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1.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 2020 Jul 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32690592

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare perioperative and oncologic outcomes between minimally invasive and open surgery in the treatment of endometrial carcinosarcoma. METHODS: We retrospectively identified all patients with newly diagnosed endometrial carcinosarcoma who underwent primary surgery via any approach at our institution from January 2009 to January 2018. Patients with known bulky disease identified on preoperative imaging were excluded. The χ2 and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate survival, and compared using the log rank test. RESULTS: We identified 147 eligible patients, of whom 37 (25%) underwent an open approach and 110 (75%) underwent minimally invasive surgery. Within the minimally invasive group, 92 (84%) of 110 patients underwent a robotic procedure and 14 (13%) underwent a laparoscopic procedure. Four minimally invasive cases (4%) were converted to open procedures. Median age, body mass index, operative time, stage, complication grade, and use of adjuvant treatment were clinically and statistically similar between groups. Median length of hospital stay in the open group was 4 days (range 3-21) compared with 1 day (range 0-6) in the minimally invasive group (p<0.001). The rates of any 30-day complication were 46% in the open and 8% in the minimally invasive group (p<0.001). The rates of grade 3 or higher complications were 5.4% and 1.8%, respectively (p=0.53). Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 30 months (range 0.4-121). Two-year progression-free survival rates were 52.8% (SE±8.4) in the open group and 58.5% (SE±5.1) in the minimally invasive group (p=0.7). Two-year disease-specific survival rates were 66.1% (SE±8.0) and 81.4% (SE±4.1), respectively (p=0.8). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with clinical stage I endometrial carcinosarcoma, minimally invasive compared with open surgery was not associated with poor oncologic outcomes, but with a shorter length of hospital stay and a lower rate of overall complications.

2.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 2020 Jun 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32499392

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To determine surveillance patterns of stage I cervical cancer after cervical conization. METHODS: A 25-question electronic survey was sent to members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology. Provider demographics, surveillance during year 1, years 1-3, and >3 years after cervical conization, use of pelvic examination, cytology, Human papillomavirus testing, colposcopy, and endocervical curettage were queried. Data were analyzed. RESULTS: 239/1175 (20.1%) responses were collected over a 5-week study period. All providers identified as gynecologic oncologists. During year 1, 66.7% of providers perform pelvic examination and 37.1% perform cytology every 3 months. During years 1-3, 61.6% perform pelvic examination and 46% perform cytology every 6 months. At >3 years, 54.4% perform pelvic examination every 6 months and 43% perform annual pelvic examination. 66.7% of respondents perform cytology annually, and 51.9% perform annual Human papilloma virus testing. 85% of providers do not offer routine colposcopy and 60% do not offer endocervical curettage at any point during 5-year follow-up. 76.3% of respondents screen patients for Human papilloma virus vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: To date, there are no specific surveillance guidelines for patients with stage I cervical cancer treated with cervical conization. The most common surveillance practice reported is pelvic examination with or without cytology every 3 months in year 1 and every 6 months thereafter. However, wide variation exists in visit frequency, cytology, and Human papillomavirus testing, and there is a clear trend away from using colposcopy and endocervical curettage. These disparate surveillance practices indicate a need for well-defined, uniform surveillance guidelines.

3.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 30(6): 717-723, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32376737

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Despite good prognosis for patients with low-risk endometrial cancer, a small subset of women with low-grade/low-stage endometrial cancer experience disease recurrence and death. The aim of this study was to characterize clinical features and mutational profiles of recurrent, low-grade, non-myoinvasive, 'ultra-low risk' endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinomas. METHODS: We retrospectively identified patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IA endometrioid endometrial cancers who underwent primary surgery at our institution, between January 2009 and February 2017, with follow-up of ≥12 months. 'Ultra-low risk' was defined as FIGO tumor grade 1, non-myoinvasive, and lacking lymphovascular space invasion. Tumor-normal profiling using massively parallel sequencing targeting 468 genes was performed. Microsatellite instability was assessed using MSIsensor. DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein proficiency was determined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: A total of 486 patients with ultra-low risk endometrioid endometrial cancers were identified: 14 (2.9%) of 486 patients developed a recurrence. Median follow-up for non-recurrent endometrioid endometrial cancers: 34 (range 12-116) months; for recurrent endometrioid endometrial cancers: 50.5 (range 20-116) months. Patients with recurrent disease were older, had lower body mass index, and were most commonly non-White (p=0.025, p<0.001, and p<0.001, respectively). Other clinical characteristics did not differ. MMR immunohistochemistry was obtained for 211 (43%) tumors: 158 (75%) MMR-proficient and 53 (25%) MMR-deficient. Primary tumors of 9 recurrent and 27 non-recurrent endometrioid endometrial cancers underwent mutational profiling. Most were microsatellite stable (6/9, 67% recurrent; 25/27, 93% non-recurrent). Recurrent PTEN and PIK3CA mutations were present in both groups. Exon 3 CTNNB1 hotspot mutations were found in 4/9 (44%) recurrent and 8/27 (30%) non-recurrent (p=0.44). CONCLUSIONS: Patients diagnosed with ultra-low risk endometrioid endometrial cancers have an overall excellent prognosis. However, in our study, 2.9% of patients with no identifiable clinical or pathologic risk factors developed recurrence. Further work is warranted to elucidate the mechanism for recurrence in this population.

