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1.
Am J Med Genet A ; 179(9): 1884-1894, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31313512

RESUMO

Brachyolmia is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short spine-short stature, platyspondyly, and minor long bone abnormalities. We describe 18 patients, from different ethnic backgrounds and ages ranging from infancy to 19 years, with the autosomal recessive form, associated with PAPSS2. The main clinical features include disproportionate short stature with short spine associated with variable symptoms of pain, stiffness, and spinal deformity. Eight patients presented prenatally with short femora, whereas later in childhood their short-spine phenotype emerged. We observed the same pattern of changing skeletal proportion in other patients. The radiological findings included platyspondyly, irregular end plates of the elongated vertebral bodies, narrow disc spaces and short over-faced pedicles. In the limbs, there was mild shortening of femoral necks and tibiae in some patients, whereas others had minor epiphyseal or metaphyseal changes. In all patients, exome and Sanger sequencing identified homozygous or compound heterozygous PAPSS2 variants, including c.809G>A, common to white European patients. Bi-parental inheritance was established where possible. Low serum DHEAS, but not overt androgen excess was identified. Our study indicates that autosomal recessive brachyolmia occurs across continents and may be under-recognized in infancy. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of short femora presenting in the second trimester.

2.
Genome Res ; 29(7): 1057-1066, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31160375

RESUMO

Germline mutations in fundamental epigenetic regulatory molecules including DNA methyltransferase 3 alpha (DNMT3A) are commonly associated with growth disorders, whereas somatic mutations are often associated with malignancy. We profiled genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in DNMT3A c.2312G > A; p.(Arg771Gln) carriers in a large Amish sibship with Tatton-Brown-Rahman syndrome (TBRS), their mosaic father, and 15 TBRS patients with distinct pathogenic de novo DNMT3A variants. This defined widespread DNA hypomethylation at specific genomic sites enriched at locations annotated as genes involved in morphogenesis, development, differentiation, and malignancy predisposition pathways. TBRS patients also displayed highly accelerated DNA methylation aging. These findings were most marked in a carrier of the AML-associated driver mutation p.Arg882Cys. Our studies additionally defined phenotype-related accelerated and decelerated epigenetic aging in two histone methyltransferase disorders: NSD1 Sotos syndrome overgrowth disorder and KMT2D Kabuki syndrome growth impairment. Together, our findings provide fundamental new insights into aberrant epigenetic mechanisms, the role of epigenetic machinery maintenance, and determinants of biological aging in these growth disorders.

3.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(5): 957-967, 2019 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31006512

RESUMO

Replicating the human genome efficiently and accurately is a daunting challenge involving the duplication of upward of three billion base pairs. At the core of the complex machinery that achieves this task are three members of the B family of DNA polymerases: DNA polymerases α, δ, and ε. Collectively these multimeric polymerases ensure DNA replication proceeds at optimal rates approaching 2 × 103 nucleotides/min with an error rate of less than one per million nucleotides polymerized. The majority of DNA replication of undamaged DNA is conducted by DNA polymerases δ and ε. The DNA polymerase α-primase complex performs limited synthesis to initiate the replication process, along with Okazaki-fragment synthesis on the discontinuous lagging strand. An increasing number of human disorders caused by defects in different components of the DNA-replication apparatus have been described to date. These are clinically diverse and involve a wide range of features, including variable combinations of growth delay, immunodeficiency, endocrine insufficiencies, lipodystrophy, and cancer predisposition. Here, by using various complementary approaches, including classical linkage analysis, targeted next-generation sequencing, and whole-exome sequencing, we describe distinct missense and splice-impacting mutations in POLA1 in five unrelated families presenting with an X-linked syndrome involving intellectual disability, proportionate short stature, microcephaly, and hypogonadism. POLA1 encodes the p180 catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase α-primase. A range of replicative impairments could be demonstrated in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from affected individuals. Our findings describe the presentation of pathogenic mutations in a catalytic component of a B family DNA polymerase member, DNA polymerase α.

