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1.
Cancers (Basel) ; 13(4)2021 Feb 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33578652

RESUMO

Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important prognostic patient-reported outcome in oncology. Because prior studies suggest that HRQOL is, in part, heritable, we performed a GWAS to elucidate genetic factors associated with HRQOL in breast cancer survivors. Physical and mental HRQOL were measured via paper surveys that included the PROMIS-10 physical and mental health domain scales in 1442 breast cancer survivors participating in the Mayo Clinic Breast Disease Registry (MCBDR). In multivariable regression analyses, age and financial concerns were significantly associated with global physical health (age: p = 1.6 × 10-23; financial concerns: p = 4.8 × 10-40) and mental health (age: p = 3.5 × 10-7; financial concerns: p = 2.0 × 10-69). Chemotherapy was associated with worse global mental health (p = 0.01). In the GWAS, none of the SNPs reached the genome-wide association significance threshold of 5 × 10-8 for associations with either global physical or global mental health, however, a cluster of SNPs in SCN10A, particularly rs112718371, appeared to be linked to worse global physical health (p = 5.21 × 10-8). Additionally, SNPs in LMX1B, SGCD, PARP12 and SEMA5A were also moderately associated with worse physical and mental health (p < 10-6). These biologically plausible candidate SNPs warrant further study as possible predictors of HRQOL.

2.
N Engl J Med ; 384(5): 440-451, 2021 02 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33471974

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Population-based estimates of the risk of breast cancer associated with germline pathogenic variants in cancer-predisposition genes are critically needed for risk assessment and management in women with inherited pathogenic variants. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study, we performed sequencing using a custom multigene amplicon-based panel to identify germline pathogenic variants in 28 cancer-predisposition genes among 32,247 women with breast cancer (case patients) and 32,544 unaffected women (controls) from population-based studies in the Cancer Risk Estimates Related to Susceptibility (CARRIERS) consortium. Associations between pathogenic variants in each gene and the risk of breast cancer were assessed. RESULTS: Pathogenic variants in 12 established breast cancer-predisposition genes were detected in 5.03% of case patients and in 1.63% of controls. Pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, with odds ratios of 7.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.33 to 11.27) and 5.23 (95% CI, 4.09 to 6.77), respectively. Pathogenic variants in PALB2 were associated with a moderate risk (odds ratio, 3.83; 95% CI, 2.68 to 5.63). Pathogenic variants in BARD1, RAD51C, and RAD51D were associated with increased risks of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer and triple-negative breast cancer, whereas pathogenic variants in ATM, CDH1, and CHEK2 were associated with an increased risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Pathogenic variants in 16 candidate breast cancer-predisposition genes, including the c.657_661del5 founder pathogenic variant in NBN, were not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides estimates of the prevalence and risk of breast cancer associated with pathogenic variants in known breast cancer-predisposition genes in the U.S. population. These estimates can inform cancer testing and screening and improve clinical management strategies for women in the general population with inherited pathogenic variants in these genes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.).


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Variação Genética , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação , Razão de Chances , Risco , Análise de Sequência de DNA , Adulto Jovem
3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33125037

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Delirium is underdiagnosed in clinical practice, and is not routinely coded for billing. Manual chart review can be used to identify the occurrence of delirium, however, it is labor-intensive and impractical for large-scale studies. Natural language processing (NLP) has the capability to process raw text in electronic health records (EHRs) and determine the meaning of the information. We developed and validated NLP algorithms to automatically identify the occurrence of delirium from EHRs. METHODS: This study used a randomly selected cohort from the population-based Mayo Clinic Biobank (n=300, age>=65). We adopted the standardized evidence-based framework confusion assessment method (CAM) to develop and evaluate NLP algorithms to identify the occurrence of delirium using clinical notes in EHRs. Two NLP algorithms were developed based on CAM criteria; one based on the original CAM (NLP-CAM; delirium vs. no delirium) and another based on our modified CAM (NLP-mCAM; definite, possible, and no delirium). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were used for concordance in delirium status between NLP algorithms and manual chart review as the gold standard. The prevalence of delirium cases was examined using ICD-9, NLP-CAM, and NLP-mCAM. RESULTS: NLP-CAM demonstrated a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.919, 1.000 and 0.967, respectively. NLP-mCAM demonstrated sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.827, 0.913 and 0.827, respectively. The prevalence analysis of delirium showed that the NLP-CAM algorithm identified 12,651 (9.4%) delirium patients, the NLP-mCAM algorithm identified 20,611 (15.3%) definite delirium cases and 10,762 (8.0%) possible cases.

