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1.
Cancer Res ; 2021 Feb 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33574088

RESUMO

Germline variation and smoking are independently associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We conducted genome-wide smoking interaction analysis of PDAC using genotype data from four previous genome-wide association studies in individuals of European ancestry (7,937 cases and 11,774 controls). Examination of expression quantitative trait loci data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project followed by colocalization analysis was conducted to determine if there was support for common SNP(s) underlying the observed associations. Statistical tests were two sided and P-values < 5 x 10-8 were considered statistically significant. Genome-wide significant evidence of qualitative interaction was identified on chr2q21.3 in intron 5 of the transmembrane protein 163 (TMEM163) and upstream of the cyclin T2 (CCNT2). The most significant SNP using the Empirical Bayes method, in this region which included 45 significantly associated SNPs, was rs1818613 (per allele OR in never smokers 0.87, 95% CI 0.82-0.93; former smokers 1.00, 95 CI 0.91-1.07; current smokers 1.25, 95%CI 1.12-1.40, interaction P-value=3.08x10-9). Examination of the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project data demonstrated an expression quantitative trait locus in this region for TMEM163 and CCNT2 in several tissue types. Colocalization analysis supported a shared SNP, rs842357, in high LD with rs1818613 (r2=0. 94) driving both the observed interaction and the expression quantitative trait loci signals. Future studies are needed to confirm and understand the differential biologic mechanisms by smoking status that contribute to our PDAC findings.

2.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 246, 2021 01 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33431812

RESUMO

Previous Mendelian randomization (MR) studies on 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and cancer have typically adopted a handful of variants and found no relationship between 25(OH)D and cancer; however, issues of horizontal pleiotropy cannot be reliably addressed. Using a larger set of variants associated with 25(OH)D (74 SNPs, up from 6 previously), we perform a unified MR analysis to re-evaluate the relationship between 25(OH)D and ten cancers. Our findings are broadly consistent with previous MR studies indicating no relationship, apart from ovarian cancers (OR 0.89; 95% C.I: 0.82 to 0.96 per 1 SD change in 25(OH)D concentration) and basal cell carcinoma (OR 1.16; 95% C.I.: 1.04 to 1.28). However, after adjustment for pigmentation related variables in a multivariable MR framework, the BCC findings were attenuated. Here we report that lower 25(OH)D is unlikely to be a causal risk factor for most cancers, with our study providing more precise confidence intervals than previously possible.


Assuntos
Predisposição Genética para Doença , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Neoplasias/genética , Vitamina D/metabolismo , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Criança , Humanos , Análise Multivariada , Pigmentação/genética , Fatores de Risco , Queimadura Solar/genética
3.
Br J Nutr ; : 1-13, 2021 Jan 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33509323

RESUMO

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of falls and fractures. Assuming this association is causal, we aimed to identify the number and proportion of hospitalisations for falls and hip fractures attributable to vitamin D deficiency [25 hydroxy D (25(OH)D) <50 nmol/L] in Australians aged 65 years and over. We used 25(OH)D data from the 2011/12 Australian Health Survey and relative risks from published meta-analyses to calculate population attributable fractions for falls and hip fracture. We applied these to data published by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare to calculate the number of events each year attributable to vitamin D deficiency. In men and women combined, 8.3% of hospitalisations for falls (7991 events) and almost 8% of hospitalisations for hip fractures (1315 events) were attributable to vitamin D deficiency. These findings suggest that even in a sunny country such as Australia vitamin D deficiency contributes to a considerable number of hospitalisations as a consequence of falls and for treatment of hip fracture in older Australians; in countries where the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is higher the impact will be even greater. It is important to mitigate vitamin D deficiency but whether this should occur through supplementation or increased sun exposure needs consideration of the benefits, harms, practicalities, and costs of both approaches.