4.
Clin Genet ; 95(6): 693-703, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30859559

RESUMO

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterised by distinctive facial features, heart defects, variable degrees of intellectual disability and other phenotypic manifestations. Although the mode of inheritance is typically dominant, recent studies indicate LZTR1 may be associated with both dominant and recessive forms. Seeking to describe the phenotypic characteristics of LZTR1-associated NS, we searched for likely pathogenic variants using two approaches. First, scrutiny of exomes from 9624 patients recruited by the Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDDs) study uncovered six dominantly-acting mutations (p.R97L; p.Y136C; p.Y136H, p.N145I, p.S244C; p.G248R) of which five arose de novo, and three patients with compound-heterozygous variants (p.R210*/p.V579M; p.R210*/p.D531N; c.1149+1G>T/p.R688C). One patient also had biallelic loss-of-function mutations in NEB, consistent with a composite phenotype. After removing this complex case, analysis of human phenotype ontology terms indicated significant phenotypic similarities (P = 0.0005), supporting a causal role for LZTR1. Second, targeted sequencing of eight unsolved NS-like cases identified biallelic LZTR1 variants in three further subjects (p.W469*/p.Y749C, p.W437*/c.-38T>A and p.A461D/p.I462T). Our study strengthens the association of LZTR1 with NS, with de novo mutations clustering around the KT1-4 domains. Although LZTR1 variants explain ~0.1% of cases across the DDD cohort, the gene is a relatively common cause of unsolved NS cases where recessive inheritance is suspected.

5.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(4): 709-720, 2019 Apr 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30905399

RESUMO

The Mediator is an evolutionarily conserved, multi-subunit complex that regulates multiple steps of transcription. Mediator activity is regulated by the reversible association of a four-subunit module comprising CDK8 or CDK19 kinases, together with cyclin C, MED12 or MED12L, and MED13 or MED13L. Mutations in MED12, MED13, and MED13L were previously identified in syndromic developmental disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Here, we report CDK8 mutations (located at 13q12.13) that cause a phenotypically related disorder. Using whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing, and by international collaboration, we identified eight different heterozygous missense CDK8 substitutions, including 10 shown to have arisen de novo, in 12 unrelated subjects; a recurrent mutation, c.185C>T (p.Ser62Leu), was present in five individuals. All predicted substitutions localize to the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase domain. Affected individuals have overlapping phenotypes characterized by hypotonia, mild to moderate intellectual disability, behavioral disorders, and variable facial dysmorphism. Congenital heart disease occurred in six subjects; additional features present in multiple individuals included agenesis of the corpus callosum, ano-rectal malformations, seizures, and hearing or visual impairments. To evaluate the functional impact of the mutations, we measured phosphorylation at STAT1-Ser727, a known CDK8 substrate, in a CDK8 and CDK19 CRISPR double-knockout cell line transfected with wild-type (WT) or mutant CDK8 constructs. These experiments demonstrated a reduction in STAT1 phosphorylation by all mutants, in most cases to a similar extent as in a kinase-dead control. We conclude that missense mutations in CDK8 cause a developmental disorder that has phenotypic similarity to syndromes associated with mutations in other subunits of the Mediator kinase module, indicating probable overlap in pathogenic mechanisms.