4.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 2020 May 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32381512

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This review examines how response rates to progestin treatment of low-grade endometrial cancer can be improved. In addition to providing a brief overview of the pathogenesis of low-grade endometrial cancer, we discuss limitations in the current classification of endometrial cancer and how stratification may be refined using molecular markers to reproducibly identify 'low-risk' cancers which may represent the best candidates for progestin therapy. We also discuss constraints in current approaches to progestin treatment of low-grade endometrial cancer and perform a systematic review of predictive biomarkers. METHODS: PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Cochrane Library were searched for studies reporting pre-treatment biomarkers associated with outcome in women with low-grade endometrial cancer or endometrial hyperplasia with an intact uterus who received progestin treatment. Studies of fewer than 50 women were excluded. The study protocol was registered in PROSPERO (ID 152374). A descriptive synthesis of pre-treatment predictive biomarkers reported in the included studies was conducted. RESULTS: Of 1908 records reviewed, 19 studies were included. Clinical features such as age or body mass index cannot predict progestin response. Lesions defined as 'low-risk' by FIGO criteria (stage 1A, grade 1) can respond well; however, the reproducibility and prognostic ability of the current histopathological classification system is suboptimal. Molecular markers can be reproducibly assessed, have been validated as prognostic biomarkers, and may inform patient selection for progestin treatment. DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE)-ultramutated tumors and a subset of p53 wild-type or DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient tumors with 'low-risk' features (eg, progesterone and estrogen receptor-positive) may have improved response rates, though this needs to be validated. DISCUSSION: Molecular markers can identify cases which may be candidates for progestin treatment. More work is needed to validate these biomarkers and potentially identify new ones. Predictive biomarkers are anticipated to inform future research into progestin treatment of low-grade endometrial cancer and ultimately improve patient outcomes.

5.
Gynecol Oncol ; 157(3): 619-623, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32247604

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We report the incidence of occult nodal metastasis in patients who underwent primary surgical staging for apparent early endometrioid or serous endometrial cancer with bilateral SLN mapping and enhanced pathology. Occult ovarian metastasis rates were also reported. METHODS: Patients with clinical stage I serous or endometrioid endometrial cancer who underwent primary staging surgery with successful bilateral SLN mapping from 1/2005-12/2018 were retrospectively evaluated. Rates of isolated tumor cells (ITCs), micro- and macrometastatic nodal disease, and occult ovarian involvement were reported. RESULTS: Of 1044 patients, 959 had endometrioid and 85 serous carcinoma. There were no positive SLNs among 510 patients with noninvasive FIGO grade 1/2 endometrioid carcinoma and < 1%ITCs. Grade 1: 4.5%(9/202) with inner-half and 10%(6/62) with outer-half myoinvasion had positive SLNs. Grade 2: rates were 4%(3/76) and 20%(8/41), respectively. Grade 3: 5%(1/20) with noninvasive, 3%(1/31) with inner-half, and 24%(4/17) with outer-half myoinvasion had positive SLNs. ITC incidence increased with depth of myoinvasion-25% of deeply invasive grade 1/2 and 18% of deeply invasive grade 3 tumors. Four (10%) of 41 patients with noninvasive serous endometrial carcinoma had ITCs or positive SLNs. There were no occult ovarian metastases with grades 1/2 disease, 2/68 (3%) with grade 3 disease, and 2/85 (2%) with serous endometrial carcinoma. CONCLUSION: Ultrastaging SLNs may be unwarranted in low-grade noninvasive endometrioid cancer but valuable in noninvasive serous carcinoma. Occult ovarian metastasis is uncommon in early endometrial carcinoma and occurs in 2-3% of high-risk histologies. Further research is needed to determine ITC significance, particularly with regard to adjuvant treatment.

