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1.
Hum Mutat ; 40(7): 908-925, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30817854

RESUMO

Pathogenic de novo variants in the X-linked gene SLC35A2 encoding the major Golgi-localized UDP-galactose transporter required for proper protein and lipid glycosylation cause a rare type of congenital disorder of glycosylation known as SLC35A2-congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG; formerly CDG-IIm). To date, 29 unique de novo variants from 32 unrelated individuals have been described in the literature. The majority of affected individuals are primarily characterized by varying degrees of neurological impairments with or without skeletal abnormalities. Surprisingly, most affected individuals do not show abnormalities in serum transferrin N-glycosylation, a common biomarker for most types of CDG. Here we present data characterizing 30 individuals and add 26 new variants, the single largest study involving SLC35A2-CDG. The great majority of these individuals had normal transferrin glycosylation. In addition, expanding the molecular and clinical spectrum of this rare disorder, we developed a robust and reliable biochemical assay to assess SLC35A2-dependent UDP-galactose transport activity in primary fibroblasts. Finally, we show that transport activity is directly correlated to the ratio of wild-type to mutant alleles in fibroblasts from affected individuals.

2.
Neurology ; 92(11): e1238-e1249, 2019 Mar 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30737342

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to expand the spectrum of epilepsy syndromes related to STX1B, encoding the presynaptic protein syntaxin-1B, and establish genotype-phenotype correlations by identifying further disease-related variants. METHODS: We used next-generation sequencing in the framework of research projects and diagnostic testing. Clinical data and EEGs were reviewed, including already published cases. To estimate the pathogenicity of the variants, we used established and newly developed in silico prediction tools. RESULTS: We describe 17 new variants in STX1B, which are distributed across the whole gene. We discerned 4 different phenotypic groups across the newly identified and previously published patients (49 patients in 23 families): (1) 6 sporadic patients or families (31 affected individuals) with febrile and afebrile seizures with a benign course, generally good drug response, normal development, and without permanent neurologic deficits; (2) 2 patients with genetic generalized epilepsy without febrile seizures and cognitive deficits; (3) 13 patients or families with intractable seizures, developmental regression after seizure onset and additional neuropsychiatric symptoms; (4) 2 patients with focal epilepsy. More often, we found loss-of-function mutations in benign syndromes, whereas missense variants in the SNARE motif of syntaxin-1B were associated with more severe phenotypes. CONCLUSION: These data expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum of STX1B-related epilepsies to a diverse range of epilepsies that span the International League Against Epilepsy classification. Variants in STX1B are protean and contribute to many different epilepsy phenotypes, similar to SCN1A, the most important gene associated with fever-associated epilepsies.

4.
Genet Med ; 2018 Sep 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30245509

RESUMO

PURPOSE: TANGO2-related disorders were first described in 2016 and prior to this publication, only 15 individuals with TANGO2-related disorder were described in the literature. Primary features include metabolic crisis with rhabdomyolysis, encephalopathy, intellectual disability, seizures, and cardiac arrhythmias. We assess whether genotype and phenotype of TANGO2-related disorder has expanded since the initial discovery and determine the efficacy of exome sequencing (ES) as a diagnostic tool for detecting variants. METHODS: We present a series of 14 individuals from 11 unrelated families with complex medical and developmental histories, in whom ES or microarray identified compound heterozygous or homozygous variants in TANGO2. RESULTS: The initial presentation of patients with TANGO2-related disorders can be variable, including primarily neurological presentations. We expand the phenotype and genotype for TANGO2, highlighting the variability of the disorder. CONCLUSION: TANGO2-related disorders can have a more diverse clinical presentation than previously anticipated. We illustrate the utility of routine ES data reanalysis whereby discovery of novel disease genes can lead to a diagnosis in previously unsolved cases and the need for additional copy-number variation analysis when ES is performed.