6.
Lancet ; 393(10173): 747-757, 2019 02 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30712880

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fetal structural anomalies, which are detected by ultrasonography, have a range of genetic causes, including chromosomal aneuploidy, copy number variations (CNVs; which are detectable by chromosomal microarrays), and pathogenic sequence variants in developmental genes. Testing for aneuploidy and CNVs is routine during the investigation of fetal structural anomalies, but there is little information on the clinical usefulness of genome-wide next-generation sequencing in the prenatal setting. We therefore aimed to evaluate the proportion of fetuses with structural abnormalities that had identifiable variants in genes associated with developmental disorders when assessed with whole-exome sequencing (WES). METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, two groups in Birmingham and London recruited patients from 34 fetal medicine units in England and Scotland. We used whole-exome sequencing (WES) to evaluate the presence of genetic variants in developmental disorder genes (diagnostic genetic variants) in a cohort of fetuses with structural anomalies and samples from their parents, after exclusion of aneuploidy and large CNVs. Women were eligible for inclusion if they were undergoing invasive testing for identified nuchal translucency or structural anomalies in their fetus, as detected by ultrasound after 11 weeks of gestation. The partners of these women also had to consent to participate. Sequencing results were interpreted with a targeted virtual gene panel for developmental disorders that comprised 1628 genes. Genetic results related to fetal structural anomaly phenotypes were then validated and reported postnatally. The primary endpoint, which was assessed in all fetuses, was the detection of diagnostic genetic variants considered to have caused the fetal developmental anomaly. FINDINGS: The cohort was recruited between Oct 22, 2014, and June 29, 2017, and clinical data were collected until March 31, 2018. After exclusion of fetuses with aneuploidy and CNVs, 610 fetuses with structural anomalies and 1202 matched parental samples (analysed as 596 fetus-parental trios, including two sets of twins, and 14 fetus-parent dyads) were analysed by WES. After bioinformatic filtering and prioritisation according to allele frequency and effect on protein and inheritance pattern, 321 genetic variants (representing 255 potential diagnoses) were selected as potentially pathogenic genetic variants (diagnostic genetic variants), and these variants were reviewed by a multidisciplinary clinical review panel. A diagnostic genetic variant was identified in 52 (8·5%; 95% CI 6·4-11·0) of 610 fetuses assessed and an additional 24 (3·9%) fetuses had a variant of uncertain significance that had potential clinical usefulness. Detection of diagnostic genetic variants enabled us to distinguish between syndromic and non-syndromic fetal anomalies (eg, congenital heart disease only vs a syndrome with congenital heart disease and learning disability). Diagnostic genetic variants were present in 22 (15·4%) of 143 fetuses with multisystem anomalies (ie, more than one fetal structural anomaly), nine (11·1%) of 81 fetuses with cardiac anomalies, and ten (15·4%) of 65 fetuses with skeletal anomalies; these phenotypes were most commonly associated with diagnostic variants. However, diagnostic genetic variants were least common in fetuses with isolated increased nuchal translucency (≥4·0 mm) in the first trimester (in three [3·2%] of 93 fetuses). INTERPRETATION: WES facilitates genetic diagnosis of fetal structural anomalies, which enables more accurate predictions of fetal prognosis and risk of recurrence in future pregnancies. However, the overall detection of diagnostic genetic variants in a prospectively ascertained cohort with a broad range of fetal structural anomalies is lower than that suggested by previous smaller-scale studies of fewer phenotypes. WES improved the identification of genetic disorders in fetuses with structural abnormalities; however, before clinical implementation, careful consideration should be given to case selection to maximise clinical usefulness. FUNDING: UK Department of Health and Social Care and The Wellcome Trust.


Assuntos
Cariótipo Anormal/estatística & dados numéricos , Anormalidades Congênitas/genética , Desenvolvimento Fetal/genética , Feto/anormalidades , Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma/estatística & dados numéricos , Cariótipo Anormal/embriologia , Aborto Eugênico/estatística & dados numéricos , Aborto Espontâneo/epidemiologia , Anormalidades Congênitas/diagnóstico , Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Variações do Número de Cópias de DNA/genética , Feminino , Feto/diagnóstico por imagem , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Nascimento Vivo/epidemiologia , Masculino , Medição da Translucência Nucal , Pais , Morte Perinatal/etiologia , Gravidez , Estudos Prospectivos , Natimorto/epidemiologia , Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma/métodos
7.
Curr Opin Hematol ; 26(1): 6-15, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30451719

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked disease characterized by defective remodeling of phospholipid side chains in mitochondrial membranes. Major features include neutropenia, dilated cardiomyopathy, motor delay and proximal myopathy, feeding problems, and constitutional growth delay. We conducted this review of neutropenia in BTHS to aid in the diagnosis of this disease, and to improve understanding of both the consequences of neutropenia and the benefits of treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). RECENT FINDINGS: In 88 patients with BTHS, neutropenia, that is, at least one count below 1.5 × 10/l, was detected in 74 (84%) and 44% had severe chronic neutropenia, with multiple counts below 0.5 × 10/l. The pattern of neutropenia varied between intermittent and unpredictable, chronic and severe, or cyclical with mathematically regular oscillations. Monocytosis, that is, monocytes more than 1.0 × 10/l, was observed at least once in 64 of 85 (75%) patients. G-CSF was administered to 39 of 88 patients (44%). Weekly average G-CSF doses ranged from 0.12 to 10.92 µg/kg/day (mean 1.16 µg/kg/day, median 1.16 µg/kg/day). Antibiotic prophylaxis was additionally employed in 21 of 26 neutropenic patients. Pretreatment bone marrow evaluations predominantly showed reduced myeloid maturation which normalized on G-CSF therapy in seven of 13 examined. Consistent clinical improvement, with reduced signs and symptoms of infections, was observed in response to prophylactic G-CSF ±â€Šprophylactic antibiotics. However, despite G-CSF and antibiotics, one adult patient died with multiple infections related to indwelling medical devices and gastrostomy site infection after 15.5 years on G-CSF and a pediatric patient required gastrostomy removal for recurrent abdominal wall cellulitis. SUMMARY: BTHS should be considered in any men with neutropenia accompanied by any of the characteristic features of this syndrome. Prophylaxis with G-CSF ±â€Šantibiotics prevents serious bacterial infections in the more severe neutropenic patients although infections remain a threat even in patients who are very compliant with therapy, especially in those with indwelling devices.

