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1.
Circ Genom Precis Med ; 12(8): e002472, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31430210

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Human genetic variation in the NPR1 (natriuretic peptide receptor 1 gene, encoding NPR-A, atrial natriuretic peptide receptor 1) was recently shown to affect blood pressure (BP). NPR-A catalyzes the intracellular conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP (cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate) on binding of ANP, BNP (atrial or brain natriuretic peptide). Increased levels of cGMP decrease BP by inducing natriuresis, diuresis, and vasodilation. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of low-frequency and rare NPR1 variants for BP association in up to 491 584 unrelated individuals. To examine whether the identified BP-associated variants affect NPR-A function, the cGMP response to ANP and BNP was measured in cells expressing wild-type NPR1 and cells expressing the NPR1 variants. RESULTS: In this study, we identified BP associations of 3 amino acid altering variants of NPR1. The minor alleles of rs35479618 (p.E967K, gnomAD non-Finnish European allele frequency 0.017) and rs116245325 (p.L1034F, allele frequency 0.0007) were associated with higher BP (P=4.0×10-25 and P=9.9×10-8, respectively), while the minor allele of rs61757359 (p.G541S, allele frequency 0.003) was associated with lower BP (P=1.8×10-9). Cells transiently expressing 967K or 1034F NPR-A displayed decreased cGMP production in response to ANP and BNP (all P<10-6), while cells expressing 541S NPR-A produced more cGMP compared with cells expressing wild-type NPR-A (P≤4.13×10-5 for ANP and P≤4.24×10-3 for BNP). CONCLUSIONS: In summary, the loss or gain of guanylate cyclase activity for these NPR1 allelic variants could explain the higher or lower BP observed for carriers in large population-based studies.

2.
Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 4(10): 771-780, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31353243

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Low donor heart availability underscores the need to identify all potentially transplantable organs. We sought to determine whether pre-emptive administration of pangenotypic direct-acting antiviral therapy can safely prevent the development of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in uninfected recipients of HCV-infected donor hearts. METHODS: Patients were recruited for this an open-label, single-centre, proof-of-concept study from Nov 1, 2017, to Nov 30, 2018. Following enrolment, the recipient's status on the heart transplantation waiting list was updated to reflect a willingness to accept either an HCV-positive or HCV-negative heart donor. Patients who underwent transplantation with a viraemic donor heart, as determined by nucleic acid testing (NAT), received pre-emptive oral glecaprevir-pibrentasvir before transport to the operating room followed by an 8-week course of glecaprevir-pibrentasvir after transplantation. Patients receiving HCV antibody-positive donor hearts without detectable circulating HCV RNA were followed using a reactive approach and started glecaprevir-pibrentasvir only if they developed viraemia. The primary outcome was achievement of sustained virological response 12 weeks after completion of glecaprevir-pibrentasvir therapy (SVR12). Patients were followed from study enrolment to 1 year after transplantation. This is an interim analysis, initiated after all enrolled patients reached the primary outcome. Results reflect data from Nov 1, 2017, to May 30, 2019. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT03208244. FINDINGS: 55 patients were assessed for eligibility and 52 consented to enrolment. 25 patients underwent heart transplantation with HCV-positive donor hearts (20 NAT-positive, five NAT-negative), three of whom underwent simultaneous heart-kidney transplantation. All 20 recipients of NAT-positive hearts tolerated glecaprevir-pibrentasvir and showed rapid viral suppression (median time to clearance 3·5 days, IQR 0·0-8·3), with the subsequent achievement of SVR12 by all 20. The five recipients of NAT-negative grafts did not become viraemic. Median pre-transplant waiting time for patients following enrolment in the HCV protocol was 20 days (IQR 8-57). Patient and allograft survival were 100% at a median follow-up of 10·7 months (range 6·5-18·0). INTERPRETATION: Pre-emptive administration of glecaprevir-pibrentasvir therapy results in expedited organ transplantation, rapid HCV suppression, prevention of chronic HCV infection, and excellent early allograft function in patients receiving HCV-infected donor hearts. Long-term outcomes are not yet known. FUNDING: American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, National Institutes of Health, and the Massachusetts General Hospital.