4.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 9(2): 69-81, 2021 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33444565

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Observational studies have linked vitamin D deficiency with acute respiratory tract infection, but results from randomised controlled trials are heterogeneous. We analysed data from the D-Health Trial to determine whether supplementing older Australian adults, recruited from the general population, with monthly doses of vitamin D reduced the risk, duration, and severity of acute respiratory tract infections. METHODS: We used data from the D-Health Trial, a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of monthly vitamin D supplementation, for which acute respiratory infection was a pre-specified trial outcome. Participants were supplemented and followed for up to 5 years. The trial was set within the Australian general population, using the Commonwealth Electoral Roll as the sampling frame, but also allowing some volunteers to participate. Participants were men and women aged 60 to 79 years (with volunteers up to age 84 years). Participants were randomly assigned to receive either vitamin D or placebo (1:1) using computer-generated permuted block randomisation, which was stratified by age, sex, and state. This was an automated process and the assignment list was not visible to study staff or investigators. Active and placebo gel capsules, identical in appearance to ensure masking, were labelled A and B and the code was not available to study staff or investigators. Participants were asked to report occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms over the previous month via annual surveys, and a subset of participants completed 8-week respiratory symptom diaries in winter. As part of our process to maintain blinding, a random sample of participants was selected for analysis of survey data and a separate sample selected for analysis of diary data. Blood samples were obtained from a random sample of participants (about 450 per group per year) and serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations were measured to monitor adherence. We used regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR), rate ratios, and rate differences. The trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12613000743763. FINDINGS: Between Jan 13, 2014, and May 26, 2015, 421 207 invitations were sent, 40 824 people were interested in participating, and 21 315 participants were recruited and randomised. Of the 16 000 participants selected for potential analysis of survey data, 15 373 were included in the analysis; 295 in the vitamin D group and 332 in the placebo group who were missing data for all five annual surveys were excluded from the analysis. Of the 3800 selected for potential analysis of diary data, 3070 were invited to complete the diaries because 730 had already withdrawn. 2598 people were included in the analysis; 218 people in the vitamin D group and 254 in the placebo group were missing data and were therefore excluded from the analysis. In blood samples collected from randomly sampled participants throughout the trial, the mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 114·8 (SD 30·3) nmol/L in the vitamin D group and 77·5 (25·2) nmol/L in the placebo group. Vitamin D supplementation did not reduce the risk of acute respiratory tract infection (survey OR 0·98, 95% CI 0·93 to 1·02; diary OR 0·98, 0·83 to 1·15). Analyses of diary data showed reductions in the overall duration of symptoms and of severe symptoms, but these were small and unlikely to be clinically significant. INTERPRETATION: Monthly bolus doses of 60 000 IU of vitamin D did not reduce the overall risk of acute respiratory tract infection, but could slightly reduce the duration of symptoms in the general population. These findings suggest that routine vitamin D supplementation of a population that is largely vitamin D replete is unlikely to have a clinically relevant effect on acute respiratory tract infection. FUNDING: National Health and Medical Research Council.


Assuntos
Infecções Respiratórias/tratamento farmacológico , Vitamina D/uso terapêutico , Austrália , Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto , Humanos , Infecções Respiratórias/etiologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Deficiência de Vitamina D/complicações , Deficiência de Vitamina D/tratamento farmacológico
5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33274462

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Screening for skin cancer can be cost-effective if focused on high-risk groups. Risk prediction tools have been developed for keratinocyte cancers and melanoma to optimise advice and management. However, few have been validated in a clinical setting over the past few years. OBJECTIVES: To assess the clinical utility of risk-assessment tools to identify individuals with prevalent skin cancers in a volunteer-based screening clinic. METHODS: Participants were adults presenting for a skin check at a volunteer-based skin cancer screening facility. We used previously published tools, based on questionnaire responses, to predict melanoma and keratinocyte cancers (KC) [basal (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC)] and classified each participant into one of 5 risk categories. Participants subsequently underwent a full skin examination by a dermatologist. All suspicious lesions were biopsied and all cancers histopathologically confirmed. RESULTS: Of 789 people who presented to the clinic, 507 (64%) consented to the study. Twenty-two BCCs, 19 SCCs and 8 melanomas were diagnosed. The proportion of keratinocyte cancers diagnosed increased according to risk category from less than 1% in the lowest to 24% in the highest risk category (p<0.001). Subtype analysis revealed similar proportionate increases in BCC or SCC prevalence according to risk category. However, a similar proportion of melanoma cases were detected in the low-risk and high-risk groups. CONCLUSION: The risk prediction model for keratinocyte cancers can reliably identify individuals with a significant skin cancer burden prior to a skin examination in the community setting. The prediction tool for melanoma needs to be tested in a larger sample exposed to a wider range of environmental risk factors.

