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1.
Am Surg ; : 31348221083948, 2022 Apr 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35377258

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Older adults (OAs; ≥ 65 years) comprise a growing population in the United States and are anticipated to require an increasing number of emergency general surgery procedures (EGSPs). The aims of this study were to identify the frequency of EGSPs and compare cost of care in OAs managed at teaching hospitals (THs) vs nonteaching hospitals (NTHs). METHODS: A retrospective review of data from the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission database from 2009 to 2018 for OAs undergoing EGSPs was undertaken. Data collected included demographics, all patient-refined (APR)-severity of illness (SOI), APR-risk of mortality (ROM), Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), EGSPs (partial colectomy (PC), small bowel resection, cholecystectomy, operative management of peptic ulcers, lysis of adhesions, appendectomy, and laparotomy, categorized hospital charges, length of stay (LOS), and mortality. RESULTS: Of the 55,401 OAs undergoing EGSPs in this study, 28,575 (51.6%) were treated at THs and 26,826 (48.4%) at NTHs. OAs at THs presented with greater APR-ROM (major 25.6% vs 24.9%, extreme 22.6% vs 22.0%, P=.01), and CCI (3.1±3 vs 2.7±2.8, P<.001) compared to NTHs. Lysis of adhesions, cholecystectomy, and PC comprised the overall most common EGSPs. Older adults at THs incurred comparatively higher median hospital charges for every EGSP due to increased room charges and LOS. Mortality was higher at THs (6.13% vs 5.33%, P<.001). CONCLUSION: While acuity of illness appears similar, cost of undergoing EGSPs for OAs is higher in THs vs NTHs due to increased LOS. Future work is warranted to determine and mitigate factors that increase LOS at THs.

2.
Am Surg ; 88(5): 953-958, 2022 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35275764

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) has developed a grading system for emergency general surgery (EGS) conditions. We sought to validate the AAST EGS grades for patients undergoing urgent/emergent colorectal resection. METHODS: Patients enrolled in the "Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma Multicenter Colorectal Resection in EGS-to anastomose or not to anastomose" study undergoing urgent/emergent surgery for obstruction, ischemia, or diverticulitis were included. Baseline demographics, comorbidity severity as defined by Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), procedure type, and AAST grade were prospectively collected. Outcomes included length of stay (LOS) in-hospital mortality, and surgical complications (superficial/deep/organ-space surgical site infection, anastomotic leak, stoma complication, fascial dehiscence, and need for further intervention). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to describe outcomes and risk factors for surgical complication or mortality. RESULTS: There were 367 patients, with a mean (± SD) age of 62 ± 15 years. 39% were women. The median interquartile range (IQR) CCI was 4 (2-6). Overall, the pathologies encompassed the following AAST EGS grades: I (17, 5%), II (54, 15%), III (115, 31%), IV (95, 26%), and V (86, 23%). Management included laparoscopic (24, 7%), open (319, 87%), and laparoscopy converted to laparotomy (24, 6%). Higher AAST grade was associated with laparotomy (P = .01). The median LOS was 13 days (8-22). At least 1 surgical complication occurred in 33% of patients and the mortality rate was 14%. Development of at least 1 surgical complication, need for unplanned intervention, mortality, and increased LOS were associated with increasing AAST severity grade. On multivariable analysis, factors predictive of in-hospital mortality included AAST organ grade, CCI, and preoperative vasopressor use (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 1.6, 3.1, respectively). The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma emergency general surgery grade was also associated with the development of at least 1 surgical complication (OR 2.5), while CCI, preoperative vasopressor use, respiratory failure, and pneumoperitoneum were not. CONCLUSION: The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma emergency general surgery grading systems display construct validity for mortality and surgical complications after urgent/emergent colorectal resection. These results support incorporation of AAST EGS grades for quality benchmarking and surgical outcomes research.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais , Cirurgia Geral , Laparoscopia , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Resultado do Tratamento , Estados Unidos
3.
J Am Coll Surg ; 234(4): 419-427, 2022 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35290260