6.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 2020 Apr 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32328983

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The frail are considered at higher risk for unfavorable surgical outcomes (major complications/mortality). We assessed the safety of and outcomes associated with robotic surgery in the frail elderly undergoing gynecologic procedures. METHODS: We identified patients aged ≥ 65 years who underwent a robotic procedure between May 2007 and December 2016. Frailty was defined as the presence of at least three of five frailty factors-more than five comorbidities, low physical activity, weight loss, exhaustion, and fatigue. Perioperative outcomes were recorded. We compared variables among frail and non-frail patients and performed a multivariate logistic regression to detect variables associated with major complications (≥ grade 3) or 90-day mortality. RESULTS: We identified 982 patients: 71 frail and 911 non-frail patients. Median age was 71 years. Median BMI was 29.8 kg/m2. Thirty-four patients (3.5%) had a 30-day readmission. Seventy-seven (7.8%) had a postoperative complication, of which 23 (2.3%) were major. Ninety-day mortality was 0.5%. There were significant differences with regard to age (P < 0.001), body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001) and performance status (P < 0.001); the frail were more likely to have had surgery for oncologic reasons (P = 0.047). There were differences in hospital stay (P < 0.001), postoperative (P = 0.042) and major complications (P = 0.007), and 90-day mortality (P = 0.05). At multivariable logistic regression, age ≥ 85 was associated with major complications. BMI, performance status, and major complications were associated with 90-day mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The frail elderly have longer hospital stays and more complications after surgery than the general population, consistent with the reported literature. Careful selection of surgical candidates is required.

7.
J Nucl Med ; 2020 Jan 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31924717

RESUMO

Rationale: The presence of metastasis in local lymph nodes (LNs) is a key factor influencing choice of therapy and prognosis in cervical and endometrial cancers; therefore, the exploration of sentinel LNs (SLNs) is highly important. Currently, however, SLN mapping requires LN biopsy for pathologic evaluation, since there are no clinical imaging approaches that can identify tumor-positive LNs in early stages. Staging lymphadenectomy poses risks, such as leg lymphedema or lymphocyst formation. Furthermore, in 80% to 90% of patients, the explored LNs are ultimately tumor free, meaning the vast majority of patients are unnecessarily subjected to lymphadenectomy. Methods: Current lymphoscintigraphy methods only identify the anatomic location of the SLNs but do not provide information on their tumor status. There are no non-invasive methods to reliably identify metastases in LNs before surgery. We have developed positron lymphography (PLG), a method to detect tumor-positive LNs, where 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) is injected interstitially into the uterine cervix the day of surgery, and its rapid transport through the lymphatic vessels to the SLN is then visualized with dynamic positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We previously showed that PLG was able to identify metastatic LNs in animal models. Here, we present the first results from our pilot clinical trial (clinical trials identifier NCT02285192) in 23 patients with uterine or cervical cancer. On the morning of surgery, 18F-FDG was injected into the cervix, followed by an immediate dynamic PET/CT scan of the pelvis and a delayed 1-h whole body scan. Results: There were 3 (15%) node-positive cases on final pathologic analysis, and all LNs (including one with a focus of only 80 tumor cells) were identified by PLG except one node with an 11-mm micrometastasis. There were 2 (10%) false-positive cases with PLG, in which final pathology of the corresponding SLNs was negative for tumor. Methods: Current lymphoscintigraphy methods only identify the anatomic location of the SLNs but do not provide information on their tumor status. There are no non-invasive methods to reliably identify metastases in LNs before surgery. We have developed positron lymphography (PLG), a method to detect tumor-positive LNs, where 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) is injected interstitially into the uterine cervix the day of surgery, and its rapid transport through the lymphatic vessels to the SLN is then visualized with dynamic positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We previously showed that PLG was able to identify metastatic LNs in animal models. Here, we present the first results from our pilot clinical trial (clinical trials identifier NCT02285192) in 23 patients with uterine or cervical cancer. On the morning of surgery, 18F-FDG was injected into the cervix, followed by an immediate dynamic PET/CT scan of the pelvis and a delayed 1-h whole body scan. Results: There were 3 (15%) node-positive cases on final pathologic analysis, and all LNs (including one with a focus of only 80 tumor cells) were identified by PLG, except for one node with an 11-mm micrometastasis. There were 2 (10%) false-positive cases with PLG, in which final pathology of the corresponding SLNs was negative for tumor. Conclusion: This first-in-human study of PLG in women with uterine and cervical cancer demonstrates its feasibility and its ability to identify patients with nodal metastases, and warrants further evaluation in additional studies.