5.
Lancet Neurol ; 17(8): 699-708, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30033060

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genetic generalised epilepsy is the most common type of inherited epilepsy. Despite a high concordance rate of 80% in monozygotic twins, the genetic background is still poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the burden of rare genetic variants in genetic generalised epilepsy. METHODS: For this exome-based case-control study, we used three different genetic generalised epilepsy case cohorts and three independent control cohorts, all of European descent. Cases included in the study were clinically evaluated for genetic generalised epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing was done for the discovery case cohort, a validation case cohort, and two independent control cohorts. The replication case cohort underwent targeted next-generation sequencing of the 19 known genes encoding subunits of GABAA receptors and was compared to the respective GABAA receptor variants of a third independent control cohort. Functional investigations were done with automated two-microelectrode voltage clamping in Xenopus laevis oocytes. FINDINGS: Statistical comparison of 152 familial index cases with genetic generalised epilepsy in the discovery cohort to 549 ethnically matched controls suggested an enrichment of rare missense (Nonsyn) variants in the ensemble of 19 genes encoding GABAA receptors in cases (odds ratio [OR] 2·40 [95% CI 1·41-4·10]; pNonsyn=0·0014, adjusted pNonsyn=0·019). Enrichment for these genes was validated in a whole-exome sequencing cohort of 357 sporadic and familial genetic generalised epilepsy cases and 1485 independent controls (OR 1·46 [95% CI 1·05-2·03]; pNonsyn=0·0081, adjusted pNonsyn=0·016). Comparison of genes encoding GABAA receptors in the independent replication cohort of 583 familial and sporadic genetic generalised epilepsy index cases, based on candidate-gene panel sequencing, with a third independent control cohort of 635 controls confirmed the overall enrichment of rare missense variants for 15 GABAA receptor genes in cases compared with controls (OR 1·46 [95% CI 1·02-2·08]; pNonsyn=0·013, adjusted pNonsyn=0·027). Functional studies for two selected genes (GABRB2 and GABRA5) showed significant loss-of-function effects with reduced current amplitudes in four of seven tested variants compared with wild-type receptors. INTERPRETATION: Functionally relevant variants in genes encoding GABAA receptor subunits constitute a significant risk factor for genetic generalised epilepsy. Examination of the role of specific gene groups and pathways can disentangle the complex genetic architecture of genetic generalised epilepsy. FUNDING: EuroEPINOMICS (European Science Foundation through national funding organisations), Epicure and EpiPGX (Sixth Framework Programme and Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission), Research Unit FOR2715 (German Research Foundation and Luxembourg National Research Fund).

6.
Nat Genet ; 50(7): 1048-1053, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29942082

RESUMO

Epilepsy is a frequent feature of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), but little is known about genetic differences between NDDs with and without epilepsy. We analyzed de novo variants (DNVs) in 6,753 parent-offspring trios ascertained to have different NDDs. In the subset of 1,942 individuals with NDDs with epilepsy, we identified 33 genes with a significant excess of DNVs, of which SNAP25 and GABRB2 had previously only limited evidence of disease association. Joint analysis of all individuals with NDDs also implicated CACNA1E as a novel disease-associated gene. Comparing NDDs with and without epilepsy, we found missense DNVs, DNVs in specific genes, age of recruitment, and severity of intellectual disability to be associated with epilepsy. We further demonstrate the extent to which our results affect current genetic testing as well as treatment, emphasizing the benefit of accurate genetic diagnosis in NDDs with epilepsy.

7.
Neuropediatrics ; 49(5): 342-346, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29801192

RESUMO

Mutations in the ATP1A3 gene are known to cause alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) and rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (RDP). Both conditions are childhood-onset neurological disorders with distinct symptoms and different times of onset. ATP1A3 has also been associated with CAPOS syndrome (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss). Within the various ATP1A3-related neurological syndromes, a specific genotype-phenotype correlation is starting to emerge. Several mutations such as the relatively common p.E815K pathogenic variant have been shown to strongly correlate with AHC, while others may cause both AHC and RDP. A significant subset of patients with AHC and RDP are reported to have epileptic seizures. Even though detailed clinical descriptions of seizures in childhood are rare, seizures involving apneic events seem to be frequent in ATP1A3-related neurological disorders. Here, we describe two children with unexplained severe apnea beginning around the first year of life and pathogenic variants in ATP1A3. We hypothesize that the symptoms are early-onset autonomic seizures related to the underlying pathogenic ATP1A3 variants.

