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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31666286

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that the risk of CRC in night-shift workers might be different according to insulin receptor substrates status. METHODS: Among 77,470 eligible women having night work assessed in the Nurses' Health Study, we documented a total of 1,397 CRC cases, of which 304 or 308 had available data on IRS1 and IRS2, respectively. We used duplication method Cox proportional hazards regression analysis for competing risks to calculate HRs and 95% CIs for each CRC subtype. We measured tumor IRS1 or IRS2 expression by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Compared with women who never worked night-shifts, those working ≥ 15 years night-shifts had a marginal trend of increased overall risk of CRC (Ptrend = 0.06, multivariable HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.45). Longer duration of night-shift work was associated with a higher risk of IRS2-positive tumors (multivariable HR = 2.69, 95% CI 1.48 to 4.89, Ptrend = 0.001, ≥ 15 years night-shifts vs. never) but not with IRS2-negative tumors (multivariable HR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.51, Ptrend = 0.72, Pheterogeneity for IRS2 = 0.008). Similarly, the corresponding multivariable HRs were 1.81 for IRS1-positive tumors (95% CI 0.94 to 3.48, Ptrend = 0.06) and 1.13 for IRS1-negative tumors (95% CI 0.71 to 1.80, Ptrend = 0.56, Pheterogeneity for IRS1 = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Our molecular pathological epidemiology data suggest a potential role of IRS in mediating carcinogenesis induced by night-shift work. IMPACT: Although these findings need validation, rotating night-shift might increase CRC risk in women with abnormal insulin receptor pathway.

2.
Carcinogenesis ; 2019 Sep 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31556446

RESUMO

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is susceptible to oxidative stress and mutation. Few epidemiological studies have assessed the relationship between mtDNA copy number (mtDNAcn) and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), with inconsistent findings. In this study, we examined the association between pre-diagnostic leukocyte mtDNAcn and CRC risk in a case-control study of 324 female cases and 658 matched controls nested within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS). Relative mtDNAcn in peripheral blood leukocytes was measured by quantitative PCR-based assay. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the association of interest. Results showed lower log-mtDNAcn was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC, in a dose-dependent relationship (P for trend < 0.0001). Compared to the 4th quartile, multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) was 1.10 (0.69, 1.76) for the 3rd quartile, 1.40 (0.89, 2.19) for the 2nd quartile, and 2.19 (1.43, 3.35) for the 1st quartile. In analysis by anatomic subsite of CRC, we found a significant inverse association for proximal colon cancer [lowest vs. highest quartile, multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) = 3.31 (1.70, 6.45), P for trend = 0.0003]. Additionally, stratified analysis according to the follow-up time since blood collection showed that the inverse association between mtDNAcn and CRC remained significant among individuals with ≥ 5 years' follow-up, and marginally significant among those with ≥ 10 years' follow-up since mtDNAcn testing, suggesting that mtDNAcn may serve as a long-term predictor for risk of CRC. In conclusion, pre-diagnostic leukocyte mtDNAcn was inversely associated with CRC risk. Further basic experimental studies are needed to explore the underlying biological mechanisms linking mtDNAcn to CRC carcinogenesis.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31427306

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Leukocyte telomere length has been associated with risk of subsequent pancreatic cancer. Few prospective studies have evaluated the association of prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length with pancreatic cancer survival. METHODS: We prospectively examined the association of prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length with overall survival (OS) time among 423 participants diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma between 1984 and 2008 within the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, Nurses' Health Study, Physicians' Health Study, and Women's Health Initiative. We measured prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length in banked blood samples using quantitative PCR. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate HRs for OS with adjustment for potential confounders. We also evaluated 10 SNPs at the telomerase reverse transcriptase locus. RESULTS: Shorter prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length was associated with reduced OS among patients with pancreatic cancer (P trend = 0.04). The multivariable-adjusted HR for OS comparing the lowest with highest quintiles of leukocyte telomere length was 1.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.93), corresponding to a 3-month difference in median OS time. In an analysis excluding cases with blood collected within 2 years of cancer diagnosis, the association was moderately stronger (HR, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.21; comparing the lowest with highest quintiles; P trend = 0.01). No prognostic association or effect modification for the prognostic association of prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length was noted in relation to the studied SNPs. CONCLUSIONS: Prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length was associated with pancreatic cancer survival. IMPACT: Prediagnostic leukocyte telomere length can be a prognostic biomarker in pancreatic cancer.