8.
Gynecol Oncol ; 156(3): 591-597, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31918996

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare oncologic and perioperative outcomes in patients who underwent minimally invasive surgery (MIS) compared to laparotomy for newly diagnosed early-stage cervical carcinoma. METHODS: We retrospectively identified patients who underwent radical hysterectomy for stage IA1 with lymphovascular invasion (LVI), IA2, or IB1 cervical carcinoma at our institution from 1/2007-12/2017. Clinicopathologic characteristics and surgical and oncologic survival outcomes were compared using appropriate statistical testing. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to control for potential confounders. RESULTS: We identified 196 evaluable cases-117 MIS (106 robotic [90.6%]) and 79 laparotomy cases. Cohorts had similar age, BMI, substage, histologic subtype, clinical and pathologic tumor size, positive margins, and presence of LVI. The MIS group had more cases with no residual tumor in the hysterectomy (24.8% vs. 10.1%, P = 0.01). The laparotomy group had more cases with positive nodes (29.1% vs. 17.1%, P = 0.046) and more patients who received adjuvant therapy (53.2% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.006). Median follow-up was ~4 years. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 87.0% in the MIS group and 86.6% in the laparotomy group (P = 0.92); 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 96.5% and 93.9%, respectively (P = 0.93); and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 96.5% and 87.4%, respectively (P = 0.15). MIS was not associated with DFS, DSS, or OS on multivariable regression analysis. The rate of postoperative complications was significantly lower in the MIS cohort (11.1% vs. 20.3%; P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: MIS radical hysterectomy for cervical carcinoma did not confer worse oncologic outcomes in our single-center and concurrent series of patients with early-stage cervical carcinoma.


Assuntos
Histerectomia/métodos , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/cirurgia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Laparoscopia/métodos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Minimamente Invasivos/métodos , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Estudos Retrospectivos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/métodos , Taxa de Sobrevida , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/patologia , Adulto Jovem
9.
Gynecol Oncol ; 156(1): 194-202, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31757464

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Assess outcomes of a clinical cohort of patients with endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) harboring somatic POLE exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs). METHODS: Patients were consented to a protocol of tumor-normal massively parallel sequencing of 410-468 cancer related genes. EECs subjected to sequencing from 2014 to 2018 were reviewed. Tumors with somatic POLE EDMs were identified. EECs were assessed for microsatellite instability (MSI) using MSIsensor and immunohistochemical analysis for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. RESULTS: Of the 451 EECs sequenced, 23 had a POLE EDM (5%): 20 primary and 3 recurrent tumors sequenced. Nineteen cases (83%) were stage I/II and 4 (17%) were stages III/IV. Thirteen EECs (57%) were of FIGO grades 1/2, 10 (43%) grade 3. All patients were treated with surgery and 17 (89%) received adjuvant therapy. Five (22%) demonstrated loss of DNA MMR protein expression, none were due to Lynch syndrome. MSIsensor scores were conclusive for 21 samples: 19 were microsatellite stable and 2 MSI-high. After median follow-up of 30 months, 4/23 (17%) developed recurrences: 3 with initial grade 3 stage I and 1 with grade 1 stage III disease. One patient with grade 2 stage IV EEC had progressive disease after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with POLE EDM EEC have been shown to have a favorable prognosis. In this real-world cohort of patients, de novo metastatic disease and recurrences in initially uterine-confined cases were observed. Further research is warranted before incorporating the presence of POLE EDM into decision-making regarding adjuvant therapy.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Endometrioide/genética , DNA Polimerase II/genética , Neoplasias do Endométrio/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a Poli-ADP-Ribose/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Carcinoma Endometrioide/enzimologia , Carcinoma Endometrioide/patologia , Carcinoma Endometrioide/terapia , Estudos de Coortes , Reparo de Erro de Pareamento de DNA , DNA Polimerase II/metabolismo , Neoplasias do Endométrio/enzimologia , Neoplasias do Endométrio/patologia , Neoplasias do Endométrio/terapia , Feminino , Humanos , Instabilidade de Microssatélites , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação , Gradação de Tumores , Metástase Neoplásica , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/genética , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/patologia , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Proteínas de Ligação a Poli-ADP-Ribose/metabolismo , Prognóstico , Estudos Prospectivos
11.
Gynecol Oncol ; 156(1): 70-76, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31739992

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The objective of our study was to assess survival among patients with uterine serous carcinoma (USC) undergoing sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping alone versus patients undergoing systematic lymphadenectomy (LND). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients undergoing primary surgical treatment for newly diagnosed USC at our institution from 1/1/1996-12/31/2017. Patients were assigned to either SLN mapping alone (SLN cohort) or systematic LND without SLN mapping (LND cohort). Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier method, compared using Logrank test. RESULTS: 245 patients were available for analysis: 79 (32.2%) underwent SLN, 166 (67.7%) LND. 132 (79.5%) in the LND cohort had paraaortic LND (PALND) versus none in the SLN cohort. Median age: 66 and 68 years in the SLN and LND cohorts, respectively (p>0.05). Proportion of stage I/II disease: 67.1% (n = 53) and 64.5% (n = 107) in the SLN and LND cohorts, respectively (p>0.05). Median follow-up: 23 (range, 1-96) and 66 months (range, 4-265) in the SLN and LND cohorts, respectively (p < 0.001). Two-year OS in stage I/II disease (n = 160, 60.1%): 96.6% (SE ± 3.4) and 89.6% (SE ± 2.2) in the SLN and LND cohorts, respectively (p = 0.8). Two-year OS in stage III disease (n = 77): 73.6% (SE ± 10.2) and 77.3% (SE ± 5.8) in the SLN and LND cohorts, respectively (p = 0.8). CONCLUSIONS: SLN mapping alone and systematic LND yielded similar survival outcomes in stage I-III USC. In our practice, the SLN algorithm has replaced systematic LND as the primary staging modality in this setting.