4.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 7: 142, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32903434

RESUMO

Background: Our previous GWAS identified genetic variants at six novel loci that were associated with a decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), p < 1 × 10-5 in 1,191 early breast cancer patients from the N9831 clinical trial of chemotherapy plus trastuzumab. In this study we sought replication of these loci. Methods: We tested the top loci from the GWAS for association with chemotherapy-related heart failure (CRHF) using 26 CRHF cases from N9831 and 984 patients from the Mayo Clinic Biobank which included CRHF cases (N = 12) and control groups of patients treated with anthracycline +/- trastuzumab without HF (N = 282) and patients with HF that were never treated with anthracycline or trastuzumab (N = 690). We further examined associated loci in the context of gene expression and rare coding variants using a TWAS approach in heart left ventricle and Sanger sequencing, respectively. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and cardiomyopathy was modeled in human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells and a mouse model, respectively, that were pre-treated with GsMTx-4, an inhibitor of TRPC6. Results: TRPC6 5' flanking variant rs57242572-T was significantly more frequent in cases compared to controls, p = 0.031, and rs61918162-T showed a trend for association, p = 0.065. The rs61918162 T-allele was associated with higher TRPC6 expression in the heart left ventricle. We identified a single TRPC6 rare missense variant (rs767086724, N338S, prevalence 0.0025% in GnomAD) in one of 38 patients (2.6%) with CRHF. Pre-treatment of cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells with GsMTx4 significantly reduced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Similarly, mice treated with GsMTx4 had significantly improved doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction. Conclusions: Genetic variants that are associated with increased TRPC6 expression in the heart and rare TRPC6 missense variants may be clinically useful as risk factors for CRHF. GsMTx-4 may be a cardioprotective agent in patients with TRPC6 risk variants. Replication of the genetic associations in larger well-characterized samples and functional studies are required.

5.
Front Public Health ; 8: 362, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32850593

RESUMO

Biobanks have become integral to improving population health. We are in a new era in medicine as patients, health professionals, and researchers increasingly collaborate to gain new knowledge and explore new paradigms for diagnosing and treating disease. Many large-scale biobanking efforts are underway worldwide at the institutional, national, and even international level. When linked with subject data from questionnaires and medical records, biobanks serve as valuable resources in translational research. A biobank must have high quality samples that meet researcher's needs. Biobank laboratory operations require an enormous amount of support-from lab and storage space, information technology expertise, and a laboratory management information system to logistics for sample movement, quality management systems, and appropriate facilities. A paramount metric of success for a biobank is the concept of every biospecimen coming to the repository belongs to a participant who has something to contribute to research for a healthier future. This article will discuss the importance of biorepository operations, specific to the collection and storage of participants materials. Specific focus will be given to maintaining the quality of samples, along with the various levels of support biorepositories need to fulfill their purpose and ensure the integrity of each specimen is maintained.

