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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31427306

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Leukocyte telomere length has been associated with risk of subsequent pancreatic cancer. Few prospective studies have evaluated the association of prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length with pancreatic cancer survival. METHODS: We prospectively examined the association of prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length with overall survival (OS) time among 423 participants diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma between 1984 and 2008 within the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, Nurses' Health Study, Physicians' Health Study, and Women's Health Initiative. We measured prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length in banked blood samples using quantitative PCR. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate HRs for OS with adjustment for potential confounders. We also evaluated 10 SNPs at the telomerase reverse transcriptase locus. RESULTS: Shorter prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length was associated with reduced OS among patients with pancreatic cancer (P trend = 0.04). The multivariable-adjusted HR for OS comparing the lowest with highest quintiles of leukocyte telomere length was 1.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.93), corresponding to a 3-month difference in median OS time. In an analysis excluding cases with blood collected within 2 years of cancer diagnosis, the association was moderately stronger (HR, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.21; comparing the lowest with highest quintiles; P trend = 0.01). No prognostic association or effect modification for the prognostic association of prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length was noted in relation to the studied SNPs. CONCLUSIONS: Prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length was associated with pancreatic cancer survival. IMPACT: Prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length can be a prognostic biomarker in pancreatic cancer.

2.
Cancer Immunol Res ; 7(8): 1230-1236, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31217164

RESUMO

Immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibitors, such as the programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibodies pembrolizumab and nivolumab, are effective in a variety of tumors, yet not all patients respond. Tumor microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) has emerged as a biomarker of response to checkpoint blockade, leading to the tissue agnostic approval of pembrolizumab in MSI-H cancers. Here we describe a patient with MSI-H colorectal cancer that was treated with this immune checkpoint inhibitor and exhibited progression of disease. We examined this intrinsic resistance through genomic, transcriptional, and pathologic characterization of the patient's tumor and the associated immune microenvironment. The tumor had typical MSI-H molecular features, including a high neoantigen load. We also identified biallelic loss of the gene for ß2-microglobulin (B2M), whose product is critical for antigen presentation. Immune infiltration deconvolution analysis of bulk transcriptome data from this anti-PD-1-resistant tumor and hundreds of other colorectal cancer specimens revealed a high natural killer cell and M2 macrophage infiltration in the patient's cancer. This was confirmed by single-cell transcriptome analysis and multiplex immunofluorescence. Our study provides insight into resistance in MSI-H tumors and suggests immunotherapeutic strategies in additional genomic contexts of colorectal cancer.

3.
Cancer Causes Control ; 30(8): 799-811, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31069578

RESUMO

An important premise of epidemiology is that individuals with the same disease share similar underlying etiologies and clinical outcomes. In the past few decades, our knowledge of disease pathogenesis has improved, and disease classification systems have evolved to the point where no complex disease processes are considered homogenous. As a result, pathology and epidemiology have been integrated into the single, unified field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE). Advancing integrative molecular and population-level health sciences and addressing the unique research challenges specific to the field of MPE necessitates assembling experts in diverse fields, including epidemiology, pathology, biostatistics, computational biology, bioinformatics, genomics, immunology, and nutritional and environmental sciences. Integrating these seemingly divergent fields can lead to a greater understanding of pathogenic processes. The International MPE Meeting Series fosters discussion that addresses the specific research questions and challenges in this emerging field. The purpose of the meeting series is to: discuss novel methods to integrate pathology and epidemiology; discuss studies that provide pathogenic insights into population impact; and educate next-generation scientists. Herein, we share the proceedings of the Fourth International MPE Meeting, held in Boston, MA, USA, on 30 May-1 June, 2018. Major themes of this meeting included 'integrated genetic and molecular pathologic epidemiology', 'immunology-MPE', and 'novel disease phenotyping'. The key priority areas for future research identified by meeting attendees included integration of tumor immunology and cancer disparities into epidemiologic studies, further collaboration between computational and population-level scientists to gain new insight on exposure-disease associations, and future pooling projects of studies with comparable data.