4.
Int J Cancer ; 2019 Jul 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31276608

RESUMO

Anthropometric measurements, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and body fat percentage, have been used as indicators of obesity. Despite evidence that excess body fat is a risk factor for colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the magnitude of the association of BMI and other obesity indicators with the long-term risk of CRC remains unclear. Utilizing a Cox proportional hazards regression model, we examined differential associations between predicted body fat percentage and BMI with the risk of CRC (n = 2,017). The associations between CRC incidence and different adiposity measurements were also assessed. Predicted body fat percentage had a similar increased risk of CRC risk as BMI. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, the hazard ratio for CRC in the second to fifth quintiles (compared to the first quintile) of predicted body fat percentage were 1.32, 1.31, 1.53 and 2.09 for men (ptrend < 0.001) and 0.91, 0.90, 0.98 and 1.15 for women (ptrend = 0.03). Among various anthropometric measurements, predicted fat mass and waist circumference were slightly more strongly associated with CRC risk than BMI. In conclusion, the novel anthropometric prediction equations provided further evidence that a greater amount of body fat might contribute to CRC risk in both sexes. An innovative approach enabled us to estimate the susceptibilities of specific body composition with CRC risk, in an inexpensive and minimally invasive manner. Furthermore, the typically used measures of BMI and waist circumference are robust measures of adiposity to predict cancer risk in a relatively healthy population.

5.
Gastroenterology ; 2019 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31302144

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Endoscopic screening reduces incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) because precursor lesions, such as conventional adenomas or serrated polyps, are removed. Individuals with polypectomies are advised to undergo colonoscopy surveillance to prevent CRC. However, guidelines for surveillance intervals after diagnosis of a precursor lesion, particularly for individuals with serrated polyps, vary widely, and lack sufficient supporting evidence. Consequently, some high-risk patients do not receive enough surveillance and lower-risk subjects receive excessive surveillance. METHODS: We examined the association between findings from first endoscopy and CRC risk among 122,899 participants who underwent flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy in the Nurses' Health Study 1 (1990-2012), Nurses' Health Study 2 (1989-2013), or the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1990-2012). Endoscopic findings were categorized as no polyp, conventional adenoma, or serrated polyp (hyperplastic polyp, traditional serrated adenoma, or sessile serrated adenoma, with or without cytological dysplasia). Conventional adenomas were classified as advanced (≥10 mm, high-grade dysplasia, or tubulovillous or villous histology) or non-advanced, and serrated polyps were assigned to categories of large (≥10 mm) or small (< 10 mm). We used Cox proportional hazards regression model to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of CRC incidence, after adjusting for various potential risk factors. RESULTS: After a median follow-up period of 10 years, we documented 491 incident cases of CRC: 51 occurred in 6161 participants with conventional adenomas, 24 in 5918 participants with serrated polyps, and 427 in 112,107 participants with no polyp. Compared to participants with no polyp detected during initial endoscopy, the multivariable HR for incident CRC in individuals with an advanced adenoma was 4.07 (95% CI, 2.89-5.72) and the HR for CRC in individuals with a large serrated polyp was 3.35 (95% CI, 1.37-8.15). In contrast, there was no significant increase in risk of CRC in patients with non-advanced adenomas (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.68-2.16, P=.52) or small serrated polyps (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.76-2.08; P=.38). CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide support for guidelines that recommend repeat lower endoscopy within 3 years of a diagnosis of advanced adenoma and large serrated polyps. In contrast, patients with non-advanced adenoma or small serrated polyps may not require more intensive surveillance than patients without polyps.