6.
Front Genet ; 11: 556, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32582289

RESUMO

Electronic health records (EHRs) are widely adopted with a great potential to serve as a rich, integrated source of phenotype information. Computational phenotyping, which extracts phenotypes from EHR data automatically, can accelerate the adoption and utilization of phenotype-driven efforts to advance scientific discovery and improve healthcare delivery. A list of computational phenotyping algorithms has been published but data fragmentation, i.e., incomplete data within one single data source, has been raised as an inherent limitation of computational phenotyping. In this study, we investigated the impact of diverse data sources on two published computational phenotyping algorithms, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), using Mayo EHRs and Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) which links medical records from multiple health care systems. Results showed that both RA (less prevalent) and T2DM (more prevalent) case selections were markedly impacted by data fragmentation, with positive predictive value (PPV) of 91.4 and 92.4%, false-negative rate (FNR) of 26.6 and 14% in Mayo data, respectively, PPV of 97.2 and 98.3%, FNR of 5.2 and 3.3% in REP. T2DM controls also contain biases, with PPV of 91.2% and FNR of 1.2% for Mayo. We further elaborated underlying reasons impacting the performance.

7.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2536, 2020 05 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32439869

RESUMO

Electronic health records (EHR) are rich heterogeneous collections of patient health information, whose broad adoption provides clinicians and researchers unprecedented opportunities for health informatics, disease-risk prediction, actionable clinical recommendations, and precision medicine. However, EHRs present several modeling challenges, including highly sparse data matrices, noisy irregular clinical notes, arbitrary biases in billing code assignment, diagnosis-driven lab tests, and heterogeneous data types. To address these challenges, we present MixEHR, a multi-view Bayesian topic model. We demonstrate MixEHR on MIMIC-III, Mayo Clinic Bipolar Disorder, and Quebec Congenital Heart Disease EHR datasets. Qualitatively, MixEHR disease topics reveal meaningful combinations of clinical features across heterogeneous data types. Quantitatively, we observe superior prediction accuracy of diagnostic codes and lab test imputations compared to the state-of-art methods. We leverage the inferred patient topic mixtures to classify target diseases and predict mortality of patients in critical conditions. In all comparison, MixEHR confers competitive performance and reveals meaningful disease-related topics.


Assuntos
Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/classificação , Informática Médica/métodos , Teorema de Bayes , Bases de Dados Factuais , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Aprendizado de Máquina , Modelos Estatísticos , Fenótipo
8.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 28(9): 1168-1177, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32327712

RESUMO

Dynamic consent has been proposed as a strategy for addressing the limitations of traditional, broad consent for biobank participation. Although the argument for dynamic consent has been made on theoretical grounds, empirical studies evaluating the potential utility of dynamic consent are needed to enhance deliberations about the merits of dynamic consent. Few studies have assessed such considerations as whether donor preferences may change over time or if participants would use a dynamic consent mechanism to modify preferences when they change. We administered a 66-item survey to participants in a large DNA biobank. The survey sought to gauge the stability of donor preferences specified at the time of biobank enrollment, specifically the stability of donors' preference regarding posthumous availability of biospecimens to next-of-kin. We received 1164 completed surveys for a response rate of 72%. Forty percent of respondents indicated a preference regarding sample availability on the survey (T2) that was inconsistent with the preference they had expressed when they enrolled in the biobank (T1). Most (94%) individuals with inconsistent preferences regarding sample availability had initially restricted sample availability at T1 but were comfortable with broader availability when asked at the time of the survey (T2). Our findings demonstrate that preferences regarding sample use expressed at the time of enrollment in a DNA biobank may not be reliable indicators of donor preferences over time. These findings lend empirical support to the case for a dynamic consent model in which biobank participants are approached over time to clarify their views regarding sample use.

9.
Pharmacogenomics ; 21(5): 347-358, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32292118

RESUMO

Aim: Pharmacogenomics (PGx) holds potential to improve patient treatment; yet, effective patient educational materials are limited. Materials & methods: Using a 'think aloud' technique, we sought to understand comprehension and perceptions of a multimedia PGx results packet including a cover letter with QR code to an educational video, brochure and prototype report in the context of PGx case vignettes. Results: The cover letter and video components were viewed less favorably due to excess detail, complex jargon and technology challenges. Recommendations were to enhance comprehension and utility and to customize materials to each patient's medications or disease conditions. Conclusion: Educational materials were revised to improve comprehension and usability, and diminish concerns to better prepare patients to understand the importance of discussing test results with their provider.


