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1.
Cancers (Basel) ; 13(18)2021 Sep 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34572753

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The laparoscopic approach in gastric cancer surgery is being increasingly adopted worldwide. However, studies focusing specifically on laparoscopic gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy are still lacking in the literature. This retrospective study aimed to compare the short-term and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic versus open gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. METHODS: The protocol-based, international IMIGASTRIC (International study group on Minimally Invasive surgery for Gastric Cancer) registry was queried to retrieve data on patients undergoing laparoscopic or open gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer with curative intent from January 2000 to December 2014. Eleven predefined, demographical, clinical, and pathological variables were used to conduct a 1:1 propensity score matching (PSM) analysis to investigate intraoperative and recovery outcomes, complications, pathological findings, and survival data between the two groups. Predictive factors of long-term survival were also assessed. RESULTS: A total of 3033 patients from 14 participating institutions were selected from the IMIGASTRIC database. After 1:1 PSM, a total of 1248 patients, 624 in the laparoscopic group and 624 in the open group, were matched and included in the final analysis. The total operative time (median 180 versus 240 min, p < 0.0001) and the length of the postoperative hospital stay (median 10 versus 14.8 days, p < 0.0001) were longer in the open group than in the laparoscopic group. The conversion to open rate was 1.9%. The proportion of patients with in-hospital complications was higher in the open group (21.3% versus 15.1%, p = 0.004). The median number of harvested lymph nodes was higher in the laparoscopic approach (median 32 versus 28, p < 0.0001), and the proportion of positive resection margins was higher (p = 0.021) in the open group (5.9%) than in the laparoscopic group (3.2%). There was no significant difference between the groups in five-year overall survival rates (77.4% laparoscopic versus 75.2% open, p = 0.229). CONCLUSION: The adoption of the laparoscopic approach for gastric resection with D2 lymphadenectomy shortened the length of hospital stay and reduced postoperative complications with respect to the open approach. The five-year overall survival rate after laparoscopy was comparable to that for patients who underwent open D2 resection. The types of surgical approaches are not independent predictive factors for five-year overall survival.

2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2120456, 2021 08 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34379123

RESUMO

Importance: Prior studies on COVID-19 and pregnancy have reported higher rates of cesarean delivery and preterm birth and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional data encompassing a longer time period are needed. Objective: To examine characteristics and outcomes of a large US cohort of women who underwent childbirth with vs without COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study compared characteristics and outcomes of women (age ≥18 years) who underwent childbirth with vs without COVID-19 between March 1, 2020, and February 28, 2021, at 499 US academic medical centers or community affiliates. Follow-up was limited to in-hospital course and discharge destination. Childbirth was defined by clinical classification software procedural codes of 134-137. A diagnosis of COVID-19 was identified using International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis of U07.1. Data were analyzed from April 1 to April 30, 2021. Exposures: The presence of a COVID-19 diagnosis using ICD-10. Main Outcomes and Measures: Analyses compared demographic characteristics, gestational age, and comorbidities. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included hospital length of stay, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mechanical ventilation, and discharge status. Continuous variables were analyzed using t test, and categorical variables were analyzed using χ2. Results: Among 869 079 women, 18 715 (2.2%) had COVID-19, and 850 364 (97.8%) did not. Most women were aged 18 to 30 years (11 550 women with COVID-19 [61.7%]; 447 534 women without COVID-19 [52.6%]) and were White (8060 White women [43.1%] in the COVID-19 cohort; 499 501 White women (58.7%) in the non-COVID-19 cohort). There was no significant increase in cesarean delivery among women with COVID-19 (6088 women [32.5%] vs 273 810 women [32.3%]; P = .57). Women with COVID-19 were more likely to have preterm birth (3072 women [16.4%] vs 97 967 women [11.5%]; P < .001). Women giving birth with COVID-19, compared with women without COVID-19, had significantly higher rates of ICU admission (977 women [5.2%] vs 7943 women [0.9%]; odds ratio [OR], 5.84 [95% CI, 5.46-6.25]; P < .001), respiratory intubation and mechanical ventilation (275 women [1.5%] vs 884 women [0.1%]; OR, 14.33 [95% CI, 12.50-16.42]; P < .001), and in-hospital mortality (24 women [0.1%] vs 71 [<0.01%]; OR, 15.38 [95% CI, 9.68-24.43]; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: This retrospective cohort study found that women with COVID-19 giving birth had higher rates of mortality, intubation, ICU admission, and preterm birth than women without COVID-19.