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Data on duration of antibiotics in patients managed with an open abdomen (OA) due to intra-abdominal infection (IAI) are scarce. We hypothesized that patients with IAI managed with OA rather than closed abdomen (CA) would have higher rates of secondary infections (SIs) independent of the duration of the antibiotic treatment. METHODS: This was an observational, prospective, multicenter, international study of patients with IAI requiring laparotomy for source control. Demographic and antibiotic duration values were collected. Primary outcomes were SI (surgical site, bloodstream, pneumonia, urinary tract) and mortality. Statistical analysis included ANOVA, chi-square/Fisher's exact test, and logistic regression. RESULTS: Twenty-one centers contributed 752 patients. The average age was 59.6 years, 43.6% were women, and 43.9% were managed with OA. Overall mortality was 16.1%, with higher rates among OA patients (31.6% vs 4.4%, p < 0.001). OA patients had higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (4.7 vs 1.8, p < 0.001), American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status (3.6 vs 2.7, p < 0.001), and APACHE II scores (16.1 vs 9.4, p < 0.001). The mean duration of antibiotics was 6.5 days (8.0 OA vs 5.4 CA, p < 0.001). A total of 179 (23.8%) patients developed SI (33.1% OA vs 16.8% CA, p < 0.001). Longer antibiotic duration was associated with increased rates of SI: 1 to 2 days, 15.8%; 3 to 5 days, 20.4%; 6 to 14 days, 26.6%; and more than 14 days, 46.8% (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with IAI managed with OA had higher rates of SI and increased mortality compared with CA. A prolonged duration of antibiotics was associated with increased rates of SI. Increased antibiotic duration is not associated with improved outcomes in patients with IAI and OA.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos , Infecções Intra-Abdominais , Abdome/cirurgia , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Humanos , Infecções Intra-Abdominais/complicações , Infecções Intra-Abdominais/etiologia , Laparotomia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos
4.
Injury ; 53(1): 122-128, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34380598

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The Bowel Injury Prediction Score (BIPS) is a tool for identifying patients at risk for blunt bowel and mesenteric injury (BBMI) requiring surgery. BIPS is calculated by assigning one point for each of the following: (1) WBC ≥ 17,000, (2) abdominal tenderness, and (3) injury grade ≥ 4 (mesenteric contusion or hematoma with bowel wall thickening or adjacent interloop fluid collection) on CT scan. A total score ≥ 2 is associated with BBMI requiring surgery. We aimed to validate the BIPS as a predictor for patients with BBMIs requiring operative intervention in a multi-center prospective study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients were prospectively enrolled at 15 U.S. trauma centers following blunt trauma with suspicion of BBMI on CT scan between July 1, 2018 and July 31, 2019. The BIPS was calculated for each patient enrolled in the study. RESULTS: Of 313 patients, 38% had BBMI requiring operative intervention. Patients were significantly more likely to require surgery in the presence of abdominal tenderness (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.6-8.0) and CT grade ≥ 4 (OR, 11.7; 95% CI, 5.7-23.7). Patients with a BIPS ≥ 2 were more than ten times more likely to require laparotomy than those with a BIPS < 2 (OR, 10.1; 95% CI, 5.0-20.4). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of a BIPS ≥ 2 for BBMI requiring surgery was 72% (CI 0.6-0.8), 78% (CI 0.7-0.8), 67% (CI 0.6-0.8), and 82% (CI 0.8-0.9), respectively. The AUROC curve for BIPS ≥ 2 was 0.75. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of a BIPS ≥ 2 for BBMI requiring surgery in patients with severe alteration in mental status (GCS 3-8) was 70% (CI 0.5-0.9), 92% (CI 0.8-1.0), 82% (CI 0.6-1.0), and 86% (CI 0.7-1.0), respectively. CONCLUSION: This prospective multi-center trial validates BIPS as a predictor of BBMI requiring surgery. Calculation of BIPS during the initial evaluation of trauma patients is a useful adjunct to help general surgeons taking trauma call determine operative versus non-operative management of patients with BBMI including those with severe alteration in mental status.


Assuntos
Traumatismos Abdominais , Ferimentos não Penetrantes , Traumatismos Abdominais/diagnóstico por imagem , Traumatismos Abdominais/cirurgia , Humanos , Mesentério/diagnóstico por imagem , Mesentério/lesões , Mesentério/cirurgia , Estudos Prospectivos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Ferimentos não Penetrantes/diagnóstico por imagem , Ferimentos não Penetrantes/cirurgia
5.
Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg ; 48(1): 5-11, 2022 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32885311