5.
Circulation ; 2018 Nov 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30586722

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a morbid and heritable disorder for which the biological mechanisms are incompletely understood. We therefore examined genetic associations with HF in a large national biobank, and assessed whether refined phenotypic classification would facilitate genetic discovery. METHODS: We defined all-cause HF among 488010 participants from the UK Biobank and performed a genome-wide association analysis. We refined the HF phenotype by classifying individuals with left ventricular dysfunction and without coronary artery disease as having nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM), and repeated a genetic association analysis. We then pursued replication of lead HF and NICM variants in independent cohorts, and performed adjusted association analyses to assess whether identified genetic associations were mediated through clinical HF risk factors. In addition, we tested rare, loss-of-function mutations in 24 known dilated cardiomyopathy genes for association with HF and NICM. Finally, we examined associations between lead variants and left ventricular structure and function among individuals without HF using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (n=4158) and echocardiographic data (n=30201). RESULTS: We identified 7382 participants with all-cause HF in the UK Biobank. Genome-wide association analysis of all-cause HF identified several suggestive loci ( P<1×10-6), the majority linked to upstream HF risk factors, ie, coronary artery disease ( CDKN2B-AS1 and MAP3K7CL) and atrial fibrillation ( PITX2). Refining the HF phenotype yielded a subset of 2038 NICM cases. In contrast to all-cause HF, genetic analysis of NICM revealed suggestive loci that have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy ( BAG3, CLCNKA-ZBTB17). Dilated cardiomyopathy signals arising from our NICM analysis replicated in independent cohorts, persisted after HF risk factor adjustment, and were associated with indices of left ventricular dysfunction in individuals without clinical HF. In addition, analyses of loss-of-function variants implicated BAG3 as a disease susceptibility gene for NICM (loss-offunction variant carrier frequency=0.01%; odds ratio,12.03; P=3.62×10-5). CONCLUSIONS: We found several distinct genetic mechanisms of all-cause HF in a national biobank that reflect well-known HF risk factors. Phenotypic refinement to a NICM subtype appeared to facilitate the discovery of genetic signals that act independently of clinical HF risk factors and that are associated with subclinical left ventricular dysfunction.

6.
Hypertension ; 72(5): e53-e90, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30354828

RESUMO

Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as above-goal elevated blood pressure (BP) in a patient despite the concurrent use of 3 antihypertensive drug classes, commonly including a long-acting calcium channel blocker, a blocker of the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker), and a diuretic. The antihypertensive drugs should be administered at maximum or maximally tolerated daily doses. RH also includes patients whose BP achieves target values on ≥4 antihypertensive medications. The diagnosis of RH requires assurance of antihypertensive medication adherence and exclusion of the "white-coat effect" (office BP above goal but out-of-office BP at or below target). The importance of RH is underscored by the associated risk of adverse outcomes compared with non-RH. This article is an updated American Heart Association scientific statement on the detection, evaluation, and management of RH. Once antihypertensive medication adherence is confirmed and out-of-office BP recordings exclude a white-coat effect, evaluation includes identification of contributing lifestyle issues, detection of drugs interfering with antihypertensive medication effectiveness, screening for secondary hypertension, and assessment of target organ damage. Management of RH includes maximization of lifestyle interventions, use of long-acting thiazide-like diuretics (chlorthalidone or indapamide), addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (spironolactone or eplerenone), and, if BP remains elevated, stepwise addition of antihypertensive drugs with complementary mechanisms of action to lower BP. If BP remains uncontrolled, referral to a hypertension specialist is advised.

