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1.
Respirology ; 2020 Jul 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32725665
2.
Chest ; 2020 Jun 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32512006

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The role of tracheostomy during the COVID-19 pandemic remains unknown. The goal of this consensus statement is to examine the current evidence for performing tracheostomy in patients with respiratory failure from COVID-19 and offer guidance to physicians on the preparation, timing, and technique while minimizing the risk of infection to health care workers (HCWs). METHODS: A panel including intensivists and interventional pulmonologists from three professional societies representing 13 institutions with experience in managing patients with COVID-19 across a spectrum of health-care environments developed key clinical questions addressing specific topics on tracheostomy in COVID-19. A systematic review of the literature and an established modified Delphi consensus methodology were applied to provide a reliable evidence-based consensus statement and expert panel report. RESULTS: Eight key questions, corresponding to 14 decision points, were rated by the panel. The results were aggregated, resulting in eight main recommendations and five additional remarks intended to guide health-care providers in the decision-making process pertinent to tracheostomy in patients with COVID-19-related respiratory failure. CONCLUSION: This panel suggests performing tracheostomy in patients expected to require prolonged mechanical ventilation. A specific timing of tracheostomy cannot be recommended. There is no evidence for routine repeat reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction testing in patients with confirmed COVID-19 evaluated for tracheostomy. To reduce the risk of infection in HCWs, we recommend performing the procedure using techniques that minimize aerosolization while wearing enhanced personal protective equipment. The recommendations presented in this statement may change as more experience is gained during this pandemic.

3.
Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther ; 30: 101711, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32145373

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) causes mucosal wart-like growths of the upper aerodigestive tract, which can undergo malignant transformation. These tumors are difficult to treat, often requiring repeated debridement, which can be associated with high morbidity. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizing medication and a topically applied light source to treat early stage endobronchial lung cancer. Most data on the use of PDT in RRP pertain to laryngeal disease. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of PDT in treating RRP involving the lower respiratory tract. METHODS: We performed a retrospective multicenter review of adult patients who had a diagnosis of RRP involving the lower airways. We documented details of their disease, treatments, and outcomes. RESULTS: Eight patients underwent PDT for ten RRP lesions. Lesions were located in the trachea and more distal airways. Pathology showed malignant conversion to squamous cell carcinoma in half of the cases. All patient underwent debulking and multimodal treatment concurrently with PDT. Treatment was successful in seven patients with improvement in luminal size. Duration of disease-free recurrence ranged from 4 to 33 months. Five of eight patients have sustained ongoing treatment effect, ranging from 10 to 33 months. Most patient had improved quality of life (83 %) and a reduction in interventions (87 %) after PDT. Complications were minimal. CONCLUSION: PDT can be a safe and effective tool when treating RRP of the lower respiratory tract, including lesions with malignant transformation. A multimodal treatment approach is associated with improved outcomes. Further prospective studies are needed to fully determine its effectiveness.

5.
Chest ; 157(5): 1346-1353, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31958444

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The concerns regarding air leak after lung surgery or spontaneous pneumothorax include detection and duration. Prior studies have suggested that digital drainage systems permit shorter chest tube duration and hospital length of stay (LOS) by earlier detection of air leak cessation. We conducted a systematic review to assess the impact of digital drainage on chest tube duration and hospital LOS after pulmonary surgery and spontaneous pneumothorax. METHODS: Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched from inception through January 2019. We included randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and case series of adult patients, using digital or traditional drainage devices for air leaks of either postsurgical or spontaneous pneumothorax origin. RESULTS: Of 1,272 references reviewed, 23 articles were included. Nineteen articles addressed postoperative air leak, and four articles pertained to air leak after spontaneous pneumothorax. Thirteen studies were randomized controlled trials. Digital drainage resulted in significantly shorter chest tube duration in eight of 18 studies and shorter hospital LOS in six of 14 studies for postoperative air leak. For postpneumothorax air leak, digital drainage resulted in significantly shorter chest tube duration in two of three studies and hospital LOS in one of two studies with an analog control group. CONCLUSIONS: Most studies show no significant differences in chest tube duration and hospital LOS with digital vs analog drainage systems for patients with air leak after pulmonary resection. For post-spontaneous pneumothorax air leak, the limited published evidence suggests shorter chest tube duration and hospital LOS with digital drainage systems.