8.
Am J Hum Genet ; 102(4): 557-573, 2018 04 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29576218

RESUMO

Mitochondrial disorders causing neurodegeneration in childhood are genetically heterogeneous, and the underlying genetic etiology remains unknown in many affected individuals. We identified biallelic variants in PMPCB in individuals of four families including one family with two affected siblings with neurodegeneration and cerebellar atrophy. PMPCB encodes the catalytic subunit of the essential mitochondrial processing protease (MPP), which is required for maturation of the majority of mitochondrial precursor proteins. Mitochondria isolated from two fibroblast cell lines and induced pluripotent stem cells derived from one affected individual and differentiated neuroepithelial stem cells showed reduced PMPCB levels and accumulation of the processing intermediate of frataxin, a sensitive substrate for MPP dysfunction. Introduction of the identified PMPCB variants into the homologous S. cerevisiae Mas1 protein resulted in a severe growth and MPP processing defect leading to the accumulation of mitochondrial precursor proteins and early impairment of the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters, which are indispensable for a broad range of crucial cellular functions. Analysis of biopsy materials of an affected individual revealed changes and decreased activity in iron-sulfur cluster-containing respiratory chain complexes and dysfunction of mitochondrial and cytosolic Fe-S cluster-dependent enzymes. We conclude that biallelic mutations in PMPCB cause defects in MPP proteolytic activity leading to dysregulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and triggering a complex neurological phenotype of neurodegeneration in early childhood.

9.
Seizure ; 56: 115-120, 2018 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29475094

RESUMO

PURPOSE: BECTS (benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes) is associated with characteristic EEG findings. This study examines the influence of anti-convulsive treatment on the EEG. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial including 43 children with BECTS, EEGs were performed prior to treatment with either Sulthiame or Levetiracetam as well as three times under treatment. Using the spike-wave-index, the degree of EEG pathology was quantified. The EEG before and after initiation of treatment was analyzed. Both treatment arms were compared and the EEG of the children that were to develop recurrent seizures was compared with those that were successfully treated. RESULTS: Regardless of the treatment agent, the spike-wave-index was reduced significantly under treatment. There were no differences between the two treatment groups. In an additional analysis, the EEG characteristics of the children with recurrent seizures differed statistically significant from those that did not have any further seizures. CONCLUSION: Both Sulthiame and Levetiracetam influence the EEG of children with BECTS. Persistent EEG pathologies are associated with treatment failures.


Assuntos
Anticonvulsivantes/uso terapêutico , Ondas Encefálicas/efeitos dos fármacos , Epilepsia Rolândica/tratamento farmacológico , Piracetam/análogos & derivados , Tiazinas/uso terapêutico , Criança , Método Duplo-Cego , Eletroencefalografia , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Levetiracetam , Masculino , Piracetam/uso terapêutico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estatísticas não Paramétricas , Resultado do Tratamento
10.
Genome Med ; 10(1): 3, 2018 01 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29310717

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis defects (GPIBDs) cause a group of phenotypically overlapping recessive syndromes with intellectual disability, for which pathogenic mutations have been described in 16 genes of the corresponding molecular pathway. An elevated serum activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP), a GPI-linked enzyme, has been used to assign GPIBDs to the phenotypic series of hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome (HPMRS) and to distinguish them from another subset of GPIBDs, termed multiple congenital anomalies hypotonia seizures syndrome (MCAHS). However, the increasing number of individuals with a GPIBD shows that hyperphosphatasia is a variable feature that is not ideal for a clinical classification. METHODS: We studied the discriminatory power of multiple GPI-linked substrates that were assessed by flow cytometry in blood cells and fibroblasts of 39 and 14 individuals with a GPIBD, respectively. On the phenotypic level, we evaluated the frequency of occurrence of clinical symptoms and analyzed the performance of computer-assisted image analysis of the facial gestalt in 91 individuals. RESULTS: We found that certain malformations such as Morbus Hirschsprung and diaphragmatic defects are more likely to be associated with particular gene defects (PIGV, PGAP3, PIGN). However, especially at the severe end of the clinical spectrum of HPMRS, there is a high phenotypic overlap with MCAHS. Elevation of AP has also been documented in some of the individuals with MCAHS, namely those with PIGA mutations. Although the impairment of GPI-linked substrates is supposed to play the key role in the pathophysiology of GPIBDs, we could not observe gene-specific profiles for flow cytometric markers or a correlation between their cell surface levels and the severity of the phenotype. In contrast, it was facial recognition software that achieved the highest accuracy in predicting the disease-causing gene in a GPIBD. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the overlapping clinical spectrum of both HPMRS and MCAHS in the majority of affected individuals, the elevation of AP and the reduced surface levels of GPI-linked markers in both groups, a common classification as GPIBDs is recommended. The effectiveness of computer-assisted gestalt analysis for the correct gene inference in a GPIBD and probably beyond is remarkable and illustrates how the information contained in human faces is pivotal in the delineation of genetic entities.