4.
Cancer Discov ; 9(6): 738-755, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30952657

RESUMO

KRAS is the most frequently mutated oncogene. The incidence of specific KRAS alleles varies between cancers from different sites, but it is unclear whether allelic selection results from biological selection for specific mutant KRAS proteins. We used a cross-disciplinary approach to compare KRASG12D, a common mutant form, and KRASA146T, a mutant that occurs only in selected cancers. Biochemical and structural studies demonstrated that KRASA146T exhibits a marked extension of switch 1 away from the protein body and nucleotide binding site, which activates KRAS by promoting a high rate of intrinsic and guanine nucleotide exchange factor-induced nucleotide exchange. Using mice genetically engineered to express either allele, we found that KRASG12D and KRASA146T exhibit distinct tissue-specific effects on homeostasis that mirror mutational frequencies in human cancers. These tissue-specific phenotypes result from allele-specific signaling properties, demonstrating that context-dependent variations in signaling downstream of different KRAS mutants drive the KRAS mutational pattern seen in cancer. SIGNIFICANCE: Although epidemiologic and clinical studies have suggested allele-specific behaviors for KRAS, experimental evidence for allele-specific biological properties is limited. We combined structural biology, mass spectrometry, and mouse modeling to demonstrate that the selection for specific KRAS mutants in human cancers from different tissues is due to their distinct signaling properties.See related commentary by Hobbs and Der, p. 696.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 681.

5.
Cancer Causes Control ; 30(6): 637-649, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30963391

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A preventive potential of high calcium intake against colorectal cancer has been indicated for distal colon cancer, which is inversely associated with high-level CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), high-level microsatellite instability (MSI), and BRAF and PIK3CA mutations. In addition, BRAF mutation is strongly inversely correlated with KRAS mutation. We hypothesized that the association between calcium intake and colon cancer risk might vary by these molecular features. METHODS: We prospectively followed 88,506 women from the Nurses' Health Study and 47,733 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study for up to 30 years. Duplication-method Cox proportional cause-specific hazards regression was used to estimate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs), and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the associations between calcium intake and the risk of colon cancer subtypes. By Bonferroni correction, the α-level was adjusted to 0.01. RESULTS: Based on 853 colon cancer cases, the inverse association between dietary calcium intake and colon cancer risk differed by CIMP status (pheterogeneity = 0.01). Per each 300 mg/day increase in intake, multivariable HRs were 0.84 (95% CI 0.76-0.94) for CIMP-negative/low and 1.12 (95% CI 0.93-1.34) for CIMP-high. Similar differential associations were suggested for MSI subtypes (pheterogeneity = 0.02), with the corresponding HR being 0.86 (95% CI 0.77-0.95) for non-MSI-high and 1.10 (95% CI 0.92-1.32) for MSI-high. No differential associations were observed by BRAF, KRAS, or PIK3CA mutations. CONCLUSION: The inverse association between dietary calcium intake and colon cancer risk may be specific to CIMP-negative/low and possibly non-MSI-high subtypes.


Assuntos
Cálcio/administração & dosagem , Neoplasias do Colo/patologia , Ilhas de CpG/genética , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas B-raf/genética , Idoso , Neoplasias do Colo/genética , Metilação de DNA , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Instabilidade de Microssatélites , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação , Fenótipo , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Risco
6.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 28(7): 1246-1251, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31028081

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: No consensus guideline has been established for microsatellite instability testing in upper gastrointestinal tract cancers. This study aims to determine whether targeted cancer next-generation sequencing can accurately detect microsatellite instability in upper gastrointestinal tract cancers and screen for patients with Lynch syndrome. METHODS: In a cohort of 645 upper gastrointestinal tract cancers, targeted next-generation sequencing assessed microsatellite instability by identifying characteristic insertion and deletion mutations. Sequencing classification was compared with mismatch repair protein IHC. Cancers with microsatellite instability by sequencing were analyzed using a testing protocol to identify patients with Lynch syndrome. RESULTS: Sequencing identified microsatellite instability in 3.6% (23/645) of upper gastrointestinal tract cancers, including 28% (8/29) of small intestinal and 9% (9/97) of gastric carcinomas. In 20 cancers classified as having microsatellite instability, 19 demonstrated loss of expression of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, or MSH6, and one cancer was indeterminate by IHC. In contrast, 52 control cancers demonstrated retained expression of all mismatch repair proteins. Using targeted sequencing as the initial screening test, 1.1% (7/645) of patients were identified to have pathogenic germline variants confirming a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Targeted cancer next-generation sequencing is an accurate first-line test to detect microsatellite instability in upper gastrointestinal tract cancers. IMPACT: This study provides a proof of concept for the use of targeted next-generation sequencing to detect microsatellite instability and screen for Lynch syndrome.