7.
Int J Cancer ; 2019 Jun 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31209889

RESUMO

Interindividual differences in DNA repair systems may play a role in modulating the individual risk of developing colorectal cancer. To better ascertain the role of DNA repair gene polymorphisms on colon and rectal cancer risk individually, we evaluated 15,419 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 185 DNA repair genes using GWAS data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO), which included 8,178 colon cancer, 2,936 rectum cancer cases and 14,659 controls. Rs1800734 (in MLH1 gene) was associated with colon cancer risk (p-value = 3.5 × 10-6 ) and rs2189517 (in RAD51B) with rectal cancer risk (p-value = 5.7 × 10-6 ). The results had statistical significance close to the Bonferroni corrected p-value of 5.8 × 10-6 . Ninety-four SNPs were significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk after Binomial Sequential Goodness of Fit (BSGoF) procedure and confirmed the relevance of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and homologous recombination pathways for colon and rectum cancer, respectively. Defects in MMR genes are known to be crucial for familial form of colorectal cancer but our findings suggest that specific genetic variations in MLH1 are important also in the individual predisposition to sporadic colon cancer. Other SNPs associated with the risk of colon cancer (e.g., rs16906252 in MGMT) were found to affect mRNA expression levels in colon transverse and therefore working as possible cis-eQTL suggesting possible mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

8.
Cancer Immunol Res ; 7(8): 1230-1236, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31217164

RESUMO

Immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibitors, such as the programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibodies pembrolizumab and nivolumab, are effective in a variety of tumors, yet not all patients respond. Tumor microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) has emerged as a biomarker of response to checkpoint blockade, leading to the tissue agnostic approval of pembrolizumab in MSI-H cancers. Here we describe a patient with MSI-H colorectal cancer that was treated with this immune checkpoint inhibitor and exhibited progression of disease. We examined this intrinsic resistance through genomic, transcriptional, and pathologic characterization of the patient's tumor and the associated immune microenvironment. The tumor had typical MSI-H molecular features, including a high neoantigen load. We also identified biallelic loss of the gene for ß2-microglobulin (B2M), whose product is critical for antigen presentation. Immune infiltration deconvolution analysis of bulk transcriptome data from this anti-PD-1-resistant tumor and hundreds of other colorectal cancer specimens revealed a high natural killer cell and M2 macrophage infiltration in the patient's cancer. This was confirmed by single-cell transcriptome analysis and multiplex immunofluorescence. Our study provides insight into resistance in MSI-H tumors and suggests immunotherapeutic strategies in additional genomic contexts of colorectal cancer.

9.
Br J Cancer ; 121(1): 86-94, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31114018

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Physical activity during adulthood has been consistently associated with lower risk of colorectal cancers, but whether physical activity during adolescence may also play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis is unclear. METHODS: We included 28,250 women in the Nurses' Health Study II who provided data on physical activity during adolescence (ages 12-22 years) in 1997 and underwent lower bowel endoscopy (1998-2011). We used logistic regression models for clustered data to examine the association between physical activity during adolescence and risk of adenoma later in life. RESULTS: Physical activity during adolescence was inversely associated with risk of colorectal adenoma (2373 cases), independent of physical activity during adulthood. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of adenoma was 0.89 (95% CI 0.77-1.02; Ptrend = 0.03) comparing women with ≥ 72 metabolic equivalent of tasks-hours/week (MET-h/week) to < 21 MET-h/week. Women with high physical activity during both adolescence (≥53.3 MET-h/week) and adulthood (≥23.1 MET-h/week) had significantly lower risk of adenoma (all adenomas: OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.66-0.88; advanced adenoma: OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45-0.82) compared to women with low physical activity during both stages of life. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that physical activity during adolescence may lower the risk of colorectal adenoma later in life.

10.
Int J Cancer ; 2019 Apr 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31037736

RESUMO

Alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). However, while studies have consistently reported elevated risk of CRC among heavy drinkers, associations at moderate levels of alcohol consumption are less clear. We conducted a combined analysis of 16 studies of CRC to examine the shape of the alcohol-CRC association, investigate potential effect modifiers of the association, and examine differential effects of alcohol consumption by cancer anatomic site and stage. We collected information on alcohol consumption for 14,276 CRC cases and 15,802 controls from 5 case-control and 11 nested case-control studies of CRC. We compared adjusted logistic regression models with linear and restricted cubic splines to select a model that best fit the association between alcohol consumption and CRC. Study-specific results were pooled using fixed-effects meta-analysis. Compared to non-/occasional drinking (≤1 g/day), light/moderate drinking (up to 2 drinks/day) was associated with a decreased risk of CRC (odds ratio [OR]: 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88-0.98, p = 0.005), heavy drinking (2-3 drinks/day) was not significantly associated with CRC risk (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.99-1.24, p = 0.08) and very heavy drinking (more than 3 drinks/day) was associated with a significant increased risk (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.11-1.40, p < 0.001). We observed no evidence of interactions with lifestyle risk factors or of differences by cancer site or stage. These results provide further evidence that there is a J-shaped association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk. This overall pattern was not significantly modified by other CRC risk factors and there was no effect heterogeneity by tumor site or stage.

