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1.
Heart Vessels ; 2021 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34599380

RESUMO

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is commonly associated with left heart disease. In this retrospective study, using the database of a clinical study conducted between January 2008 and July 2008, the phenotypes of PH were classified using non-invasive cardiac acoustic biomarkers (CABs) and compared with classification by echocardiography. Records with same-day measurement of acoustic cardiography and right heart catheterization (RHC) parameters were included; cases with congenital heart disease were excluded. Using the RHC measurements, PH was classified as pre-capillary PH (Prec-PH), isolated post-capillary PH (Ipc-PH), and combined pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (Cpc-PH). The first, second, third, and fourth heart sounds (S1, S2, S3, and S4) were quantified as CABs (intensity, complexity, and strength). Forty subjects were selected: 5 had Prec-PH, 5 had Ipc-PH, 8 had Cpc-PH, and 22 had No-PH. CABs were significantly correlated with RHC measurements, with significant differences among phenotypes. Phenotype classification was performed using various CABs, and the diagnostic performance as assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.674-0.720 for Prec-PH, 0.657-0.807 for Ipc-PH, and 0.742 for Cpc-PH. High negative and low positive predictive values for phenotype identification were observed. CABs may provide an ambulatory measurement method with home-monitoring friendliness which is more convenient than standard examinations to identify presence of PH and its phenotypes.

2.
ESC Heart Fail ; 2021 Oct 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34612008

RESUMO

AIMS: Previous studies have suggested that low serum albumin (LSA) at admission for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is associated with adverse in-hospital outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LSA in the remote phase after AMI is prognostic for long-term outcomes. METHODS AND RESULTS: This was a single-centre, retrospective study of consecutive patients admitted for AMI from 2008 to 2016. Serum albumin concentrations were measured serially at admission and 1 year after discharge in Japanese patients. Occurrence of a composite of hospitalization for heart failure and cardiovascular death was the primary endpoint. The prognostic impact of remote LSA, defined as a serum albumin level < 3.8 g/dL at 1 year after discharge, was investigated with a multivariate-adjusted Cox model. Among 1424 subjects analysed, 289 (20.3%) had LSA at admission, and 165 (11.6%) had LSA at 1 year after discharge. During follow-up (median: 4.1 years), the primary endpoint occurred in 31/165 (18.8%) patients with remote LSA and 42/1259 (3.3%) patients without it [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR), 2.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32 to 5.72; P = 0.007]. The all-cause death rate was 29.7% (49/165) in patients with remote LSA and 4.3% (54/1259) in patients without it (aHR, 4.02; 95% CI, 2.36 to 6.87; P < 0.001). The prognostic impact of remote LSA was consistent across albumin status in the acute phase of AMI. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of albumin status in the acute phase of AMI, LSA in the remote phase after AMI was significantly associated with long-term adverse outcomes.

4.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 78(15): e117, 2021 Oct 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34620418
5.
J Cardiol ; 2021 Sep 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34625315

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity is reported to be a predictor of adverse clinical events in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Western countries. However, there are limited data reported regarding the prognostic impact of obesity in Asian patients. We investigated the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and in-hospital outcomes in 580 Japanese patients with cardiovascular disease and/or risk factors and who were admitted for COVID-19 infection using data from 49 hospitals in Japan. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Clinical Outcomes of COVID-19 Infection in Hospitalized Patients with Cardiovascular Disease and/or Risk Factors (CLAVIS-COVID) registry. BMI was classified into four groups accordance with the definition of the Japan Society for the Study of Obesity, as follows: underweight, <18.5 kg/m2; normal range, 18.5 to <25 kg/m2; pre-obese, 25 to 30 kg/m2; and obese, ≥30 kg/m2. RESULTS: In-hospital death occurred in 15.0% (n=87) of the patients and intubation was performed for 139 (24.0%) patients. In a multivariate analysis, we found a significant association between higher BMI and in-hospital mortality [underweight: hazard ratio (HR) 0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.97; p=0.041; pre-obese: HR 1.46, 95%CI 0.84-2.55; p=0.18; and obese: HR 3.28, 95%CI 1.34-8.02; p=0.009 vs. normal range]. In contrast, the association between BMI and the intubation rate was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity was associated with a stepwise increase in the risk of in-hospital mortality in Japanese patients with COVID-19 infection. The threshold BMI for the increased risk of a worse outcome was 30, which was much lower in comparison to Western countries.