Assuntos
COVID-19/mortalidade , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva/estatística & dados numéricos , Nascimento Prematuro/epidemiologia , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , COVID-19/terapia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Cesárea/estatística & dados numéricos , Bases de Dados Factuais , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Intubação Intratraqueal/estatística & dados numéricos , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/mortalidade , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/terapia , Estudos Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2 , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
3.
Am Surg ; : 31348211029843, 2021 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34240654

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Geriatric trauma patients (GTPs) represent a high-risk population for needing post-acute care, such as skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and long-term acute care hospitals (LTACs), due to a combination of traumatic injuries and baseline functional health. As there is currently no well-established tool for predicting these needs, we aimed to create a scoring tool that predicts disposition to SNFs/LTACs in GTPs. METHODS: The adult 2017 Trauma Quality Improvement Program database was divided at random into two equal sized sets (derivation and validation sets) of GTPs >65 years old. First, multiple logistic regression models were created to determine risk factors for discharge to a SNF/LTAC in admitted GTPs. Second, the weighted average and relative impact of each independent predictor was used to derive a DEPARTS (Discharge of Elderly Patients After Recent Trauma to SNF/LTAC) score. We then validated the score using the area under the receiver-operating curve (AROC). RESULTS: Of 66 479 patients in the derivation set, 36 944 (55.6%) were discharged to a SNF/LTAC. Number of comorbidities, fall mechanism, spinal cord injury, long bone fracture, and major surgery were each independent predictors for discharge to SNF/LTAC, and a DEPARTS score was derived with scores ranging from 0 to 19. The AROC for this was .74. In the validation set, 66 477 patients also had a SNF/LTAC discharge rate of 55.7%, and the AROC was .74. DISCUSSION: The DEPARTS score is a good predictor of SNF/LTAC discharge for GTPs. Future prospective studies are warranted to validate its accuracy and clinical utility in preventing delays in discharge.

4.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254066, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34242273

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to be a global threat, with tremendous resources invested into identifying risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness. The objective of this study was to analyze the characteristics and outcomes of male compared to female adults with COVID-19 who required hospitalization within US academic centers. METHODS: Using the Vizient clinical database, discharge records of adults with a diagnosis of COVID-19 between March 1, 2020 and November 30, 2020 were reviewed. Outcome measures included demographics, characteristics, length of hospital stay, rate of respiratory intubation and mechanical ventilation, and rate of in-hospital mortality of male vs female according to age, race/ethnicity, and presence of preexisting comorbidities. RESULTS: Among adults with COVID-19, 161,206 were male while 146,804 were female. Adult males with COVID-19 were more likely to have hypertension (62.1% vs 59.6%, p <0.001%), diabetes (39.2% vs 36.0%, p <0.001%), renal failure (22.3% vs 18.1%, p <0.001%), congestive heart failure (15.3% vs 14.6%, p <0.001%), and liver disease (5.9% vs 4.5%, p <0.001%). Adult females with COVID-19 were more likely to be obese (32.3% vs 25.7%, p<0.001) and have chronic pulmonary disease (23.7% vs 18.1%, p <0.001). Gender was significantly different among races (p<0.001), and there was a lower proportion of males versus females in African American patients with COVID-19. Comparison in outcomes of male vs. female adults with COVID-19 is depicted in Table 2. Compared to females, males with COVID-19 had a higher rate of in-hospital mortality (13.8% vs 10.2%, respectively, p <0.001); a higher rate of respiratory intubation (21.4% vs 14.6%, p <0.001); and a longer length of hospital stay (9.5 ± 12.5 days vs. 7.8 ± 9.8 days, p<0.001). In-hospital mortality analyzed according to age groups, race/ethnicity, payers, and presence of preexisting comorbidities consistently showed higher death rate among males compared to females (Table 2). Adult males with COVID-19 were associated with higher odds of mortality compared to their female counterparts across all age groups, with the effect being most pronounced in the 18-30 age group (OR, 3.02 [95% CI, 2.41-3.78]). CONCLUSION: This large analysis of 308,010 COVID-19 adults hospitalized at US academic centers showed that males have a higher rate of respiratory intubation and longer length of hospital stay compared to females and have a higher death rate even when compared across age groups, race/ethnicity, payers, and comorbidity.


