Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 84
Filtrar
1.
Psychol Health ; : 1-16, 2021 May 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34029134

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To analyse the combined effect of depression and cognitive reserve (CR) on cognition over a three-year follow-up period; and to explore this relationship specifically in individuals aged 65+ years. DESIGN: Data from the 'Edad con Salud' project were analysed (n = 1,144; 50+ years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to evaluate depression. CR was assessed with the Cognitive Reserve Questionnaire. Episodic memory was assessed with the word list memory and recall. Verbal fluency was measured through the animal naming task. Random coefficient regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: Depression was associated with lower scores in episodic memory, whereas increased levels of CR were related with higher scores across all the cognitive tests. Among older-aged individuals, cognition decreased at lower levels of CR regardless of depression, while participants with depression exhibited decreased values in both measures of memory at higher levels of CR. CONCLUSION: Depression and CR were related with cognitive performance. Among older individuals, those with low levels of CR may constitute a vulnerable group with poor cognitive prognosis, whilst a harmful effect of depression on memory performance was observed among individuals with greater CR. Further evidence needs to be gathered to understand these associations.

2.
Appl Neuropsychol Adult ; : 1-10, 2021 May 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33969762

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prevalence of dementia and cognitive impairment increase creating the need for identifying modifiable risk factors to reduce their burden. The aim of this study was to identify latent groups following similar trajectories in cognitive performance assessed with the verbal fluency test, as well as their determinants. METHODS: Data from English Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA) were studied. Latent groups of similar course through a 6-year period in the outcome variable (verbal fluency) were investigated, along with their determinants, using Group Based Trajectory Modeling (GBTM). RESULTS: Four latent groups of verbal fluency trajectories were revealed. Education was the strongest predictor for a favorable trajectory, while cardiovascular disease and depression symptoms were associated with lower within each trajectory. CONCLUSION: Cardiovascular diseases and depressive symptoms are associated with a worse course of verbal fluency through aging, implying that they might serve as targets for interventions to prevent cognitive decline in the aging population. Contrarily, higher level of education is associated with a more favorable course through aging.

3.
Int. j. clin. health psychol. (Internet) ; 21(1): 196-196, ene.-abr. 2021. graf, tab
Artigo em Inglês | IBECS | ID: ibc-194177

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 pandemic, declared on March 11, 2020, constitute an extraordinary health, social and economic global challenge. The impact on people's mental health is expected to be high. This paper sought to systematically review community-based studies on depression conducted during the COVID-19 and estimate the pooled prevalence of depression. METHOD: We searched for cross-sectional, community-based studies listed on PubMed or Web of Science from January 1, 2020 to May 8, 2020 that reported prevalence of depression. A random effect model was used to estimate the pooled proportion of depression. RESULTS: A total of 12 studies were included in the meta-analysis, with prevalence rates of depression ranging from 7.45% to 48.30%. The pooled prevalence of depression was 25% (95% CI: 18%−33%), with significant heterogeneity between studies (I2=99.60%, p<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with a global estimated prevalence of depression of 3.44% in 2017, our pooled prevalence of 25% appears to be 7 times higher, thus suggesting an important impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on people's mental health. Addressing mental health during and after this global health crisis should be placed into the international and national public health agenda to improve citizens' wellbeing


INTRODUCCIÓN: La pandemia de COVID-19, declarada el 11 de marzo de 2020, representa un reto global extraordinario a nivel sanitario, social y económico. Se espera un impacto alto en la salud mental de las personas. Este artículo tiene como objetivo realizar una revisión sistemática de estudios transversales basados en muestras comunitarias que proporcionaban la prevalencia de depresión durante la crisis del COVID-19. MÉTODO: Se realizó una búsqueda de estudios comunitarios publicados en Pubmed y Web of Science desde el 1 de enero del 2020 al 8 de mayo del 2020 y que informaron sobre la prevalencia de depresión. Se usó un modelo de efectos aleatorios para estimar la proporción agrupada de depresión. RESULTADOS: Un total de 12 estudios fueron incluidos en el meta-análisis, con prevalencias de depresión que oscilaban entre 7,45% y 48,30%. La prevalencia agrupada de depresión fue de 25% (95% CI: 18%-33%), con heterogeneidad significativa entre estudios (I2 = 99,60%, p < 0,001). CONCLUSIONES: En comparación con una estimación global de depresión en 2017 del 3,44%, nuestra prevalencia agrupada del 25% es 7 veces mayor, sugiriendo un impacto importante del brote de COVID-19 en la salud mental de las personas. El abordaje de la salud mental durante y después de esta crisis global sanitaria debe ser parte de las agendas de salud pública nacionales e internacionales para mejorar el bienestar de los ciudadanos


