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1.
Respiration ; : 1-13, 2022 Jan 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35042222

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Few studies have reported a double-step follow-up of patients after hospitalization for COVID-19. OBJECTIVES: We designed an observational double-step follow-up study with a clinical, functional, and radiological evaluation at 2 and 6 months after COVID-19. The primary outcome was to describe symptoms, spirometry, and 6-minute walking test (6MWT) at 2 and 6 months. Secondary outcomes were to identify if the lowest PaO2/FiO2 during hospitalization is related with functional and radiological evolution and to assess the correlation between radiological and functional abnormalities at 6 months. METHODS: Symptoms, spirometry, and 6MWT were assessed at 2 and 6 months; arterial blood gas, chest x-ray, and lung ultrasound were performed at 2 months; body plethysmography, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and CT scan were performed at 6 months. RESULTS: Sixty-four per cent and 42% of patients reported at least one symptom at 2 and 6 months, respectively. The most common 6-month functional alteration was DLCO impairment (57% of patients). An improvement of FEV1, FVC, and 6MWT was observed between 2 and 6 months (p < 0.001). Patients with PaO2/FiO2 <200 during hospitalization performed worse at 6MWT at 2 and 6 months (p < 0.05) and reported more extended radiological abnormalities at 6 months (p < 0.001) compared with patients with PaO2/FiO2>200. At 6 months, more extended radiological abnormalities were related with worse 6MWT, DLCO, and total lung capacity (p < 0.05). DISCUSSION: DLCO and 6MWT impairment seem to be the functional hallmark of COVID-19 and are related with the severity of acute pneumonia. At 6 months, radiological abnormalities were related to functional impairment.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34861135

RESUMO

RATIONALE: The "Berlin definition" of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) does not allow inclusion of patients receiving high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO). However, several articles proposed that criteria for defining ARDS should be broadened to allow inclusion of patients receiving HFNO. OBJECTIVE: To compare the proportion of patients fulfilling ARDS criteria during HFNO and soon after intubation, and 28-day mortality between patients treated exclusively with HFNO and patients transitioned from HFNO to IMV. METHODS: From previously published studies we analyzed COVID-19 patients who had PaO2/FiO2 ≤300 while treated with HFNO ≥40 L/min, or NIV with PEEP ≥5 cmH2O (comparator). In patients transitioned from HFNO/NIV to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), we compared ARDS severity during HFNO/NIV and soon after IMV. We compared 28-day mortality in patients treated exclusively with HFNO/NIV vs. transitioned to IMV. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We analyzed 184 and 131 patients receiving HFNO or NIV, respectively. 112 HFNO, and 69 NIV patients transitioned to IMV. 104 (92.9%) HFNO patients and 66 (95.7%) NIV patients continued to have PaO2/FiO2 ≤300 under IMV. 28-day mortality in patients who remained on HFNO was 4.2% (3/72) while in patients transitioned from HFNO to IMV it was 28.6% (32/112) (p<0.001). 28-day mortality in patients who remained on NIV was 1.6% (1/62), while in patients who transitioned from NIV to IMV it was 44.9% (31/69) (p<0.001). Overall mortality was 19.0% (35/184) and 24.4% (32/131) for HFNO and NIV, respectively (p=0.2479). CONCLUSIONS: Broadening ARDS definition to include HFNO patients with PaO2/FiO2 ≤300 may identify patients at earlier stages of disease but with lower mortality. This article is open access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