Assuntos
COVID-19/tratamento farmacológico , COVID-19/mortalidade , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitalização , Caracteres Sexuais , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores Sexuais , Estados Unidos
5.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253767, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34170950

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: COVID-19's pulmonary manifestations are broad, ranging from pneumonia with no supplemental oxygen requirements to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with acute respiratory failure (ARF). In response, new oxygenation strategies and therapeutics have been developed, but their large-scale effects on outcomes in severe COVID-19 patients remain unknown. Therefore, we aimed to examine the trends in mortality, mechanical ventilation, and cost over the first six months of the pandemic for adult COVID-19 patients in the US who developed ARDS or ARF. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Vizient Clinical Data Base, a national database comprised of administrative, clinical, and financial data from academic medical centers, was queried for patients ≥ 18-years-old with COVID-19 and either ARDS or ARF admitted between 3/2020-8/2020. Demographics, mechanical ventilation, length of stay, total cost, mortality, and discharge status were collected. Mann-Kendall tests were used to assess for significant monotonic trends in total cost, mechanical ventilation, and mortality over time. Chi-square tests were used to compare mortality rates between March-May and June-August. 110,223 adult patients with COVID-19 ARDS or ARF were identified. Mean length of stay was 12.1±13.3 days and mean total cost was $35,991±32,496. Mechanical ventilation rates were 34.1% and in-hospital mortality was 22.5%. Mean cost trended downward over time (p = 0.02) from $55,275 (March) to $18,211 (August). Mechanical ventilation rates trended down (p<0.01) from 53.8% (March) to 20.3% (August). Overall mortality rates also decreased (p<0.01) from 28.4% (March) to 13.7% (August). Mortality rates in mechanically ventilated patients were similar over time (p = 0.45), but mortality in patients not requiring mechanical ventilation decreased from March-May compared to June-July (13.5% vs 4.6%, p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: This study describes the outcomes of a large cohort with COVID-19 ARDS or ARF and the subsequent decrease in cost, mechanical ventilation, and mortality over the first 6 months of the pandemic in the US.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Tempo de Internação , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , COVID-19/economia , COVID-19/mortalidade , COVID-19/terapia , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório/economia , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório/mortalidade , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório/terapia , Taxa de Sobrevida
6.
Surg Endosc ; 2021 Apr 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33871720

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the Surgeon General recommended limiting elective procedures to prepare for the COVID-19 surge. We hypothesize a consequence of COVID-19 is reduced operative volume across the country. We aim to examine changes in volume of common gastrointestinal operations during COVID-19, including elective, urgent/emergent, and cancer operations. We also evaluate if hospitals with more COVID-19 admissions were most impacted. METHODS: The Vizient database was used to determine monthly operative volume from November 2019 to June 2020 for elective operations (hiatal hernia repairs, bariatric surgery), urgent operations (cholecystectomies, appendectomies, inguinal hernia repairs), and cancer operations (colectomies, gastrectomies, esophagectomies). COVID-19 admissions per hospital were also determined. November 2019-January 2020 was defined as "pre-COVID." The monthly reduction in volume from pre-COVID was calculated for each operation. The top quartile (25%) of hospitals with the most COVID admissions were also evaluated separately from hospitals with fewer COVID cases. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. RESULTS: Data from 559 hospitals were analyzed. The volumes of all operations evaluated were significantly reduced during the pandemic except gastrectomies and esophagectomies for cancer. The greatest reduction in all operations was in April. In April, the volume of bariatric surgery reduced by 98% (P < 0.001), hiatal hernia repairs by 96% (P < 0.001), urgent cholecystectomies by 42% (P < 0.001), urgent inguinal hernia repairs by 40% (P < 0.001), urgent appendectomies by 24% (P < 0.001), and colectomies for cancer by 39% (P < 0.001). Hospitals with the most COVID-19 admissions had greater reductions in all operations than hospitals with fewer COVID cases. CONCLUSIONS: The coronavirus pandemic led to a significant reduction in volume of all gastrointestinal operations evaluated except gastrectomies and esophagectomies. While elective, non-cancer operations were most affected, urgent and some cancer operations also declined significantly. As COVID-19 continues to surge, Americans may suffer continued limited access to surgical care and a significant operative backlog may be forthcoming.