8.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 26(9): 1306-1311, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29907757

RESUMO

Trio based whole exome sequencing via the Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) study has identified three individuals with de novo frameshift variants in the Suppressor of Variegation, Enhancer of Zeste, and Trithorax (SET) gene. Variants in the SET gene have not previously been recognised to be associated with human developmental disorders. Here we report detailed phenotypic information and propose that SET is a new Intellectual Disability/Developmental Delay (ID/DD) gene.

9.
Wellcome Open Res ; 3: 46, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29900417

RESUMO

Tatton-Brown-Rahman syndrome (TBRS; OMIM 615879), also known as the DNMT3A-overgrowth syndrome, is an overgrowth intellectual disability syndrome first described in 2014 with a report of 13 individuals with constitutive heterozygous DNMT3A variants. Here we have undertaken a detailed clinical study of 55 individuals with de novoDNMT3A variants, including the 13 previously reported individuals. An intellectual disability and overgrowth were reported in >80% of individuals with TBRS and were designated major clinical associations. Additional frequent clinical associations (reported in 20-80% individuals) included an evolving facial appearance with low-set, heavy, horizontal eyebrows and prominent upper central incisors; joint hypermobility (74%); obesity (weight ³2SD, 67%); hypotonia (54%); behavioural/psychiatric issues (most frequently autistic spectrum disorder, 51%); kyphoscoliosis (33%) and afebrile seizures (22%). One individual was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia in teenage years. Based upon the results from this study, we present our current management for individuals with TBRS.

10.
Heart Rhythm ; 15(7): 1051-1057, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29758173

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence that Brugada Syndrome (BrS) is due to SCN1B variants (BrS5). This gene may be inappropriately included in routine genetic testing panels for BrS or Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome (SADS). OBJECTIVE: We sought to characterize the genotype-phenotype correlation in families who had BrS and SADS with reportedly pathogenic SCN1B variants and to review their pathogenicity. METHODS: Families with BrS and SADS were assessed from 6 inherited arrhythmia centers worldwide, and a comprehensive literature review was performed. Clinical characteristics including relevant history, electrocardiographic parameters and drug provocation testing results were studied. SCN1B genetic testing results were reclassified using American College of Medical Genetics criteria. RESULTS: A total of 23 SCN1B genotype-positive individuals were identified from 8 families. Four probands (17%) experienced ventricular fibrillation or sudden cardiac death at the time of presentation. All family members were free from syncope or ventricular arrhythmias. Only 2 of 23 genotype-positive individuals (9%) demonstrated a spontaneous BrS electrocardiographic pattern. Drug challenge testing for BrS in 87% (13 of 15) was negative. There was no difference in PR interval (161 ± 7 ms vs 165 ± 9 ms; P = .83), QRS duration (101 ± 6 ms vs 89 ± 5 ms; P = .35), or corrected QT interval (414 ± 35 ms vs 405 ± 8 ms; P = .7) between genotype-positive and genotype-negative family members. The overall frequency of previously implicated SCN1B variants in the Genome Aggregation Database browser is 0.004%, exceeding the estimated prevalence of BrS owing to SCN1B (0.0005%), including 15 of 23 individuals (65%) who had the p.Trp179X variant. CONCLUSION: The lack of genotype-phenotype concordance among families, combined with the high frequency of previously reported mutations in the Genome Aggregation Database browser, suggests that SCN1B is not a monogenic cause of BrS or SADS.