6.
Hypertens Res ; 2021 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34650193

RESUMO

In 2020, 199 papers were published in Hypertension Research. Many excellent papers have contributed to progress in research on hypertension. Here, our editorial members have summarized eleven topics from published work and discussed current topics in depth. We hope you enjoy our special feature, Annual Reports on Hypertension Research.

7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34491362

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is increasing in prevalence worldwide. We explored whether adults with trace and positive proteinuria were at a high risk for incident HF compared with those with negative proteinuria using a nationwide epidemiological database. METHODS: This is an obserevational cohort study using the JMDC Claims Database collected between 2005 and 2020. This is a population-based sample (n = 1,021,943; median age [interquartile range], 44 [37-52] years; 54.8% men). No participants had a known history of cardiovascular disease. Each participant was categorized into three groups according to the urine dipstick test results: negative proteinuria (n = 902,273), trace proteinuria (n = 89,599), and positive proteinuria (≥1+) (n = 30,071). The primary outcome was HF. The secondary outcomes were myocardial infarction, stroke, and atrial fibrillation. We performed multivariable Cox regression analyses to identify the association between the proteinuria category and incient HF and other cardiovascular disease events. RESULTS: Over a mean follow-up of 1,150 ± 920 days, 17,182 incident HF events occurred. After multivariable adjustment, hazard ratios (HRs) for HF events were 1.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.15) and 1.59 (95% CI, 1.49-1.70) for trace proteinuria and positive proteinuria vs. negative proteinuria, respectively. This association was present irrespective of clinical characteristics. A stepwise increase in the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and atrial fibrillation with proteinuria category was also observed. Our primary results were confirmed in participants after multiple imputation for missing values and in those having no medications for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Discriminative predictive value for HF events improved by adding the results of urine dipstick test to traditional risk factors (net reclassification improvement 0.0497, 95% CI 0.0346-0.0648, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Not only positive proteinuria but also trace proteinuria was associated with a greater incidence of HF in the general population. Semiquantitative assessment of proteinuria would be informative for the risk stratification of HF.

8.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 175, 2021 09 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34479543

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors reduce the risk of a deterioration in heart failure (HF) and mortality in patients with a broad range of cardiovascular risks. Recent guidelines recommend considering the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and HF, irrespective of their glycemic control status and background use of other glucose-lowering agents including metformin. However, only a small number of studies have investigated whether the effects of SGLT2 inhibitor in these patients differ by the concomitant use of other glucose-lowering agents. METHODS: This was a post-hoc analysis of the CANDLE trial (UMIN000017669), an investigator-initiated, multicenter, open-label, randomized, controlled trial. The primary aim of the analysis was to assess the effect of 24 weeks of treatment with canagliflozin, relative to glimepiride, on N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration in patients with T2D and clinically stable chronic HF. In the present analysis, the effect of canagliflozin on NT-proBNP concentration was assessed in the patients according to their baseline use of other glucose-lowering agents. RESULTS: Almost all patients in the CANDLE trial presented as clinically stable (New York Heart Association class I to II), with about 70% of participants having HF with a preserved ejection fraction phenotype (defined as a left ventricular ejection fraction ≥ 50%) at baseline. Of the 233 patients randomized to either canagliflozin (100 mg daily) or glimepiride (starting dose 0.5 mg daily), 85 (36.5%) had not been taking any glucose-lowering agents at baseline (naïve). Of the 148 patients who had been taking at least one glucose-lowering agent at baseline (non-naïve), 44 (29.7%) and 127 (85.8%) had received metformin or a dipeptidyl dipeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, respectively. The group ratio (canagliflozin vs. glimepiride) of proportional changes in the geometric means of NT-proBNP concentration was 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76 to 1.18, p = 0.618) for the naïve subgroup, 0.92 (95% CI 0.79 to1.07, p = 0.288) for the non-naïve subgroup, 0.90 (95% CI 0.68 to 1.20, p = 0.473) for the metformin-user subgroup, and 0.91 (95% CI 0.77 to 1.08, p = 0.271) for the DPP-4 inhibitor-user subgroup. No heterogeneity in the effect of canagliflozin, relative to glimepiride, on NT-proBNP concentration was observed in the non-naïve subgroups compared to that in the naïve subgroup. CONCLUSION: The impact of canagliflozin treatment on NT-proBNP concentration appears to be independent of the background use of diabetes therapy in the patient population examined. Trial registration University Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registry, number 000017669. Registered on May 25, 2015.