11.
Cancer Causes Control ; 30(8): 799-811, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31069578

RESUMO

An important premise of epidemiology is that individuals with the same disease share similar underlying etiologies and clinical outcomes. In the past few decades, our knowledge of disease pathogenesis has improved, and disease classification systems have evolved to the point where no complex disease processes are considered homogenous. As a result, pathology and epidemiology have been integrated into the single, unified field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE). Advancing integrative molecular and population-level health sciences and addressing the unique research challenges specific to the field of MPE necessitates assembling experts in diverse fields, including epidemiology, pathology, biostatistics, computational biology, bioinformatics, genomics, immunology, and nutritional and environmental sciences. Integrating these seemingly divergent fields can lead to a greater understanding of pathogenic processes. The International MPE Meeting Series fosters discussion that addresses the specific research questions and challenges in this emerging field. The purpose of the meeting series is to: discuss novel methods to integrate pathology and epidemiology; discuss studies that provide pathogenic insights into population impact; and educate next-generation scientists. Herein, we share the proceedings of the Fourth International MPE Meeting, held in Boston, MA, USA, on 30 May-1 June, 2018. Major themes of this meeting included 'integrated genetic and molecular pathologic epidemiology', 'immunology-MPE', and 'novel disease phenotyping'. The key priority areas for future research identified by meeting attendees included integration of tumor immunology and cancer disparities into epidemiologic studies, further collaboration between computational and population-level scientists to gain new insight on exposure-disease associations, and future pooling projects of studies with comparable data.


Assuntos
Epidemiologia , Patologia Molecular , Humanos , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Neoplasias/genética , Neoplasias/imunologia , Neoplasias/patologia
12.
Int J Cancer ; 145(11): 3040-3051, 2019 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31044426

RESUMO

Epidemiologic evidence relating fiber intake to colorectal cancer (CRC) remains inconclusive and data are limited on different food sources of fiber and heterogeneity by tumor subsite and molecular profile. We prospectively followed for CRC incidence 90,869 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1980-2012) and 47,924 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2012), who completed a validated food frequency questionnaire every 4 years. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the associations with CRC risk for total, cereal, fruit and vegetable fiber and whole grains. We also assessed the associations according to tumor subsites (proximal colon, distal colon and rectum) and molecular markers (microsatellite instability, BRAF mutation, CpG island methylator phenotype and KRAS mutation). We documented 3,178 CRC cases during 3,685,903 person-years of follow-up in the NHS and HPFS. Intake of total dietary fiber was not associated with CRC risk after multivariable adjustment in either women (hazard ratio [HR] comparing extreme deciles, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.92-1.48, ptrend = 0.55) or men (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.67-1.21, ptrend = 0.47). Higher intake of cereal fiber and whole grains was associated with lower CRC risk in men with an HR of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.57-1.00) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96), respectively. No heterogeneity was detected by tumor subsite or molecular markers (pheterogeneity > 0.05). Higher intake of total dietary fiber within the range of a typical American diet is unlikely to substantially reduce CRC risk. The potential benefit of cereal fiber and whole grains in men warrants further confirmation.

13.
Int J Epidemiol ; 2019 Apr 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31038671

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests that conventional adenomas (CAs) and serrated polyps (SPs) represent two distinct groups of precursor lesions for colorectal cancer (CRC). The influence of common genetic variants on risk of CAs and SPs remain largely unknown. METHODS: Among 27 426 participants within three prospective cohort studies, we created a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) based on 40 CRC-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in previous genome-wide association studies; and we examined the association of GRS (per one standard deviation increment) with risk of CAs, SPs and synchronous CAs and SPs, by multivariable logistic regression. We also analysed individual variants in the secondary analysis. RESULTS: During 18-20 years of follow-up, we documented 2952 CAs, 1585 SPs and 794 synchronous CAs and SPs. Higher GRS was associated with increased risk of CAs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-1.21] and SPs (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03-1.14), with a stronger association for CAs than SPs (Pheterogeneity=0.01). An even stronger association was found for patients with synchronous CAs and SPs (OR = 1.32), advanced CAs (OR = 1.22) and multiple CAs (OR = 1.25). Different sets of variants were associated with CAs and SPs, with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.02 between the ORs associating the 40 SNPs with the two lesions. After correcting for multiple testing, three variants were associated with CAs (rs3802842, rs6983267 and rs7136702) and two with SPs (rs16892766 and rs4779584). CONCLUSIONS: Common genetic variants play a potential role in the conventional and serrated pathways of CRC. Different sets of variants are identified for the two pathways, further supporting the aetiological heterogeneity of CRC.