11.
Eur J Med Genet ; 2018 Apr 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29698805

RESUMO

In the last 3 years de novo sequence variants in the ARID2 (AT-rich interaction domain 2) gene, a subunit of the SWI/SNF complex, have been linked to intellectual disabilities in 3 case reports including one which describes frameshift mutations in ARID2 in 2 patients with features resembling Coffin-Siris syndrome. Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by intellectual deficit, coarse facial features and hypoplastic or absent fifth fingernails and/or toenails among other features. Mutations in a number of different genes encoding SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex proteins have been described but the underlying molecular cause remains unknown in approximately 40% of patients with CSS. Here we describe 7 unrelated individuals, 2 with deletions of the ARID2 region and 5 with de novo truncating mutations in the ARID2 gene. Similarities to CSS are evident. Although hypertrichosis and hypoplasia of the fifth finger nail and distal phalanx do not appear to be common in these patients, toenail hypoplasia and the presence of Wormian bones might support the involvement of ARID2.

12.
Am J Med Genet A ; 176(4): 862-876, 2018 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29460469

RESUMO

In 2016, we described that missense variants in parts of exons 30 and 31 of CREBBP can cause a phenotype that differs from Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS). Here we report on another 11 patients with variants in this region of CREBBP (between bp 5,128 and 5,614) and two with variants in the homologous region of EP300. None of the patients show characteristics typical for RSTS. The variants were detected by exome sequencing using a panel for intellectual disability in all but one individual, in whom Sanger sequencing was performed upon clinical recognition of the entity. The main characteristics of the patients are developmental delay (90%), autistic behavior (65%), short stature (42%), and microcephaly (43%). Medical problems include feeding problems (75%), vision (50%), and hearing (54%) impairments, recurrent upper airway infections (42%), and epilepsy (21%). Major malformations are less common except for cryptorchidism (46% of males), and cerebral anomalies (70%). Individuals with variants between bp 5,595 and 5,614 of CREBBP show a specific phenotype (ptosis, telecanthi, short and upslanted palpebral fissures, depressed nasal ridge, short nose, anteverted nares, short columella, and long philtrum). 3D face shape demonstrated resemblance to individuals with a duplication of 16p13.3 (the region that includes CREBBP), possibly indicating a gain of function. The other affected individuals show a less specific phenotype. We conclude that there is now more firm evidence that variants in these specific regions of CREBBP and EP300 result in a phenotype that differs from RSTS, and that this phenotype may be heterogeneous.

13.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 26(1): 64-74, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29180823

RESUMO

Whole-gene duplications and missense variants in the HUWE1 gene (NM_031407.6) have been reported in association with intellectual disability (ID). Increased gene dosage has been observed in males with non-syndromic mild to moderate ID with speech delay. Missense variants reported previously appear to be associated with severe ID in males and mild or no ID in obligate carrier females. Here, we report the largest cohort of patients with HUWE1 variants, consisting of 14 females and 7 males, with 15 different missense variants and one splice site variant. Clinical assessment identified common clinical features consisting of moderate to profound ID, delayed or absent speech, short stature with small hands and feet and facial dysmorphism consisting of a broad nasal tip, deep set eyes, epicanthic folds, short palpebral fissures, and a short philtrum. We describe for the first time that females can be severely affected, despite preferential inactivation of the affected X chromosome. Three females with the c.329 G > A p.Arg110Gln variant, present with a phenotype of mild ID, specific facial features, scoliosis and craniosynostosis, as reported previously in a single patient. In these females, the X inactivation pattern appeared skewed in favour of the affected transcript. In summary, HUWE1 missense variants may cause syndromic ID in both males and females.