9.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 186, 2021 Sep 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34521417

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Identification of the effective subtypes of treatment for heart failure (HF) is an essential topic for optimizing treatment of the disorder. We hypothesized that the beneficial effect of SGLT2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) on the levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) might depend on baseline diastolic function. To elucidate the effects of SGLT2i in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and chronic HF we investigated, as a post-hoc sub-study of the CANDLE trial, the effects of canagliflozin on NT-proBNP levels from baseline to 24 weeks, with the data stratified by left ventricular (LV) diastolic function at baseline. METHODS: Patients (n = 233) in the CANDLE trial were assigned randomly to either an add-on canagliflozin (n = 113) or glimepiride treatment groups (n = 120). The primary endpoint was a comparison between the two groups of the changes from baseline to 24 weeks in NT-pro BNP levels, stratified according to baseline ventricular diastolic function. RESULTS: The change in the geometric mean of NT-proBNP level from baseline to 24 weeks was 0.98 (95% CI 0.89-1.08) in the canagliflozin group and 1.07 (95% CI 0.97-1.18) in the glimepiride group. The ratio of change with canagliflozin/glimepiride was 0.93 (95% CI 0.82-1.05). Responder analyses were used to investigate the response of an improvement in NT-proBNP levels. Although the subgroup analyses for septal annular velocity (SEP-e') showed no marked heterogeneity in treatment effect, the subgroup with an SEP-e' < 4.7 cm/s indicated there was an association with lower NT-proBNP levels in the canagliflozin group compared with that in the glimepiride group (ratio of change with canagliflozin/glimepiride (0.83, 95% CI 0.66-1.04). CONCLUSIONS: In the subgroup with a lower LV diastolic function, canagliflozin showed a trend of reduced NT-pro BNP levels compared to that observed with glimepiride. This study suggests that the beneficial effects of canagliflozin treatment may be different in subgroups classified by the severity of LV diastolic dysfunction.

10.
Am J Cardiol ; 158: 132-138, 2021 11 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34481589

RESUMO

Onco-cardiology is the emerging field, and the concept of shared risk factor holds an important position in this field. The increasing prevalence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in young adults is a critical epidemiological issue. Although metabolic syndrome, which is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is known to be associated with CRC incidence in middle-aged and elderly individuals, it is unclear whether this association is present in young adults. We assessed whether metabolic syndrome was associated with CRC events in young adults (aged <50 years), and whether the association differed by the definition of metabolic syndrome. We retrospectively analyzed 902,599 adults (20 to 49 years of age) enrolled in the JMDC Claims Database which is a nationwide epidemiological database in Japan between January 2005 and August 2018. Participants who had a history of CRC, colorectal polyps, or inflammatory bowel disease were excluded. Study participants were categorized into 2 groups according to the presence of metabolic syndrome, defined using the Japanese criteria (waist circumference ≥85 cm for men and ≥90 cm for women, and ≥2 metabolic parameters including elevated blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or elevated fasting plasma glucose). Clinical outcomes were collected between January 2005 and August 2018. The primary outcome was CRC of any stage. Median (interquartile range) age was 41 (37 to 45), and 55.4% were men. Over a median follow-up of 1,008 (429 to 1,833) days, there were 1,884 incidences of CRC. After multivariable adjustment, the hazard ratio (HR) of metabolic syndrome for CRC events was 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07 to 1.49). Cox regression analysis after multiple imputation for missing values showed that metabolic syndrome was associated with CRC incidence (HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.56). Metabolic syndrome was also associated with a higher incidence of CRC in individuals with a follow-up period of ≥365 days (HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.60). This association was observed when metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation criteria (HR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.55) and the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.72). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome was associated with a higher incidence of CRC among individuals aged <50 years. These results could be informative for risk stratification of subsequent CRC among young adults.