7.
Ann Surg ; 274(1): 40-44, 2021 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33843791

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study analyzed the outcomes of COVID-19 patients with ARDS who were managed with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) across 155 US academic centers. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: ECMO has been utilized in COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and refractory hypoxemia. Early case series with the use of ECMO in these patients reported high mortality exceeding 90%. METHODS: Using ICD-10 codes, data of patients with COVID-19 with ARDS, managed with ECMO between April and September 2020, were analyzed using the Vizient clinical database. Outcomes measured included in-hospital mortality, hospital and ICU length of stay, and direct cost. For comparative purposes, the outcome of a subset of COVID-19 patients aged between 18 and 64 years and managed with versus without ECMO were examined. RESULTS: 1,182 patients with COVID-19 and ARDS received ECMO. In-hospital mortality was 45.9%, mean length of stay was 36.8 ±â€Š24.9 days, and mean ICU stay was 29.1 ±â€Š17.3 days. In-hospital mortality according to age group was 25.2% for 1 to 30 years; 42.2% for 31 to 50 years; 53.2% for 51 to 64 years; and 73.7% for ≥65 years. A subset analysis of COVID-19 patients, aged 18 to 64 years with ARDS requiring mechanical ventilation and managed with (n = 1113) vs without (n = 16,343) ECMO, showed relatively high in-hospital mortality for both groups (44.6% with ECMO vs 37.9% without ECMO). CONCLUSIONS: In this large US study of patients with COVID-19 and ARDS managed with ECMO, the in-hospital mortality is high but much lower than initial reports. Future research is needed to evaluate which patients with COVID-19 and ARDS would benefit from ECMO.


Assuntos
Centros Médicos Acadêmicos , COVID-19/complicações , COVID-19/terapia , Oxigenação por Membrana Extracorpórea , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório/terapia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , COVID-19/mortalidade , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitalização , Humanos , Lactente , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório/mortalidade , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório/virologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
8.
Surg Endosc ; 35(6): 3214-3220, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33709228

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic and sometimes disabling disease. An important component in the surgical management of GERD is either laparoscopic or endoscopic restoration of the native gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV). Recently, a procedure combining laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair with transoral incisionless fundoplication (cTIF) was introduced. This relatively new operation is performed in collaboration between the gastrointestinal (GI) surgeon and the gastroenterologist. METHODS: By working together, both interventionalists gain new insight into the ideal GEFV by observing the same operation being performed from different perspectives. In the cTIF, the gastroenterologist learns from an external perspective, through the laparoscopic view, the importance of the crura in contributing to the antireflux barrier. Similarly, the GI surgeon gains understanding of the elements that define an effective and desirable GEFV through an endoscopic perspective. RESULTS: This collaboration with cTIF and seeing the procedure from different perspectives have led to our improved understanding of 1) factors contributing to an optimal surgically constructed GEFV and 2) the limitations of the GEFV constructed by the conventional laparoscopic total and partial fundoplications. CONCLUSION: The collaboration between GI surgery and gastroenterology with cTIF has led to an improved understanding in characteristics of an optimal antireflux barrier and allowed for a proposed technical modification of the current fundoplication technique to optimize the construct of the surgical GEFV.


Assuntos
Gastroenterologia , Refluxo Gastroesofágico , Laparoscopia , Fundoplicatura , Refluxo Gastroesofágico/cirurgia , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
9.
J Am Coll Surg ; 233(1): 21-27.e1, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33752982

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The US News & World Report (USNWR) annual ranking of the best hospitals for gastroenterology and gastrointestinal surgery offers direction to patients and healthcare providers, especially for recommendations on complex medical and surgical gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. The objective of this study was to examine the outcomes of complex GI cancer resections performed at USNWR top-ranked, compared to non-ranked, hospitals. STUDY DESIGN: Using the Vizient database, data for patients who underwent esophagectomy, gastrectomy, and pancreatectomy for malignancy between January and December 2018 were reviewed. Perioperative outcomes were analyzed according to USNWR rank status. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes include length of stay, mortality index (observed-to-expected mortality ratio), rate of serious complication, and cost. Secondary analysis was performed for outcomes of patients who developed serious complications. RESULTS: There were 3,054 complex GI cancer resections performed at 42 top-ranked hospitals vs 3,608 resections performed at 198 non-ranked hospitals. The mean annual case volume was 73 cases at top-ranked hospitals compared to 18 cases at non-ranked hospitals. Compared with non-ranked hospitals, top-ranked hospitals had lower in-hospital mortality (0.96% vs 2.26%, respectively, p < 0.001) and lower mortality index (0.71 vs 1.53, respectively). There were no significant differences in length of stay, rate of serious complications, or direct cost between groups. In patients who developed serious morbidity, top-ranked hospitals had a lower mortality compared with non-ranked hospitals (8.2% vs 16.8%, respectively, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Within the context of complex GI cancer resection, USNWR top-ranked hospitals performed a 4-fold higher case volume and were associated with improved outcomes. Patients with complex GI-related malignancies may benefit from seeking surgical care at high-volume regional USNWR top-ranked hospitals.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Esofágicas/cirurgia , Esofagectomia , Gastrectomia , Pancreatectomia , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/cirurgia , Neoplasias Gástricas/cirurgia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Bases de Dados Factuais/estatística & dados numéricos , Custos Diretos de Serviços/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias Esofágicas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Esofágicas/mortalidade , Esofagectomia/efeitos adversos , Esofagectomia/economia , Esofagectomia/mortalidade , Esofagectomia/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Gastrectomia/efeitos adversos , Gastrectomia/economia , Gastrectomia/mortalidade , Gastrectomia/estatística & dados numéricos , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitais/normas , Hospitais/estatística & dados numéricos , Hospitais com Alto Volume de Atendimentos/normas , Hospitais com Alto Volume de Atendimentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Tempo de Internação/economia , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pancreatectomia/efeitos adversos , Pancreatectomia/economia , Pancreatectomia/mortalidade , Pancreatectomia/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/mortalidade , Neoplasias Gástricas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Gástricas/mortalidade , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
10.
Mayo Clin Proc Innov Qual Outcomes ; 5(2): 516-519, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33686379