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Emergency general surgery (EGS) is emerging as a distinct sub-specialty of acute care surgery but continues to exist without essential processes that drive modern trauma programs. An EGS-specific quality program was created with service-based Advanced Practice Provider (SB APP) administrative oversight, thus validating the need for a dedicated EGS program manager. METHODS: In 2017, a quality structure was formalized with primary focus on scheduled quality meetings, peer review and outcomes review. All admission, service-specific dashboards, and readmission data were manually audited by SB APPs to confirm accuracy and identify opportunities for process improvement. RESULTS: Surgical quality metrics including patient volume, mortality, complications, readmission and infection prevention indicators, were reviewed by SBAPPs. Annual EMR data for all EGS patients was compared to data collected via manual review with a novel registry logic. Comparison of EMR generated data versus EGS registry data identified under-representation of total admissions: in 2016, the EMR identified 130 admissions with registry logic identifying 625 actual EGS admissions. The EMR identified 515 admissions in 2017 and 485 admission in 2018 with registry logic identifying 777 and 712, respectively. Review of readmission data revealed an error of 14 patients in 2017 and 11 patients in 2018. CONCLUSIONS: The quest to improve quality of care for the EGS patient requires timely review of high-quality, accurate data by dedicated and trained personnel. Our process revealed the vital functions of an EGS PM are crucial in the evolution of the EGS specialty. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV economic and value-based evaluations.


Assuntos
Cirurgia Geral , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios , Cuidados Críticos , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitalização , Humanos , Sistema de Registros , Estudos Retrospectivos
6.
J Thorac Dis ; 13(8): 5297-5313, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34527367

RESUMO

Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placements are routine procedures performed in the intensive care units (ICUs). They are performed to facilitate care and promote healing. They also help prevent complications from prolonged endotracheal intubation and malnutrition. In most cases, both are performed simultaneously. Physicians performing them require knowledge of local anatomy, tissue and vascular relationships, along with advance bronchoscopy and endoscopy skills. Although PDTs and PEGs are considered relatively low-risk procedures, operators need to have the knowledge and skill to recognize and prevent adverse outcomes. Current published literature on post-procedural care and stoma wound management was reviewed. Available recommendations for the routine care of tracheostomy and PEG tubes are included in this review. Signs and symptoms of early PDT- and PEG-related complications and their management are discussed in detail. These include hemorrhage, infection, accidental decannulation, tube obstruction, clogging, and dislodgement. Rare, life-threatening complications are also discussed. Multidisciplinary teams are needed for improved patient care, and members should be aware of all pertinent care aspects and potential complications related to PDT and PEG placement. Each institute is strongly encouraged to have detailed protocols to standardize care. This review provides a state-of-the-art guidance on the care of patients with tracheostomies and gastrostomies specifically in the ICU setting.

7.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 90(3): 557-564, 2021 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33507026

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Emergency Surgery Score (ESS) was recently validated as an accurate mortality risk calculator for emergency general surgery. We sought to prospectively evaluate whether ESS can predict the need for respiratory and/or renal support (RRS) at discharge after emergent laparotomies (EL). METHODS: This is a post hoc analysis of a 19-center prospective observational study. Between April 2018 and June 2019, all adult patients undergoing EL were enrolled. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were systematically collected. In this analysis, patients were excluded if they died during the index hospitalization, were discharged to hospice, or transferred to other hospitals. A composite variable, the need for RRS, was defined as the need for one or more of the following at hospital discharge: tracheostomy, ventilator dependence, or dialysis. Emergency Surgery Score was calculated for all patients, and the correlation between ESS and RRS was examined using the c-statistics method. RESULTS: From a total of 1,649 patients, 1,347 were included. Median age was 60 years, 49.4% were men, and 70.9% were White. The most common diagnoses were hollow viscus organ perforation (28.1%) and small bowel obstruction (24.5%); 87 patients (6.5%) had a need for RRS (4.7% tracheostomy, 2.7% dialysis, and 1.3% ventilator dependence). Emergency Surgery Score predicted the need for RRS in a stepwise fashion; for example, 0.7%, 26.2%, and 85.7% of patients required RRS at an ESS of 2, 12, and 16, respectively. The c-statistics for the need for RRS, the need for tracheostomy, ventilator dependence, or dialysis at discharge were 0.84, 0.82, 0.79, and 0.88, respectively. CONCLUSION: Emergency Surgery Score accurately predicts the need for RRS at discharge in EL patients and could be used for preoperative patient counseling and for quality of care benchmarking. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic and epidemiological, level III.