11.
Circ J ; 2021 Sep 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34556591

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine whether disease severity varied according to whether coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients had multiple or single cardiovascular diseases and risk factors (CVDRFs).Methods and Results:COVID-19 patients with single (n=281) or multiple (n=412) CVDRFs were included retrospectively. Multivariable logistic regression showed no significant difference in the risk of in-hospital death between groups, but patients with multiple CVDRFs had a significantly higher risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio: 1.75, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-2.81). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 patients with multiple CVDRFs have a higher risk of complications than those with a single CDVRF.

12.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e052708, 2021 09 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34497086

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Predictive algorithms to inform risk management decisions are needed for patients with COVID-19, although the traditional risk scores have not been adequately assessed in Asian patients. We aimed to evaluate the performance of a COVID-19-specific prediction model, the 4C (Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium) Mortality Score, along with other conventional critical care risk models in Japanese nationwide registry data. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Hospitalised patients with COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease or coronary risk factors from January to May 2020 in 49 hospitals in Japan. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Two different types of outcomes, in-hospital mortality and a composite outcome, defined as the need for invasive mechanical ventilation and mortality. RESULTS: The risk scores for 693 patients were tested by predicting in-hospital mortality for all patients and composite endpoint among those not intubated at baseline (n=659). The number of events was 108 (15.6%) for mortality and 178 (27.0%) for composite endpoints. After missing values were multiply imputed, the performance of the 4C Mortality Score was assessed and compared with three prediction models that have shown good discriminatory ability (RISE UP score, A-DROP score and the Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (REMS)). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the 4C Mortality Score was 0.84 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.88) for in-hospital mortality and 0.78 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.81) for the composite endpoint. It showed greater discriminatory ability compared with other scores, except for the RISE UP score, for predicting in-hospital mortality (AUC: 0.82, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.86). Similarly, the 4C Mortality Score showed a positive net reclassification improvement index over the A-DROP and REMS for mortality and over all three scores for the composite endpoint. The 4C Mortality Score model showed good calibration, regardless of outcome. CONCLUSIONS: The 4C Mortality Score performed well in an independent external COVID-19 cohort and may enable appropriate disposition of patients and allocation of medical resources.Trial registration number UMIN000040598.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Doenças Cardiovasculares , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34371853