7.
Eur Heart J ; 39(44): 3961-3969, 2018 Nov 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30169657

RESUMO

Aims: Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) accounts for 10% of adult mortality in Western populations. We aim to identify potential loci associated with SCA and to identify risk factors causally associated with SCA. Methods and results: We carried out a large genome-wide association study (GWAS) for SCA (n = 3939 cases, 25 989 non-cases) to examine common variation genome-wide and in candidate arrhythmia genes. We also exploited Mendelian randomization (MR) methods using cross-trait multi-variant genetic risk score associations (GRSA) to assess causal relationships of 18 risk factors with SCA. No variants were associated with SCA at genome-wide significance, nor were common variants in candidate arrhythmia genes associated with SCA at nominal significance. Using cross-trait GRSA, we established genetic correlation between SCA and (i) coronary artery disease (CAD) and traditional CAD risk factors (blood pressure, lipids, and diabetes), (ii) height and BMI, and (iii) electrical instability traits (QT and atrial fibrillation), suggesting aetiologic roles for these traits in SCA risk. Conclusions: Our findings show that a comprehensive approach to the genetic architecture of SCA can shed light on the determinants of a complex life-threatening condition with multiple influencing factors in the general population. The results of this genetic analysis, both positive and negative findings, have implications for evaluating the genetic architecture of patients with a family history of SCA, and for efforts to prevent SCA in high-risk populations and the general community.

8.
Circ Genom Precis Med ; 11(5): e001663, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29752399

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genetic variants at the SCN5A/SCN10A locus are strongly associated with electrocardiographic PR and QRS intervals. While SCN5A is the canonical cardiac sodium channel gene, the role of SCN10A in cardiac conduction is less well characterized. METHODS: We sequenced the SCN10A locus in 3699 European-ancestry individuals to identify variants associated with cardiac conduction, and replicated our findings in 21,000 individuals of European ancestry. We examined association with expression in human atrial tissue. We explored the biophysical effect of variation on channel function using cellular electrophysiology. RESULTS: We identified 2 intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms in high linkage disequilibrium (r 2=0.86) with each other to be the strongest signals for PR (rs10428132, ß=-4.74, P=1.52×10-14) and QRS intervals (rs6599251, QRS ß=-0.73; P=1.2×10-4), respectively. Although these variants were not associated with SCN5A or SCN10A expression in human atrial tissue (n=490), they were in high linkage disequilibrium (r 2≥0.72) with a common SCN10A missense variant, rs6795970 (V1073A). In total, we identified 7 missense variants, 4 of which (I962V, P1045T, V1073A, and L1092P) were associated with cardiac conduction. These 4 missense variants cluster in the cytoplasmic linker of the second and third domains of the SCN10A protein and together form 6 common haplotypes. Using cellular electrophysiology, we found that haplotypes associated with shorter PR intervals had a significantly larger percentage of late current compared with wild-type (I962V+V1073A+L1092P, 20.2±3.3%, P=0.03, and I962V+V1073A, 22.4±0.8%, P=0.0004 versus wild-type 11.7±1.6%), and the haplotype associated with the longest PR interval had a significantly smaller late current percentage (P1045T, 6.4±1.2%, P=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest an association between genetic variation in SCN10A, the late sodium current, and alterations in cardiac conduction.

10.
PLoS One ; 13(4): e0196697, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29698509

RESUMO

AIMS: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), secreted primarily by atrial cardiomyocytes, decreases blood pressure by raising cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels and inducing vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. Raising the level of ANP has been shown to be an effective treatment for hypertension. To advance the future development of an anti-microRNA (miR) approach to increasing expression of ANP, we investigated the regulation of NPPA expression by two miRs: miR-425 and miR-155. We examined whether miR-425 and miR-155 have an additive effect on the expression and function of ANP. METHODS AND RESULTS: Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) were transfected with miR-425, miR-155, or a combination of the two miRs. Two days later, NPPA expression was measured using real time qPCR. Each of the miRs decreased NPPA expression over a wide range of concentrations, with a significant reduction at concentrations as low as 1 nM. The combination of miR-425 and miR-155 reduced NPPA expression to a greater extent than either miR-425 or miR-155 alone. An in vitro assay was developed to study the potential biological significance of the miR-induced decrease in NPPA expression. The cooperative effect of miR-425 and miR-155 on NPPA expression was associated with a significant decrease in cGMP levels. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that miR-425 and miR-155 regulate NPPA expression in a cooperative manner. Targeting both miRNAs with anti-miRs (possibly at submaximal concentrations) might prove to be a more effective strategy to modulate ANP levels, and thus blood pressure, than targeting either miRNA alone.