RESUMO

As the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic continues to impact hospital systems both in the United States and throughout the world, it is important to understand how the pandemic has impacted the volume of hospital admissions. Using the Vizient Inc (Chicago, IL) clinical databases, we analyzed inpatient hospital discharges from the general medicine service and its subspecialty services including cardiology, neonatology, pulmonary/critical care, oncology, psychiatry, and neurology between December 2019 and July 2020. We compared baseline discharge data to that of the first six months of the pandemic, from February to July 2020. We set the baseline as discharges by specialty from February 2019 through January 2020, averaged over the 12 months. Compared to baseline, by April 2020 the volume of general medicine hospital discharge was reduced by -20.2%, from 235,581 to 188,027 discharges. We found that while overall the number of discharges decreased from baseline, with a nadir in April 2020, pulmonary/critical care services had an increase in hospital discharge volume throughout the pandemic, from 7534 at baseline to 15,792 discharges in April. These findings are important for understanding health care use during the pandemic and ensuring proper allocation of resources and funding throughout the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.

12.
Surg Endosc ; 35(6): 2607-2612, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32488656

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Female representation in surgery and surgical subspecialties has increased over the last decade. Studies have shown a discrepancy in compensation in the field of surgery, and several groups have advocated for increasing transparency as a primary solution to decrease this gender salary gap in surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in compensation between genders in surgical specialties within a large academic healthcare system. METHODS: Using a public compensation database from January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2016, this retrospective observational study analyzed salaries of full-time faculty surgeons within a large multi-institutional academic healthcare system. Surgeons included those who were employed for the entirety of 2016 and were full-time faculty who were then stratified according to surgical specialty and rank. The median base and median total salaries were compared between male and female surgeons with adjustment for rank and surgical specialty. RESULTS: There were 170 surgeons from eight surgical subspecialties included in the study with 29% being female (n = 50). Overall, unadjusted and adjusted median total salaries were significantly lower for female compared to male surgeons by $121,578 and $45,904, respectively. The three subspecialties with the highest compensation had a median total salary of $558,998 and had a high male to female ratio (3.7 male to 1 female), whereas the three subspecialties with the lowest compensation had a median total salary of $376,174 and had a male to female ratio of 1.5 male to 1 female. CONCLUSIONS: In a large academic healthcare system with transparent and publicly accessible salaries, the gender compensation gap in surgery persists. In conjunction with transparency, future academic institutions should consider a value-based, objective compensation plan with personal and systemic introspection of traditional gender biases, in efforts to circumvent the impact of gender on salary.