Assuntos
Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Farmacogenética/tendências , Testes Farmacogenômicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/organização & administração , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/normas , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Multimídia , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/organização & administração , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/tendências , Projetos Piloto , Inquéritos e Questionários , Materiais de Ensino
10.
Support Care Cancer ; 28(12): 5833-5838, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32253604

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate acupuncture use among breast cancer survivors, including perceived symptom improvements and referral patterns. METHODS: Breast cancer survivors who had used acupuncture for cancer- or treatment-related symptoms were identified using an ongoing prospective Mayo Clinic Breast Disease Registry (MCBDR). Additionally, Mayo Clinic electronic health records (MCEHR) were queried to identify eligible participants. All received a mailed consent form and survey including acupuncture-related questions about acupuncture referrals, delivery, and costs. Respondents were also asked to recall symptom severity before and after acupuncture treatment and time to benefit on Likert scales. RESULTS: Acupuncture use was reported among 415 participants (12.3%) of the MCBDR. Among MCBDR and MCEHR eligible participants, 241 women returned surveys. A total of 193 (82.1%) participants reported a symptomatic benefit from acupuncture, and 57 (24.1% of participants) reported a "substantial benefit" or "totally resolved my symptoms" (corresponding to 4 and 5 on the 5-point Likert scale). The mean symptom severity decreased by at least 1 point of the 5-point scale for each symptom; the percentage of patients who reported an improvement in symptoms ranged from 56% (lymphedema) to 79% (headache). The majority of patients reported time to benefit as "immediate" (34%) or "after a few treatments" (40.4%). Over half of the participants self-referred for treatment; 24.1% were referred by their oncologist. Acupuncture delivery was more frequent in private offices (61.0%) than in hospital or medical settings (42.3%). Twelve participants (5.1%) reported negative side effects, such as discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is commonly utilized by patients for a variety of breast cancer-related symptoms. However, patients frequently self-refer for acupuncture treatments, and most acupuncture care is completed at private offices, rather than medical clinic or hospital settings.

11.
Front Public Health ; 8: 9, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32117849

RESUMO

Objective: To better understand the characteristics associated with a participant's willingness to consent to the Mayo Clinic Biobank (MCB) and examine factors associated with willingness to participate in follow-up studies embedded within MCB that require re-contact and participant approval. Participants and Methods: Consent rates were compared across patient demographics to the MCB. Rates of participation to follow-up studies were also compared across demographics and request types. Results: Among 272,102 Mayo Clinic patients invited to the MCB, 48,314 (19%) consented across the three recruitment sites within 90 days of initial invitation. A significant age by gender interaction was identified, showing young males consent at a lower rate than young females and older males consent at a higher rate than older females. Over the recruitment time frame of 2009-2015, there was a significant decrease in consent rates (decline of 2.5%/year). Of the 57,041 consented MCB participants, 33,487 participants (59%) have been invited to participate in follow-up studies via re-contact. Follow-up studies of the MCB may require participants to provide additional samples, complete questionnaires, and/or release their identity to a research team. MCB participants have been invited to enroll in a median of two studies (IQR: 1-3). Seventy-one percent of participants consented to at least one follow-up study, with individual follow-up study consent rates ranging from 14 to 87% depending on study type, with a median consent rate of 61% (IQR: 47-70%). Studies requesting return of a questionnaire had the highest participation rates. White participants, older participants, and participants with some college or a degree were significantly more likely to participate to follow-up studies, while there was no association with gender. Conclusion: Consent rates among younger and non-white patients were lower than in older, white patients. However, we also found that participation rates among those already enrolled in the biobank were much higher than those seen in new recruitment efforts, external to an existing biobank. We thus demonstrate an important way that biobanks can advance precision medicine goals: through provision of populations from which studies can draw participants for future studies.