7.
Thyroid ; 29(5): 666-673, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30869569

RESUMO

Background: Prior studies have reported mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes in a small subset of anaplastic thyroid carcinomas (ATC). The aim of this study was to identify MMR-protein-deficient (MMR-D) ATC and investigate their histopathologic features and clinical outcome. Methods: A cohort of 28 ATC diagnosed between 2003 and 2017 with tissue blocks available were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry for MMR proteins was performed to identify MMR-D tumors. Clinicopathologic features, molecular findings (determined by a targeted next-generation sequencing assay), and clinical outcome data for MMR-D tumors were recorded and compared to that of MMR-protein-intact (MMR-I) tumors. Results: There were four (14%) MMR-D ATC, all of which showed complete loss of MSH2 and MSH6 with intact expression of MLH1 and PMS2. Three of these tumors had MSH2 mutations and a hypermutated phenotype by next-generation sequencing. All four patients (two male; Mage at diagnosis = 64 years) presented with stage IVB disease (i.e., gross extrathyroidal extension or a lymph node metastasis at presentation). There were no differences in tumor size or rates of gross extrathyroidal extension, lymph node metastases, or positive resection margins between MMR-D and MMR-I ATC. Patients with MMR-D tumors were less likely to have distant metastatic disease at presentation (p = 0.035), although half did eventually develop distant metastases. MMR-D tumors were not histologically distinct. All four patients with MMR-D tumors lived for more than one year. One patient died of disease at 15 months, while the remaining three were alive at last follow-up, with survival of 19, 38, and 48 months. Patients with MMR-D ATC had significantly better survival compared to those with MMR-I tumors (p = 0.033), which was maintained when considering only patients with stage IVB disease at presentation (p = 0.030). Conclusion: MMR-D tumors comprised 14% of this ATC cohort. Although the findings must be interpreted with caution given the small number of MMR-D ATC in the cohort, the results suggest that MMR status may be prognostically significant in ATC.

8.
Br J Cancer ; 120(8): 848-854, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30867564

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Individuals with a family history of cancer may be at increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) individuals carry increased risk for pancreatic cancer and other cancer types. METHODS: We examined the association between family history of cancer, AJ heritage, and incident pancreatic cancer in 49 410 male participants of the prospective Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: During 1.1 million person-years (1986-2016), 452 participants developed pancreatic cancer. Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed in individuals with a family history of pancreatic (HR, 2.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-6.07) or breast cancer (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.01-1.94). There was a trend towards higher risk of pancreatic cancer in relation to a family history of colorectal cancer (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.95-1.55) or AJ heritage (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.94-1.77). The risk was highly elevated among AJ men with a family history of breast or colorectal cancer (HR, 2.61 [95% CI, 1.41-4.82] and 1.92 [95% CI, 1.05-3.49], respectively). CONCLUSION: Family history of pancreatic cancer was associated with increased risk of this malignancy. Family history of breast or colorectal cancer was associated with the increased risk among AJ men.

9.
Eur J Cancer ; 111: 82-93, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30826660

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2, cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2)-prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway promotes tumour progression. Considering evidence suggesting increased PGE2 synthesis by BRAF mutation in tumour cells, we hypothesised that the association of tumour PTGS2 (COX-2) expression with colorectal cancer mortality might be stronger in BRAF-mutated tumours than in BRAF-wild-type tumours. METHODS: Using 1708 patients, including 1200 stage I-IV colorectal carcinoma cases in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) and 508 stage III colon cancer cases in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored randomised controlled trial of adjuvant therapy (CALGB/Alliance 89803), we evaluated tumour PTGS2 (COX-2) expression status using immunohistochemistry. We examined the prognostic association of PTGS2 (COX-2) expression in strata of BRAF mutation status by multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models to adjust for potential confounders, including disease stage, tumour differentiation, microsatellite instability status and KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. RESULTS: In NHS and HPFS, the association of PTGS2 (COX-2) expression with colorectal cancer-specific survival differed by BRAF mutation status (Pinteraction = 0.0005); compared with PTGS2 (COX-2)-negative/low carcinomas, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for PTGS2 (COX-2)-high carcinomas were 2.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.39-4.28) in BRAF-mutated cases and 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-1.04) in BRAF-wild-type cases. Differential prognostic associations of PTGS2 (COX-2) expression in strata of BRAF mutation status were similarly observed in CALGB/Alliance 89803 trial (Pinteraction = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The association of tumour PTGS2 (COX-2) expression with colorectal cancer mortality is stronger in BRAF-mutated tumours than in BRAF-wild-type tumours, supporting interactive roles of PTGS2 (COX-2) expression and BRAF mutation statuses in prognostication of patients with colorectal cancer; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier, NCT00003835.