Assuntos
Fator Natriurético Atrial/metabolismo , GMP Cíclico/metabolismo , MicroRNAs/metabolismo , Animais , Fator Natriurético Atrial/genética , Células COS , Linhagem Celular , Cercopithecus aethiops , Células-Tronco Embrionárias Humanas/citologia , Humanos , MicroRNAs/genética , Miócitos Cardíacos/citologia , Miócitos Cardíacos/metabolismo , Transfecção
11.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 987, 2018 03 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29511194

RESUMO

Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular heart disease, and valve replacement is the only definitive treatment. Here we report a large genome-wide association (GWA) study of 2,457 Icelandic AS cases and 349,342 controls with a follow-up in up to 4,850 cases and 451,731 controls of European ancestry. We identify two new AS loci, on chromosome 1p21 near PALMD (rs7543130; odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 1.2 × 10-22) and on chromosome 2q22 in TEX41 (rs1830321; OR = 1.15, P = 1.8 × 10-13). Rs7543130 also associates with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) (OR = 1.28, P = 6.6 × 10-10) and aortic root diameter (P = 1.30 × 10-8), and rs1830321 associates with BAV (OR = 1.12, P = 5.3 × 10-3) and coronary artery disease (OR = 1.05, P = 9.3 × 10-5). The results implicate both cardiac developmental abnormalities and atherosclerosis-like processes in the pathogenesis of AS. We show that several pathways are shared by CAD and AS. Causal analysis suggests that the shared risk factors of Lp(a) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol contribute substantially to the frequent co-occurence of these diseases.

12.
Circ Genom Precis Med ; 11(3): e001901, 2018 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29540468

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Inhibition of PKC-α (protein kinase C-α) enhances contractility and cardioprotection in animal models, but effects in humans are unknown. Genotypes at rs9912468 strongly associate with PRKCA expression in the left ventricle, enabling genetic approaches to measure effects of reduced PKC-α in human populations. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the cis expression quantitative trait locus for PRKCA marked by rs9912468 using 313 left ventricular specimens from European Ancestry patients. The forward strand minor allele (G) at rs9912468 is associated with reduced PKC-α transcript abundance (1.7-fold reduction in minor allele homozygotes, P=1×10-41). This association was cardiac specific in expression quantitative trait locus data sets that span 16 human tissues. Cardiac epigenomic data revealed a predicted enhancer in complete (R2=1.0) linkage disequilibrium with rs9912468 within intron 2 of PRKCA. We cloned this region and used reporter constructs to verify cardiac-specific enhancer activity in vitro in cardiac and noncardiac cells and in vivo in zebrafish. The PRKCA enhancer contains 2 common genetic variants and 4 haplotypes; the haplotype correlated with the rs9912468 PKC-α-lowering allele (G) showed lowest activity. In contrast to previous reports in animal models, the PKC-α-lowering allele is associated with adverse left ventricular remodeling (higher mass, larger diastolic dimension), reduced fractional shortening, and higher risk of dilated cardiomyopathy in human populations. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support PKC-α as a regulator of the human heart but suggest that PKC-α inhibition may adversely affect the left ventricle depending on timing and duration. Pharmacological studies in human subjects are required to discern potential benefits and harms of PKC-α inhibitors as an approach to treat heart disease.

13.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet ; 10(6)2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29237688