Assuntos
Cistadenocarcinoma Seroso/patologia , Cistadenocarcinoma Seroso/cirurgia , Neoplasias do Endométrio/patologia , Neoplasias do Endométrio/cirurgia , Linfonodos/patologia , Linfonodos/cirurgia , Linfonodo Sentinela/patologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Cistadenocarcinoma Seroso/mortalidade , Neoplasias do Endométrio/mortalidade , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Biópsia de Linfonodo Sentinela/métodos , Análise de Sobrevida
12.
Gynecol Oncol ; 156(1): 147-153, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31780238

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of patient-reported lower-extremity lymphedema (LEL) with sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping versus comprehensive lymph node dissection (LND) for the surgical management of newly diagnosed endometrial carcinoma. METHODS: Patients who underwent primary surgery for endometrial cancer from 01/2006-12/2012 were mailed a survey that included a validated 13-item LEL screening questionnaire in 08/2016. Patients diagnosed with LEL prior to surgery and those who answered ≤6 survey items were excluded. RESULTS: Of 1275 potential participants, 623 (49%) responded to the survey and 599 were evaluable (180 SLN, 352 LND, 67 hysterectomy alone). Median BMI was similar among cohorts (P = 0.99). External-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was used in 10/180 (5.5%) SLN and 35/352 (10%) LND patients (P = 0.1). Self-reported LEL prevalence was 27% (49/180) and 41% (144/352), respectively (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.25-2.74; P = 0.002). LEL prevalence was 51% (23/45) in patients who received EBRT and 35% (170/487) in those who did not (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.06-3.6; P = 0.03). High BMI was associated with increased prevalence of LEL (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.06; P = 0.001). After controlling for EBRT and BMI, LND retained independent association with an increased prevalence of LEL over SLN (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.22-2.69; P = 0.003). Patients with self-reported LEL had significantly worse QOL compared to those without self-reported LEL. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to assess patient-reported LEL after SLN mapping for endometrial cancer. SLN mapping was independently associated with a significantly lower prevalence of patient-reported LEL. High BMI and adjuvant EBRT were associated with an increased prevalence of patient-reported LEL.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Endométrio/cirurgia , Excisão de Linfonodo/estatística & dados numéricos , Linfedema/epidemiologia , Biópsia de Linfonodo Sentinela/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Neoplasias do Endométrio/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Perna (Membro)/patologia , Excisão de Linfonodo/efeitos adversos , Linfonodos/patologia , Linfonodos/cirurgia , Metástase Linfática , Linfedema/etiologia , Linfedema/patologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Prevalência , Linfonodo Sentinela/patologia , Linfonodo Sentinela/cirurgia , Biópsia de Linfonodo Sentinela/efeitos adversos , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
Gynecol Oncol ; 155(2): 192-200, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31521322

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To determine if the primary treatment approach (primary debulking surgery (PDS) versus neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery (NACT-IDS)) influences the pattern of first recurrence in patients with completely cytoreduced advanced high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study included 178 patients with newly diagnosed stage IIIC-IV HGSOC, complete gross resection during PDS (n = 124) or IDS (n = 54) from January 2008-March 2013, and baseline and first recurrence contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans. Clinical characteristics and number of disease sites at baseline were analyzed for associations with time to recurrence. In 135 patients who experienced recurrence, the overlap in disease locations between baseline and recurrence and the number of new disease locations at recurrence were analyzed according to the primary treatment approach. RESULTS: At univariate and multivariate analyses, NACT-IDS was associated with more overlapping locations between baseline and first recurrence (p ≤ 0.003) and fewer recurrences in new anatomic locations (p ≤ 0.043) compared with PDS. The same results were found in a subgroup that received intra-peritoneal adjuvant chemotherapy after either treatment approach. At univariate analysis, patient age, primary treatment approach, adjuvant chemotherapy route, and number of disease locations at baseline were associated with time to recurrence (p ≤ 0.009). At multivariate analysis, older patient age, NACT-IDS, and greater disease locations at baseline remained significant (p ≤ 0.018). CONCLUSION: The distribution of disease at the time of first recurrence varied with the choice of primary treatment. Compared to patients treated with PDS, patients who underwent NACT-IDS experienced recurrence more often in the same locations as the original disease.