6.
J Clin Oncol ; 38(7): 753-766, 2020 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31829901

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To provide evidence-based recommendations to practicing clinicians on radiographic imaging and biomarker surveillance strategies after definitive curative-intent therapy in patients with stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and SCLC. METHODS: ASCO convened an Expert Panel of medical oncology, thoracic surgery, radiation oncology, pulmonary, radiology, primary care, and advocacy experts to conduct a literature search, which included systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective comparative observational studies published from 2000 through 2019. Outcomes of interest included survival, disease-free or recurrence-free survival, and quality of life. Expert Panel members used available evidence and informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. RESULTS: The literature search identified 14 relevant studies to inform the evidence base for this guideline. RECOMMENDATIONS: Patients should undergo surveillance imaging for recurrence every 6 months for 2 years and then annually for detection of new primary lung cancers. Chest computed tomography imaging is the optimal imaging modality for surveillance. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging should not be used as a surveillance tool. Surveillance imaging may not be offered to patients who are clinically unsuitable for or unwilling to accept further treatment. Age should not preclude surveillance imaging. Circulating biomarkers should not be used as a surveillance strategy for detection of recurrence. Brain magnetic resonance imaging should not be used for routine surveillance in stage I-III NSCLC but may be used every 3 months for the first year and every 6 months for the second year in patients with stage I-III small-cell lung cancer who have undergone curative-intent treatment.

7.
Respiration ; 99(3): 239-247, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31851991

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of published data regarding the optimal type of anesthesia and ventilation strategies during rigid bronchoscopy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study is to report the procedural and anesthesia-related complications with rigid bronchoscopy using total intravenous anesthesia and spontaneous assisted ventilation. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients undergoing therapeutic rigid bronchoscopy at the University of Chicago between October 2012 and December 2014 was performed. Data were recorded relating to patients' demographics, comorbidities, type of anesthesia, need for neuromuscular blockade (NMB), intraoperative hypoxemia, hypotension, perioperative adverse events, and mortality. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients underwent 79 rigid bronchoscopy procedures; 90% were performed for malignant disease and 90% of patients had an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class III or IV. The majority (76%) did not require use of NMB. The most common adverse events were intraoperative hypoxemia (67%) and hypotension (77%). Major bleeding and postoperative respiratory failure occurred in 3.8 and 5.1% of procedures, respectively. There was no intraoperative mortality or cardiac dysrhythmias. The 30-day mortality was 7.6% and was associated with older age, inpatient status, congestive heart failure, home oxygen use, and procedural duration. Intraoperative hypoxemia, hypotension, and ASA class were not associated with 30-day mortality. The majority (94%) of patients were discharged home. The use of NMB did not impact outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that therapeutic rigid bronchoscopy can be safely performed with total intravenous anesthesia and spontaneous assisted ventilation in patients with central airway obstruction, significant comorbidities, and a high ASA class. The only significant modifiable variable predicting the 30-day mortality was the duration of the procedure.

8.
BMC Pulm Med ; 19(1): 243, 2019 Dec 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31829148

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Robotic Endoscopic System (Auris Health, Inc., Redwood City, CA) has the potential to overcome several limitations of contemporary guided-bronchoscopic technologies for the diagnosis of lung lesions. Our objective is to report on the initial post-marketing feasibility, safety and diagnostic yield of this technology. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed data on consecutive cases in which robot-assisted bronchoscopy was used to sample lung lesions at four centers in the US (academic and community) from June 15th, 2018 to December 15th, 2018. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-seven lesions in 165 patients were included in the analysis, with an average follow-up of 185 ± 55 days. The average size of target lesions was 25.0 ± 15.0 mm. Seventy-one percent were located in the peripheral third of the lung. Pneumothorax and airway bleeding occurred in 3.6 and 2.4% cases, respectively. Navigation was successful in 88.6% of cases. Tissue samples were successfully obtained in 98.8%. The diagnostic yield estimates ranged from 69.1 to 77% assuming the cases of biopsy-proven inflammation without any follow-up information (N = 13) were non-diagnostic and diagnostic, respectively. The yield was 81.5, 71.7 and 26.9% for concentric, eccentric and absent r-EBUS views, respectively. Diagnostic yield was not affected by lesion size, density, lobar location or centrality. CONCLUSIONS: RAB implementation in community and academic centers is safe and feasible, with an initial diagnostic yield of 69.1-77% in patients with lung lesions that require diagnostic bronchoscopy. Comparative trials with the existing bronchoscopic technologies are needed to determine cost-effectiveness of this technology.