5.
Trials ; 22(1): 718, 2021 Oct 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34666820

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hypercapnic exacerbations are severe complications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by negative impact on prognosis, quality of life and healthcare costs. The present standard of care for acute exacerbations of COPD is non-invasive ventilation; when it fails, the use of invasive mechanical ventilation is inevitable, but is associated with extremely poor prognosis. Extracorporeal circuits designed to remove CO2 (ECCO2R) may enhance the efficacy of NIV to remove CO2 and avoid the worsening of respiratory acidosis, which inevitably leads to failure of non-invasive ventilation. Although the use of ECCO2R for acute exacerbations of COPD is steadily increasing, solid evidence on its efficacy and safety is scarce, thus the need for a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: multicenter randomized controlled unblinded clinical trial including 284 (142 per arm) patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure caused by exacerbation of COPD, requiring respiratory support with NIV. The primary outcome is event free survival at 28 days, a composite outcome defined by survival in absence of prolonged mechanical ventilation, severe hypoxemia, septic shock and second episode of COPD exacerbation. Secondary outcomes are incidence of endotracheal intubation and tracheostomy, intensive care and hospital length-of-stay and 90-day mortality. DISCUSSION: Acute exacerbations of COPD represent a significant burden in terms of prognosis, quality of life and healthcare costs. Lack definite evidence despite increasing use of ECCO2R justifies a randomized trial to evaluate whether patients with acute hypercapnic acidosis not responsive to NIV should undergo invasive mechanical ventilation (with all serious related risks) or be treated with ECCO2R to avoid invasive ventilation but be exposed to possible adverse events of ECCO2R. Owing to its pragmatic nature, sample size and composite primary outcome, this trial aims at providing valuable answers to relevant questions for clinical treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov , NCT04582799 . Registered 12 October 2020, .


Assuntos
Ventilação não Invasiva , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica , Dióxido de Carbono , Humanos , Hipercapnia , Estudos Multicêntricos como Assunto , Ventilação não Invasiva/efeitos adversos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/diagnóstico , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia , Qualidade de Vida , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
7.
J Clin Med ; 10(20)2021 Oct 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34682873

RESUMO

Uric acid (UA) is the final product of the catabolism of endogenous and exogenous purine nucleotides. While its association with articular gout and kidney disease has been known for a long time, new data have demonstrated that UA is also related to cardiovascular (CV) diseases. UA has been identified as a significant determinant of many different outcomes, such as all-cause and CV mortality, and also of CV events (mainly Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) and even strokes). Furthermore, UA has been related to the development of Heart Failure, and to a higher mortality in decompensated patients, as well as to the onset of atrial fibrillation. After a brief introduction on the general role of UA in CV disorders, this review will be focused on UA's relationship with CV outcomes, as well as on the specific features of patients with ACS and Chronic Coronary Syndrome. Finally, two issues which remain open will be discussed: the first is about the identification of a CV UA cut-off value, while the second concerns the possibility that the pharmacological reduction of UA is able to lower the incidence of CV events.

8.
Eur Respir J ; 2021 Oct 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34649974

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) has become a frequently used non-invasive form of respiratory support in acute settings, however evidence supporting its use has only recently emerged. These guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of HFNC alongside other noninvasive forms of respiratory support in adults with acute respiratory failure (ARF). MATERIALS AND METHODOLOGY: The European Respiratory Society Task Force panel included expert clinicians and methodologists in pulmonology and intensive care medicine. The Task Force used the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluations) methods to summarize evidence and develop clinical recommendations for the use of HFNC alongside conventional oxygen therapy (COT) and non-invasive ventilation (NIV) for the management of adults in acute settings with ARF. RESULTS: The Task Force developed 8 conditional recommendations, suggesting using: 1) HFNC over COT in hypoxemic ARF, 2) HFNC over NIV in hypoxemic ARF, 3)HFNC over COT during breaks from NIV, 4) either HFNC or COT in post-operative patients at low risk of pulmonary complications, 5) either HFNC or NIV in post-operative patients at high risk of pulmonary complications, 6) HFNC over COT in non-surgical patients at low risk of extubation failure, 7) NIV over HFNC for patients at high risk of extubation failure unless there are relative or absolute contraindications to NIV, 8) trialling NIV prior to use of HFNC in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hypercapnic ARF. CONCLUSIONS: HFNC is a valuable intervention in adults with ARF. These conditional recommendations can assist clinicians in choosing the most appropriate form of non-invasive respiratory support to provide to patients in different acute settings.