10.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 12(5): 283-294, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30760501

RESUMO

Calcium intake has been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer. Calcium signaling may enhance T-cell proliferation and differentiation, and contribute to T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity. In this prospective cohort study, we investigated the association between calcium intake and colorectal cancer risk according to tumor immunity status to provide additional insights into the role of calcium in colorectal carcinogenesis. The densities of tumor-infiltrating T-cell subsets [CD3+, CD8+ , CD45RO (PTPRC) + , or FOXP3+ cell] were assessed using IHC and computer-assisted image analysis in 736 cancer cases that developed among 136,249 individuals in two cohorts. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Total calcium intake was associated with a multivariable HR of 0.55 (comparing ≥1,200 vs. <600 mg/day; 95% CI, 0.36-0.84; P trend = 0.002) for CD8+ T-cell-low but not for CD8+ T-cell-high tumors (HR = 1.02; 95% CI, 0.67-1.55; P trend = 0.47). Similarly, the corresponding HRs (95% CIs) for calcium for low versus high T-cell-infiltrated tumors were 0.63 (0.42-0.94; P trend = 0.01) and 0.89 (0.58-1.35; P trend = 0.20) for CD3+ ; 0.58 (0.39-0.87; P trend = 0.006) and 1.04 (0.69-1.58; P trend = 0.54) for CD45RO+ ; and 0.56 (0.36-0.85; P trend = 0.006) and 1.10 (0.72-1.67; P trend = 0.47) for FOXP3+ , although the differences by subtypes defined by T-cell density were not statistically significant. These potential differential associations generally appeared consistent regardless of sex, source of calcium intake, tumor location, and tumor microsatellite instability status. Our findings suggest a possible role of calcium in cancer immunoprevention via modulation of T-cell function.

11.
Mod Pathol ; 32(7): 977-987, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30765880

RESUMO

Due to the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy in tumors with deficient mismatch repair, there has been a surge in demand for mismatch repair deficiency testing in various tumor types. Mismatch repair deficiency is not known to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of sarcomas, and the utility of testing these tumor types is not established. This study aimed to determine the frequency, pattern, and clinicopathologic correlates of mismatch repair deficiency in sarcomas. Three hundred and four sarcomas were profiled using a genomic platform that employs massively parallel sequencing to interrogate 447 cancer-associated genes. Mismatch repair status was evaluated by determining the number of small insertion/deletion events occurring in homopolymer regions per megabase of exonic sequence data across all genes.  Molecular characteristics of mismatch repair-deficient sarcomas were compared to mismatch repair-deficient carcinomas (n = 70) also identified using the sequencing panel. Seven sarcomas (2.3%) were classified as mismatch repair-deficient: four unclassified sarcomas, and one each of pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma, epithelioid leiomyosarcoma and malignant PEComa. One patient had an established diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. In the remaining patients, the mismatch repair gene mutation was confirmed or suspected to be somatic. Mismatch repair immunohistochemistry confirmed the mismatch repair-deficiency status of all cases with alterations in the tested proteins. As expected, mismatch repair-deficient sarcomas showed a significantly elevated tumor mutation burden relative to mismatch repair-proficient sarcomas (median 16 versus 4.6, p < 0.001). However, in comparison to mismatch repair-deficient carcinomas, mismatch repair-deficient sarcomas showed a lower tumor mutation burden (median 28 versus 16, p = 0.006) and a significantly greater degree of chromosomal instability. Among mismatch repair-deficient sarcomas, PD-L1 was variably expressed on tumor-associated macrophages but not on tumor cells. Three patients received pembrolizumab: two progressed and one has stable disease with five months follow-up. Mismatch repair deficiency in histologically classifiable sarcomas is rare (1%) and is more common in unclassified sarcomas (10%). Additional study is required to determine the predictive role of mismatch repair-deficiency in sarcomas for immunotherapy.