9.
J Thorac Dis ; 11(10): 4389-4399, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31737325

RESUMO

Background: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with central airway obstruction (CAO) may have better survival on systemic therapy if the airway patency is successfully restored by bronchoscopic interventions. It remains unclear which therapeutic bronchoscopic modality [laser, stenting, external beam radiation, brachytherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT)] used for restoring airway patency positively affects outcomes in these patients. We analyzed the effectiveness of PDT in terms of mortality, and time to subsequent treatments in patients with stage III and IV NSCLC. Methods: Study used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Medicare linked data. We categorized NSCLC patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2011 and with stage III and IV, into three treatment groups: PDT + radiation ± chemotherapy, non-PDT ablation therapy + radiation ± chemotherapy, and radiation + chemotherapy. We analyzed all-cause and cause-specific mortality using Cox proportional hazard models with an inverse probability weighted propensity score adjustment. Time to subsequent treatment was analyzed using GLM model. Results: For the PDT group, hazard for all-cause and cause-specific mortality was comparable to the radiation + chemotherapy group (HR =1.03, 95% CI: 0.73-1.45; and HR =1.04, 95% CI: 0.71-1.51, respectively). The non-PDT ablation group had higher hazard for all-cause (HR =1.22, 95% CI: 1.13-1.33) and cause-specific mortality (HR =1.10, 95% CI: 1.01-1.20), compared to the radiation + chemotherapy group. The PDT group had longer time to follow-up treatment, compared to non-PDT ablation group. Conclusions: In our exploratory study of stage III and IV NSCLC patients with CAO, addition of PDT demonstrated hazard of mortality comparable to radiation + chemotherapy group. However, addition of non-PDT ablation showed higher mortality compared to the radiation + chemotherapy group. Future studies should investigate the efficacy and effectiveness of multimodal therapy including radiation, chemo, immunotherapy and bronchoscopic interventions.

10.
Ann Transl Med ; 7(15): 351, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31516897

RESUMO

Guidelines recommend testing for driver mutations and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression at the time of initial diagnosis and during disease progression to help determine prognosis and initiate personalized therapy. In this article we review the updated literature and techniques of endobronchial ultrasound transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in obtaining adequate tissue for molecular analysis by using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and for assessing PD-L1 expression through immunohistochemistry.

13.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 16(10): 1220-1229, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31194922

RESUMO

Bronchoscopic ablative therapies have been applied safely and successfully for the palliation of malignant central airway obstruction and have the potential for treating inoperable peripheral lung tumors. Proper understanding of technology-tissue interaction allows clinicians to optimize tissue effects, avoid intraoperative complications, and predict response to therapy and potential adverse events. This article reviews the basic mechanisms of action and clinical data on bronchoscopic ablation using laser, electrosurgery, photodynamic therapy, cryotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and thermal vapor ablation for malignant central airway obstruction and peripheral lung tumors.

14.
BMC Pulm Med ; 19(1): 89, 2019 May 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31072355

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Peripheral pulmonary nodules are increasingly detected in patients screened for lung cancer or during disease progression of thoracic or extrathoracic malignancies. Sampling these lesions requires surgery, computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy or bronchoscopic interventions. Bronchoscopic interventions are preferable because they have lower complications and often patients may not be ideal candidates for surgical or CT-guided biopsy. In addition, guidelines recommend diagnosis and staging in one single procedure. The diagnostic yield of existing advanced bronchoscopic techniques including electromagnetic navigation, radial probe ultrasonography, ultrathin bronchoscopy or virtual bronchoscopy remains suboptimal. The purpose of this paper is to codify the technique whereby a diagnostic bronchoscopy is performed using the new robotic platform. METHODS: In the present report, I describe the technique for performing robotic-assisted bronchoscopy (RAB) using the Monarch™ platform (Auris Health, Inc., Redwood City, CA). RESULTS: Appropriate team training, patient selection, anesthesia settings, optimal tissue acquisition and processing, and prevention of complications are described and illustrated. CONCLUSIONS: RAB may be beneficial for patients with peripheral lung lesions that require biopsy prior to surgical resection, stereotactic radiation, targeted or immunotherapy.