Assuntos
Cistadenocarcinoma Seroso/cirurgia , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/etiologia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/cirurgia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/uso terapêutico , Quimioterapia Adjuvante , Cistadenocarcinoma Seroso/tratamento farmacológico , Cistadenocarcinoma Seroso/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/patologia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias Ovarianas/patologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Tempo , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X
14.
Gynecol Oncol ; 154(2): 333-337, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31200927

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To assess outcomes after secondary surgical resection in patients with recurrent uterine leiomyosarcoma (uLMS). METHODS: We retrospectively identified all patients who had no evidence of disease after initial surgery for uLMS, who underwent surgery for a first recurrence at our institution between 1/1991 and 10/2013. We excluded patients who received any therapy for recurrence prior to secondary resection, and patients who underwent surgery soon after morcellation [of presumed benign fibroids] showed widespread disease. Overall survival (OS) was determined from time of first recurrence to death or last follow-up. RESULTS: We identified 62 patients: 29 with abdominal/pelvic recurrence only, 30 with lung recurrence only, 3 with both. Median time to first recurrence was 18 months (95% CI: 13.3-23.3): 15.8 months (95% CI: 13.0-18.6) abdominal/pelvic recurrence; 24.1 months (95% CI: 14.5-33.7) lung-only recurrence (p = 0.03). Median OS was 37.7 months (95% CI: 25.9-49.6) abdominal/pelvic recurrence; 78.1 months (95% CI: 44.8-11.4) lung recurrence (p = 0.02). Complete gross resection (CGR) was achieved in 58 cases (93%), with gross residual ≤1 cm in 2 (3.5%) and >1 cm in 2 (3.5%). Median OS based on residual disease was 54.1 months (95% CI: 24.9-83.3), 38.7 months (95% CI: NE), 1.7 months (95% CI: NE), respectively (p < 0.001). In cases with CGR, neither adjuvant radiation (N = 9), chemotherapy (N = 8) nor hormonal therapy (N = 10) was associated with improved OS. CONCLUSIONS: Secondary surgical resection of recurrent uLMS is reasonable in patients with a high probability of achieving CGR. Lung-only recurrences were associated with more favorable outcome. Following CGR, additional therapy may not offer benefit.


Assuntos
Leiomiossarcoma/secundário , Leiomiossarcoma/cirurgia , Neoplasias Pulmonares/secundário , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/cirurgia , Neoplasias Pélvicas/secundário , Adulto , Idoso , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Leiomiossarcoma/mortalidade , Neoplasias Pulmonares/cirurgia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/mortalidade , Neoplasia Residual , Neoplasias Pélvicas/cirurgia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Neoplasias Uterinas/mortalidade , Neoplasias Uterinas/cirurgia
15.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 2019 May 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31097512

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We described progression-free survival and overall survival in patients with primary mucinous ovarian cancer receiving adjuvant gynecologic versus gastrointestinal chemotherapy regimens. METHODS: We identified all primary mucinous ovarian cancer patients receiving adjuvant gynecologic or gastrointestinal chemotherapy regimens at a single institution from 1994 to 2016. Gynecologic pathologists using strict pathologic/clinical criteria determined diagnosis. Adjuvant therapy was coded as gynecologic or gastrointestinal based on standard agents and schedules. Clinical/pathologic/treatment characteristics were recorded. Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used for continuous variables, and Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Progression-free and overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, applying landmark analysis. RESULTS: Of 62 patients identified, 21 received adjuvant chemotherapy: 12 gynecologic, 9 gastrointestinal. Median age (in years) at diagnosis: 58 (range 25-68) gynecologic cohort, 38 (range 32-68) gastrointestinal cohort (p=0.13). Median body mass index at first post-operative visit: 25 kg/m2 (range 18-31) gynecologic cohort, 23 kg/m2 (range 18-31) gastrointestinal cohort (p=0.23). History of smoking: 6/12 (50%) gynecologic cohort, 3/9 (33%) gastrointestinal cohort (p=0.66). Stage distribution in gynecologic and gastrointestinal cohorts, respectively: stage I: 9/12 (75%) and 3/9 (33%); stage II: 2/12 (17%) and 1/9 (11%); stage III: 1/12 (8%) and 5/9 (56%) (p=0.06). Grade distribution in gynecologic and gastrointestinal cohorts, respectively: grade 1: 8/12 (67%) and 1/9 (13%); grade 2/3: 4/12 (33%) and 7/9 (88%) (p=0.03). Three-year progression-free survival: 90.9% (95% CI 50.8% to 98.7 %) gynecologic, 53.3% (95% CI 17.7% to 79.6%) gastrointestinal. Three-year overall survival: 90.9% (95% CI 50.8% to 98.7%) gynecologic, 76.2% (95% CI 33.2% to 93.5%) gastrointestinal. CONCLUSION: Ongoing international collaborative research may further define associations between chemotherapy regimens and survival.