Assuntos
Citometria de Fluxo/métodos , Glicosilfosfatidilinositóis/biossíntese , Processamento de Imagem Assistida por Computador , Anormalidades Múltiplas/metabolismo , Automação , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/metabolismo , Fenótipo , Distúrbios do Metabolismo do Fósforo/metabolismo , Síndrome
11.
JAMA Neurol ; 74(10): 1228-1236, 2017 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28806457

RESUMO

Importance: Knowing the range of symptoms seen in patients with a missense or loss-of-function variant in KCNB1 and how these symptoms correlate with the type of variant will help clinicians with diagnosis and prognosis when treating new patients. Objectives: To investigate the clinical spectrum associated with KCNB1 variants and the genotype-phenotype correlations. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study summarized the clinical and genetic information of patients with a presumed pathogenic variant in KCNB1. Patients were identified in research projects or during clinical testing. Information on patients from previously published articles was collected and authors contacted if feasible. All patients were seen at a clinic at one of the participating institutes because of presumed genetic disorder. They were tested in a clinical setting or included in a research project. Main Outcomes and Measures: The genetic variant and its inheritance and information on the patient's symptoms and characteristics in a predefined format. All variants were identified with massive parallel sequencing and confirmed with Sanger sequencing in the patient. Absence of the variant in the parents could be confirmed with Sanger sequencing in all families except one. Results: Of 26 patients (10 female, 15 male, 1 unknown; mean age at inclusion, 9.8 years; age range, 2-32 years) with developmental delay, 20 (77%) carried a missense variant in the ion channel domain of KCNB1, with a concentration of variants in region S5 to S6. Three variants that led to premature stops were located in the C-terminal and 3 in the ion channel domain. Twenty-one of 25 patients (84%) had seizures, with 9 patients (36%) starting with epileptic spasms between 3 and 18 months of age. All patients had developmental delay, with 17 (65%) experiencing severe developmental delay; 14 (82%) with severe delay had behavioral problems. The developmental delay was milder in 4 of 6 patients with stop variants and in a patient with a variant in the S2 transmembrane element rather than the S4 to S6 region. Conclusions and Relevance: De novo KCNB1 missense variants in the ion channel domain and loss-of-function variants in this domain and the C-terminal likely cause neurodevelopmental disorders with or without seizures. Patients with presumed pathogenic variants in KCNB1 have a variable phenotype. However, the type and position of the variants in the protein are (imperfectly) correlated with the severity of the disorder.


Assuntos
Mutação de Sentido Incorreto/genética , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/fisiopatologia , Canais de Potássio Shab/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Eletroencefalografia , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/diagnóstico por imagem , Fenótipo , Adulto Jovem
12.
Neurology ; 89(4): 385-394, 2017 Jul 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28667181