6.
medRxiv ; 2020 Nov 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33269357

RESUMO

Background: A 2017 meta-analysis of data from 25 randomised controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation for the prevention of acute respiratory infections revealed a protective effect of the intervention. Since then, 20 new RCTs have been completed. Methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis of data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of vitamin D for ARI prevention using a random effects model. Pre-specified sub-group analyses were done to determine whether effects of vitamin D on risk of ARI varied according to baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration or dosing regimen. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of Science and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry from inception to 1st May 2020. Double-blind RCTs of supplementation with vitamin D or calcidiol, of any duration, were eligible if they were approved by a Research Ethics Committee and if ARI incidence was collected prospectively and pre-specified as an efficacy outcome. Aggregate data, stratified by baseline 25(OH)D concentration, were obtained from study authors. The study was registered with PROSPERO (no. CRD42020190633). Findings: We identified 45 eligible RCTs (total 73,384 participants). Data were obtained for 46,331 (98.0%) of 47,262 participants in 42 studies, aged 0 to 95 years. For the primary comparison of vitamin D supplementation vs. placebo, the intervention reduced risk of ARI overall (Odds Ratio [OR] 0.91, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.99; P for heterogeneity 0.01). No statistically significant effect of vitamin D was seen for any of the sub-groups defined by baseline 25(OH)D concentration. However, protective effects were seen for trials in which vitamin D was given using a daily dosing regimen (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.93); at daily dose equivalents of 400-1000 IU (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.89); and for a duration of ≤12 months (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.93). No significant interaction was seen between allocation to vitamin D vs. placebo and dose frequency, dose size, or study duration. Vitamin D did not influence the proportion of participants experiencing at least one serious adverse event (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.09). Risk of bias within individual studies was assessed as being low for all but three trials. A funnel plot showed left-sided asymmetry (P=0.008, Egger's test). Interpretation: Vitamin D supplementation was safe and reduced risk of ARI, despite evidence of significant heterogeneity across trials. Protection was associated with administration of daily doses of 400-1000 IU vitamin D for up to 12 months. The relevance of these findings to COVID-19 is not known and requires investigation. Funding: None.

7.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0243312, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33332372

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Accurate pre-operative imaging plays a vital role in patient selection for surgery and in allocating stage-appropriate therapies to patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (PC). This study aims to: (1) understand the current diagnosis and staging practices for PC; and (2) explore the factors (barriers and enablers) that influence the use of a pancreatic protocol computed tomography (PPCT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm diagnosis and/or accurately stage PC. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with radiologists, surgeons, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists from the states of New South Wales (NSW) and Victoria, Australia. Interviews were conducted either in person or via video conferencing. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, de-identified and data were thematically coded according to the 12 domains explored within the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). Common belief statements were generated to compare the variation between participant responses. FINDINGS: In total, 21 clinicians (5 radiologists, 10 surgeons, 2 gastroenterologists, 4 medical and radiation oncologists) were interviewed over a four-month-period. Belief statements relevant to the TDF domains were generated. Across the 11 relevant domains, 20 themes and 30 specific beliefs were identified. All TDF domains, with the exception of social influences were identified by participants as relevant to protocol-based imaging using either a PPCT or MRI, with the domains of knowledge, skills and environmental context and resources being offered by most participants as being relevant in influencing their decisions. CONCLUSIONS: To maximise outcomes and personalise therapy it is imperative that diagnosis and staging investigations using the most appropriate imaging modalities are conducted in a timely, efficient and effective manner. The results provide an understanding of specialists' opinion and behaviour in relation to a PPCT or MRI and should be used to inform the design of future interventions to improve compliance with this practice.