Assuntos
Broncoscopia/métodos , Pneumopatias/patologia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos , Humanos , Biópsia Guiada por Imagem , Pneumopatias/diagnóstico por imagem , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X , Ultrassonografia
15.
J Thorac Oncol ; 14(3): 445-458, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30476574

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB) is a minimally invasive technology that guides endoscopic tools to pulmonary lesions. ENB has been evaluated primarily in small, single-center studies; thus, the diagnostic yield in a generalizable setting is unknown. METHODS: NAVIGATE is a prospective, multicenter, cohort study that evaluated ENB using the superDimension navigation system (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota). In this United States cohort analysis, 1215 consecutive subjects were enrolled at 29 academic and community sites from April 2015 to August 2016. RESULTS: The median lesion size was 20.0 mm. Fluoroscopy was used in 91% of cases (lesions visible in 60%) and radial endobronchial ultrasound in 57%. The median ENB planning time was 5 minutes; the ENB-specific procedure time was 25 minutes. Among 1157 subjects undergoing ENB-guided biopsy, 94% (1092 of 1157) had navigation completed and tissue obtained. Follow-up was completed in 99% of subjects at 1 month and 80% at 12 months. The 12-month diagnostic yield was 73%. Pathology results of the ENB-aided tissue samples showed malignancy in 44% (484 of 1092). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for malignancy were 69%, 100%, 100%, and 56%, respectively. ENB-related Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 2 or higher pneumothoraces (requiring admission or chest tube placement) occurred in 2.9%. The ENB-related Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 2 or higher bronchopulmonary hemorrhage and grade 4 or higher respiratory failure rates were 1.5% and 0.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: NAVIGATE shows that an ENB-aided diagnosis can be obtained in approximately three-quarters of evaluable patients across a generalizable cohort based on prospective 12-month follow-up in a pragmatic setting with a low procedural complication rate.


Assuntos
Broncoscopia/métodos , Pneumopatias/diagnóstico , Pneumotórax/diagnóstico , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Fenômenos Eletromagnéticos , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Estudos Prospectivos , Adulto Jovem
16.
J Thorac Dis ; 10(2): 1124-1128, 2018 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29607190

RESUMO

Immunotherapy agents in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can result in improved quality of life and survival when compared with platinum-based chemotherapy. Novel response patterns such as pseudoprogression and hyperprogression, however, have been described and pose a challenge to treating physicians. Predictors of hyperprogressive disease (HPD) have not yet been identified. Evaluation and management by a multidisciplinary team involving medical and radiation oncologists, thoracic radiologists, and proceduralists is necessary to identify this subset of patients in a timely manner. Repeat biopsy distinguishes HPD from pseudoprogression and may eventually elucidate predictive biomarkers. We describe the epidemiology of these two phenomena, their diagnostic criteria, and their relevance for interventional pulmonologists.

17.
Clin Chest Med ; 39(1): 99-110, 2018 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29433728

RESUMO

Bronchoscopy programs implementing the experiential learning model address different learning styles. Problem-based learning improves knowledge retention, critical decision making, and communication. These modalities are preferred by learners and contribute to their engagement, in turn leading to durable learning. Follow-up after live events is warranted through spaced education strategies. The objectives of this article are to (1) summarize and illustrate the implementation of experiential learning theory for bronchoscopy courses, (2) discuss the flipped classroom model and problem-based learning, (3) illustrate bronchoscopy checklists implementation in simulation, and (4) discuss the importance of feedback and spaced learning for bronchoscopy education programs.


Assuntos
Broncoscopia/métodos , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Humanos
18.
Clin Lung Cancer ; 19(3): 230-238.e2, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29277564

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Next generation sequencing (NGS) testing of lung cancer is recommended by guidelines, and endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) often provides the only material available for testing. Previous studies have demonstrated successful NGS testing on cell block samples obtained by EBUS; however, cytology smears provide a more reliable sample with better DNA quality for testing. In this study, we aimed to determine the success rate of OncoScreen (50 gene) and OncoPlus (1213 gene) panel NGS testing of cytology samples obtained by EBUS utilizing 22- and 25-gauge needles. METHODS: Fifty-four patients underwent EBUS-TBNA of lung cancer for which NGS testing was requested. Data was analyzed for needle gauge, cytologic assessment, NGS test success, and sample type (cytology smear or cell block) used for testing. RESULTS: Eighty-five NGS tests were ordered on 54 samples. Overall, 95.3% of samples had successful testing. OncoScreen and OncoPlus panels were successful 98.0% and 91.4% of the time, respectively. Cytology smears provided testing material for 85% of the tests. OncoScreen testing was successful in 97.5% and 100% of the 22- and 25-gauge samples, respectively (P = 1.00). OncoPlus testing was successful in 91.3% and 100% of the 22- and 25-gauge samples, respectively (P = 1.00). CONCLUSIONS: NGS can be reliably performed on cytology smears obtained from EBUS-TBNA. The size of the needle does not seem to affect the success rate of small or large panel NGS tests.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/genética , Aspiração por Agulha Fina Guiada por Ultrassom Endoscópico/métodos , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/métodos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/genética , Idoso , Broncoscopia/métodos , Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/diagnóstico , Aspiração por Agulha Fina Guiada por Ultrassom Endoscópico/instrumentação , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/diagnóstico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
19.
Chest ; 153(4): 876-887, 2018 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29246769