13.
BMJ Open Gastroenterol ; 7(1): e000353, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32128228

RESUMO

Introduction: Population-level screening has been shown to reduce the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC). Unfortunately, adherence to screening recommendations among eligible US adults remains below national goals. A relatively new non-invasive screening modality, the Food and Drug Administration-approved multi-target stool DNA (mt-sDNA) assay (commercialised as Cologuard), which combines the detection of haemoglobin and DNA abnormalities, has been completed by more than 3 million individuals. Given mt-sDNA's recent availability, the effectiveness of mt-sDNA screening with respect to CRC incidence and mortality reduction has not yet been established. Methods and analysis: Through an academic-industry collaboration, a prospective cohort study (Voyage) was designed with an initial enrolment target of 150 000 individuals with mt-sDNA ordered by their healthcare provider for CRC screening. Consented participants will be asked to complete a baseline questionnaire to collect sociodemographic and health information. Additional questionnaires will be provided after 1 year, and every 3 years thereafter, to collect data regarding CRC screening follow-up in order to estimate rates of CRC incidence and other health outcomes. Linkage to the National Death Index will be used to estimate mortality rates. Ethics and dissemination: The Voyage study will be conducted in accordance with international guidelines and local regulatory requirements and laws. Data will be stored and retained at Mayo Clinic. Only limited data elements required for research purposes will be transmitted between Mayo Clinic and Exact Sciences Laboratories. Results of the Voyage study will be disseminated through scientific presentations and publications. Trial registration number: NCT04124406.

14.
J Clin Oncol ; 38(13): 1409-1418, 2020 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32125938

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To determine the sensitivity and specificity of genetic testing criteria for the detection of germline pathogenic variants in women with breast cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Women with breast cancer enrolled in a breast cancer registry at a tertiary cancer center between 2000 and 2016 were evaluated for germline pathogenic variants in 9 breast cancer predisposition genes (ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, NF1, PALB2, PTEN, and TP53). The performance of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) hereditary cancer testing criteria was evaluated relative to testing of all women as recommended by the American Society of Breast Surgeons. RESULTS: Of 3,907 women, 1,872 (47.9%) meeting NCCN criteria were more likely to carry a pathogenic variant in 9 predisposition genes compared with women not meeting criteria (9.0% v 3.5%; P < .001). Of those not meeting criteria (n = 2,035), 14 (0.7%) had pathogenic variants in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The sensitivity of NCCN criteria was 70% for 9 predisposition genes and 87% for BRCA1 and BRCA2, with a specificity of 53%. Expansion of the NCCN criteria to include all women diagnosed with breast cancer at ≤ 65 years of age achieved > 90% sensitivity for the 9 predisposition genes and > 98% sensitivity for BRCA1 and BRCA2. CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of women with breast cancer carrying germline pathogenic variants in predisposition genes do not qualify for testing by NCCN criteria. Expansion of NCCN criteria to include all women diagnosed at ≤ 65 years of age improves the sensitivity of the selection criteria without requiring testing of all women with breast cancer.

16.
BMJ Open ; 9(11): e032707, 2019 11 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31699749

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The Mayo Clinic Biobank was established to provide a large group of patients from which comparison groups (ie, controls) could be selected for case-control studies, to create a prospective cohort with sufficient power for common outcomes and to support electronic health record (EHR) studies. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 56 862 participants enrolled (21% response rate) into the Mayo Clinic Biobank from Rochester, Minnesota (77%, n=43 836), Jacksonville, Florida (18%, n=10 368) and La Crosse, Wisconsin (5%, n=2658). Participants were all Mayo Clinic patients, 18 years of age or older and US residents. FINDINGS TO DATE: Overall, 43% of participants were 65 years of age or older and female participants were more frequent (59%) than males at all sites. Most participants resided in the Upper Midwest regions of the USA (Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois or Wisconsin), Florida or Georgia. Self-reported race among Biobank participants was 90% white. Here we provide examples of the types of studies that have successfully utilised the resource, including (1) investigations of the population itself, (2) provision of controls for case-control studies, (3) genotype-driven research, (4) EHR-based research and (5) prospective recruitment to other studies. Over 270 projects have been approved to date to access Biobank data and/or samples; over 200 000 sample aliquots have been approved for distribution. FUTURE PLANS: The data and samples in the Mayo Clinic Biobank can be used for various types of epidemiological and clinical studies, especially in the setting of case-control studies for which the Biobank samples serve as control samples. We are planning cohort studies with additional follow-up and acquisition of genetic information on a large scale.