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the phenotypic spectrum caused by mutations in dynamin 1 (DNM1), encoding the presynaptic protein DNM1, and to investigate possible genotype-phenotype correlations and predicted functional consequences based on structural modeling. METHODS: We reviewed phenotypic data of 21 patients (7 previously published) with DNM1 mutations. We compared mutation data to known functional data and undertook biomolecular modeling to assess the effect of the mutations on protein function. RESULTS: We identified 19 patients with de novo mutations in DNM1 and a sibling pair who had an inherited mutation from a mosaic parent. Seven patients (33.3%) carried the recurrent p.Arg237Trp mutation. A common phenotype emerged that included severe to profound intellectual disability and muscular hypotonia in all patients and an epilepsy characterized by infantile spasms in 16 of 21 patients, frequently evolving into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Two patients had profound global developmental delay without seizures. In addition, we describe a single patient with normal development before the onset of a catastrophic epilepsy, consistent with febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome at 4 years. All mutations cluster within the GTPase or middle domains, and structural modeling and existing functional data suggest a dominant-negative effect on DMN1 function. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotypic spectrum of DNM1-related encephalopathy is relatively homogeneous, in contrast to many other genetic epilepsies. Up to one-third of patients carry the recurrent p.Arg237Trp variant, which is now one of the most common recurrent variants in epileptic encephalopathies identified to date. Given the predicted dominant-negative mechanism of this mutation, this variant presents a prime target for therapeutic intervention.


Assuntos
Encefalopatias/genética , Encefalopatias/metabolismo , GTP Fosfo-Hidrolases/genética , GTP Fosfo-Hidrolases/metabolismo , Proteínas Associadas aos Microtúbulos/genética , Proteínas Associadas aos Microtúbulos/metabolismo , Proteínas Mitocondriais/genética , Proteínas Mitocondriais/metabolismo , Mutação , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Feminino , Proteínas de Homeodomínio , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Modelos Moleculares , Fenótipo , Proteína de Homoeobox de Baixa Estatura , Irmãos , Vesículas Sinápticas/metabolismo , Adulto Jovem
13.
Brain ; 140(5): 1316-1336, 2017 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28379373

RESUMO

Mutations in SCN2A, a gene encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.2, have been associated with a spectrum of epilepsies and neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we report the phenotypes of 71 patients and review 130 previously reported patients. We found that (i) encephalopathies with infantile/childhood onset epilepsies (≥3 months of age) occur almost as often as those with an early infantile onset (<3 months), and are thus more frequent than previously reported; (ii) distinct phenotypes can be seen within the late onset group, including myoclonic-atonic epilepsy (two patients), Lennox-Gastaut not emerging from West syndrome (two patients), and focal epilepsies with an electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep-like EEG pattern (six patients); and (iii) West syndrome constitutes a common phenotype with a major recurring mutation (p.Arg853Gln: two new and four previously reported children). Other known phenotypes include Ohtahara syndrome, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, and intellectual disability or autism without epilepsy. To assess the response to antiepileptic therapy, we retrospectively reviewed the treatment regimen and the course of the epilepsy in 66 patients for which well-documented medical information was available. We find that the use of sodium channel blockers was often associated with clinically relevant seizure reduction or seizure freedom in children with early infantile epilepsies (<3 months), whereas other antiepileptic drugs were less effective. In contrast, sodium channel blockers were rarely effective in epilepsies with later onset (≥3 months) and sometimes induced seizure worsening. Regarding the genetic findings, truncating mutations were exclusively seen in patients with late onset epilepsies and lack of response to sodium channel blockers. Functional characterization of four selected missense mutations using whole cell patch-clamping in tsA201 cells-together with data from the literature-suggest that mutations associated with early infantile epilepsy result in increased sodium channel activity with gain-of-function, characterized by slowing of fast inactivation, acceleration of its recovery or increased persistent sodium current. Further, a good response to sodium channel blockers clinically was found to be associated with a relatively small gain-of-function. In contrast, mutations in patients with late-onset forms and an insufficient response to sodium channel blockers were associated with loss-of-function effects, including a depolarizing shift of voltage-dependent activation or a hyperpolarizing shift of channel availability (steady-state inactivation). Our clinical and experimental data suggest a correlation between age at disease onset, response to sodium channel blockers and the functional properties of mutations in children with SCN2A-related epilepsy.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsia/genética , Epilepsia/fisiopatologia , Canal de Sódio Disparado por Voltagem NAV1.2/genética , Canal de Sódio Disparado por Voltagem NAV1.2/fisiologia , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Bloqueadores dos Canais de Sódio/uso terapêutico , Adolescente , Adulto , Idade de Início , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Epilepsia/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Mutação , Fenótipo , Adulto Jovem
14.
Epilepsy Res ; 132: 84-90, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28324682