Assuntos
Humanos , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Depressão/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Prevalência
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33546118

RESUMO

(1) Introduction: Dementia is a major public health problem, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequent subtype. Clarifying the potential risk factors is necessary in order to improve dementia-prevention strategies and quality of life. Here, our purpose was to investigate the role of the absence of hedonic tone; anhedonia, understood as the reduction on previous enjoyable daily activities, which occasionally is underdetected and underdiagnosed; and the risk of developing AD in a cognitively unimpaired and non-depressed population sample. (2) Method: We used data from the Zaragoza Dementia and Depression (ZARADEMP) project, a longitudinal epidemiological study on dementia and depression. After excluding subjects with dementia, a sample of 2830 dwellers aged ≥65 years was followed for 4.5 years. The geriatric mental state examination was used to identify cases of anhedonia. AD was diagnosed by a panel of research psychiatrists according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. A multivariate survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression model were performed, and the analysis was controlled by an analysis for the presence of clinically significant depression. (3) Results: We found a significant association between anhedonia cases and AD risk in the univariate analysis (hazard ratio (HR): 2.37; 95% CI: 1.04-5.40). This association persisted more strongly in the fully adjusted model. (4) Conclusions: Identifying cognitively intact individuals with anhedonia is a priority to implement preventive strategies that could delay the progression of cognitive and functional impairment in subjects at risk of AD.


Assuntos
Doença de Alzheimer , Idoso , Doença de Alzheimer/epidemiologia , Anedonia , Humanos , Vida Independente , Qualidade de Vida , Fatores de Risco
5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33453320

RESUMO

During the COVID-19, healthcare workers are exposed to a higher risk of mental health problems, especially anxiety symptoms. The current work aims at contributing to an update of anxiety prevalence in this population by conducting a rapid systematic review and meta-analysis. Medline and Pubmed were searched for studies on the prevalence of anxiety in health care workers published from December 1, 2019 to September 15, 2020. In total, 71 studies were included in this study. The pooled prevalence of anxiety in healthcare workers was 25% (95% CI: 21%-29%), 27% in nurses (95% CI: 20%-34%), 17% in medical doctors (95% CI: 12%-22%) and 43% in frontline healthcare workers (95% CI: 25%-62%). Our results suggest that healthcare workers are experiencing significant levels of anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially those on the frontline and nurses. However, international longitudinal studies are needed to fully understand the impact of the pandemic on healthcare workers' mental health, especially those working at the frontline.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/psicologia , /psicologia , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Pandemias , Estudos Transversais , Pessoal de Saúde/tendências , Humanos , Prevalência , Fatores de Tempo
6.
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry ; 36(1): 76-85, 2021 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32791563

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The number of older adults is rapidly rising globally. Loneliness is a common problem that can deteriorate health. The aims of this work were to identify different types of loneliness (transient and chronic) and to assess their association with depression over time. METHODS: A nationally representative sample from the Spanish population comprising 1190 individuals aged 50+ years was interviewed on three evaluations over a 7-year period. The UCLA Loneliness Scale was used to measure loneliness. While chronic loneliness was defined as the presence of loneliness across all three waves, transient loneliness expressed the presence of loneliness in one wave only. A 12-month major depressive episode was assessed at each interview. After confirming the cross-sectional relationship, a multilevel mixed-effects model was used to examine the association between loneliness and depression. RESULTS: Almost a quarter of individuals felt lonely and one out of 10 presented depression at baseline. Of the sample, 22.78% showed transient loneliness, while 6.72% presented the chronic type. People experiencing chronic loneliness were at a higher risk of presenting major depression (OR = 6.11; 95% CI = 2.62, 14.22) than those presenting transient loneliness (OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.19, 4.14). This association varied over time and was stronger at the first follow-up than at the second one. CONCLUSIONS: Focusing on loneliness prevention could reduce the risk of depression. Chronic loneliness is a public health problem that should be addressed through the full participation of the political, social, and medical sectors.