Assuntos
Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Hospitalização , Laparotomia/efeitos adversos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Diálise Renal , Respiração Artificial , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/terapia , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Medição de Risco
8.
Am Surg ; 87(6): 971-978, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33295188

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A previous single-center survey of trauma and general surgery faculty demonstrated perceived positive impact of trauma and surgical subspecialty service-based advanced practice providers (SB APPs). The aim of this multicenter survey was to further validate these findings. METHODS: Faculty surgeons on teams that employ SB APPs at 8 academic centers completed an electronic survey querying perception about advanced practice provider (APP) competency and impact. RESULTS: Respondents agreed that SB APPs decrease workload (88%), length of stay (72%), contribute to continuity (92%), facilitate care coordination (87%), enhance patient satisfaction (88%), and contribute to best practice/safe patient care (83%). Fewer agreed that APPs contribute to resident education (50%) and quality improvement (QI)/research (36%). Although 93% acknowledged variability in the APP level of function, 91% reported trusting their clinical judgment. CONCLUSION: This study supports the perception that SB APPs have a positive impact on patient care and quality indicators. Areas for potential improvement include APP contribution to resident education and research/QI initiatives.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Profissionais de Enfermagem , Assistentes Médicos , Papel Profissional , Cirurgiões/psicologia , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos , Adulto , Competência Clínica , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Feminino , Humanos , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Satisfação do Paciente , Melhoria de Qualidade , Inquéritos e Questionários , Carga de Trabalho/estatística & dados numéricos
9.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 89(6): 1023-1031, 2020 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32890337

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Evidence comparing stoma creation (STM) versus anastomosis after urgent or emergent colorectal resection is limited. This study examined outcomes after colorectal resection in emergency general surgery patients. METHODS: This was an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma-sponsored prospective observational multicenter study of patients undergoing urgent/emergent colorectal resection. Twenty-one centers enrolled patients for 11 months. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were recorded. χ, Mann-Whitney U test, and multivariable logistic regression models were used to describe outcomes and risk factors for surgical complication/mortality. RESULTS: A total of 439 patients were enrolled (ANST, 184; STM, 255). The median (interquartile range) age was 62 (53-71) years, and the median Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was 4 (1-6). The most common indication for surgery was diverticulitis (28%). Stoma group was older (64 vs. 58 years, p < 0.001), had a higher CCI, and were more likely to be immunosuppressed. Preoperatively, STM patients were more likely to be intubated (57 vs. 15, p < 0.001), on vasopressors (61 vs. 13, p < 0.001), have pneumoperitoneum (131 vs. 41, p < 0.001) or fecal contamination (114 vs. 33, p < 0.001), and had a higher incidence of elevated lactate (149 vs. 67, p < 0.001). Overall mortality was 13%, which was higher in STM patients (18% vs. 8%, p = 0.02). Surgical complications were more common in STM patients (35% vs. 25%, p = 0.02). On multivariable analysis, management with an open abdomen, intraoperative blood transfusion, and larger hospital size were associated with development of a surgical complication, while CCI, preoperative vasopressor use, steroid use, open abdomen, and intraoperative blood transfusion were independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: This study highlights a tendency to perform fecal diversion in patients who are acutely ill at presentation. There is a higher morbidity and mortality rate in STM patients. Independent predictors of mortality include CCI, preoperative vasopressor use, steroid use, open abdomen, and intraoperative blood transfusion. Following adjustment by clinical factors, method of colon management was not associated with surgical complications or mortality. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, level IV.


Assuntos
Colectomia/métodos , Cirurgia Colorretal/educação , Doença Diverticular do Colo/cirurgia , Cirurgia Geral/educação , Idoso , Anastomose Cirúrgica , Colectomia/educação , Colectomia/estatística & dados numéricos , Emergências , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Prospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento , Estados Unidos
10.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 89(1): 118-124, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176177

