , Humanos , Internet , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Sono , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/terapia , Resultado do Tratamento
13.
J Clin Med ; 11(15)2022 Jul 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35955982

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Natural disasters happen in an increased frequency, and telemental health interventions could offer easily accessible help to reduce mental health symptoms experienced by survivors. However, there are very few programs offered to natural disaster survivors, and no research exists on therapists' experiences with providing blended interventions for natural disaster survivors. AIMS: Our qualitative case study aims to describe psychologists' experiences with an online, therapist-assisted blended intervention for survivors of the Fort McMurray wildfires in Alberta, Canada. METHOD: The RESILIENT intervention was developed in the frames of a randomized controlled trial to promote resilience after the Fort McMurray wildfires by providing survivors free access to a 12-module, therapist-assisted intervention, aiming to improve post-traumatic stress, insomnia, and depression symptoms. A focus group design was used to collect data from the therapists, and emerging common themes were identified by thematic analysis. RESULTS: Therapists felt they could build strong alliances and communicate emotions and empathy effectively, although the lack of nonverbal cues posed some challenges. The intervention, according to participating therapists, was less suitable for participants in high-stress situations and in case of discrepancy between client expectations and the intervention content. Moreover, the therapists perceived specific interventions as easy-to-use or as more challenging based on their complexity and on the therapist support needed for executing them. Client engagement in the program emerged as an underlying theme that had fundamental impact on alliance, communication, and ultimately, treatment efficiency. Therapist training and supervision was perceived as crucial for the success of the program delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provided several implications for the optimalization of blended interventions for natural disaster survivors from our therapists' perspective.

14.
J Clin Med ; 11(15)2022 Jul 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35956005

RESUMO

(1) Background: Insomnia is the most prevalent sleep disorder worldwide and cognitive behavioral therapy is the front-line treatment. Digital health technologies have a role to play in screening and delivering interventions remotely and without the need for human intervention. The KANOPEE app, which provides a screening and behavioral intervention for insomnia symptoms through an interaction with a virtual agent, showed encouraging results in previous studies during and after the COVID-19 lockdown, but has not yet been evaluated in a controlled study. This study aims at comparing the benefits of KANOPEE, a smartphone application dealing with insomnia complaints, with another application proposing an electronic sleep diary named "My Sleep Diary". The acceptance and potential benefits of these digital solutions are tested in real-life settings (i.e., without soliciting human medical resources) and in the general population. (2) Methods: Subjects were included if they downloaded one of the apps between December 2020 and October 2021, and were of legal age. Both apps were available on downloading platforms in France. Primary outcome was Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and secondary outcomes were total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE) and wake time after sleep onset (WASO). (3) Results: A total of 535 users completed the intervention with KANOPEE and 489 users completed My Sleep Diary, both for 17 days. KANOPEE users improved their ISI score significantly more than sleep diary users (interaction Time*Group: F(2,2002) = 17.3, p < 0.001). Similar results were found for nocturnal sleep parameters (TST) (KANOPEE users gained 48 min of sleep after intervention, while My Sleep Diary users gained only 16 min of sleep), and particularly in the population with moderate to severe initial sleep complaints (F(4,1980) = 8.9, p < 0.001). Other sleep markers (SE and WASO) were significantly improved in the KANOPEE users compared to the sleep diary ones (p < 0.001). (4) Conclusions: KANOPEE provides significantly greater benefits than an electronic sleep diary regarding reduction of insomnia complaints and estimated nocturnal sleep characteristics in a self-selected sample of the general population. Population with the most severe initial ISI score (≥15) benefited the most from the KANOPEE App compared to filling up a simple sleep diary.

15.
Biomedicines ; 10(7)2022 Jul 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35884924

RESUMO

The aim of this article is to provide a systematic review of reliability studies of the sleep-wake disorder diagnostic criteria of the international classifications used in sleep medicine. Electronic databases (ubMed (1946-2021) and Web of Science (-2021)) were searched up to December 2021 for studies computing the Cohen's kappa coefficient of diagnostic criteria for the main sleep-wake disorder categories described in the principal classifications. Cohen's kappa coefficients were extracted for each main sleep-wake disorder category, for each classification subtype, and for the different types of methods used to test the degree of agreement about a diagnosis. The database search identified 383 studies. Fifteen studies were analyzed in this systematic review. Insomnia disorder (10/15) and parasomnia disorder (7/15) diagnostic criteria were the most studied. The reliability of all sleep-wake disorders presented a Cohen's kappa with substantial agreement (Cohen's kappa mean = 0.66). The two main reliability methods identified were "test-retest reliability" (11/15), principally used for International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD), and "joint interrater reliability" (4/15), principally used for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) subtype diagnostic criteria, in particularl, the DSM-5. The implications in terms of the design of the methods used to test the degree of agreement about a diagnosis in sleep medicine are discussed.

16.
Sleep Med Clin ; 17(2): 173-191, 2022 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35659072

RESUMO

This article summarizes epidemiologic evidence on insomnia, including the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors, as well as its course and consequences. Approximately 10% of the adult population suffers from an insomnia disorder and another 20% experiences occasional insomnia symptoms. Women, older adults, and people with socioeconomic hardship are more vulnerable to insomnia. Insomnia is often a chronic condition, with a 40% persistence rate over a 5-year period. Insomnia is a significant public health problem that should be addressed at the individual level with appropriate clinical care and at the population level with large-scale sleep health interventions.