12.
J Pathol ; 247(5): 615-628, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30632609

RESUMO

Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is an integrative transdisciplinary field that addresses heterogeneous effects of exogenous and endogenous factors (collectively termed 'exposures'), including microorganisms, on disease occurrence and consequences, utilising molecular pathological signatures of the disease. In parallel with the paradigm of precision medicine, findings from MPE research can provide aetiological insights into tailored strategies of disease prevention and treatment. Due to the availability of molecular pathological tests on tumours, the MPE approach has been utilised predominantly in research on cancers including breast, lung, prostate, and colorectal carcinomas. Mounting evidence indicates that the microbiome (inclusive of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites) plays an important role in a variety of human diseases including neoplasms. An alteration of the microbiome may be not only a cause of neoplasia but also an informative biomarker that indicates or mediates the association of an epidemiological exposure with health conditions and outcomes. To adequately educate and train investigators in this emerging area, we herein propose the integration of microbiology into the MPE model (termed 'microbiology-MPE'), which could improve our understanding of the complex interactions of environment, tumour cells, the immune system, and microbes in the tumour microenvironment during the carcinogenic process. Using this approach, we can examine how lifestyle factors, dietary patterns, medications, environmental exposures, and germline genetics influence cancer development and progression through impacting the microbial communities in the human body. Further integration of other disciplines (e.g. pharmacology, immunology, nutrition) into microbiology-MPE would expand this developing research frontier. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies, researchers now have increasing access to large-scale metagenomics as well as other omics data (e.g. genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) in population-based research. The integrative field of microbiology-MPE will open new opportunities for personalised medicine and public health. Copyright © 2019 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

13.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2018 Oct 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30312431

RESUMO

Background: Evidence indicates not only carcinogenic effect of cigarette smoking but also its immunosuppressive effect. We hypothesized that the association of smoking with colorectal cancer risk might be stronger for tumors with lower anti-tumor adaptive immune response. Methods: During follow-up of 134 981 participants (3 490 851 person-years) in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we documented 729 rectal and colon cancer cases with available data on T-cell densities in tumor microenvironment. Using the duplication-method Cox regression model, we examined a differential association of smoking status with risk of colorectal carcinoma subclassified by densities of CD3+ cells, CD8+ cells, CD45RO (PTPRC)+ cells, or FOXP3+ cells. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The association of smoking status with colorectal cancer risk differed by CD3+ cell density (Pheterogeneity = .007). Compared with never smokers, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for CD3+ cell-low colorectal cancer were 1.38 (95% confidence interval = 1.09 to 1.75) in former smokers and 1.59 (95% confidence interval = 1.14 to 2.23) in current smokers (Ptrend = .002, across smoking status categories). In contrast, smoking status was not associated with CD3+ cell-high cancer risk (Ptrend = .52). This differential association appeared consistent in strata of microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, or BRAF mutation status. There was no statistically significant differential association according to densities of CD8+ cells, CD45RO+ cells, or FOXP3+ cells (Pheterogeneity > .04, with adjusted α of 0.01). Conclusions: Colorectal cancer risk increased by smoking was stronger for tumors with lower T-lymphocyte response, suggesting an interplay of smoking and immunity in colorectal carcinogenesis.

14.
Genome Biol ; 19(1): 142, 2018 09 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30253799

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous approaches to defining subtypes of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and other cancers based on transcriptomes have assumed the existence of discrete subtypes. We analyze gene expression patterns of colorectal tumors from a large number of patients to test this assumption and propose an approach to identify potentially a continuum of subtypes that are present across independent studies and cohorts. RESULTS: We examine the assumption of discrete CRC subtypes by integrating 18 published gene expression datasets and > 3700 patients, and contrary to previous reports, find no evidence to support the existence of discrete transcriptional subtypes. Using a meta-analysis approach to identify co-expression patterns present in multiple datasets, we identify and define robust, continuously varying subtype scores to represent CRC transcriptomes. The subtype scores are consistent with established subtypes (including microsatellite instability and previously proposed discrete transcriptome subtypes), but better represent overall transcriptional activity than do discrete subtypes. The scores are also better predictors of tumor location, stage, grade, and times of disease-free survival than discrete subtypes. Gene set enrichment analysis reveals that the subtype scores characterize T-cell function, inflammation response, and cyclin-dependent kinase regulation of DNA replication. CONCLUSIONS: We find no evidence to support discrete subtypes of the CRC transcriptome and instead propose two validated scores to better characterize a continuity of CRC transcriptomes.