Assuntos
Transtorno Depressivo Maior , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/epidemiologia , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/epidemiologia , Humanos , Solidão , Estudos Longitudinais
7.
Maturitas ; 143: 157-164, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33308622

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Higher levels of sedentary behavior (SB) may be associated with decreased happiness but there are no studies on this topic. Thus, we investigated this association, and its influential factors among middle-aged and older adults using nationally representative datasets from six low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). STUDY DESIGN: Community-based cross-sectional data from the Global Ageing and Adult Health study were analyzed. SB was assessed with the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression and mediation analyses were performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Happiness was assessed with a cross-culturally validated single-item question (5-point scale) with higher scores indicating higher levels of happiness. RESULTS: The final sample included 34,129 adults aged 50 years or more (mean age = 62.4 ±â€¯SD 16 years; 51.9 % female). After adjusting for multiple confounders, increased time spent in SB (hours/day) was associated with lower happiness levels (OR = 0.96; 95 % CI = 0.94-0.98). Mobility limitations, cognitive complaints, pain/discomfort, sleep problems and disability explained the largest proportion of the association between SB and happiness. CONCLUSIONS: SB was linked with lower levels of happiness in middle-aged and older adults from LMICs, although a high level of between-country heterogeneity was observed. Longitudinal and interventional studies among older people in LMICs are warranted to assess directionality and the potential for reduction in SB to improve mental well-being in this population.


Assuntos
Países em Desenvolvimento/estatística & dados numéricos , Felicidade , Comportamento Sedentário , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Transtornos Cognitivos/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Pessoas com Deficiência , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Limitação da Mobilidade , Dor/epidemiologia , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/epidemiologia
8.
Int J Epidemiol ; 2020 Dec 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33274372

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Research efforts to measure the concept of healthy ageing have been diverse and limited to specific populations. This diversity limits the potential to compare healthy ageing across countries and/or populations. In this study, we developed a novel measurement scale of healthy ageing using worldwide cohorts. METHODS: In the Ageing Trajectories of Health-Longitudinal Opportunities and Synergies (ATHLOS) project, data from 16 international cohorts were harmonized. Using ATHLOS data, an item response theory (IRT) model was used to develop a scale with 41 items related to health and functioning. Measurement heterogeneity due to intra-dataset specificities was detected, applying differential item functioning via a logistic regression framework. The model accounted for specificities in model parameters by introducing cohort-specific parameters that rescaled scores to the main scale, using an equating procedure. Final scores were estimated for all individuals and converted to T-scores with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10. RESULTS: A common scale was created for 343 915 individuals above 18 years of age from 16 studies. The scale showed solid evidence of concurrent validity regarding various sociodemographic, life and health factors, and convergent validity with healthy life expectancy (r = 0.81) and gross domestic product (r = 0.58). Survival curves showed that the scale could also be predictive of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The ATHLOS scale, due to its reliability and global representativeness, has the potential to contribute to worldwide research on healthy ageing.

9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32904715

RESUMO

Introduction: COVID-19 pandemic, declared on March 11, 2020, constitute an extraordinary health, social and economic global challenge. The impact on people's mental health is expected to be high. This paper sought to systematically review community-based studies on depression conducted during the COVID-19 and estimate the pooled prevalence of depression. Method: We searched for cross-sectional, community-based studies listed on PubMed or Web of Science from January 1, 2020 to May 8, 2020 that reported prevalence of depression. A random effect model was used to estimate the pooled proportion of depression. Results: A total of 12 studies were included in the meta-analysis, with prevalence rates of depression ranging from 7.45% to 48.30%. The pooled prevalence of depression was 25% (95% CI: 18% - 33%), with significant heterogeneity between studies (I 2  = 99.60%, p < .001). Conclusions: Compared with a global estimated prevalence of depression of 3.44% in 2017, our pooled prevalence of 25% appears to be 7 times higher, thus suggesting an important impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on people's mental health. Addressing mental health during and after this global health crisis should be placed into the international and national public health agenda to improve citizens' wellbeing.