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Childhood and Juvenile Absence Epilepsy account for 30% of all genetic generalized epilepsies with a strong genetic contribution. At the current state the genetic background remains to be resolved. The aim of this study was to identify disease associated transcripts pinpointing potential underlying disease mechanisms in patients with CAE and JAE. METHODS: We performed gene expression analysis from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 30 patients with newly-diagnosed absence epilepsy prior to initiating treatment and 30 healthy age - and gender-matched pediatric controls. In a first group (group 1), 10 patients and controls we performed genome-wide transcriptome analysis using the Affymetrix HG U133 2.0+ microarray. 75 differentially expressed genes were followed up by qRT-PCR in two independent groups of 10 patients and controls (group 2 and 3). Furthermore, we analyzed 18 candidate genes by qRT-PCR in groups 2 and 3, which had previously been considered strong candidates for genetic epilepsies. RESULTS: Genome-wide gene expression analysis in group 1 revealed 601 differentially regulated genes. Independent validation of 75 group 1-derived genes by qRT-PCR in groups 2 and 3 confirmed candidate genes with a consistent, but non-significant pattern of up- or down-regulation across all groups (ATP1B3, CAND1, PRPF6, TRIM8). Previously known genes including GABRA1, GABRB3, GABRG2, and RCN2 showed evidence for up- or down-regulation in individual experiments, but were not reliable across groups either. DISCUSSION: Gene expression analysis in absence epilepsy from PMBCs displayed a high degree of heterogeneity between different patient groups. Our study provides several potentially interesting candidate genes, while demonstrating the limits of using gene expression analysis from blood in the identification of novel pathogenic mechanisms. In particular, we found that gene expression levels vary in response to altered experimental conditions, representing a substantial challenge for the identification of disease-related gene expression signatures for neurological diseases from whole blood.


Assuntos
Epilepsia Tipo Ausência/sangue , Epilepsia Tipo Ausência/genética , Expressão Gênica , Regulação para Baixo , Feminino , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino
15.
Neurology ; 88(5): 483-492, 2017 01 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28053010

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the ß3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3 probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies. Electrophysiologic analysis of 7 mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes, using coexpression of wild-type or mutant ß3, together with α5 and γ2s subunits and an automated 2-microelectrode voltage-clamp system, revealed reduced GABA-induced current amplitudes or GABA sensitivity for 5 of 7 mutations. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that GABRB3 mutations are associated with a broad phenotypic spectrum of epilepsies and that reduced receptor function causing GABAergic disinhibition represents the relevant disease mechanism.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Mutação , Receptores de GABA-A/genética , Animais , Automação Laboratorial , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Epilepsia/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Heterozigoto , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Potenciais da Membrana/fisiologia , Oócitos , Técnicas de Patch-Clamp , Fenótipo , Receptores de GABA-A/metabolismo , Xenopus laevis
16.
Neurology ; 87(11): 1140-51, 2016 09 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27521439

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To delineate phenotypic heterogeneity, we describe the clinical features of a cohort of patients with GABRA1 gene mutations. METHODS: Patients with GABRA1 mutations were ascertained through an international collaboration. Clinical, EEG, and genetic data were collected. Functional analysis of 4 selected mutations was performed using the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system. RESULTS: The study included 16 novel probands and 3 additional family members with a disease-causing mutation in the GABRA1 gene. The phenotypic spectrum varied from unspecified epilepsy (1), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (2), photosensitive idiopathic generalized epilepsy (1), and generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (1) to severe epileptic encephalopathies (11). In the epileptic encephalopathy group, the patients had seizures beginning between the first day of life and 15 months, with a mean of 7 months. Predominant seizure types in all patients were tonic-clonic in 9 participants (56%) and myoclonic seizures in 5 (31%). EEG showed a generalized photoparoxysmal response in 6 patients (37%). Four selected mutations studied functionally revealed a loss of function, without a clear genotype-phenotype correlation. CONCLUSIONS: GABRA1 mutations make a significant contribution to the genetic etiology of both benign and severe epilepsy syndromes. Myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizures with pathologic response to photic stimulation are common and shared features in both mild and severe phenotypes.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Mutação , Receptores de GABA-A/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Animais , Encéfalo/fisiopatologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Epilepsia/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Potenciais da Membrana/fisiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Oócitos , Fenótipo , Receptores de GABA-A/metabolismo , Xenopus laevis , Ácido gama-Aminobutírico/metabolismo
17.
Mol Genet Genomic Med ; 4(4): 457-64, 2016 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27465585