14.
Europace ; 20(2): 377-385, 2018 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28371864

RESUMO

Aims: Timothy syndrome (TS) is an extremely rare multisystem disorder characterized by marked QT prolongation, syndactyly, seizures, behavioural abnormalities, immunodeficiency, and hypoglycaemia. The aim of this study was to categorize the phenotypes and examine the outcomes of patients with TS. Methods and results: All patients diagnosed with TS in the United Kingdom over a 24-year period were reviewed. Fifteen centres in the British Congenital Arrhythmia Group network were contacted to partake in the study. Six patients with TS were identified over a 24-year period (4 boys and 2 girls). Five out of the six patients were confirmed to have a CACNA1C mutation (p.Gly406Arg) and the other patient was diagnosed clinically. Early presentation with heart block, due to QT prolongation was frequently seen. Four are still alive, two of these have a pacemaker and two have undergone defibrillator implantation. Five out of six patients have had a documented cardiac arrest with three occurring under general anaesthesia. Two patients suffered a cardiac arrest while in hospital and resuscitation was unsuccessful, despite immediate access to a defibrillator. Surviving patients seem to have mild developmental delay and learning difficulties. Conclusion: Timothy syndrome is a rare disorder with a high attrition rate if undiagnosed. Perioperative cardiac arrests are common and not always amenable to resuscitation. Longer-term survival is possible, however, patients invariably require pacemaker or defibrillator implantation.


Assuntos
Transtorno Autístico , Síndrome do QT Longo , Sindactilia , Transtorno Autístico/complicações , Transtorno Autístico/genética , Transtorno Autístico/fisiopatologia , Transtorno Autístico/terapia , Canais de Cálcio Tipo L/genética , Estimulação Cardíaca Artificial , Desfibriladores Implantáveis , Cardioversão Elétrica/instrumentação , Eletrocardiografia , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Parada Cardíaca/etiologia , Parada Cardíaca/fisiopatologia , Parada Cardíaca/terapia , Bloqueio Cardíaco/etiologia , Bloqueio Cardíaco/fisiopatologia , Bloqueio Cardíaco/terapia , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Síndrome do QT Longo/complicações , Síndrome do QT Longo/genética , Síndrome do QT Longo/fisiopatologia , Síndrome do QT Longo/terapia , Masculino , Mutação , Marca-Passo Artificial , Fenótipo , Prognóstico , Ressuscitação , Sindactilia/complicações , Sindactilia/genética , Sindactilia/fisiopatologia , Sindactilia/terapia , Fatores de Tempo , Reino Unido
15.
Prenat Diagn ; 38(1): 33-43, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29096039

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Rare genetic disorders resulting in prenatal or neonatal death are genetically heterogeneous, but testing is often limited by the availability of fetal DNA, leaving couples without a potential prenatal test for future pregnancies. We describe our novel strategy of exome sequencing parental DNA samples to diagnose recessive monogenic disorders in an audit of the first 50 couples referred. METHOD: Exome sequencing was carried out in a consecutive series of 50 couples who had 1 or more pregnancies affected with a lethal or prenatal-onset disorder. In all cases, there was insufficient DNA for exome sequencing of the affected fetus. Heterozygous rare variants (MAF < 0.001) in the same gene in both parents were selected for analysis. Likely, disease-causing variants were tested in fetal DNA to confirm co-segregation. RESULTS: Parental exome analysis identified heterozygous pathogenic (or likely pathogenic) variants in 24 different genes in 26/50 couples (52%). Where 2 or more fetuses were affected, a genetic diagnosis was obtained in 18/29 cases (62%). In most cases, the clinical features were typical of the disorder, but in others, they result from a hypomorphic variant or represent the most severe form of a variable phenotypic spectrum. CONCLUSION: We conclude that exome sequencing of parental samples is a powerful strategy with high clinical utility for the genetic diagnosis of lethal or prenatal-onset recessive disorders. © 2017 The Authors Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/genética , Doenças Genéticas Inatas/diagnóstico , Pais , Diagnóstico Pré-Natal/métodos , Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma , Feminino , Genes Recessivos , Humanos , Masculino , Gravidez
16.
J Med Genet ; 55(1): 28-38, 2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29021403