10.
J Anxiety Disord ; 75: 102296, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32866758

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous research suggests an association between anxiety disorders and worse cognitive function. However, this association may vary depending on the type of disorder and age. We analysed the association of panic attack, 12-month and lifetime panic disorder (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), with cognitive function in a representative sample of Spanish adults, and compared three age groups (18-49, 50-64, and 65+). METHODS: Some 4,582 participants were interviewed with an adapted CIDI interview. Unadjusted and adjusted linear regression models were calculated by age group, using T scores of verbal fluency and episodic memory as the outcomes. RESULTS: In young adults, 12-month GAD was associated with significantly lower scores of memory performance and verbal fluency, and 12-month PD with worse verbal fluency. In middle-aged participants, lifetime panic attack was related to better performance in verbal fluency, whereas having a diagnosis of lifetime PD was associated with lower scores. However, only participants aged 18-49 with 12-month GAD showed lower memory and verbal fluency, at almost one standard deviation below participants without 12-month GAD. LIMITATIONS: Low prevalence rates of anxiety disorder could have led to biased results. CONCLUSIONS: In young adults, a concurrent GAD might be particularly associated with memory and verbal fluency deficits, whereas only verbal fluency is affected in middle-aged adults with a history of PD, although this association is small. In older adults, anxiety disorders are not clearly associated with worse cognition, probably because in this age group other confounder variables might be attenuating this link. Overall, our findings suggest that cognitive interventions for anxiety disorders may be relevant, especially for young and middle-aged adults.

11.
BMJ Open ; 10(7): e034441, 2020 07 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32690500

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to determine clusters of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in a very large, population-based sample of middle-aged and older adults from low- and middle-income (LMICs) and high-income (HICs) regions. Additionally, we explored the associations with several covariates. DESIGN: The total sample was 72 140 people aged 50+ years from three population-based studies (English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe Study and Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health) included in the Ageing Trajectories of Health: Longitudinal Opportunities and Synergies (ATHLOS) project and representing eight regions with LMICs and HICs. Variables were previously harmonised using an ex-post strategy. Eight NCDs were used in latent class analysis. Multinomial models were made to calculate associations with covariates. All the analyses were stratified by age (50-64 and 65+ years old). RESULTS: Three clusters were identified: 'cardio-metabolic' (8.93% in participants aged 50-64 years and 27.22% in those aged 65+ years), 'respiratory-mental-articular' (3.91% and 5.27%) and 'healthy' (87.16% and 67.51%). In the younger group, Russia presented the highest prevalence of the 'cardio-metabolic' group (18.8%) and England the 'respiratory-mental-articular' (5.1%). In the older group, Russia had the highest proportion of both classes (48.3% and 9%). Both the younger and older African participants presented the highest proportion of the 'healthy' class. Older age, being woman, widowed and with low levels of education and income were related to an increased risk of multimorbidity. Physical activity was a protective factor in both age groups and smoking a risk factor for the 'respiratory-mental-articular'. CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is common worldwide, especially in HICs and Russia. Health policies in each country addressing coordination and support are needed to face the complexity of a pattern of growing multimorbidity.

12.
Soc Sci Med ; 258: 113087, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32554229

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the association between loneliness and all-cause mortality over a six-year follow-up period using the overall sample and by age groups (18-59 years and 60+ years). METHOD: Data from a longitudinal, prospective study of a nationally-representative sample of the Spanish non-institutionalized adult population were analysed (n = 4467). Mortality was ascertained via linkage to the National Death Index or obtained during the household visits. The UCLA Loneliness Scale was used to measure loneliness. Sex, age, education, physical activity, tobacco consumption, body mass index, disability, depression, living situation, and social participation were also considered as covariates. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were carried out. RESULTS: A higher level of loneliness was not associated with mortality risk in fully covariate-adjusted models over the entire population (HR = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.94, 1.12). The interaction term between loneliness and age groups was significant, indicating that the rate for survival of loneliness varied by age (HR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.63 for young- and middle-aged individuals; HR = 0.96; 95% CI = 0.89, 1.04 for older adults). CONCLUSIONS: The development of interventions aimed at tackling loneliness among young- and middle-aged adults might contribute to a mortality risk reduction. Future research is warranted to test whether our results can be replicated.

13.
Nutrients ; 12(6)2020 Jun 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32545243

RESUMO

We investigated the relation between alcohol drinking and healthy ageing by means of a validated health status metric, using individual data from the Ageing Trajectories of Health: Longitudinal Opportunities and Synergies (ATHLOS) project. For the purposes of this study, the ATHLOS harmonised dataset, which includes information from individuals aged 65+ in 38 countries, was analysed (n = 135,440). Alcohol drinking was reflected by means of three harmonised variables: alcohol drinking frequency, current and past alcohol drinker. A set of 41 self-reported health items and measured tests were used to generate a specific health metric. In the harmonised dataset, the prevalence of current drinking was 47.5% while of past drinking was 26.5%. In the pooled sample, current alcohol drinking was positively associated with better health status among older adults ((b-coef (95% CI): 1.32(0.45 to 2.19)) and past alcohol drinking was inversely related (b-coef (95% CI): -0.83 (-1.51 to -0.16)) with health status. Often alcohol consumption appeared to be beneficial only for females in all super-regions except Africa, both age group categories (65-80 years old and 80+), both age group categories, as well as among all the financial status categories (all p < 0.05). Regional analysis pictured diverse patterns in the association for current and past alcohol drinkers. Our results report the need for specific alcohol intake recommendations among older adults that will help them maintain a better health status throughout the ageing process.