Assuntos
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/diagnóstico por imagem , Medicina de Precisão , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Pesquisa Qualitativa
8.
Int J Epidemiol ; 2020 Dec 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33370439

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have consistently documented an increased risk of developing primary non-cutaneous malignancies among people with a history of keratinocyte carcinoma (KC). However, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. We conducted two separate analyses to test whether genetically predicted KC is related to the risk of developing cancers at other sites. METHODS: In the first approach (one-sample), we calculated the polygenic risk scores (PRS) for KC using individual-level data in the UK Biobank (n = 394 306) and QSkin cohort (n = 16 896). The association between the KC PRS and each cancer site was assessed using logistic regression. In the secondary (two-sample) approach, we used genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary statistics identified from the most recent GWAS meta-analysis of KC and obtained GWAS data for each cancer site from the UK-Biobank participants only. We used inverse-variance-weighted methods to estimate risks across all genetic variants. RESULTS: Using the one-sample approach, we found that the risks of cancer at other sites increased monotonically with KC PRS quartiles, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-1.19 for those in KC PRS quartile 4 compared with those in quartile 1. In the two-sample approach, the pooled risk of developing other cancers was statistically significantly elevated, with an OR of 1.05, 95% CI: 1.03-1.07 per doubling in the odds of KC. We observed similar trends of increasing cancer risk with increasing KC PRS in the QSkin cohort. CONCLUSION: Two different genetic approaches provide compelling evidence that an instrumental variable for KC constructed from genetic variants predicts the risk of cancers at other sites.

9.
BMJ Qual Saf ; 2020 Nov 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33247002

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines recommend discussion by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) to review and plan the management of patients for a variety of cancers. However, not all patients diagnosed with cancer are presented at an MDT. OBJECTIVES: (1) To identify the factors (barriers and enablers) influencing presentation of all patients to, and the perceived value of, MDT meetings in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer and; (2) to identify potential interventions that could overcome modifiable barriers and enhance enablers using the theoretical domains framework (TDF). METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with radiologists, surgeons, medical and radiation oncologists, gastroenterologists, palliative care specialists and nurse specialists based in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. Interviews were conducted either in person or via videoconferencing. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, deidentified and data were thematically coded according to the 12 domains explored within the TDF. Common belief statements were generated to compare the variation between participant responses. RESULTS: In total, 29 specialists were interviewed over a 4-month period. Twenty-two themes and 40 belief statements relevant to all the TDF domains were generated. Key enablers influencing MDT practices included a strong organisational focus (social/professional role and identity), beliefs about the benefits of an MDT discussion (beliefs about consequences), the use of technology, for example, videoconferencing (environmental context and resources), the motivation to provide good quality care (motivation and goals) and collegiality (social influences). Barriers included: absence of palliative care representation (skills), the number of MDT meetings (environmental context and resources), the cumulative cost of staff time (beliefs about consequences), the lack of capacity to discuss all patients within the allotted time (beliefs about capabilities) and reduced confidence to participate in discussions (social influences). CONCLUSIONS: The internal and external organisational structures surrounding MDT meetings ideally need to be strengthened with the development of agreed evidence-based protocols and referral pathways, a focus on resource allocation and capabilities, and a culture that fosters widespread collaboration for all stages of pancreatic cancer.