9.
Biomedicines ; 9(9)2021 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34572414

RESUMO

The synergic combination of D-dimer (as proxy of thrombotic/vascular injury) and static compliance (as proxy of parenchymal injury) in predicting mortality in COVID-19-ARDS has not been systematically evaluated. The objective is to determine whether the combination of elevated D-dimer and low static compliance can predict mortality in patients with COVID-19-ARDS. A "training sample" (March-June 2020) and a "testing sample" (September 2020-January 2021) of adult patients invasively ventilated for COVID-19-ARDS were collected in nine hospitals. D-dimer and compliance in the first 24 h were recorded. Study outcome was all-cause mortality at 28-days. Cut-offs for D-dimer and compliance were identified by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Mutually exclusive groups were selected using classification tree analysis with chi-square automatic interaction detection. Time to death in the resulting groups was estimated with Cox regression adjusted for SOFA, sex, age, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and sample (training/testing). "Training" and "testing" samples amounted to 347 and 296 patients, respectively. Three groups were identified: D-dimer ≤ 1880 ng/mL (LD); D-dimer > 1880 ng/mL and compliance > 41 mL/cmH2O (LD-HC); D-dimer > 1880 ng/mL and compliance ≤ 41 mL/cmH2O (HD-LC). 28-days mortality progressively increased in the three groups (from 24% to 35% and 57% (training) and from 27% to 39% and 60% (testing), respectively; p < 0.01). Adjusted mortality was significantly higher in HD-LC group compared with LD (HR = 0.479, p < 0.001) and HD-HC (HR = 0.542, p < 0.01); no difference was found between LD and HD-HC. In conclusion, combination of high D-dimer and low static compliance identifies a clinical phenotype with high mortality in COVID-19-ARDS.

10.
Sleep Med ; 85: 60-65, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34274813

RESUMO

Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare pulmonary disease characterized by progressive airflow limitation. We conducted a pilot trial to investigate the incidence of sleep disorders, sleep quality and their relationship with disease severity. We performed pulmonary function tests, blood gas analysis, overnight 12-channels polysomnography and clinical assessments in 15 consecutive LAM patients. For statistics, p values < 0.05 were considered significant. Sleep efficiency (SE) was inversely correlated with RV/TLC (p = 0.035) and positively with daytime SpO2 (p = 0.010) and PaO2 (p = 0.011). Three cases had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); seven patients (46.7%) showed a REMOSA. AHIREM was correlated with FEV1% (r = 0.75, p = 0.003), TLC% (r = 0.57, p = 0.026), RV% (r = 0.8, p=<0.0001) and RV/TLC (r = 0.77, p = 0.001). No correlations were observed between anxiety/depression and SE, CAP rate, pulmonary function test variables and AHIREM (p > 0.05). four subjects had nocturnal hypoxia (T90 ≥ 1% of TST) showing lower values of DLCO%, daytime SpO2%, PaO2, FEV1% and a higher value of VR/TLC comparing with the subgroup with normal T90 (p < 0.05). This pilot study shows that sleep alterations could be frequent in LAM and associated to disease severity. Nocturnal hypoxemia and SE were related to lung function impairment. A dysregulation of sleep seems to involve exclusively REM phase, while NREM appears to be preserved. This phenomenon might be linked to the pathophysiology of disease: our study, even with the limits of the small sample size, showed that the presence of REMOSA is related to the disease severity, in particular to the degree of airflow limitation and hyperinflation. More studies are needed to assess this topic.