14.
J Clin Med ; 9(6)2020 Jun 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32526871

RESUMO

Background: Anxiety has been suggested as a potentially modifiable risk factor for dementia, but results are still controversial. Our main objectives are to develop an updated meta-analysis of prospective population-based studies on the relationship between anxiety and risk of dementia, and to estimate the population fraction of dementia attributable to anxiety (PAF). Methods: We searched for cohort studies listed on PubMed or Web of Science from January 2018 to January 2020 that reported risk estimates for the association between anxiety and incident dementia. These were added to cohort studies published before January 2018 that were used in a previously published meta-analysis. Fully adjusted RRs were pooled using random effects models. We estimated the proportion of incident dementia attributable to anxiety by using PAF. Results: The meta-analysis included nine prospective cohorts from eight studies, representing 29,608 participants. The overall relative risk (RR) of dementia was 1.24 (95% CI: 1.06-1.46) and the PAF of dementia due to anxiety was 3.9%. Conclusions: Anxiety is significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause dementia. The treatment or prevention of anxiety might help to reduce dementia incidence rates, but more research is needed to clarify whether anxiety is a cause of dementia rather than a prodrome.

15.
Health Place ; 62: 102280, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32479358

RESUMO

Depression and loneliness act in a synergistic way among older adults. We tested two indicators of the perceived neighborhood built environment (BE) as moderators of the association between these conditions in older European adults. Positive perceptions of neighborhood BE were related to lower levels of loneliness but not to major depressive disorder (MDD). Reporting low BE usability was significantly related to a higher likelihood of feeling lonely except for those suffering from MDD, whereas reporting low BE walkability was significantly related with a high likelihood of loneliness particularly among those with MDD. Therefore, improving neighborhood BE and, specifically, its walkability, might result in a reduction in the prevalence of loneliness.

16.
J Clin Med ; 9(5)2020 May 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32384818

RESUMO

The association between anxiety and vascular dementia (VaD) is unclear. We aimed to reliably estimate the association between anxiety and VaD risk using meta-analysis to pool new results from a large community-based cohort (Zaragoza Dementia and Depression (ZARADEMP) study) and results from previous studies. ZARADEMP participants (n = 4057) free of dementia were followed up on for up to 12 years. Cases and subcases of anxiety were determined at baseline. A panel of four psychiatrists diagnosed incident cases of VaD by consensus. We searched for similar studies published up to October 2019 using PubMed and Web of Science. Observational studies reporting associations between anxiety and VaD risk, and adjusting at least for age, were selected. Odds ratios (ORs) from each study were combined using fixed-effects models. In the ZARADEMP study, the risk of VaD was 1.41 times higher among individuals with anxiety (95% CI: 0.75-2.68) compared with non-cases (p = 0.288). Pooling this result with results from two previous studies yielded an OR of 1.65 (95% CI: 1.07-2.53; p = 0.022). These findings indicate that anxiety is associated with an increased risk of VaD. Taking into account that anxiety is commonly observed in the elderly, treating and preventing it might reduce the prevalence and incidence of VaD. However, whether anxiety is a cause of a prodrome of VaD is still unknown, and future research is needed to clarify this.

17.
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry ; 35(9): 1060-1068, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32394534