11.
JAMA Dermatol ; 156(12): 1324-1332, 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33026421

RESUMO

Importance: Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a common and generally benign keratinocyte skin tumor. Reports of the incidence rates of KA are scant. In addition, the risk factors for KA are not well understood, although associations with UV radiation exposure and older age have been described. Objective: To investigate the incidence rate of KA and the risk factors for developing KA. Design, Setting, and Participants: The study included data from 40 438 of 193 344 randomly selected residents of Queensland, Australia, who participated in the QSkin Sun and Health (QSkin) prospective population-based cohort study. All participants completed a baseline survey between 2010 and 2011 and were ages 40 to 69 years at baseline. Histopathologic reports of KA were prospectively collected until June 30, 2014, through data linkage with pathologic records. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify risk factors associated with KA while controlling for potential confounding variables. Data were analyzed from January 2 to April 8, 2020. Exposures: Demographic characteristics, phenotypes, UV radiation exposure, medical history, and lifestyle. Results: Among 40 438 participants (mean [SD] age, 56 [8] years; 18 240 men [45.1%]), 596 individuals (mean [SD] age, 62 [6] years; 349 men [58.6%]) developed 776 KA tumors during a median follow-up period of 3.0 years (interquartile range, 2.8-3.3 years). The person-based age-standardized incidence rate for KA in the age-restricted cohort was 409 individuals per 100 000 person-years (based on the 2001 Australian population). Risk factors after adjustment for potential confounders were older age (age ≥60 years vs age <50 years; hazard ratio [HR], 6.38; 95% CI, 4.65-8.75), male sex (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.33-1.84), fair skin (vs olive, dark, or black skin; HR, 3.42; 95% CI, 1.66-7.04), inability to tan (vs ability to tan deeply; HR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.19-2.40), previous excisions of keratinocyte cancers (ever had an excision vs never had an excision; HR, 6.28; 95% CI, 5.03-7.83), current smoking (vs never smoking, HR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.59-2.57), and high alcohol use (≥14 alcoholic drinks per week vs no alcoholic drinks per week; HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.09-1.86). Conclusions and Relevance: This is, to date, the first large prospective population-based study to report the incidence rate and risk factors for KA. The high person-based incidence rate (409 individuals per 100 000 person-years) highlights the substantial burden of KA in Queensland, Australia. Furthermore, the study's findings suggest that older age (≥60 years), male sex, UV radiation-sensitive phenotypes, indications of high sun exposure (eg, previous keratinocyte cancer excisions), smoking, and high alcohol use are independent risk factors for the development of KA.

12.
Pancreatology ; 20(7): 1458-1464, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32868184

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Serum CA19-9 concentration may be useful in triaging patients with pancreatic cancer for more intensive staging investigations. Our aim was to identify the CA19-9 cut-point with the greatest accuracy for detecting unresectable features not identified by CT scan, and to examine the performance of this and other cut-points in predicting the outcome of staging laparoscopy (SL). METHODS: Patients with pancreatic cancer were drawn from two state-wide cancer registries between 2009 and 2011. We used classification and regression tree (CART) analysis to identify the CA19-9 cut-point which best predicted the presence of imaging-occult unresectable features, and compared its performance with that of a number of alternative cut-points. We then used logistic regression to test the association between CA19-9 concentration and detection of unresectable features in patients who underwent SL. RESULTS: From the CART analysis, the optimal CA19-9 cut-point was 440 U/mL. CA19-9 ≥ 150 U/mL had a similar Youden Index, but greater sensitivity (69% versus 47%). This remained true for those who had obstructive jaundice at the time of CA19-9 sampling. CA19-9 concentration greater than or equal to 110 U/mL, 150 U/mL and 200 U/mL was associated with significantly greater odds of unresectable features being detected during SL. CONCLUSION: Elevated serum CA19-9 concentration is a valid marker for CT-occult unresectable features; the most clinically appropriate cut-point appears to be ≥ 150 U/mL irrespective of the presence of jaundice. Clinical trials which evaluate the value of CA19-9 in the staging algorithm for pancreatic cancer are needed before it is routinely used in clinical practice.

13.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(12): 2735-2739, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32967863

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Whether circulating polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels are associated with pancreatic cancer risk is uncertain. Mendelian randomization (MR) represents a study design using genetic instruments to better characterize the relationship between exposure and outcome. METHODS: We utilized data from genome-wide association studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, involving approximately 9,269 cases and 12,530 controls of European descent, to evaluate associations between pancreatic cancer risk and genetically predicted plasma n-6 PUFA levels. Conventional MR analyses were performed using individual-level and summary-level data. RESULTS: Using genetic instruments, we did not find evidence of associations between genetically predicted plasma n-6 PUFA levels and pancreatic cancer risk [estimates per one SD increase in each PUFA-specific weighted genetic score using summary statistics: linoleic acid odds ratio (OR) = 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.98-1.02; arachidonic acid OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.99-1.01; and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.87-1.02]. The OR estimates remained virtually unchanged after adjustment for covariates, using individual-level data or summary statistics, or stratification by age and sex. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that variations of genetically determined plasma n-6 PUFA levels are not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. IMPACT: These results suggest that modifying n-6 PUFA levels through food sources or supplementation may not influence risk of pancreatic cancer.