RESUMO

Data on the association between body mass index (BMI) and stroke are scarce. We aimed to examine the association between BMI and incident stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) and to clarify the relationship between underweight, overweight, and obesity and stroke risk stratified by sex. We analyzed the JMDC Claims Database between January 2005 and April 2020 including 2,740,778 healthy individuals (Median (interquartile) age, 45 (38-53) years; 56.2% men; median (interquartile) BMI, 22.3 (20.2-24.8) kg/m2). None of the participants had a history of cardiovascular disease. Each participant was categorized as underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m2), or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). We investigated the association of BMI with incidence stroke in men and women using the Cox regression model. We used restricted cubic spline (RCS) functions to identify the association of BMI as a continuous parameter with incident stroke. The incidence (95% confidence interval) of total stroke, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke was 32.5 (32.0-32.9), 28.1 (27.6-28.5), and 5.5 (5.3-5.7) per 10,000 person-years in men, whereas 25.7 (25.1-26.2), 22.5 (22.0-23.0), and 4.0 (3.8-4.2) per 10,000 person-years in women, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that overweight and obesity were associated with a higher incidence of total and ischemic stroke in both men and women. Underweight, overweight, and obesity were associated with a higher hemorrhagic stroke incidence in men, but not in women. Restricted cubic spline showed that the risk of ischemic stroke increased in a BMI dose-dependent manner in both men and women, whereas there was a U-shaped relationship between BMI and the hemorrhagic stroke risk in men. In conclusion, overweight and obesity were associated with a greater incidence of stroke and ischemic stroke in both men and women. Furthermore, underweight, overweight, and obesity were associated with a higher hemorrhagic stroke risk in men. Our results would help in the risk stratification of future stroke based on BMI.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , AVC Hemorrágico/epidemiologia , Obesidade/complicações , Sobrepeso/complicações , Magreza/complicações , Adulto , Bases de Dados Factuais , Feminino , Fatores de Risco de Doenças Cardíacas , AVC Hemorrágico/etiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Japão/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Sobrepeso/epidemiologia , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores Sexuais , Magreza/epidemiologia
16.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 160, 2021 07 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34332584

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The most recent treatment guidelines for type 2 diabetes (T2D) recommend sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors should be considered preferentially in patients with T2D with either a high cardiovascular risk or with cardiovascular disease (CVD), regardless of their diabetes status and prior use of conventional metformin therapy. Whether the therapeutic impact of SGLT2 inhibitors on clinical parameters differs according to the use of metformin therapy however remains unclear. METHODS: The study was a post hoc analysis of the EMBLEM trial (UMIN000024502). All participants (n = 105; women 31.4%; mean age 64.8 years) had both T2D and CVD and were randomized to either 24 weeks of empagliflozin 10 mg daily or placebo. Analysis of the data assessed the effect of empagliflozin on changes from baseline to 24 weeks in glycemic and non-glycemic clinical parameters, according to the baseline use of metformin. RESULTS: Overall, 53 (50.5%) patients received baseline metformin. In the 52 patients treated with empagliflozin (48.1% with baseline metformin), the decrease in systolic blood pressure from baseline levels was greater in patients receiving metformin, compared to that observed in metformin-naïve patients (group difference - 8.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) - 17.7 to 0.6 mmHg], p = 0.066). Reduction in body mass index (BMI) was significantly greater in patients receiving baseline metformin, relative to nonusers (- 0.54 [95% CI - 1.07 to - 0.01] kg/m2, p = 0.047). The group ratio (baseline metformin users vs. nonusers) of proportional changes in the geometric mean of high-sensitivity Troponin-I (hs-TnI) was 0.74 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.92, p = 0.009). No obvious differences were observed in glycemic parameters (fasting plasma glucose, glycohemoglobin, and glycoalbumin) between the baseline metformin users and nonusers. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest 24 weeks of empagliflozin treatment was associated with an improvement in glycemic control, irrespective of the baseline use of metformin therapy. The effects of empagliflozin on reductions in BMI and hs-TnI were more apparent in patients who received baseline metformin therapy, compared to that observed in metformin-naïve patients. Trial registration University Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registry, number 000024502.

17.
Support Care Cancer ; 2021 Aug 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34378082

RESUMO

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cancer often share risk factors and influence each other's pathological features. In addition to the unfavorable effects of cancer on the cardiovascular system, the adverse effects of cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiation, have also been determined. In particular, vascular toxic effects associated with cancer therapy (vasospasm, thrombosis formation, and promotion of arteriosclerosis), which are the second most common complications after myocardial adverse effects, are usually managed after the onset of vascular diseases, because screening and predictive methods are yet to be fully established. However, the onset of these vascular complications has a major influence on the implementation of cancer therapy, resulting in worsening of the quality of cancer care and prognosis of patients with cancer. It is therefore necessary to establish clinical strategies for detecting the vascular adverse effects of cancer therapy and evaluating vascular function during cancer care. In this article, we discuss the expected role of vascular function assessment using physiological testing tools for early detection of vascular adverse effects caused by cancer therapy and also preemptive assessment of vascular function prior to this treatment being initiated.