Assuntos
Linfangioleiomiomatose , Humanos , Linfangioleiomiomatose/complicações , Linfangioleiomiomatose/diagnóstico , Projetos Piloto , Polissonografia , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Sono
11.
Chest ; 159(6): 2505-2506, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34099133
12.
Eur J Intern Med ; 92: 48-54, 2021 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34175182

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Up to fifteen percent of patients with novel pandemic coronavirus disease (Covid-19) have acute respiratory failure (ARF). Ratio between arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), P/F, is currently used as a marker of ARF severity in Covid-19. P/F does not reflect the respiratory efforts made by patients to maintain arterial blood oxygenation, such as tachypnea and hyperpnea, leading to hypocapnia. Standard PaO2, the value of PaO2 adjusted for arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) of the subject, better reflects the pathophysiology of hypoxemic ARF. We hypothesized that the ratio between standard PaO2 over FiO2 (STP/F) better predicts Covid-19 ARF severity compared to P/F. METHODS: Aim of this pilot prospectic observational study was to observe differences between STP/F and P/F in predicting outcome failure, defined as need of invasive mechanical ventilation and/or deaths in Covid-19 ARF. Accuracy was calculated using Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis and areas under the ROC curve (AUROC) were compared. RESULTS: 349 consecutive subjects admitted to our respiratory wards due to Covid-19 ARF were enrolled. STP/F was accurate to predict mortality and superior to P/F with, respectively, AUROC 0.710 versus 0.688, p = 0.012.Both STP/F and PF were accurate to predict outcome failure (AUROC respectively of 0.747 and 0.742, p = 0.590). DISCUSSION: This is the first study assessing the role of STP/F in describing severity of ARF in Covid-19. According to results, STP/F is accurate and superior to P/F in predicting in-hospital mortality.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Insuficiência Respiratória , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Oxigênio , Estudos Prospectivos , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Pulmonology ; 2021 May 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34049831

RESUMO

High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is used to treat acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) even outside the ICU and the ROX index (pulse oximetry/fraction of inspired oxygen/respiratory rate) may predict HFNC failure. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was therefore to verify whether the ROX index is an accurate predictor of HFNC failure for COVID-19 patients treated outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and to evaluate the validity of the previously suggested threshold. DESIGN: Multicenter study. Retrospective observational analysis of prospectively collected data. SETTING: 3 centres specialized in non-invasive respiratory support (Buenos Aires, Argentina; Bolzano and Treviso, Italy). Patients treated outside the ICU were analysed MEASUREMENTS: The variables to calculate the ROX index were collected during the first day of therapy at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours and then recorded every 24 hours. HFNC failure was defined as escalation of respiratory support to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) or death. MAIN RESULTS: A total of 35 (29%) patients failed HFNC and required intubation. ROC analysis identified the 12-hour ROX index as the best predictor of intubation with an AUC of 0.7916[CI 95% 0.6905-0.8927] and the best threshold to be 5.99[Specificity 96% Sensitivity 62%]. In the survival analysis, a ROX value <5.99 was associated with an increased risk of failure (p = 0008 log - rank test). The threshold of 4,9 identified by Roca as the best predictor in non-COVID patients, was not able to discriminate between success and failure (p = 0.4 log-rank test) in our patients. CONCLUSIONS: ROX index may be useful in guiding the clinicians in their decision to intubate patients, especially in patients with moderate ARF, treated therefore outside the ICU. Indeed, it also demonstrates a different threshold value than reported for non-COVID patients, possibly related to the different mechanisms of hypoxia.