14.
Genet Epidemiol ; 44(8): 880-892, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32779232

RESUMO

It is of great scientific interest to identify interactions between genetic variants and environmental exposures that may modify the risk of complex diseases. However, larger sample sizes are usually required to detect gene-by-environment interaction (G × E) than required to detect genetic main association effects. To boost the statistical power and improve the understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms, we incorporate functional genomics information, specifically, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), into a data-adaptive G × E test, called aGEw. This test adaptively chooses the best eQTL weights from multiple tissues and provides an extra layer of weighting at the genetic variant level. Extensive simulations show that the aGEw test can control the Type 1 error rate, and the power is resilient to the inclusion of neutral variants and noninformative external weights. We applied the proposed aGEw test to the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (discovery cohort of 3,585 cases and 3,482 controls) and the PanScan II genome-wide association study data (replication cohort of 2,021 cases and 2,105 controls) with smoking as the exposure of interest. Two novel putative smoking-related pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes, TRIP10 and KDM3A, were identified. The aGEw test is implemented in an R package aGE.

15.
Cancer Res ; 80(18): 4004-4013, 2020 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32641412

RESUMO

Registry-based epidemiologic studies suggest associations between chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). As genetic susceptibility contributes to a large proportion of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases, we hypothesize that the genomic regions surrounding established genome-wide associated variants for these chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with PDAC. We examined the association between PDAC and genomic regions (±500 kb) surrounding established common susceptibility variants for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, chronic pancreatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. We analyzed summary statistics from genome-wide association studies data for 8,384 cases and 11,955 controls of European descent from two large consortium studies using the summary data-based adaptive rank truncated product method to examine the overall association of combined genomic regions for each inflammatory disease group. Combined genomic susceptibility regions for ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic pancreatitis were associated with PDAC at P values < 0.05 (0.0040, 0.0057, 0.011, and 3.4 × 10-6, respectively). After excluding the 20 PDAC susceptibility regions (±500 kb) previously identified by GWAS, the genomic regions for ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and inflammatory bowel disease remained associated with PDAC (P = 0.0029, 0.0057, and 0.0098, respectively). Genomic regions for celiac disease (P = 0.22) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (P = 0.078) were not associated with PDAC. Our results support the hypothesis that genomic regions surrounding variants associated with inflammatory intestinal diseases, particularly, ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic pancreatitis are associated with PDAC. SIGNIFICANCE: The joint effects of common variants in genomic regions containing susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and chronic pancreatitis are associated with PDAC and may provide insights to understanding pancreatic cancer etiology.

16.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 67: 101742, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32512495

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cancer is a major disease burden globally and people who are socioeconomically disadvantaged have a higher incidence of many types of cancer. We investigated the potential to reduce socioeconomic disparities in cancer incidence in Australia by lowering the prevalence of exposure to four modifiable causes: smoking, alcohol, overweight/obesity and physical inactivity. METHODS: We used cancer incidence data from the Australian Cancer Database and risk factor prevalence data from the Australian National Health Survey to estimate the proportions of cancers attributable to the four factors, by area-level socioeconomic disadvantage. For the three risk factors where prevalence was lowest among the least disadvantaged (smoking, overweight/obesity, physical inactivity), we also estimated the potential impact of reducing prevalence in the most disadvantaged areas to that in the least disadvantaged areas. RESULTS: The proportion of cancer attributable to the four factors in combination ranged from 22 % in the most disadvantaged areas to 14 % in the least disadvantaged areas. If the prevalence of tobacco smoking, overweight/obesity and physical inactivity in the more disadvantaged areas were the same as that in the least disadvantaged, an estimated 19,500 cancers (4 % of all cancers diagnosed) could have been prevented in Australia between 2009 and 2013. CONCLUSIONS: Reducing the prevalence of key causal factors in areas of greater social disadvantage would prevent many cases of cancer. Strategies to achieve this in highly disadvantaged areas are needed.