18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34378781

RESUMO

CONTEXT: Although diabetes mellitus (DM) was reported to be associated with incident colorectal cancer (CRC), the detailed association between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and incident CRC has not been fully understood. OBJECTIVE: We assessed whether hyperglycemia is associated with a higher risk for CRC. DESIGN: Analyses were conducted using the JMDC Claims Database [n = 1 441 311; median age (interquartile range), 46 (40-54) years; 56.6% men). None of the participants were taking antidiabetic medication or had a history of CRC, colorectal polyps, or inflammatory bowel disease. Participants were categorized as normal FPG (FPG level < 100 mg/dL; 1 125 647 individuals), normal-high FPG (FPG level = 100-109 mg/dL; 210 365 individuals), impaired fasting glucose (IFG; FPG level = 110-125 mg/dL; 74 836 individuals), and DM (FPG level ≥ 126 mg/dL; 30 463 individuals). RESULTS: Over a mean follow-up of 1137 ± 824 days, 5566 CRC events occurred. After multivariable adjustment, the hazard ratios for CRC events were 1.10 (95% CI 1.03-1.18) for normal-high FPG, 1.24 (95% CI 1.13-1.37) for IFG, and 1.36 (95% CI 1.19-1.55) for DM vs normal FPG. We confirmed this association in sensitivity analyses excluding those with a follow-up of< 365 days and obese participants. CONCLUSION: The risk of CRC increased with elevated FPG category. FPG measurements would help to identify people at high-risk for future CRC.

19.
ESC Heart Fail ; 8(5): 3748-3759, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34268904

RESUMO

AIMS: White blood cell (WBC) count in healthy people is associated with the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and mortality. This study aimed to determine whether WBC count predicts heart failure (HF) requiring hospitalization as well as all-cause death, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and established CAD. METHODS: We conducted this retrospective registry study that enrolled consecutive patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and CAD based on coronary arteriography records and medical charts at 70 teaching hospitals in Japan from 2005 to 2015. A total of 7608 participants (28.2% women, mean age 68 ± 10 years) were eligible. In the cohort, the median (interquartile range) and mean follow-up durations were 39 (16.5-66.1 months) and 44.3 ± 32.7 months, respectively. The primary outcome was HF requiring hospitalization. The secondary outcomes were AMI, stroke, all-cause death, 3-point major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) (AMI/stroke/death) and 4-point MACE (AMI/stroke/death/HF requiring hospitalization). Outcomes were reported as cumulative incidences (proportion of patients experiencing an event) and incidence rates (events/100 person-years). The primary and secondary outcomes were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test stratified by the baseline WBC count. The association between the WBC count at baseline and each MACE was assessed using the Cox proportional hazard model and expressed as the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) after adjusting for other well-known risk factors for MACE. RESULTS: During the follow-up, 880 patients were hospitalized owing to HF. The WBC Quartile 4 (≥7700 cells/µL) had significantly lower HF event-free survival rate (log-rank test, P < 0.001). The HRs for HF events requiring hospitalization with each WBC quartile compared with the lowest in the first WBC quartile were 1 for Quartile 1 (WBC < 5300 cells/µL), 1.20 (95% CI, 0.96-1.5; P = 0.1) for Quartile 2 (5300 ≤ WBC < 6400), 1.34 (95% CI, 1.08-1.67; P = 0.009) for Quartile 3 (6400 ≤ WBC < 7700) and 1.62 (95% CI, 1.31-2.00; P < 0.001) for Quartile 4 after adjusting for covariates. Similar findings were observed for the risk of AMI and death; however, no significant difference was found for stroke. WBC Quartile 4 patients had a significantly lower 3- or 4-point MACE-free survival rate (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: A higher WBC count is a predictor of hospitalization for HF, all-cause death and AMI but not for stroke in patients with concurrent Type 2 diabetes mellitus and established CAD.

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