Assuntos
Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Prevalência , Saúde Pública , Fatores de Risco , Sono , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/epidemiologia
17.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(8): 6689-6698, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35507112

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Insomnia affects 30-60% of cancer patients and tends to become chronic when left untreated. While cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the recommended first-line treatment, this intervention is not readily accessible. This qualitative study investigated current practices in the assessment and management of insomnia in five hospitals offering cancer care and identified the barriers and facilitators to the implementation of a stepped care CBT-I (i.e., web-based CBT-I followed, if needed, by 1-3 booster sessions) in these settings. METHODS: Nine focus groups composed of a total of 43 clinicians (e.g., physicians, nurses, radiation therapists, psychologists), six administrators, and 10 cancer patients were held. The Consolidated Framework for Implementing Research (CFIR) was used to develop the semi-structured interview and analyze the data. RESULTS: Sleep difficulties are not systematically discussed in clinical practice and when a treatment is offered, most often, it is a pharmacological one. Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of a stepped care CBT-I included individual characteristics (e.g., lack of knowledge about CBT-I); intervention characteristics (e.g., increased accessibility offered by a web-based format); inner setting characteristics (e.g., resistance to change); and process factors (e.g., motivation to offer a new service). CONCLUSIONS: This qualitative study confirms the need to better address insomnia in routine cancer care and suggests that, while some barriers were mentioned, the implementation of a stepped care CBT-I is feasible. Keys to a successful implementation include accessibility, training, inclusion of stakeholders in the process, and ensuring that they are supported throughout the implementation.


Assuntos
Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental , Neoplasias , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Neoplasias/complicações , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/etiologia , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/terapia
18.
Behav Sleep Med ; : 1-15, 2022 May 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35535772

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of protocols for acceptance and commitment therapy for insomnia (ACT-I) and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in adults. METHOD: Participants were 37 adults (74.3% women; M = 43.7 years, SD = 10.7) with chronic insomnia who were randomized to 6 weekly group sessions consisting of ACT-I (n = 19) or CBT-I (n = 18). The primary outcome measures were based on the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) total score, a measure of insomnia complaints, and included the proportions of treatment responders (defined as a change in score of 8 points or more) and remitters (defined as a final score below 8). RESULTS: Both treatment modalities significantly reduced insomnia severity. Post-treatment, the proportion of treatment responders was higher in the CBT-I than the ACT-I (64.7% vs. 50.0%, respectively) group and six months later, ACT-I made further improvements whereas CBT-I had a reduced treatment response (58.8% vs. 55.6%, respectively). CBT-I was associated with a higher proportion of insomnia remission at post treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Both CBT-I and ACT-I are effective, with a higher proportion of insomnia remitters in CBT-I post-treatment. The different change trajectories for the two therapy groups provide insights into behavioral change via a cognitive versus contextual approach.

19.
J Clin Sleep Med ; 18(7): 1823-1829, 2022 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35404226

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: In most standardized approaches to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, it is commonly the case that total wake time is reduced substantially during sleep restriction, but self-reported total sleep time (TST) is minimally affected. By follow-up, however, TST increases by almost 1 hour on average. A secondary analysis was undertaken to assess what percentage of participants meet or appreciably exceed baseline TST after cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. METHODS: Data were drawn from a randomized controlled trial assessing acute and maintenance therapies for chronic insomnia (n = 80). The present analyses assessed the percentage of participants that 1) reached (≥ 0 minute increase) and 2) appreciably exceeded (≥ 30 minutes increase) baseline TST as assessed via daily sleep diaries at posttreatment and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months following treatment. RESULTS: By the end of acute treatment, 45% of participants reached or exceeded baseline TST. By 24 months follow-up, this percentage had increased to 86%. Only 17% of participants achieved a 30-minute increase in TST by the end of acute treatment, and this proportion only increased to 58% over time. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in its current form does not appreciably increase self-reported TST in a significant proportion of patients with insomnia. Whether participants would benefit from further increases in TST warrants investigation. The further titration of sleep opportunity may be useful to accelerate increases in TST, to extend the effect to a larger subset of patients, and/or to increase the magnitude of the TST gain. CITATION: Scott H, Cheung JMY, Muench A, et al. Does total sleep time substantially increase after cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia? J Clin Sleep Med. 2022;18(7):1823-1829.


Assuntos
Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono , Humanos , Polissonografia , Sono , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/terapia , Resultado do Tratamento
20.
J Sleep Res ; 2022 Apr 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35474255

RESUMO

There has been increasing concern about the long-term impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as evidenced by anecdotal case reports of acute-onset parkinsonism and the polysomnographic feature of increased rapid eye movement sleep electromyographic activity. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and correlates of dream-enactment behaviours, a hallmark of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, which is a prodrome of α-synucleinopathy. This online survey was conducted between May and August 2020 in 15 countries/regions targeting adult participants (aged ≥18 years) from the general population with a harmonised structured questionnaire on sleep patterns and disorders, COVID-19 diagnosis and symptoms. We assessed dream-enactment behaviours using the Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behaviour Disorder Single-Question Screen with an additional question on their frequency. Among 26,539 respondents, 21,870 (82.2%) answered all items that were analysed in this study (mean [SD] age 41.6 [15.8] years; female sex 65.5%). The weighted prevalence of lifetime and weekly dream-enactment behaviours was 19.4% and 3.1% and were found to be 1.8- and 2.9-times higher in COVID-19-positive cases, respectively. Both lifetime and weekly dream-enactment behaviours were associated with young age, male sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, higher physical activity level, nightmares, COVID-19 diagnosis, olfactory impairment, obstructive sleep apnea symptoms, mood, and post-traumatic stress disorder features. Among COVID-19-positive cases, weekly dream-enactment behaviours were positively associated with the severity of COVID-19. Dream-enactment behaviours are common among the general population during the COVID-19 pandemic and further increase among patients with COVID-19. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential neurodegenerative effect of COVID-19.

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