16.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 29(1): 223, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30640709

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a robotic-assisted psoas hitch with ureteral reimplantation. METHODS: We gleaned video footage from a robotic-assisted psoas hitch procedure performed for a patient with an isolated pelvic recurrence of ovarian cancer. RESULTS: We demonstrate trocar placement and a robotic-arm docking strategy for pelvic recurrence of ovarian cancer. We also show surgical steps involved in a psoas hitch and reimplantation of a transected ureter into the bladder. Special emphasis is placed on guiding the surgeon using key robotic instruments and materials to optimize the robotic completion of this procedure. Key components of the procedure, including en bloc tumor excision and ureteral transection, are shown. The bladder is placed on traction using the fourth arm, and the avascular planes of dissection, including the space of Retzius and the paravesical spaces, are shown. The bladder is then backfilled to allow the surgeon to determine the ideal placement of the ureteral reimplantation to ensure the anastomosis is tension free. The surgeon then demonstrates where and how to place anchoring sutures from the bladder to the psoas muscle. The ureter is examined to determine where it can be implanted in the bladder with zero tension or angulation, which would compromise function and healing. The ureter is prepared for reimplantation, including trimming, tagging, and spatulation. An instrument tie technique is used to implant the ureter into the bladder and a ureteral stent is placed. Robotic-assisted psoas hitch with ureteral reimplantation has been described in the literature.1-4 CONCLUSIONS: Through the use of still photographs and video, we demonstrate the technique of robotic-assisted psoas hitch with ureteral reimplantation.


Assuntos
Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/cirurgia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/cirurgia , Neoplasias Pélvicas/cirurgia , Músculos Psoas/cirurgia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/métodos , Ureter/cirurgia , Cirurgia Vídeoassistida/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Prognóstico , Reimplante
17.
Gynecol Oncol Rep ; 26: 87-90, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30426061

RESUMO

Objective: To report characteristics of patients with low-grade endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EC) who develop brain metastases. Methods: We retrospectively identified all patients treated at our institution for FIGO grades 1/2 EC from 1/2000-12/2016, who developed brain metastases. Electronic medical records were reviewed, data abstracted. Overall survival (OS) was determined from time of brain metastases to death or last follow-up. Appropriate statistical tests were used. Results: Of 3052 patients, 23 (9, grade 1; 14, grade 2) developed brain metastases (incidence = 0.75%). Presentation at initial diagnosis: median age = 61.3 years (range, 41-81); median BMI = 29.8 kg/m2 (range, 20.3-42.6 kg/m2); distribution by stage: I, 15/23 (65%); II, 2/23 (8.7%); III, 3/23 (13.0%); IV, 3 (13.0%). None showed clinical evidence of brain metastases at presentation. Median time to diagnosis of brain metastases = 29.7 months (range, 6-145); median age = 64.6 years (range, 47.5-86.5). Brain metastases were the first, isolated site of recurrence in 2/23 (9%). All presented with neurological symptoms. Six (26%) had solitary brain lesions. Seventeen (74%) received treatment; 6 (28%), supportive care only. Median OS for patients receiving any treatment = 5.8 months (95% CI, 1.6-10.0), versus 2.4 months (95% CI, 1.5-3.3; p = .04) for best supportive care. Conclusion: Brain metastases in low-grade EC is rare, prognosis generally poor. Compared to supportive care only, any treatment results in more favorable outcomes.

18.
Gynecol Oncol ; 150(1): 127-135, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29793804

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Mucinous ovarian cancer (MOC) is a rare type of epithelial ovarian cancer resistant to standard chemotherapy regimens. We sought to characterize the repertoire of somatic mutations in MOCs and to define the contribution of massively parallel sequencing to the classification of tumors diagnosed as primary MOCs. METHODS: Following gynecologic pathology and chart review, DNA samples obtained from primary MOCs and matched normal tissues/blood were subjected to whole-exome (n = 9) or massively parallel sequencing targeting 341 cancer genes (n = 15). Immunohistochemical analysis of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, PTEN, ARID1A/BAF250a, and the DNA mismatch (MMR) proteins MSH6 and PMS2 was performed for all cases. Mutational frequencies of MOCs were compared to those of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and mucinous tumors from other sites. RESULTS: MOCs were heterogeneous at the genetic level, frequently harboring TP53 (75%) mutations, KRAS (71%) mutations and/or CDKN2A/B homozygous deletions/mutations (33%). Although established criteria for diagnosis were employed, four cases harbored mutational and immunohistochemical profiles similar to those of endometrioid carcinomas, and one case for colorectal or endometrioid carcinoma. Significant differences in the frequencies of KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, FBXW7, PIK3CA and/or APC mutations between the confirmed primary MOCs (n = 19) and HGSOCs, mucinous gastric and/or mucinous colorectal carcinomas were found, whereas no differences in the 341 genes studied between MOCs and mucinous pancreatic carcinomas were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the assessment of mutations affecting TP53, KRAS, PIK3CA, ARID1A and POLE, and DNA MMR protein expression may be used to further aid the diagnosis and treatment decision-making of primary MOC.