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous reports have implicated multiple genetic loci associated with AF, but the contributions of genome-wide variation to AF susceptibility have not been quantified. METHODS AND RESULTS: We assessed the contribution of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism variation to AF risk (single-nucleotide polymorphism heritability, h2g ) using data from 120 286 unrelated individuals of European ancestry (2987 with AF) in the population-based UK Biobank. We ascertained AF based on self-report, medical record billing codes, procedure codes, and death records. We estimated h2g using a variance components method with variants having a minor allele frequency ≥1%. We evaluated h2g in age, sex, and genomic strata of interest. The h2g for AF was 22.1% (95% confidence interval, 15.6%-28.5%) and was similar for early- versus older-onset AF (≤65 versus >65 years of age), as well as for men and women. The proportion of AF variance explained by genetic variation was mainly accounted for by common (minor allele frequency, ≥5%) variants (20.4%; 95% confidence interval, 15.1%-25.6%). Only 6.4% (95% confidence interval, 5.1%-7.7%) of AF variance was attributed to variation within known AF susceptibility, cardiac arrhythmia, and cardiomyopathy gene regions. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic variation contributes substantially to AF risk. The risk for AF conferred by genomic variation is similar to that observed for several other cardiovascular diseases. Established AF loci only explain a moderate proportion of disease risk, suggesting that further genetic discovery, with an emphasis on common variation, is warranted to understand the causal genetic basis of AF.


Assuntos
Fibrilação Atrial/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Idoso , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Frequência do Gene , Predisposição Genética para Doença/etnologia , Humanos , Desequilíbrio de Ligação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Reino Unido
15.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet ; 10(5)2017 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28986454

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Polygenic risk scores (PGS) enable rapid estimation of genome-wide susceptibility for traits, which may be useful in clinical settings, such as prediction of QT interval. In this study, we sought to validate PGS for QT interval in 2 real-world cohorts of European ancestry (EA) and African ancestry (AA). METHODS AND RESULTS: Two thousand nine hundred and fifteen participants of EA and 366 of AA in the MGH CAMP study (Cardiology and Metabolic Patient) were genotyped on a genome-wide array and imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel. An additional 820 EA and 57 AA participants in the Partners Biobank were genotyped and used for validation. PGS were created for each individual using effect estimates from association tests with QT interval obtained from prior genome-wide association studies, with variants selected based from multiple significance thresholds in the original study. In regression models, clinical variables explained ≈9% to 10% of total variation in resting QTc in EA individuals and ≈12% to 18% in AA individuals. The PGS significantly increased variation explained at most significance thresholds (P<0.001), with a trend toward increased variation explained at more stringent P value cut points in the CAMP EA cohort (P<0.05). In AA individuals, PGS provided no improvement in variation explained at any significance threshold. CONCLUSIONS: For individuals of European descent, PGS provided a significant increase in variation in QT interval explained compared with a model with only nongenetic factors at nearly every significance level. There was no apparent benefit gained by relaxing the significance threshold from conventional genome-wide significance (P<5×10-8).


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/genética , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Síndrome do QT Longo/genética , Herança Multifatorial , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Doenças Metabólicas/genética
17.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet ; 10(4)2017 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28760750

RESUMO

There have been major advances in our knowledge of the contribution of DNA sequence variations to cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, the inner workings of the body reflect the complex interplay of factors beyond the DNA sequence, including epigenetic modifications, RNA transcripts, proteins, and metabolites, which together can be considered the "expressed genome." The emergence of high-throughput technologies, including epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, is now making it possible to address the contributions of the expressed genome to cardiovascular disorders. This statement describes how the expressed genome can currently and, in the future, potentially be used to diagnose diseases and to predict who will develop diseases such as coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, and arrhythmias.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/diagnóstico , Genoma Humano , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/diagnóstico , American Heart Association , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Doenças Cardiovasculares/genética , Epigenômica , Humanos , Metabolômica , Proteômica , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/genética , Estados Unidos
18.
Circulation ; 135(14): 1300-1310, 2017 04 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28213480