17.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(9): 1784-1791, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32546605

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes are major modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Interactions between genetic variants and diabetes/obesity have not previously been comprehensively investigated in pancreatic cancer at the genome-wide level. METHODS: We conducted a gene-environment interaction (GxE) analysis including 8,255 cases and 11,900 controls from four pancreatic cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets (Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium I-III and Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium). Obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) and diabetes (duration ≥3 years) were the environmental variables of interest. Approximately 870,000 SNPs (minor allele frequency ≥0.005, genotyped in at least one dataset) were analyzed. Case-control (CC), case-only (CO), and joint-effect test methods were used for SNP-level GxE analysis. As a complementary approach, gene-based GxE analysis was also performed. Age, sex, study site, and principal components accounting for population substructure were included as covariates. Meta-analysis was applied to combine individual GWAS summary statistics. RESULTS: No genome-wide significant interactions (departures from a log-additive odds model) with diabetes or obesity were detected at the SNP level by the CC or CO approaches. The joint-effect test detected numerous genome-wide significant GxE signals in the GWAS main effects top hit regions, but the significance diminished after adjusting for the GWAS top hits. In the gene-based analysis, a significant interaction of diabetes with variants in the FAM63A (family with sequence similarity 63 member A) gene (significance threshold P < 1.25 × 10-6) was observed in the meta-analysis (P GxE = 1.2 ×10-6, P Joint = 4.2 ×10-7). CONCLUSIONS: This analysis did not find significant GxE interactions at the SNP level but found one significant interaction with diabetes at the gene level. A larger sample size might unveil additional genetic factors via GxE scans. IMPACT: This study may contribute to discovering the mechanism of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer.

19.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(7): 1501-1508, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32439797

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal malignancies, with few known risk factors and biomarkers. Several blood protein biomarkers have been linked to PDAC in previous studies, but these studies have assessed only a limited number of biomarkers, usually in small samples. In this study, we evaluated associations of circulating protein levels and PDAC risk using genetic instruments. METHODS: To identify novel circulating protein biomarkers of PDAC, we studied 8,280 cases and 6,728 controls of European descent from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, using genetic instruments of protein quantitative trait loci. RESULTS: We observed associations between predicted concentrations of 38 proteins and PDAC risk at an FDR of < 0.05, including 23 of those proteins that showed an association even after Bonferroni correction. These include the protein encoded by ABO, which has been implicated as a potential target gene of PDAC risk variant. Eight of the identified proteins (LMA2L, TM11D, IP-10, ADH1B, STOM, TENC1, DOCK9, and CRBB2) were associated with PDAC risk after adjusting for previously reported PDAC risk variants (OR ranged from 0.79 to 1.52). Pathway enrichment analysis showed that the encoding genes for implicated proteins were significantly enriched in cancer-related pathways, such as STAT3 and IL15 production. CONCLUSIONS: We identified 38 candidates of protein biomarkers for PDAC risk. IMPACT: This study identifies novel protein biomarker candidates for PDAC, which if validated by additional studies, may contribute to the etiologic understanding of PDAC development.

20.
Eur J Oncol Nurs ; 46: 101729, 2020 Feb 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32339910

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Patients with pancreatic cancer have extremely high unmet psychological and physical needs. Family carers of these patients have even higher levels of distress than patients. Our purpose was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a counselling intervention in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and their carers. METHODS: We conducted a single-arm feasibility study of the PREPARES (Patients and RElatives affected by PAncreatic cancer: Referral, Education and Support) pilot intervention. Patient and carer participants received up to nine counselling sessions delivered by a trained nurse via telephone and/or telehealth technology. The intervention, informed by self-efficacy theory, involved components to assess and address care needs, and provide feedback to clinicians. Feasibility was measured using participation and retention rates. Participants completed semi-structured interviews at the end of the intervention about acceptability. These were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Twelve people participated: five patients and seven carers (38% and 50% participation rates respectively). Most participants (eight) completed all nine counselling sessions; two chose to receive fewer sessions and two were discontinued requiring more intensive psychiatric support. The intervention was highly acceptable. Participants unanimously preferred the telephone over video-conferencing and to receive counselling separately from their carer/patient. The main perceived benefits were emotional support, the nurse-counsellors' knowledge, care coordination and personalised care. Suggested improvements included a welcome pack about their nurse-counsellor and that sessions should continue beyond nine sessions if required. CONCLUSIONS: The PREPARES intervention was feasible and highly acceptable. This low-cost intervention provided much-needed support to people affected by this devastating disease.

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