15.
Eur J Cancer ; 103: 98-107, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30219720

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: High-level plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] has been associated with lower colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Considering evidence indicating immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D, we hypothesised that survival benefits from high systemic vitamin D level might be stronger for colorectal carcinoma with lower immune response to tumour. METHODS: Using 869 colon and rectal cancer cases within the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we assessed the prognostic association of postdiagnosis 25(OH)D score [derived from diet and lifestyle variables to predict plasma 25(OH)D level] in strata of levels of histopathologic lymphocytic reaction. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was adjusted for potential confounders, including microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, LINE-1 methylation, PTGS2 (cyclooxygenase-2) expression and KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations. RESULTS: The association of postdiagnosis 25(OH)D score with colorectal cancer-specific mortality differed by levels of peritumoural lymphocytic reaction (pinteraction = 0.001). Multivariable-adjusted mortality hazard ratios for a quintile-unit increase of 25(OH)D score were 0.69 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.54-0.89] in cases with negative/low peritumoural lymphocytic reaction, 1.08 (95% CI, 0.93-1.26) in cases with intermediate peritumoural reaction and 1.25 (95% CI, 0.75-2.09) in cases with high peritumoural reaction. The survival association of the 25(OH)D score did not significantly differ by Crohn's-like lymphoid reaction, intratumoural periglandular reaction or tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS: The association between the 25(OH)D score and colorectal cancer survival is stronger for carcinomas with lower peritumoural lymphocytic reaction. Our results suggesting interactive effects of vitamin D and immune response may contribute to personalised dietary and lifestyle intervention strategies.

16.
Am J Pathol ; 188(12): 2839-2852, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30243655

RESUMO

Evidence indicates a complex link between microbiota, tumor characteristics, and host immunity in the tumor microenvironment. In experimental studies, bifidobacteria appear to modulate intestinal epithelial cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence suggests that bifidobacteria may enhance the antitumor immunity and efficacy of immunotherapy. We hypothesized that the amount of bifidobacteria in colorectal carcinoma tissue might be associated with tumor differentiation and higher immune response to colorectal cancer. Using a molecular pathologic epidemiology database of 1313 rectal and colon cancers, we measured the amount of Bifidobacterium DNA in carcinoma tissue by a quantitative PCR assay. The multivariable regression model was used to adjust for potential confounders, including microsatellite instability status, CpG island methylator phenotype, long-interspersed nucleotide element-1 methylation, and KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations. Intratumor bifidobacteria were detected in 393 cases (30%). The amount of bifidobacteria was associated with the extent of signet ring cells (P = 0.002). Compared with Bifidobacterium-negative cases, multivariable odd ratios for the extent of signet ring cells were 1.29 (95% CI, 0.74-2.24) for Bifidobacterium-low cases and 1.87 (95% CI, 1.16-3.02) for Bifidobacterium-high cases (Ptrend = 0.01). The association between intratumor bifidobacteria and signet ring cells suggests a possible role of bifidobacteria in determining distinct tumor characteristics or as an indicator of dysfunctional mucosal barrier in colorectal cancer.

17.
Cancer Immunol Res ; 6(11): 1327-1336, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30228205

RESUMO

The presence of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) in colorectal carcinoma tissue has been associated with microsatellite instability (MSI), lower-level T-cell infiltrates, and poor clinical outcomes. Considering differences in the tumor-immune microenvironment between MSI-high and non-MSI-high carcinomas, we hypothesized that the association of F. nucleatum with immune response might differ by tumor MSI status. Using samples from 1,041 rectal and colon cancer patients within the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we measured F. nucleatum DNA in tumor tissue by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the association between F. nucleatum status and histopathologic lymphocytic reactions or density of CD3+ cells, CD8+ cells, CD45RO (PTPRC)+ cells, or FOXP3+ cells in strata of tumor MSI status. We adjusted for potential confounders, including CpG island methylator phenotype; LINE-1 methylation; and KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations. The association of F. nucleatum with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and intratumoral periglandular reaction differed by tumor MSI status (P interaction = 0.002). The presence of F. nucleatum was negatively associated with TIL in MSI-high tumors [multivariable odds ratio (OR), 0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.92], but positively associated with TIL in non-MSI-high tumors (multivariable OR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.12-3.25). No significant differential association was observed for peritumoral lymphocytic reaction, Crohn-like lymphoid reaction, or T-cell densities. In conclusion, the association of F. nucleatum with immune response to colorectal carcinoma differs by tumor MSI status, suggesting that F. nucleatum and MSI status interact to affect antitumor immune reactions. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(11); 1327-36. ©2018 AACR See related Spotlight on p. 1290.