15.
Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 8(2): 269-290, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30954552

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Colorectal cancer is an epigenetically heterogeneous disease, however, the extent and spectrum of the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) is not clear. METHODS: Genome-scale methylation and transcript expression were measured by DNA Methylation and RNA expression microarray in 216 unselected colorectal cancers, and findings were validated using The Cancer Genome Atlas 450K and RNA sequencing data. Mutations in epigenetic regulators were assessed using CIMP-subtyped Cancer Genome Atlas exomes. RESULTS: CIMP-high cancers dichotomized into CIMP-H1 and CIMP-H2 based on methylation profile. KRAS mutation was associated significantly with CIMP-H2 cancers, but not CIMP-H1 cancers. Congruent with increasing methylation, there was a stepwise increase in patient age from 62 years in the CIMP-negative subgroup to 75 years in the CIMP-H1 subgroup (P < .0001). CIMP-H1 predominantly comprised consensus molecular subtype 1 cancers (70%) whereas consensus molecular subtype 3 was over-represented in the CIMP-H2 subgroup (55%). Polycomb Repressive Complex-2 (PRC2)-marked loci were subjected to significant gene body methylation in CIMP cancers (P < 1.6 × 10-78). We identified oncogenes susceptible to gene body methylation and Wnt pathway antagonists resistant to gene body methylation. CIMP cluster-specific mutations were observed in chromatin remodeling genes, such as in the SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable and Chromodomain Helicase DNA-Binding gene families. CONCLUSIONS: There are 5 clinically and molecularly distinct subgroups of colorectal cancer. We show a striking association between CIMP and age, sex, and tumor location, and identify a role for gene body methylation in the progression of serrated neoplasia. These data support our recent findings that CIMP is uncommon in young patients and that BRAF mutant polyps in young patients may have limited potential for malignant progression.

17.
Cancer Causes Control ; 30(6): 637-649, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30963391

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A preventive potential of high calcium intake against colorectal cancer has been indicated for distal colon cancer, which is inversely associated with high-level CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), high-level microsatellite instability (MSI), and BRAF and PIK3CA mutations. In addition, BRAF mutation is strongly inversely correlated with KRAS mutation. We hypothesized that the association between calcium intake and colon cancer risk might vary by these molecular features. METHODS: We prospectively followed 88,506 women from the Nurses' Health Study and 47,733 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study for up to 30 years. Duplication-method Cox proportional cause-specific hazards regression was used to estimate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs), and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the associations between calcium intake and the risk of colon cancer subtypes. By Bonferroni correction, the α-level was adjusted to 0.01. RESULTS: Based on 853 colon cancer cases, the inverse association between dietary calcium intake and colon cancer risk differed by CIMP status (pheterogeneity = 0.01). Per each 300 mg/day increase in intake, multivariable HRs were 0.84 (95% CI 0.76-0.94) for CIMP-negative/low and 1.12 (95% CI 0.93-1.34) for CIMP-high. Similar differential associations were suggested for MSI subtypes (pheterogeneity = 0.02), with the corresponding HR being 0.86 (95% CI 0.77-0.95) for non-MSI-high and 1.10 (95% CI 0.92-1.32) for MSI-high. No differential associations were observed by BRAF, KRAS, or PIK3CA mutations. CONCLUSION: The inverse association between dietary calcium intake and colon cancer risk may be specific to CIMP-negative/low and possibly non-MSI-high subtypes.