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Recent evidence has emerged linking mutations in CDK13 to syndromic congenital heart disease. We present here genetic and phenotypic data pertaining to 16 individuals with CDK13 mutations. METHODS: Patients were investigated by exome sequencing, having presented with developmental delay and additional features suggestive of a syndromic cause. RESULTS: Our cohort comprised 16 individuals aged 4-16 years. All had developmental delay, including six with autism spectrum disorder. Common findings included feeding difficulties (15/16), structural cardiac anomalies (9/16), seizures (4/16) and abnormalities of the corpus callosum (4/11 patients who had undergone MRI). All had craniofacial dysmorphism, with common features including short, upslanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism or telecanthus, medial epicanthic folds, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears and a small mouth with thin upper lip vermilion. Fifteen patients had predicted missense mutations, including five identical p.(Asn842Ser) substitutions and two p.(Gly717Arg) substitutions. One patient had a canonical splice acceptor site variant (c.2898-1G>A). All mutations were located within the protein kinase domain of CDK13. The affected amino acids are highly conserved, and in silico analyses including comparative protein modelling predict that they will interfere with protein function. The location of the missense mutations in a key catalytic domain suggests that they are likely to cause loss of catalytic activity but retention of cyclin K binding, resulting in a dominant negative mode of action. Although the splice-site mutation was predicted to produce a stable internally deleted protein, this was not supported by expression studies in lymphoblastoid cells. A loss of function contribution to the underlying pathological mechanism therefore cannot be excluded, and the clinical significance of this variant remains uncertain. CONCLUSIONS: These patients demonstrate that heterozygous, likely dominant negative mutations affecting the protein kinase domain of the CDK13 gene result in a recognisable, syndromic form of intellectual disability, with or without congenital heart disease.


Assuntos
Proteína Quinase CDC2/química , Proteína Quinase CDC2/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Mutação/genética , Adolescente , Criança , Sequência Conservada , Feminino , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Moleculares , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto/genética , Domínios Proteicos , Síndrome , Termodinâmica
17.
J Med Genet ; 54(12): 830-835, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29074562

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Bohring-Opitz syndrome (BOS) is a rare genetic disorder characterised by a recognisable craniofacial appearance and a typical 'BOS' posture. BOS is caused by sporadic mutations ofASXL1. However, several typical patients with BOS have no molecular diagnosis, suggesting clinical and genetic heterogeneity. OBJECTIVES: To expand the phenotypical spectrum of autosomal recessive variants of KLHL7, reported as causing Crisponi syndrome/cold-induced sweating syndrome type 1 (CS/CISS1)-like syndrome. METHODS: We performed whole-exome sequencing in two families with a suspected recessive mode of inheritance. We used the Matchmaker Exchange initiative to identify additional patients. RESULTS: Here, we report six patients with microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, including exophthalmos, nevus flammeus of the glabella and joint contractures with a suspected BOS posture in five out of six patients. We identified autosomal recessive truncating mutations in the KLHL7 gene. KLHL7 encodes a BTB-kelch protein implicated in the cell cycle and in protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Recently, biallelic mutations in the KLHL7 gene were reported in four families and associated with CS/CISS1, characterised by clinical features overlapping with our patients. CONCLUSION: We have expanded the clinical spectrum of KLHL7 autosomal recessive variants by describing a syndrome with features overlapping CS/CISS1 and BOS.


Assuntos
Autoantígenos/genética , Craniossinostoses/diagnóstico , Craniossinostoses/genética , Genes Recessivos , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Mutação , Fenótipo , Encéfalo/anormalidades , Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem , Pré-Escolar , Facies , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Lactente , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Adulto Jovem
18.
Am J Hum Genet ; 100(4): 650-658, 2017 Apr 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28343630

RESUMO

Intellectual disability (ID) is a highly heterogeneous disorder involving at least 600 genes, yet a genetic diagnosis remains elusive in ∼35%-40% of individuals with moderate to severe ID. Recent meta-analyses statistically analyzing de novo mutations in >7,000 individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders highlighted mutations in PPM1D as a possible cause of ID. PPM1D is a type 2C phosphatase that functions as a negative regulator of cellular stress-response pathways by mediating a feedback loop of p38-p53 signaling, thereby contributing to growth inhibition and suppression of stress-induced apoptosis. We identified 14 individuals with mild to severe ID and/or developmental delay and de novo truncating PPM1D mutations. Additionally, deep phenotyping revealed overlapping behavioral problems (ASD, ADHD, and anxiety disorders), hypotonia, broad-based gait, facial dysmorphisms, and periods of fever and vomiting. PPM1D is expressed during fetal brain development and in the adult brain. All mutations were located in the last or penultimate exon, suggesting escape from nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Both PPM1D expression analysis and cDNA sequencing in EBV LCLs of individuals support the presence of a stable truncated transcript, consistent with this hypothesis. Exposure of cells derived from individuals with PPM1D truncating mutations to ionizing radiation resulted in normal p53 activation, suggesting that p53 signaling is unaffected. However, a cell-growth disadvantage was observed, suggesting a possible effect on the stress-response pathway. Thus, we show that de novo truncating PPM1D mutations in the last and penultimate exons cause syndromic ID, which provides additional insight into the role of cell-cycle checkpoint genes in neurodevelopmental disorders.