14.
Pulmonology ; 2021 Mar 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33824084

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was conducted in two teaching hospitals over a 3-month period (March 2010-June 2020) comparing severe and critical COVID-19 patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit for non-invasive respiratory support (NRS) and subjected to awake prone position (PP) with those receiving standard care (SC). Primary outcome was endotracheal intubation (ETI) rate. In-hospital mortality, time to ETI, tracheostomy, length of RICU and hospital stay served as secondary outcomes. Risk factors associated to ETI among PP patients were also investigated. RESULTS: A total of 114 patients were included, 76 in the SC and 38 in the PP group. Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier estimates showed greater effect of PP compared to SC on ETI rate (HR = 0.45 95% CI [0.2-0.9], p = 0.02) even after adjustment for baseline confounders (HR = 0.59 95% CI [0.3-0.94], p = 0.03). After stratification according to non-invasive respiratory support, PP showed greater significant benefit for those on High Flow Nasal Cannulae (HR = 0.34 95% CI [0.12-0.84], p = 0.04). Compared to SC, PP patients also showed a favorable difference in terms of days free from respiratory support, length of RICU and hospital stay while mortality and tracheostomy rate were not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS: Prone positioning in awake and spontaneously breathing Covid-19 patients is feasible and associated with a reduction of intubation rate, especially in those patients undergoing HFNC. Although our results are intriguing, further randomized controlled trials are needed to answer all the open questions remaining pending about the real efficacy of PP in this setting.

15.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis ; 31(5): 1501-1508, 2021 05 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33810962

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Uric Acid (UA) has been related to the development of Cardio-Vascular (CV) events in patients affected by Chronic Coronary Syndromes (CCS). Among various hypothesis, two arise: UA may negatively act on coronary artery determining a higher degree of atherosclerotic disease, and/or on heart determining a higher prevalence of diastolic dysfunction. Both the above hypothesized effects are object of our investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: 231 patients who were admitted to the cardiological department of the Niguarda Hospital (Milan, Italy) for CCS from January 2017 to June 2018 were enrolled. Coronary atherosclerotic burden was evaluated from coronary angiography as the number and type of involved vessels, as well as with both Gensini and Syntax scores. All subjects underwent a complete echocardiogram. At unadjusted and adjusted/multivariable analysis, UA levels were not significantly associated with variables analysed from the coronary angiography (number and type of vessels involved, neither the Gensini and Syntax scores) as well as with echocardiographic parameters regarding systolic and diastolic function. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the main finding of our work is the absence of a role for UA in determining coronary arteries disease as well as LV diastolic dysfunction in CCS subjects. Taking together the results of previous studies with ours, we hypothesize that UA could act on heart (both on coronary arteries and on LV function) in an early phase of the disease, whereas while in the advanced stages other factors (previous myocardial infarction, previous myocardial revascularization and so on) may overshadow its effects.


Assuntos
Doença da Artéria Coronariana/sangue , Hiperuricemia/sangue , Ácido Úrico/sangue , Disfunção Ventricular Esquerda/sangue , Função Ventricular Esquerda , Idoso , Biomarcadores/sangue , Angiografia Coronária , Doença da Artéria Coronariana/diagnóstico por imagem , Doença da Artéria Coronariana/fisiopatologia , Estudos Transversais , Diástole , Ecocardiografia , Feminino , Humanos , Hiperuricemia/diagnóstico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Disfunção Ventricular Esquerda/diagnóstico por imagem , Disfunção Ventricular Esquerda/fisiopatologia
16.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(7): 1959-1965, 2021 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33646507

RESUMO

During the first outbreak of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) Emergency Departments (EDs) were overcrowded. Hence, the need for a rapid and simple tool to support clinical decisions, such as the ROX index (Respiratory rate - OXygenation), defined as the ratio of peripheral oxygen saturation and fraction of inspired oxygen, to respiratory rate. The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of the ROX index in predicting hospitalization and mortality in patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 in the ED. The secondary outcomes were to assess the number of readmissions and the variations in the ROX index between the first and the second admission. This was an observational prospective monocentric study, carried out in the ED of Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital in Bologna, Italy. Five hundred and fifty-four consecutive patients with COVID-19 were enrolled and the ROX index was calculated. Patients were followed until hospital discharge or death. A ROX index value < 25.7 was associated with hospitalization (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.737, 95% CI 0.696-0.779, p < 0.001). The ROX index < 22.3 was statistically related to higher 30-day mortality (AUC = 0.764, 95% CI 0.708-0.820, p < 0.001). Eight patients were discharged and returned to the ED within the subsequent 7 days, their mean ROX index was 30.3 (6.2; range 21.9-39.4) at the first assessment and 24.6 (5.5; 14.5-29.5) at the second assessment, (p = 0.012). The ROX index, together with laboratory, imaging and clinical findings, correlated with the need for hospital admission, mechanical ventilation and mortality risk in COVID-19 patients.