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sanger sequencing, still the standard technique for genetic testing in most diagnostic laboratories and until recently widely used in research, is gradually being complemented by next-generation sequencing (NGS). No single mutation detection technique is however perfect in identifying all mutations. Therefore, we wondered to what extent inconsistencies between Sanger sequencing and NGS affect the molecular diagnosis of patients. Since mutations in SCN1A, the major gene implicated in epilepsy, are found in the majority of Dravet syndrome (DS) patients, we focused on missed SCN1A mutations. METHODS: We sent out a survey to 16 genetic centers performing SCN1A testing. RESULTS: We collected data on 28 mutations initially missed using Sanger sequencing. All patients were falsely reported as SCN1A mutation-negative, both due to technical limitations and human errors. CONCLUSION: We illustrate the pitfalls of Sanger sequencing and most importantly provide evidence that SCN1A mutations are an even more frequent cause of DS than already anticipated.

18.
Epileptic Disord ; 18(3): 252-88, 2016 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27435520

RESUMO

The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The term "benign" is often used in connection with the IFEs and is increasingly being challenged. Certainly most of these disorders are not associated with the devastating cognitive and behavioural problems seen with early childhood epileptic encephalopathies, such as West or Dravet syndromes. However, it is clear that specific, and sometimes persistent, neuropsychological deficits in attention, language and literacy accompany many of the IFEs that, when multiplied by the large numbers affected, make up a significant public health problem. Understanding the nature, distribution, evolution, risk and management of these is an important area of current research. A corollary to such questions regarding comorbidities is the role of focal interictal spikes and their enduring impact on cognitive functioning. What explains the paradox that epilepsies characterised by abundant interictal epileptiform abnormalities are often associated with very few clinical seizures? This is an exciting area in both clinical and experimental arenas and will eventually have important implications for clinical management of the whole child, taking into account not just seizures, but also adaptive functioning and quality of life. For several decades, we have accepted an evidence-free approach to using or not using antiepileptic drugs in IFEs. There is huge international variation and only a handful of studies examining neurocognitive outcomes. Clearly, this is a situation ready for an overhaul in practice. Fundamental to understanding treatment is knowledge of aetiology. In recent years, there have been several significant discoveries in IFEs from studies of copy number variation, exome sequencing, and linkage that prompt reconsideration of the "unknown cause" classification and strongly suggest a genetic aetiology. The IFE are strongly age-related, both with regards to age of seizure onset and remission. Does this time window solely relate to a similar age-related gene expression, or are there epigenetic factors involved that might also explain low observed twin concordance? The genetic (and epigenetic) models for different IFEs, their comorbidities, and their similarities to other neurodevelopmental disorders deserve investigation in the coming years. In so doing, we will probably learn much about normal brain functioning. This is because these disorders, perhaps more than any other human brain disease, are disorders of functional brain systems (even though these functional networks may not yet be fully defined). In June 2012, an international group of clinical and basic science researchers met in London under the auspices of the Waterloo Foundation to discuss and debate these issues in relation to IFEs. This Waterloo Foundation Symposium on the Idiopathic Focal Epilepsies: Phenotype to Genotype witnessed presentations that explored the clinical phenomenology, phenotypes and endophenotypes, and genetic approaches to investigation of these disorders. In parallel, the impact of these epilepsies on children and their families was reviewed. The papers in this supplement are based upon these presentations. They represent an updated state-of-the-art thinking on the topics explored. The symposium led to the formation of international working groups under the umbrella of "Luke's Idiopathic Focal Epilepsy Project" to investigate various aspects of the idiopathic focal epilepsies including: semiology and classification, genetics, cognition, sleep, high-frequency oscillations, and parental resources (see www.childhood-epilepsy.org). The next sponsored international workshop, in June 2014, was on randomised controlled trials in IFEs and overnight learning outcome measures.