Assuntos
Éxons , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Mutação , Proteína Fosfatase 2C/genética , Adolescente , Ciclo Celular , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/patologia , Adulto Jovem
19.
PLoS Genet ; 12(12): e1006521, 2016 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27992425

RESUMO

The forelimbs and hindlimbs of vertebrates are bilaterally symmetric. The mechanisms that ensure symmetric limb formation are unknown but they can be disrupted in disease. In Holt-Oram Syndrome (HOS), caused by mutations in TBX5, affected individuals have left-biased upper/forelimb defects. We demonstrate a role for the transcription factor Tbx5 in ensuring the symmetric formation of the left and right forelimb. In our mouse model, bilateral hypomorphic levels of Tbx5 produces asymmetric forelimb defects that are consistently more severe in the left limb than the right, phenocopying the left-biased limb defects seen in HOS patients. In Tbx hypomorphic mutants maintained on an INV mutant background, with situs inversus, the laterality of defects is reversed. Our data demonstrate an early, inherent asymmetry in the left and right limb-forming regions and that threshold levels of Tbx5 are required to overcome this asymmetry to ensure symmetric forelimb formation.


Assuntos
Desenvolvimento Embrionário/genética , Membro Anterior/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Deformidades Congênitas dos Membros/genética , Proteínas com Domínio T/genética , Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Anormalidades Múltiplas/patologia , Animais , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Embrião de Mamíferos , Regulação da Expressão Gênica no Desenvolvimento , Cardiopatias Congênitas/genética , Cardiopatias Congênitas/patologia , Comunicação Interatrial/genética , Comunicação Interatrial/patologia , Humanos , Botões de Extremidades/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Deformidades Congênitas dos Membros/patologia , Deformidades Congênitas das Extremidades Inferiores/genética , Deformidades Congênitas das Extremidades Inferiores/patologia , Camundongos , Somitos/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Deformidades Congênitas das Extremidades Superiores/genética , Deformidades Congênitas das Extremidades Superiores/patologia
20.
Am J Med Genet A ; 170(11): 2835-2846, 2016 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27667800

RESUMO

KBG syndrome is characterized by short stature, distinctive facial features, and developmental/cognitive delay and is caused by mutations in ANKRD11, one of the ankyrin repeat-containing cofactors. We describe 32 KBG patients aged 2-47 years from 27 families ascertained via two pathways: targeted ANKRD11 sequencing (TS) in a group who had a clinical diagnosis of KBG and whole exome sequencing (ES) in a second group in whom the diagnosis was unknown. Speech delay and learning difficulties were almost universal and variable behavioral problems frequent. Macrodontia of permanent upper central incisors was seen in 85%. Other clinical features included short stature, conductive hearing loss, recurrent middle ear infection, palatal abnormalities, and feeding difficulties. We recognized a new feature of a wide anterior fontanelle with delayed closure in 22%. The subtle facial features of KBG syndrome were recognizable in half the patients. We identified 20 ANKRD11 mutations (18 novel: all truncating) confirmed by Sanger sequencing in 32 patients. Comparison of the two ascertainment groups demonstrated that facial/other typical features were more subtle in the ES group. There were no conclusive phenotype-genotype correlations. Our findings suggest that mutation of ANKRD11 is a common Mendelian cause of developmental delay. Affected patients may not show the characteristic KBG phenotype and the diagnosis is therefore easily missed. We propose updated diagnostic criteria/clinical recommendations for KBG syndrome and suggest that inclusion of ANKRD11 will increase the utility of gene panels designed to investigate developmental delay. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Múltiplas/diagnóstico , Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Doenças do Desenvolvimento Ósseo/diagnóstico , Doenças do Desenvolvimento Ósseo/genética , Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Anormalidades Dentárias/diagnóstico , Anormalidades Dentárias/genética , Deleção Cromossômica , Cromossomos Humanos Par 16 , Hibridização Genômica Comparativa , Facies , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Fenótipo , Proteínas Repressoras/genética
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