Assuntos
COVID-19/diagnóstico , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Oximetria/métodos , Taxa Respiratória/fisiologia , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto , Idoso , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Escores de Disfunção Orgânica , Estudos Prospectivos
17.
J Clin Oncol ; 39(12): 1389-1411, 2021 04 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33617290

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To provide guidance on the clinical management of dyspnea in adult patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: ASCO convened an Expert Panel to review the evidence and formulate recommendations. An Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) systematic review provided the evidence base for nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions to alleviate dyspnea. The review included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies with a concurrent comparison group published through early May 2020. The ASCO Expert Panel also wished to address dyspnea assessment, management of underlying conditions, and palliative care referrals, and for these questions, an additional systematic review identified RCTs, systematic reviews, and guidelines published through July 2020. RESULTS: The AHRQ systematic review included 48 RCTs and two retrospective cohort studies. Lung cancer and mesothelioma were the most commonly addressed types of cancer. Nonpharmacologic interventions such as fans provided some relief from breathlessness. Support for pharmacologic interventions was limited. A meta-analysis of specialty breathlessness services reported improvements in distress because of dyspnea. RECOMMENDATIONS: A hierarchical approach to dyspnea management is recommended, beginning with dyspnea assessment, ascertainment and management of potentially reversible causes, and referral to an interdisciplinary palliative care team. Nonpharmacologic interventions that may be offered to relieve dyspnea include airflow interventions (eg, a fan directed at the cheek), standard supplemental oxygen for patients with hypoxemia, and other psychoeducational, self-management, or complementary approaches. For patients who derive inadequate relief from nonpharmacologic interventions, systemic opioids should be offered. Other pharmacologic interventions, such as corticosteroids and benzodiazepines, are also discussed.Additional information is available at www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines.


Assuntos
Dispneia/terapia , Neoplasias/complicações , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Dispneia/etiologia , Humanos
18.
Pulmonology ; 27(3): 191, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33495126
20.
Front Med Technol ; 3: 690442, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35047935

RESUMO

Background: Patient-ventilator synchronization during non-invasive ventilation (NIV) can be assessed by visual inspection of flow and pressure waveforms but it remains time consuming and there is a large inter-rater variability, even among expert physicians. SyncSmart™ software developed by Breas Medical (Mölnycke, Sweden) provides an automatic detection and scoring of patient-ventilator asynchrony to help physicians in their daily clinical practice. This study was designed to assess performance of the automatic scoring by the SyncSmart software using expert clinicians as a reference in patient with chronic respiratory failure receiving NIV. Methods: From nine patients, 20 min data sets were analyzed automatically by SyncSmart software and reviewed by nine expert physicians who were asked to score auto-triggering (AT), double-triggering (DT), and ineffective efforts (IE). The study procedure was similar to the one commonly used for validating the automatic sleep scoring technique. For each patient, the asynchrony index was computed by automatic scoring and each expert, respectively. Considering successively each expert scoring as a reference, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), κ-coefficients, and agreement were calculated. Results: The asynchrony index assessed by SynSmart was not significantly different from the one assessed by the experts (18.9 ± 17.7 vs. 12.8 ± 9.4, p = 0.19). When compared to an expert, the sensitivity and specificity provided by SyncSmart for DT, AT, and IE were significantly greater than those provided by an expert when compared to another expert. Conclusions: SyncSmart software is able to score asynchrony events within the inter-rater variability. When the breathing frequency is not too high (<24), it therefore provides a reliable assessment of patient-ventilator asynchrony; AT is over detected otherwise.

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