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Emergency Surgery Score (ESS) was recently developed and retrospectively validated as an accurate mortality risk calculator for emergency general surgery. We sought to prospectively validate ESS, specifically in the high-risk nontrauma emergency laparotomy (EL) patient. METHODS: This is an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma multicenter prospective observational study. Between April 2018 and June 2019, 19 centers enrolled all adults (aged >18 years) undergoing EL. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were prospectively and systematically collected. Emergency Surgery Score was calculated for each patient and validated using c-statistic methodology by correlating it with three postoperative outcomes: (1) 30-day mortality, (2) 30-day complications (e.g., respiratory/renal failure, infection), and (3) postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) admission. RESULTS: A total of 1,649 patients were included. The mean age was 60.5 years, 50.3% were female, and 71.4% were white. The mean ESS was 6, and the most common indication for EL was hollow viscus perforation. The 30-day mortality and complication rates were 14.8% and 53.3%; 57.0% of patients required ICU admission. Emergency Surgery Score gradually and accurately predicted 30-day mortality; 3.5%, 50.0%, and 85.7% of patients with ESS of 3, 12, and 17 died after surgery, respectively, with a c-statistic of 0.84. Similarly, ESS gradually and accurately predicted complications; 21.0%, 57.1%, and 88.9% of patients with ESS of 1, 6, and 13 developed postoperative complications, with a c-statistic of 0.74. Emergency Surgery Score also accurately predicted which patients required intensive care unit admission (c-statistic, 0.80). CONCLUSION: This is the first prospective multicenter study to validate ESS as an accurate predictor of outcome in the EL patient. Emergency Surgery Score can prove useful for (1) perioperative patient and family counseling, (2) triaging patients to the intensive care unit, and (3) benchmarking the quality of emergency general surgery care. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level III.


Assuntos
Emergências , Cirurgia Geral , Medição de Risco/métodos , Ferimentos e Lesões/cirurgia , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/mortalidade , Pontuação de Propensão , Estudos Prospectivos , Ferimentos e Lesões/mortalidade
11.
Am Surg ; 85(7): 747-751, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31405421

RESUMO

The ACGME work hour restrictions facilitated increased utilization of service-based advanced practice providers (APPs) to offset reduced general surgery resident work hours. Information regarding attending surgeon perceptions of APP impact is limited. The aim of this survey was to gauge these perceptions with respect to workload, length of stay (LOS), safety, best practice, level of function, and clinical judgment. Attending surgeons on surgical teams that employ service-based APPs at an urban tertiary referral center responded to a survey at the completion of academic year 2016. Perceptions regarding APP impact on workload, LOS, safety, best practice, level of function, and clinical judgment were examined. Twenty-two attending surgeons (40%) responded. Respondents agreed that APPs always/usually decrease their workload (77%), decrease LOS (64%), improve safety (68%), contribute to best practice (82%), and decrease near misses (71%). They also agreed that APPs decrease resident workload (87%), but fewer agreed that APPs contribute to resident education (68%). The majority perceived APPs function at the PGY1/2 (43%) or PGY3 (39%) level and always/usually trust their clinical judgment (72%), and felt there was variability in level of function among APPs (56%). This single-center study illustrates that attending surgeons perceive a positive impact on patient care by service-based APPs.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Internato e Residência , Admissão e Escalonamento de Pessoal/organização & administração , Adulto , Feminino , Cirurgia Geral/educação , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Profissionais de Enfermagem , Segurança do Paciente/normas , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde , Carga de Trabalho
12.
Am J Surg ; 217(6): 1006-1009, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30654919

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Choledocholithiasis is present in up to 15% of cholecystectomy patients. Treatment can be surgical, endoscopic, or via interventional radiology. We hypothesized significant heterogeneity between hospitals exists in the approach to suspected common duct stones. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients that had a preoperative MRCP, endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP), or intra-operative cholangiogram was performed. Comparisons were by Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests with significance of p < 0.05 for paired variables and p < 0.017 for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: Twelve participating institutions identified 1263 patients (409 men and 854 women) with a median age of 49 years (IQR: 31-94). Liver function tests (LFT's) were elevated in 939 patients (75%), median bilirubin level 1.75 mg/dl (IQ: 0.8-3.7 mg/dl) and median common duct size 7 mm (IQR 5-10 mm). The most common initial procedure was cholecystectomy with IOC at seven institutions, endoscopy at four and MRCP at one. CONCLUSION: Significant variation exists within the surgical community regarding suspected common duct stones. These results underscore the need for a protocol for common duct stones to minimize multiple, redundant interventions.


Assuntos
Colangiopancreatografia Retrógrada Endoscópica/estatística & dados numéricos , Colangiopancreatografia por Ressonância Magnética/estatística & dados numéricos , Colecistectomia/estatística & dados numéricos , Coledocolitíase/diagnóstico por imagem , Coledocolitíase/cirurgia , Endossonografia/estatística & dados numéricos , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sudoeste dos Estados Unidos
14.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 82(3): 435-443, 2017 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28030492