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The concept of European psychologisation of depression versus somatisation in non-European populations has been the basis of several studies of cultural psychopathology in the general population. Little is currently known about cross-cultural differences and similarities in late-life depression symptom reporting. We cross-culturally compared symptom reporting in the context of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) among community-dwelling older adults from Spain and Nigeria. METHODS: We relied on data from two household multistage probability samples comprising 3,715 persons aged 65 years or older in the Spanish and Nigerian populations. All participants underwent assessments for MDD using the World Mental Health Survey version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Cross-cultural comparison of broad somatic and psychological categories as well as relationship and influence of individual symptoms were analysed using the Symptom Network Analysis approach. RESULTS: Current MDD was diagnosed in 232 and 195 older persons from Spain and Nigeria, respectively. The symptom network of the two samples were invariant in terms of global strength, S(GSPAIN , GNIGERIA ) = 7.56, P = .06, with psychological and somatic symptoms demonstrating centrality in both countries. However, country-specific relationships and influence of individual symptoms were found in the network structure of both samples, M(GSPAIN , GNIGERIA ) = 2.95, P < .01. CONCLUSION: Broad somatic and psychological symptoms categories contributed to the structural network of older Africans and their peers from the Spanish population. Variations in the relationship and influence of individual symptoms suggests that the functional and "communicative" role of individual symptoms may be differentiated by context specific imperatives. J Am Geriatr Soc 68:-, 2020.

18.
Brain Sci ; 10(4)2020 Apr 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32331406

RESUMO

(1) Cognitive decline differs among individuals and cognition function domains. We sought to identify distinct groups of immediate and delayed verbal memory in two age subsamples (50-64, 65+ years), and to analyze associated factors. (2) Latent class mixed models were used to identify verbal memory trajectories in a sample of Spanish community-dwelling individuals over 8 years' follow up. Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to assess differences among trajectories. (3) Different trajectories were identified. In the case of immediate verbal memory, these were: very low/decline (6.3%), low/stable (38.2%), medium/slow decline (43.4%), and high/slow decline (12.2%) in the middle-aged group, and low/decline (20.4%), medium/slow decline (60.4%), and high/slow decline (19.2%) in the older subsample. In delayed verbal memory, more distinct patterns were found: very low/decline (12.4%), low/stable (51.4%), medium/accelerated decline (24.7%), and high/slow increase (11.4%) in the younger group, and low/slow decline (34.4%), medium/decline (52.7%), and high/slow decline (12.9%) in the older group. (4) Overall, low initial performance and decline were associated with older age, lower education, and higher diabetes/stroke prevalence. Differences found suggests heterogeneity in cognitive ageing. The high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in those with worse cognition suggests that early interventions to prevent those conditions should be targeted in midlife to delay cognitive decline.

19.
J Affect Disord ; 266: 424-428, 2020 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32056909

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Literature has shown that the effect of depression on all-cause mortality is stronger in men. However, it is less clear whether depression affects older and younger people equally. The present study is aimed to analyze whether depression is associated to all-cause mortality in different age and gender groups. METHODS: We analyzed a nationally representative sample of the Spanish adult population that was followed-up on for a period of 6 years (n = 4583). Unadjusted and adjusted cox proportional hazard regression models were conducted to test whether baseline depression was associated to all-cause mortality in the total sample and in the different gender and age specific groups, separately. RESULTS: Unadjusted analyses revealed that depression was associated with higher likelihood of having a shorter survival and dying, in the total sample and in both groups of men (18-64 and 65+ years). However, adjusted analyses stratified by age groups and gender revealed that depression was only a significant factor for all-cause mortality in 18-64 aged men (HR: 6.11; 95%CI= 2.16,17.23). LIMITATIONS: Cause-specific mortality was not examined. Young adults and middle-aged participants were not analyzed separately. CONCLUSIONS: The depression and all-cause mortality relationship was only found among young and middle-aged men. Further studies should consider whether the significant association between depression and all-cause mortality in young and middle-aged men is due to a behavior of seeking help less, the way depression is shaped in adult men, or to other clinical or health-system related factors.

20.
J Aging Health ; 32(9): 1120-1132, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31789063

RESUMO

Objective: We aimed to identify the patterns of multimorbidity in older adults and explored their association with sociodemographic and lifestyle risk factors. Method: The sample included 9,171 people aged 50+ from Wave 2 of the English Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA). Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was performed on 26 chronic diseases to determine clusters of common diseases within individuals and their association with sociodemographic and lifestyle risk factors. Result: Three latent classes were identified: (a) a cardiorespiratory/arthritis/cataracts class, (b) a metabolic class, and (c) a relatively healthy class. People aged 70 to 79 were 9.91 times (95% Confidence Interval [CI] = [5.13, 19.13]) more likely to be assigned to the cardiorespiratory/arthritis/cataracts class, while regular drinkers and physically inactive people were 0.33 times (95% CI = [0.24, 0.47]) less likely to be assigned to this class. Conclusion: Future research should investigate these patterns further to gain more insights into the needs of people with multimorbidity.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...