13.
Surg Endosc ; 35(4): 1872-1878, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32394166

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The use of laparoscopic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer remains controversial. Our objective was to compare outcomes of laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) vs. open total gastrectomy (OTG) for gastric adenocarcinoma using a national cancer database. METHODS: The National Cancer Database (2010-2014) was analyzed for total gastrectomy cases performed for gastric adenocarcinoma. Patient demographics and surgical outcomes were stratified by stage and compared based on laparoscopic vs. open surgical approach. Primary outcome measures included 30-day and 90-day mortality and Kaplan-Meier curves to estimate long-term survival. RESULTS: There were 2584 cases analyzed, including 592 (22.9%) stage I, 710 (27.5%) stage II, and 1282 (49.6%) stage III cases. The distribution of LTG vs. OTG cases was 156 (26.4%) vs. 436 (73.6%) for stage I, 163 (23.0%) vs. 547 (77.0%) for stage II, and 241 (18.8%) vs. 1041 (81.2%) for stage III. For all stages analyzed, there was no difference between laparoscopic vs. open approach for adjusted 30-day mortality (stage I: adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.52, p = 0.75; stage II: AOR 1.36, p > 0.99; stage III: AOR 0.46, p = 0.29) or 90-day mortality (stage I: AOR 0.46, p = 0.99; stage II: AOR 1.17, p = 0.99; stage III: 0.57, p = 0.29). There was no difference between LTG vs. OTG 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimated survival curves for any stage (stage I: p = 0.20; stage II: p = 0.83; stage III: p = 0.46). When compared to OTG, LTG had a similar hazard ratio (HR) for mortality (HR 0.89 p = 0.20). CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic total gastrectomy and OTG have comparable 30-day mortality, 90-day mortality, and long-term survival.

14.
J Invest Surg ; 34(3): 270-275, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31218891

RESUMO

Purpose: Several single-center studies have demonstrated same-day discharge (SDD) to be safe in adults undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) for non-perforated appendicitis (NPA). The proportion of SDD appendectomy patients nationally is unknown. We sought to identify the incidence of SDD among patients undergoing LA after NPA hypothesizing a similar risk of complications including superficial surgical site infections (SSSIs), post-operative intra-abdominal abscess, and 30-day readmission rates. Materials and methods: The 2016-2017 ACS-NSQIP Procedure-Targeted Appendectomy database was queried for adults undergoing LA with no intraoperative findings of perforation or abscess. Patients with SDD were compared to those discharged within two days. A multivariable logistic regression model was used for analysis. Results: From 16,931 patients undergoing LA, 3988 (23.6%) were SDD. Compared to those with a longer hospital stay, patients with SDD were of similar age (p = 0.29) and less likely to have a contaminated wound-class (58.5% vs. 62.6%, p < 0.001). After adjusting for age and comorbidities, patients with SDD had a similar risk of 30-day readmission (p = 0.088) and post-operative abscess (p = 0.739) but lower risk of SSSI (OR: 0.48, 0.28-0.82, p = 0.008), compared to those discharged within two days. Conclusions: Nearly a quarter of patients with NPA undergoing LA are discharged the same day. The risk of 30-day readmission is similar compared to those with a longer index hospital stay. Interestingly, the risk of SSSI is lower, however this may be related to differences in wound classification and/or selection bias. Regardless, SDD for NPA patients appears safe and should be utilized whenever possible.

15.
J Am Coll Surg ; 232(3): 309-318, 2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33346082

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) is an endoscopic alternative for the treatment of GERD. However, TIF does not address the hiatal hernia (HH). We present a novel approach with a laparoscopic HH repair followed by same-session TIF, coined concomitant transoral incisionless fundoplication (cTIF). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and feasibility of cTIF in a collaborative approach between Gastroenterology and surgery. STUDY DESIGN: Patients with confirmed GERD and >2 cm HH who underwent cTIF between 2018 and 2020 were included. Symptoms were assessed using the Reflux Disease Questionnaire, GERD Health-Related Quality of Life Index, and the Reflux Symptom Index pre and post cTIF. One-way ANOVA and paired samples t-test were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Sixty patients underwent cTIF (53% were men, mean age was 59.3 years) with 100% technical success. Mean ± SD HH measurement on endoscopy was 2.9 ± 1.5 cm. Scores on Reflux Disease Questionnaire for symptom frequency and symptom severity improved significantly from before to 6 months after cTIF (17.4 to 4.72; p < 0.01 and 16.7 to 4.56; p < 0.05, respectively). According to the GERD Health-Related Quality of Life Index, significant decreases were seen post cTIF in heartburn (23.26 to 7.37; p < 0.01) and regurgitation (14.26 to 0; p = 0.05). Reflux Symptom Index similarly decreased after cTIF (17.7 to 8.1 post cTIF; p < 0.01). Mean DeMeester score decreased from 43.7 to 4.9 and acid exposure time decreased from 12.7% to 1.28% post cTIF (p = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: We present a novel multidisciplinary approach to GERD using a combined endoscopic and surgical approach with close collaboration between Gastroenterology and surgery. Our results suggest that cTIF is safe and effective in reducing reflux symptoms in a large spectrum of GERD patients.