18.
Annu Rev Pathol ; 2018 08 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30125150

RESUMO

Evidence indicates that diet, nutrition, lifestyle, the environment, the microbiome, and other exogenous factors have pathogenic roles and also influence the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome of tumor and nonneoplastic cells, including immune cells. With the need for big-data research, pathology must transform to integrate data science fields, including epidemiology, biostatistics, and bioinformatics. The research framework of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) demonstrates the strengths of such an interdisciplinary integration, having been used to study breast, lung, prostate, and colorectal cancers. The MPEresearch paradigm not only can provide novel insights into interactions among environment, tumor, and host but also opens new research frontiers. New developments-such as computational digital pathology, systems biology, artificial intelligence, and in vivo pathology technologies-will further transform pathology and MPE. Although it is necessary to address the rarity of transdisciplinary education and training programs, MPE provides an exemplary model of integrative scientific approaches and contributes to advancements in precision medicine, therapy, and prevention. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease Volume 14 is January 24, 2019. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

19.
Genet Med ; 2018 Jul 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29961768

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Germline variants in double-strand DNA damage repair (dsDDR) genes (e.g., BRCA1/2) predispose to pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and may predict sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy and poly(ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. We sought to determine the prevalence and significance of germline cancer susceptibility gene variants in PDAC with paired somatic and survival analyses. METHODS: Using a customized next-generation sequencing panel, germline/somatic DNA was analyzed from 289 patients with resected PDAC ascertained without preselection for high-risk features (e.g., young age, personal/family history). All identified variants were assessed for pathogenicity. Outcomes were analyzed using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: We found that 28/289 (9.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.5-13.7%) patients carried pathogenic/likely pathogenic germline variants, including 21 (7.3%) dsDDR gene variants (3 BRCA1, 4 BRCA2, 14 other dsDDR genes [ATM, BRIP1, CHEK2, NBN, PALB2, RAD50, RAD51C]), 3 Lynch syndrome, and 4 other genes (APC p.I1307K, CDKN2A, TP53). Somatic sequencing and immunohistochemistry identified second hits in the tumor in 12/27 (44.4%) patients with germline variants (1 failed sequencing). Compared with noncarriers, patients with germline dsDDR gene variants had superior overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54; 95% CI 0.30-0.99; P = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Nearly 10% of PDAC patients harbor germline variants, although the majority lack somatic second hits, the therapeutic significance of which warrants further study.

20.
Cancer Discov ; 8(9): 1096-1111, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29903880

RESUMO

Clinically relevant subtypes exist for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but molecular characterization is not yet standard in clinical care. We implemented a biopsy protocol to perform time-sensitive whole-exome sequencing and RNA sequencing for patients with advanced PDAC. Therapeutically relevant genomic alterations were identified in 48% (34/71) and pathogenic/likely pathogenic germline alterations in 18% (13/71) of patients. Overall, 30% (21/71) of enrolled patients experienced a change in clinical management as a result of genomic data. Twenty-six patients had germline and/or somatic alterations in DNA-damage repair genes, and 5 additional patients had mutational signatures of homologous recombination deficiency but no identified causal genomic alteration. Two patients had oncogenic in-frame BRAF deletions, and we report the first clinical evidence that this alteration confers sensitivity to MAPK pathway inhibition. Moreover, we identified tumor/stroma gene expression signatures with clinical relevance. Collectively, these data demonstrate the feasibility and value of real-time genomic characterization of advanced PDAC.Significance: Molecular analyses of metastatic PDAC tumors are challenging due to the heterogeneous cellular composition of biopsy specimens and rapid progression of the disease. Using an integrated multidisciplinary biopsy program, we demonstrate that real-time genomic characterization of advanced PDAC can identify clinically relevant alterations that inform management of this difficult disease. Cancer Discov; 8(9); 1096-111. ©2018 AACR.See related commentary by Collisson, p. 1062This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1047.

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