Assuntos
Epilepsias Parciais/fisiopatologia , Criança , Humanos
19.
Neurology ; 86(10): 954-62, 2016 Mar 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26865513

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To give a comprehensive overview of the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of STXBP1 encephalopathy (STXBP1-E) by systematically reviewing newly diagnosed and previously reported patients. METHODS: We recruited newly diagnosed patients with STXBP1 mutations through an international network of clinicians and geneticists. Furthermore, we performed a systematic literature search to review the phenotypes of all previously reported patients. RESULTS: We describe the phenotypic features of 147 patients with STXBP1-E including 45 previously unreported patients with 33 novel STXBP1 mutations. All patients have intellectual disability (ID), which is mostly severe to profound (88%). Ninety-five percent of patients have epilepsy. While one-third of patients presented with Ohtahara syndrome (21%) or West syndrome (9.5%), the majority has a nonsyndromic early-onset epilepsy and encephalopathy (53%) with epileptic spasms or tonic seizures as main seizure type. We found no correlation between severity of seizures and severity of ID or between mutation type and seizure characteristics or cognitive outcome. Neurologic comorbidities including autistic features and movement disorders are frequent. We also report 2 previously unreported adult patients with prominent extrapyramidal features. CONCLUSION: De novo STXBP1 mutations are among the most frequent causes of epilepsy and encephalopathy. Most patients have severe to profound ID with little correlation among seizure onset, seizure severity, and the degree of ID. Accordingly, we hypothesize that seizure severity and ID present 2 independent dimensions of the STXBP1-E phenotype. STXBP1-E may be conceptualized as a complex neurodevelopmental disorder rather than a primary epileptic encephalopathy.


Assuntos
Encefalopatias/genética , Epilepsia/genética , Proteínas Munc18/genética , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Encefalopatias/diagnóstico , Encefalopatias/epidemiologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Epilepsia/diagnóstico , Epilepsia/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação/genética , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/diagnóstico , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
20.
Epilepsia ; 56(12): e203-8, 2015 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26537434

RESUMO

The first mutations identified in SLC2A1, encoding the glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1) protein of the blood-brain barrier, were associated with severe epileptic encephalopathy. Recently, dominant SLC2A1 mutations were found in rare autosomal dominant families with various forms of epilepsy including early onset absence epilepsy (EOAE), myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE), and genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE). Our study aimed to investigate the possible role of SLC2A1 in various forms of epilepsy including MAE and absence epilepsy with early onset. We also aimed to estimate the frequency of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in the Danish population. One hundred twenty patients with MAE, 50 patients with absence epilepsy, and 37 patients with unselected epilepsies, intellectual disability (ID), and/or various movement disorders were screened for mutations in SLC2A1. Mutations in SLC2A1 were detected in 5 (10%) of 50 patients with absence epilepsy, and in one (2.7%) of 37 patient with unselected epilepsies, ID, and/or various movement disorders. None of the 120 MAE patients harbored SLC2A1 mutations. We estimated the frequency of SLC2A1 mutations in the Danish population to be approximately 1:83,000. Our study confirmed the role of SLC2A1 mutations in absence epilepsy with early onset. However, our study failed to support the notion that SLC2A1 aberrations are a cause of MAE without associated features such as movement disorders.


Assuntos
Erros Inatos do Metabolismo dos Carboidratos/epidemiologia , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/genética , Epilepsia Tipo Ausência/genética , Transportador de Glucose Tipo 1/genética , Proteínas de Transporte de Monossacarídeos/deficiência , Erros Inatos do Metabolismo dos Carboidratos/genética , Pré-Escolar , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Epilepsia Generalizada/genética , Transportador de Glucose Tipo 1/deficiência , Transportador de Glucose Tipo 1/fisiologia , Humanos , Lactente , Proteínas de Transporte de Monossacarídeos/genética , Mutação , Síndrome
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