Assuntos
Fundoplicatura/métodos , Refluxo Gastroesofágico/cirurgia , Hérnia Hiatal/cirurgia , Herniorrafia/métodos , Laparoscopia/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Seguimentos , Refluxo Gastroesofágico/complicações , Refluxo Gastroesofágico/diagnóstico , Hérnia Hiatal/complicações , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Resultado do Tratamento
16.
Am Surg ; : 3134820960077, 2020 Dec 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33295195

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Appendiceal cancer (AC) is a rare malignancy usually diagnosed incidentally after appendectomy. Risk factors for AC are poorly understood. We sought to provide a descriptive analysis for patients with AC discovered after appendectomy for acute appendicitis (AA). METHODS: The 2016-2017 American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Procedure-Targeted Appendectomy database was queried for adult patients who underwent appendectomy for image-suspected AA. Patients with pathology consistent with AA were compared to patients found to have AC. A multivariable logistic regression model was used for analysis. RESULTS: From 21 058 patients, 203 (1.0%) were found to have AC on pathology. Compared to patients with AA, patients with AC were older (median, 48 vs. 40 years old, P < .001). The AA group had a similar rate of perforated appendix compared to the AC group (16.3% vs. 13.4% P = .32). After adjusting for covariates, associated risk factors for AC were: age ≥65 years old (odds ratio (OR) 2.25, 1.5-3.38, P < .001), absence of leukocytosis (OR 1.58, 1.16-2.17, P = .004), and operative time ≥1 hour (OR 1.57, 1.14-2.16, P = .006). Gender, race, and history of smoking were not independent associated risk factors for AC. CONCLUSION: The incidence of AC after appendectomy for suspected AA is approximately 1% in a large national analysis. These factors may be used to help identify patients at higher risk for AC after appendectomy.

17.
Am Surg ; : 3134820956329, 2020 Nov 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33233922

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The impact of preoperative chemotherapy/radiation on esophageal anastomotic leaks (ALs) and the correlation between AL severity and mortality risk have not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that lower severity ALs have a similar risk of mortality compared to those without ALs, and preoperative chemotherapy/radiation increases AL risk. METHODS: The 2016-2017 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program's procedure-targeted esophagectomy database was queried for patients undergoing any esophagectomy for cancer. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed for risk of ALs. RESULTS: From 2042 patients, 280 (13.7%) had ALs. AL patients requiring intervention had increased mortality risk including those requiring reoperation, interventional procedure, and medical therapy (P < .05). AL patients requiring no intervention had similar mortality risk compared to patients without ALs (P > .05). Preoperative chemotherapy/radiation was not predictive of ALs (P > .05). CONCLUSION: Preoperative chemotherapy/radiation does not contribute to risk for ALs after esophagectomy. There is a stepwise increased risk of 30-day mortality for ALs requiring increased invasiveness of treatment.

18.
Am Surg ; 86(10): 1411-1417, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33074734

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Anastomotic leak is a dreaded complication following esophagectomy. Conventional management for leaks includes invasive reoperation and even gastrointestinal diversion. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine our contemporary outcome of using endoscopic esophageal stenting as primary therapy for management of anastomotic leak following minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE). METHODS: We reviewed data on 11 patients who developed an esophageal leak following 111 MIE between January 2011 and December 2019. Of the 11 anastomotic leaks, 10 patients had an anastomotic disruption and underwent endoscopic esophageal stenting as primary therapy for management of leaks, while 1 patient had an anastomotic disruption complicated by an associated tracheoesophageal fistula that required surgical reoperation and subsequent colonic interposition. Main outcome measures focused on the 10 patients who were managed with endoscopic stenting, including length of hospital stay following leak management, need for thoracotomy or gastrointestinal diversion for leak, stent complications, and leak-associated mortality. RESULTS: Of the 10 patients who underwent endoscopic esophageal stenting as primary therapy for management of leaks, there were 8 males with a median age of 66 years. The median time to diagnosis of anastomotic leak was 10 days postoperatively. One of the ten patients also underwent percutaneous drain placement, while none of the patients required thoracotomy. Median duration of stent placement was 39 (range, 29-105) days. Median length of stay after stent placement was 10 (range, 4-43) days. The median number of stent exchange was 1 (range, 1-3) stent. Gastrointestinal continuity was maintained in all patients. The 90-day leak-associated mortality was 9.1% (1 of 11 patients). CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic stenting is an effective primary therapy in the management of postesophagectomy leak and avoids the need for an invasive, reoperative thoracotomy or gastrointestinal diversion procedure.