Assuntos
Genômica/métodos , Imuno-Histoquímica/métodos , Neoplasias Ovarianas/diagnóstico , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Feminino , Humanos , Neoplasias Ovarianas/patologia
19.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 28(5): 915-924, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29561302

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We sought to describe a large, international cohort of patients diagnosed with primary mucinous ovarian carcinoma (PMOC) across 3 tertiary medical centers to evaluate differences in patient characteristics, surgical/adjuvant treatment strategies, and oncologic outcomes. METHODS: This was a retrospective review spanning 1976-2014. All tumors were centrally reviewed by an expert gynecologic pathologist. Each center used a combination of clinical and histologic criteria to confirm a PMOC diagnosis. Data were abstracted from medical records, and a deidentified dataset was compiled and processed at a single institution. Appropriate statistical tests were performed. RESULTS: Two hundred twenty-two patients with PMOC were identified; all had undergone primary surgery. Disease stage distribution was as follows: stage I, 163 patients (74%); stage II, 8 (4%); stage III, 40 (18%); and stage IV, 10 (5%). Ninety-nine (45%) of 219 patients underwent lymphadenectomy; 41 (19%) of 215 underwent fertility-preserving surgery. Of the 145 patients (65%) with available treatment data, 68 (47%) had received chemotherapy-55 (81%) a gynecologic regimen and 13 (19%) a gastrointestinal regimen. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 80% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73%-85%) for patients with stage I to II disease and 17% (95% CI, 8%-29%) for those with stage III to IV disease. The 5-year PFS rate was 73% (95% CI, 50%-86%) for patients who underwent fertility-preserving surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Most patients (74%) presented with stage I disease. Nearly 50% were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy using various regimens across institutions. The PFS outcomes were favorable for those with early-stage disease and lower but acceptable for those who underwent fertility preservation.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma Mucinoso/cirurgia , Preservação da Fertilidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos em Ginecologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias Ovarianas/cirurgia , Centros de Atenção Terciária/estatística & dados numéricos , Adenocarcinoma Mucinoso/tratamento farmacológico , Adenocarcinoma Mucinoso/mortalidade , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Quimioterapia Adjuvante/estatística & dados numéricos , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , França/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cidade de Nova Iorque/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias Ovarianas/mortalidade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Adulto Jovem
20.
Gynecol Oncol ; 144(2): 274-278, 2017 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27979319

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To determine if 6 versus 3cycles of adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy with or without taxane impacts survival in early stage ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC). METHODS: We retrospectively identified all cases of stage I and II OCCC treated at 5 institutions from January 1994 through December 2011. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received 3 versus 6cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Our cohort consisted of 210 patients with stage IA-II disease, 116 of whom underwent full surgical staging. Cox proportional hazards regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to evaluate progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between groups. RESULTS: Among 210 eligible patients, the median age was 53years (range 30-88). The majority of patients were Caucasian (83.8%). All patients received adjuvant chemotherapy with 90% receiving carboplatin and paclitaxel. Thirty-eight (18.1%) patients received 3cycles, and 172 (81.9%) patients received 6cycles of adjuvant treatment. Recurrence rate was comparable between groups (18.4% vs. 27.3% for 3 vs. 6cycles, p=0.4). There was no impact of 3 versus 6cycles of chemotherapy on PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63-3.12, p=0.4) or OS (HR 1.65; 95% CI 0.59-4.65, p=0.3) on univariate analysis. There was no benefit to more chemotherapy in stratified analysis by stage nor on multivariate analysis adjusting for the impact of stage. Subgroup analysis of surgically staged patients also showed no difference in survival between 3 versus 6cycles of chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Three cycles of platinum with or without taxane adjuvant chemotherapy were comparable to 6cycles with respect to recurrence and survival in patients diagnosed with early stage ovarian clear cell carcinoma in this retrospective multi-institutional cohort. CONDENSATION: Three cycles of platinum with or without taxane adjuvant chemotherapy are comparable to 6 cycles with respect to recurrence and survival in patients diagnosed with early stage ovarian clear cell carcinoma in this retrospective multi-institutional cohort.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma de Células Claras/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias Ovarianas/tratamento farmacológico , Adenocarcinoma de Células Claras/mortalidade , Adenocarcinoma de Células Claras/patologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Quimioterapia Adjuvante , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Neoplasias Ovarianas/mortalidade , Neoplasias Ovarianas/patologia , Platina/uso terapêutico , Estudos Retrospectivos
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