Assuntos
Cálcio/administração & dosagem , Neoplasias do Colo/patologia , Ilhas de CpG/genética , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas B-raf/genética , Idoso , Neoplasias do Colo/genética , Metilação de DNA , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Instabilidade de Microssatélites , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação , Fenótipo , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Risco
18.
Br J Cancer ; 120(8): 848-854, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30867564

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Individuals with a family history of cancer may be at increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) individuals carry increased risk for pancreatic cancer and other cancer types. METHODS: We examined the association between family history of cancer, AJ heritage, and incident pancreatic cancer in 49 410 male participants of the prospective Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: During 1.1 million person-years (1986-2016), 452 participants developed pancreatic cancer. Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed in individuals with a family history of pancreatic (HR, 2.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-6.07) or breast cancer (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.01-1.94). There was a trend towards higher risk of pancreatic cancer in relation to a family history of colorectal cancer (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.95-1.55) or AJ heritage (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.94-1.77). The risk was highly elevated among AJ men with a family history of breast or colorectal cancer (HR, 2.61 [95% CI, 1.41-4.82] and 1.92 [95% CI, 1.05-3.49], respectively). CONCLUSION: Family history of pancreatic cancer was associated with increased risk of this malignancy. Family history of breast or colorectal cancer was associated with the increased risk among AJ men.

19.
Eur J Cancer ; 111: 82-93, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30826660

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2, cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2)-prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway promotes tumour progression. Considering evidence suggesting increased PGE2 synthesis by BRAF mutation in tumour cells, we hypothesised that the association of tumour PTGS2 (COX-2) expression with colorectal cancer mortality might be stronger in BRAF-mutated tumours than in BRAF-wild-type tumours. METHODS: Using 1708 patients, including 1200 stage I-IV colorectal carcinoma cases in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) and 508 stage III colon cancer cases in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored randomised controlled trial of adjuvant therapy (CALGB/Alliance 89803), we evaluated tumour PTGS2 (COX-2) expression status using immunohistochemistry. We examined the prognostic association of PTGS2 (COX-2) expression in strata of BRAF mutation status by multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models to adjust for potential confounders, including disease stage, tumour differentiation, microsatellite instability status and KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. RESULTS: In NHS and HPFS, the association of PTGS2 (COX-2) expression with colorectal cancer-specific survival differed by BRAF mutation status (Pinteraction = 0.0005); compared with PTGS2 (COX-2)-negative/low carcinomas, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for PTGS2 (COX-2)-high carcinomas were 2.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.39-4.28) in BRAF-mutated cases and 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-1.04) in BRAF-wild-type cases. Differential prognostic associations of PTGS2 (COX-2) expression in strata of BRAF mutation status were similarly observed in CALGB/Alliance 89803 trial (Pinteraction = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The association of tumour PTGS2 (COX-2) expression with colorectal cancer mortality is stronger in BRAF-mutated tumours than in BRAF-wild-type tumours, supporting interactive roles of PTGS2 (COX-2) expression and BRAF mutation statuses in prognostication of patients with colorectal cancer; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier, NCT00003835.

20.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 111(2): 170-179, 2019 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30726946

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that diets inducing postprandial hyperinsulinemia may be associated with increased cancer-related mortality. The goal of this study was to assess the influence of postdiagnosis dietary insulin load and dietary insulin index on outcomes of stage III colon cancer patients. METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study of 1023 patients with resected stage III colon cancer enrolled in an adjuvant chemotherapy trial who reported dietary intake halfway through and six months after chemotherapy. We evaluated the association of dietary insulin load and dietary insulin index with cancer recurrence and survival using Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for potential confounders; statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: High dietary insulin load had a statistically significant association with worse disease-free survival (DFS), comparing the highest vs lowest quintile (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 2.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.90 to 4.02, Ptrend < .001). High dietary insulin index was also associated with worse DFS (highest vs lowest quintile, HR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.22 to 2.51, Ptrend= .01). The association between higher dietary insulin load and worse DFS differed by body mass index and was strongest among patients with obesity (HR = 3.66, 95% CI = 1.88 to 7.12, Pinteraction = .04). The influence of dietary insulin load on cancer outcomes did not differ by mutation status of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, or microsatellite instability. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with resected stage III colon cancer who consumed a high-insulinogenic diet were at increased risk of recurrence and mortality. These findings support the importance of dietary management following resection of colon cancer, and future research into underlying mechanisms of action is warranted.

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