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Successful implementation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) evidence-based guideline recommendations requires effective educational programs that target all clinicians from interdisciplinary teams. This study describes and evaluates the Engaging an Interdisciplinary Team for NSCLC (GAIN 3.0) experiential learning-based educational curriculum. METHODS: GAIN 3.0 was designed to enhance interdisciplinary collaboration for effective NSCLC diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. The program used a flipped classroom model that included an e-learning component prior to a live 6-hour interactive program. The interactive program included hands-on simulations, small group workshops, gamification, and case discussions. Participants included academic and community members of multidisciplinary lung cancer teams. Assessments included an online baseline survey, a pretest and posttest, a program evaluation, a long-term survey (LTS), and on-site faculty evaluation of participants. RESULTS: Of 416 attendees to 13 live GAIN 3.0 programs (nine in the United States and four in Europe), 304 (73%) completed the pretest and 187 (45%) completed the posttest. Out of a perfect score of 12 points, program participants had a mean test score of 6.3 ± 2.1 on the pretest (52%) and 7.8 ± 2.1 on the posttest (65%) (P = .03). There was an overall knowledge increase of 13% from pretest to posttest. Most LTS respondents (65%) rated the GAIN 3.0 live programs as "high impact." On the LTS, the areas with the greatest gains in participants who had very high confidence were communication across disciplines, use of a team-based approach, and personalized treatment. CONCLUSIONS: GAIN 3.0 was a highly successful interdisciplinary activity that improved participants' knowledge, competence, and likely the clinical care provided to patients with NSCLC.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/terapia , Educação Médica Continuada/métodos , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Neoplasias Pulmonares/terapia , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Pneumologia/educação , Competência Clínica/normas , Instrução por Computador , Currículo , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/normas , Humanos
20.
Cancer Cytopathol ; 126(2): 122-128, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29053224

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression testing is recommended by guidelines for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The primary objective of the current study was to determine the success rate of PD-L1 testing from cytology cell block samples obtained by bronchoscopic needle aspiration. The secondary objective was the assessment of the difference in specimen adequacy acquired via needles of different gauges. METHODS: Patients with NSCLC who underwent bronchoscopic needle aspirations for which PD-L1 testing was requested between November 1, 2016, and February 6, 2017, were included in the current analysis. Patients underwent needle aspiration from intrathoracic adenopathy or a pulmonary lesion. Rapid on-site cytology evaluation was performed in all cases. PD-L1 immunohistochemistry was performed using the Abcam anti-PD-L1 antibody 28.8 clone on cell block specimen. RESULTS: A total of 22 patients had PD-L1 testing requested on needle cytology samples obtained via bronchoscopy at the time of initial diagnosis (81.8%) and for progression of disease (18.2%). Twenty patients (90.9%) underwent successful PD-L1 testing. Sample acquisition was via endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in 72.7% of patients, endobronchial needle aspiration in 18.2% of patients, and peripheral nodule needle aspiration in 9.1% of patients. There was no statistical difference in PD-L1 test success rates between sample methods (P = .99) or needle sizes (P = 1.00). CONCLUSIONS: Bronchoscopically obtained cytology needle-based samples are adequate for PD-L1 testing in patients with NSCLC. There was no difference noted between different needle sizes with regard to adequacy for PD-L1 testing. These findings are relevant for clinicians caring for patients with lung cancer because a vast majority of patients with advanced NSCLC are diagnosed by bronchoscopic needle-based techniques using a variety of commercially available needles. Cancer Cytopathol 2018;126:122-8. © 2017 American Cancer Society.


Assuntos
Antígeno B7-H1/análise , Broncoscopia/métodos , Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/patologia , Neoplasias Pulmonares/patologia , Idoso , Biópsia por Agulha Fina/instrumentação , Biópsia por Agulha Fina/métodos , Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/diagnóstico por imagem , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Pulmão/diagnóstico por imagem , Pulmão/patologia , Neoplasias Pulmonares/diagnóstico por imagem , Linfonodos/patologia , Metástase Linfática/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Agulhas , Estudos Retrospectivos , Ultrassonografia de Intervenção/métodos
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