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Drug-induced QT interval prolongation, a risk factor for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, is a potential side effect of many marketed and withdrawn medications. The contribution of common genetic variants previously associated with baseline QT interval to drug-induced QT prolongation and arrhythmias is not known. METHODS: We tested the hypothesis that a weighted combination of common genetic variants contributing to QT interval at baseline, identified through genome-wide association studies, can predict individual response to multiple QT-prolonging drugs. Genetic analysis of 22 subjects was performed in a secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of 3 QT-prolonging drugs with 15 time-matched QT and plasma drug concentration measurements. Subjects received single doses of dofetilide, quinidine, ranolazine, and placebo. The outcome was the correlation between a genetic QT score comprising 61 common genetic variants and the slope of an individual subject's drug-induced increase in heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) versus drug concentration. RESULTS: The genetic QT score was correlated with drug-induced QTc prolongation. Among white subjects, genetic QT score explained 30% of the variability in response to dofetilide (r=0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-0.81; P=0.02), 23% in response to quinidine (r=0.48; 95% confidence interval, -0.03 to 0.79; P=0.06), and 27% in response to ranolazine (r=0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.80; P=0.03). Furthermore, the genetic QT score was a significant predictor of drug-induced torsade de pointes in an independent sample of 216 cases compared with 771 controls (r2=12%, P=1×10-7). CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that a genetic QT score comprising 61 common genetic variants explains a significant proportion of the variability in drug-induced QT prolongation and is a significant predictor of drug-induced torsade de pointes. These findings highlight an opportunity for recent genetic discoveries to improve individualized risk-benefit assessment for pharmacological therapies. Replication of these findings in larger samples is needed to more precisely estimate variance explained and to establish the individual variants that drive these effects. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01873950.


Assuntos
Arritmias Cardíacas/etiologia , Síndrome do QT Longo/induzido quimicamente , Adulto , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Projetos Piloto , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Medição de Risco , Torsades de Pointes/etiologia
19.
J Med Genet ; 54(5): 313-323, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28039329

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Increased heart rate and a prolonged QT interval are important risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and can be influenced by the use of various medications, including tricyclic/tetracyclic antidepressants (TCAs). We aim to identify genetic loci that modify the association between TCA use and RR and QT intervals. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted race/ethnic-specific genome-wide interaction analyses (with HapMap phase II imputed reference panel imputation) of TCAs and resting RR and QT intervals in cohorts of European (n=45 706; n=1417 TCA users), African (n=10 235; n=296 TCA users) and Hispanic/Latino (n=13 808; n=147 TCA users) ancestry, adjusted for clinical covariates. Among the populations of European ancestry, two genome-wide significant loci were identified for RR interval: rs6737205 in BRE (ß=56.3, pinteraction=3.9e-9) and rs9830388 in UBE2E2 (ß=25.2, pinteraction=1.7e-8). In Hispanic/Latino cohorts, rs2291477 in TGFBR3 significantly modified the association between TCAs and QT intervals (ß=9.3, pinteraction=2.55e-8). In the meta-analyses of the other ethnicities, these loci either were excluded from the meta-analyses (as part of quality control), or their effects did not reach the level of nominal statistical significance (pinteraction>0.05). No new variants were identified in these ethnicities. No additional loci were identified after inverse-variance-weighted meta-analysis of the three ancestries. CONCLUSIONS: Among Europeans, TCA interactions with variants in BRE and UBE2E2 were identified in relation to RR intervals. Among Hispanic/Latinos, variants in TGFBR3 modified the relation between TCAs and QT intervals. Future studies are required to confirm our results.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento/fisiologia , Antidepressivos Tricíclicos/farmacologia , Eletrocardiografia , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Coração/fisiopatologia , Farmacogenética , Idoso , Feminino , Loci Gênicos , Coração/efeitos dos fármacos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
20.
Nat Genet ; 49(3): 403-415, 2017 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28135244

RESUMO

Elevated blood pressure is the leading heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease worldwide. We report genetic association of blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, pulse pressure) among UK Biobank participants of European ancestry with independent replication in other cohorts, and robust validation of 107 independent loci. We also identify new independent variants at 11 previously reported blood pressure loci. In combination with results from a range of in silico functional analyses and wet bench experiments, our findings highlight new biological pathways for blood pressure regulation enriched for genes expressed in vascular tissues and identify potential therapeutic targets for hypertension. Results from genetic risk score models raise the possibility of a precision medicine approach through early lifestyle intervention to offset the impact of blood pressure-raising genetic variants on future cardiovascular disease risk.


Assuntos
Pressão Sanguínea/genética , Doenças Cardiovasculares/genética , Loci Gênicos/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Adulto , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , Hipertensão/genética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Fatores de Risco
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