Assuntos
Fístula Anastomótica/terapia , Esofagectomia , Esofagoscopia/métodos , Stents , Idoso , Anastomose Cirúrgica , Feminino , Humanos , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino
19.
Am Surg ; 86(5): 493-498, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32684037

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Isolated diaphragm injury (IDI) occurs in up to 30% of penetrating left thoracoabdominal injuries. Laparoscopic abdominal procedures have demonstrated improved outcome including decreased postoperative pain and length of stay (LOS) compared to open surgery. However, there is a paucity of data on this topic for penetrating IDI. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and outcome of laparoscopic diaphragmatic repair versus open diaphragmatic repair (LDR vs ODR) of IDI. METHODS: The Trauma Quality Improvement Program (2010-2016) was queried for patients with IDI who underwent ODR versus LDR. A bivariate analysis using Pearson chi-square and Mann-Whitney test was performed to determine LOS among the two groups. RESULTS: From 2039 diaphragm injuries, 368 patients had IDI; 281 patients (76.4%) underwent ODR and 87 (23.6%) underwent LDR. Compared to LDR, the ODR patients were older (median, 31 vs 25 years, P < .001) and had a higher injury severity score (mean, 11.2 vs 9.6, P = .03) but had similar rates of intensive care unit LOS, unplanned return to the operating room, ventilator days, and complications (P > .05). Patients undergoing ODR had a longer LOS (5 vs 4 days, P = .01), compared to LDR. There were no deaths in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Trauma patients presenting with IDI undergoing ODR had a longer hospital LOS compared to patients undergoing LDR with no difference in complications or mortality. Therefore, we recommend when possible an LDR should be employed to decrease hospital LOS. Further research is needed to examine other benefits of laparoscopy such as postoperative pain, incisional hernia, and wound-related complications.


Assuntos
Diafragma/lesões , Diafragma/cirurgia , Laparoscopia , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Ferimentos Penetrantes/cirurgia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
20.
Surgery ; 168(2): 322-327, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32461001

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The number of geriatric patients is expected to grow 3-fold over the next 30 years, and as many as 50% of the surgeries done in the United States may occur in geriatric patients. Geriatric patients often have increased comorbidities and more often present in a delayed manner for acute appendicitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes between geriatric patients and younger patients undergoing appendectomy, hypothesizing that geriatric patients will have a higher risk of abscess and/or perforation, conversion to open surgery, postoperative intra-abdominal abscess, and 30-day readmission. METHODS: The 2016 to 2017 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Procedure Targeted Appendectomy database was queried for patients with preoperative image findings consistent with acute appendicitis. Geriatric patients (age ≥65 years old) were compared with younger patients (age <65 years old). A multivariable logistic regression model was used for analysis. RESULTS: From 21,586 patients undergoing appendectomy, 2,060 (9.5%) were geriatric patients. Compared with the younger cohort, geriatric patients were less likely to have leukocytosis (59.0% vs 65.8%, P < .001) and more likely to have a tumor and/or malignancy involving the appendix on final pathology (2.0% vs 0.8%, P < .001), an unplanned laparoscopic conversion to open surgery (4.2% vs 1.5%, P < .001), and 30-day readmission (7.0% vs 3.3%, P < .001). Geriatric patients had a longer median length of stay (2 vs 1 days, P < .001) and higher mortality rate (0.5% vs <0.1%, P < .001). After adjusting for covariates, there was an increased associated risk of intraoperative abscess and/or perforation (odds ratio 2.23, 2.01-2.48, P < .001) and postoperative intra-abdominal abscess (odds ratio 1.43, 1.12-1.83, P = .005) but no difference in associated risk for mortality (odds ratio 2.56, 0.79-8.25, P = .116), compared with the younger cohort. CONCLUSION: Nearly 10% of laparoscopic appendectomies are done on geriatric patients with geriatric patients having a higher rate of conversion to open surgery and tumor and/or malignancy on final pathology. Geriatric patients have an associated increased risk of intraoperative perforation and/or abscess and postoperative intra-abdominal abscess but have similar risk for mortality compared with nongeriatric patients undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy.


Assuntos
Abscesso Abdominal/epidemiologia , Apendicectomia , Apendicite/cirurgia , Idoso , Apendicectomia/efeitos adversos , Neoplasias do Apêndice/epidemiologia , Apendicite/mortalidade , Conversão para Cirurgia Aberta/estatística & dados numéricos , Bases de Dados Factuais , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Laparoscopia , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Readmissão do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
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