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1.
Circulation ; 140(8): 645-657, 2019 Aug 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31424985

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is implicated in coronary heart disease (CHD), but current evidence is based on small, cross-sectional studies. We examined blood DNA methylation in relation to incident CHD across multiple prospective cohorts. METHODS: Nine population-based cohorts from the United States and Europe profiled epigenome-wide blood leukocyte DNA methylation using the Illumina Infinium 450k microarray, and prospectively ascertained CHD events including coronary insufficiency/unstable angina, recognized myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, and coronary death. Cohorts conducted race-specific analyses adjusted for age, sex, smoking, education, body mass index, blood cell type proportions, and technical variables. We conducted fixed-effect meta-analyses across cohorts. RESULTS: Among 11 461 individuals (mean age 64 years, 67% women, 35% African American) free of CHD at baseline, 1895 developed CHD during a mean follow-up of 11.2 years. Methylation levels at 52 CpG (cytosine-phosphate-guanine) sites were associated with incident CHD or myocardial infarction (false discovery rate<0.05). These CpGs map to genes with key roles in calcium regulation (ATP2B2, CASR, GUCA1B, HPCAL1), and genes identified in genome- and epigenome-wide studies of serum calcium (CASR), serum calcium-related risk of CHD (CASR), coronary artery calcified plaque (PTPRN2), and kidney function (CDH23, HPCAL1), among others. Mendelian randomization analyses supported a causal effect of DNA methylation on incident CHD; these CpGs map to active regulatory regions proximal to long non-coding RNA transcripts. CONCLUSION: Methylation of blood-derived DNA is associated with risk of future CHD across diverse populations and may serve as an informative tool for gaining further insight on the development of CHD.

2.
PLoS Med ; 14(1): e1002215, 2017 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28095459

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The link between DNA methylation, obesity, and adiposity-related diseases in the general population remains uncertain. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted an association study of body mass index (BMI) and differential methylation for over 400,000 CpGs assayed by microarray in whole-blood-derived DNA from 3,743 participants in the Framingham Heart Study and the Lothian Birth Cohorts, with independent replication in three external cohorts of 4,055 participants. We examined variations in whole blood gene expression and conducted Mendelian randomization analyses to investigate the functional and clinical relevance of the findings. We identified novel and previously reported BMI-related differential methylation at 83 CpGs that replicated across cohorts; BMI-related differential methylation was associated with concurrent changes in the expression of genes in lipid metabolism pathways. Genetic instrumental variable analysis of alterations in methylation at one of the 83 replicated CpGs, cg11024682 (intronic to sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 [SREBF1]), demonstrated links to BMI, adiposity-related traits, and coronary artery disease. Independent genetic instruments for expression of SREBF1 supported the findings linking methylation to adiposity and cardiometabolic disease. Methylation at a substantial proportion (16 of 83) of the identified loci was found to be secondary to differences in BMI. However, the cross-sectional nature of the data limits definitive causal determination. CONCLUSIONS: We present robust associations of BMI with differential DNA methylation at numerous loci in blood cells. BMI-related DNA methylation and gene expression provide mechanistic insights into the relationship between DNA methylation, obesity, and adiposity-related diseases.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Doença da Artéria Coronariana/genética , Metilação de DNA , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Leucócitos/metabolismo , Metabolismo dos Lipídeos , Idoso , Doença da Artéria Coronariana/etiologia , Epigênese Genética , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , Metabolismo dos Lipídeos/genética , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Obesidade/complicações , Análise de Sequência com Séries de Oligonucleotídeos
3.
Cell Metab ; 21(1): 138-49, 2015 Jan 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25565211

RESUMO

Using a functional approach to investigate the epigenetics of type 2 diabetes (T2D), we combine three lines of evidence-diet-induced epigenetic dysregulation in mouse, epigenetic conservation in humans, and T2D clinical risk evidence-to identify genes implicated in T2D pathogenesis through epigenetic mechanisms related to obesity. Beginning with dietary manipulation of genetically homogeneous mice, we identify differentially DNA-methylated genomic regions. We then replicate these results in adipose samples from lean and obese patients pre- and post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, identifying regions where both the location and direction of methylation change are conserved. These regions overlap with 27 genetic T2D risk loci, only one of which was deemed significant by GWAS alone. Functional analysis of genes associated with these regions revealed four genes with roles in insulin resistance, demonstrating the potential general utility of this approach for complementing conventional human genetic studies by integrating cross-species epigenomics and clinical genetic risk.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Epigênese Genética , Adipócitos/citologia , Adipócitos/metabolismo , Animais , Células Cultivadas , Metilação de DNA , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/patologia , Dieta Hiperlipídica , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Loci Gênicos , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Teste de Tolerância a Glucose , Humanos , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , RNA Interferente Pequeno/metabolismo , Proteína 2 Semelhante ao Fator 7 de Transcrição/genética
4.
Genome Biol ; 16: 25, 2015 Jan 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25633388

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: DNA methylation levels change with age. Recent studies have identified biomarkers of chronological age based on DNA methylation levels. It is not yet known whether DNA methylation age captures aspects of biological age. RESULTS: Here we test whether differences between people's chronological ages and estimated ages, DNA methylation age, predict all-cause mortality in later life. The difference between DNA methylation age and chronological age (Δage) was calculated in four longitudinal cohorts of older people. Meta-analysis of proportional hazards models from the four cohorts was used to determine the association between Δage and mortality. A 5-year higher Δage is associated with a 21% higher mortality risk, adjusting for age and sex. After further adjustments for childhood IQ, education, social class, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and APOE e4 status, there is a 16% increased mortality risk for those with a 5-year higher Δage. A pedigree-based heritability analysis of Δage was conducted in a separate cohort. The heritability of Δage was 0.43. CONCLUSIONS: DNA methylation-derived measures of accelerated aging are heritable traits that predict mortality independently of health status, lifestyle factors, and known genetic factors.


Assuntos
Sangue/metabolismo , Causas de Morte , Metilação de DNA/genética , Mortalidade , Idoso , Envelhecimento/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Demografia , Feminino , Humanos , Padrões de Herança/genética , Contagem de Leucócitos , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Análise de Sobrevida
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