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Data from the trauma patient population suggests handsewn (HS) anastomoses are superior to stapled (ST). A recent retrospective study in emergency general surgery (EGS) patients had similar findings. The aim of the current study was to evaluate HS and ST anastomoses in EGS patients undergoing urgent/emergent operations. METHODS: The study was sponsored by the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Multi-Institutional Studies Committee. Patients undergoing urgent/emergent bowel resection for EGS pathology were prospectively enrolled from July 22, 2013 to December 31, 2015. Patients were grouped by HS/ST anastomoses, and variables were collected. The primary outcome was anastomotic failure. Similar to other studies, anastomotic failure was evaluated at the anastomosis level. Multivariable logistic regression was performed controlling for age and risk factors for anastomotic failure. RESULTS: Fifteen institutions enrolled a total of 595 patients with 649 anastomoses (253 HS and 396 ST). Mean age was 61 years, 51% were men, 7% overall mortality. Age and sex were the same between groups. The overall anastomotic failure rate was 12.5%. The HS group had higher lactate, lower albumin, and were more likely to be on vasopressors. Hospital and intensive care unit days, as well as mortality, were greater in the HS group. Anastomotic failure rates and operative time were equivalent for HS and ST. On multivariate regression, the presence of contamination at initial resection (odds ratio, 1.965; 95% confidence interval, 1.183-3.264) and the patient being managed with open abdomen (odds ratio, 2.529; 95% confidence interval, 1.492-4.286) were independently associated with anastomotic failure, while the type of anastomosis was not. CONCLUSION: EGS patients requiring bowel resection and anastomosis are at high risk for anastomotic failure. The current study illustrates an apparent bias among acute care surgeons to perform HS techniques in higher-risk patients. Despite the individualized application of technique for differing patient populations, the risk of anastomotic failure was equivalent when comparing HS and ST anastomoses. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, level II.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos do Sistema Digestório/métodos , Emergências , Cirurgia Geral/métodos , Grampeamento Cirúrgico , Técnicas de Sutura , Idoso , Anastomose Cirúrgica , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Resultado do Tratamento
15.
Am J Surg ; 210(6): 1126-30; discussion 1130-1, 2015 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26520871

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Emergency general surgery patients are increasingly being managed with an open abdomen (OA). Factors associated with complications after primary fascial closure (PFC) are unknown. METHODS: Demographic and operative variables for all emergency general surgery patients managed with OA at an academic medical center were prospectively examined from June to December 2013. Primary outcome was complication requiring reoperation. RESULTS: Of 58 patients, 37 managed with OA achieved PFC. Of these, 14 needed re-exploration for dehiscence, compartment syndrome, infection, or other. Complications after PFC were not associated with age, type of operative intervention, time to closure, re-explorations, comorbidities, or mortality. Complications correlated with higher body mass index (P = .02), skin closure (P = .04), plasma infusion (P = .01), and less intraoperative bleeding (P = .05). Deep surgical site infection correlated with fascial dehiscence (P = .02). CONCLUSIONS: Reoperation after PFC was more likely in obese and nonhemorrhagic patients. Recognition of these factors and strategies to reduce surgical site infection may improve outcomes.


Assuntos
Técnicas de Fechamento de Ferimentos Abdominais , Fasciotomia , Cirurgia Geral , Adulto , Idoso , Perda Sanguínea Cirúrgica , Índice de Massa Corporal , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/prevenção & controle , Estudos Prospectivos , Reoperação , Fatores de Risco , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/prevenção & controle , Resultado do Tratamento
16.
Int J Surg Case Rep ; 13: 15-8, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26074486

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) is a technique that has been shown to provide central vascular control to support proximal aortic pressure and minimize hemorrhage in a wide variety of clinic settings, however the role of REBOA for emergency general surgery is less defined. CASE DESCRIPTION: This is a report of a 44 year old man who experienced hemorrhagic shock during video-assisted retroperitoneal debridement (VARD) for necrotizing pancreatitis where REBOA was used to prevent ongoing hemorrhage and death. DISCUSSION: This is the first documented report REBOA being used during pancreatic debridement in the literature and one of the first times it has been used in emergency general surgery. The use of REBOA is an option for those in hemorrhagic shock whom conventional aortic cross-clamping or supra-celiac aortic exposure is either not possible or exceedingly dangerous. CONCLUSION: REBOA allows for adequate resuscitation and can be used as a bridge to definitive therapy in a range of surgical subspecialties with minimal morbidity and complications. The risks associated with insertion of wires, sheaths, and catheters into the arterial system, as well as the risk of visceral and spinal cord ischemia due to aortic occlusion mandate that the use of this technique be utilized in only appropriate clinical scenarios.

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