Assuntos
Bancos de Espécimes Biológicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Pesquisa Biomédica , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Utilização de Instalações e Serviços , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
17.
Breast Cancer Res ; 21(1): 68, 2019 05 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31118087

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mammographic breast density, adjusted for age and body mass index, and a polygenic risk score (PRS), comprised of common genetic variation, are both strong risk factors for breast cancer and increase discrimination of risk models. Understanding their joint contribution will be important to more accurately predict risk. METHODS: Using 3628 breast cancer cases and 5126 controls of European ancestry from eight case-control studies, we evaluated joint associations of a 77-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) PRS and quantitative mammographic density measures with breast cancer. Mammographic percent density and absolute dense area were evaluated using thresholding software and examined as residuals after adjusting for age, 1/BMI, and study. PRS and adjusted density phenotypes were modeled both continuously (per 1 standard deviation, SD) and categorically. We fit logistic regression models and tested the null hypothesis of multiplicative joint associations for PRS and adjusted density measures using likelihood ratio and global and tail-based goodness of fit tests within the subset of six cohort or population-based studies. RESULTS: Adjusted percent density (odds ratio (OR) = 1.45 per SD, 95% CI 1.38-1.52), adjusted absolute dense area (OR = 1.34 per SD, 95% CI 1.28-1.41), and the 77-SNP PRS (OR = 1.52 per SD, 95% CI 1.45-1.59) were associated with breast cancer risk. There was no evidence of interaction of the PRS with adjusted percent density or dense area on risk of breast cancer by either the likelihood ratio (P > 0.21) or goodness of fit tests (P > 0.09), whether assessed continuously or categorically. The joint association (OR) was 2.60 in the highest categories of adjusted PD and PRS and 0.34 in the lowest categories, relative to women in the second density quartile and middle PRS quintile. CONCLUSIONS: The combined associations of the 77-SNP PRS and adjusted density measures are generally well described by multiplicative models, and both risk factors provide independent information on breast cancer risk.


Assuntos
Biomarcadores Tumorais , Densidade da Mama/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/patologia , Herança Multifatorial , Adulto , Idoso , Algoritmos , Índice de Massa Corporal , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos Biológicos , Razão de Chances , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco
18.
Biopreserv Biobank ; 17(4): 296-302, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30912675

RESUMO

Background: DNA biobanks frequently obtain broad permissions from sample donors, who agree to allow their biospecimens to be used for a variety of future purposes. A limitation of this approach is that it may not be possible to discuss or anticipate all potential uses of biospecimens at the time patient consent is obtained. We surveyed biobank participants to clarify their views regarding the need to be informed about research involving whole genome sequencing (WGS). Methods: We invited 1200 participants in the Mayo Clinic Biobank to complete a survey inquiring about their support for WGS; their interest in being recontacted before WGS of their biospecimens; whether they would consent to WGS if asked; and the acceptability of proceeding with WGS if sample donors could not be reached. Results: Six hundred eighty-seven biobank participants returned completed surveys (57% response). More than 96% of biobank participants were supportive of WGS and would give permission for WGS of their sample, if asked. Nonetheless, 61% of biobank participants felt they should be recontacted before WGS was done. Participants were divided regarding the permissibility of conducting WGS if efforts to recontact sample donors were unsuccessful. Discussion: Our findings highlight a potential discrepancy between the broad permissions granted by biobank participants at the time they donated biospecimens and their views about the application of WGS to their samples. Biobank participants appear to value the ability to confirm their commitment to genetic research when the studies in question involve WGS, a technological capacity they may not have anticipated at the time they donated their biospecimens. Efforts to reevaluate biobank participants' views about the acceptability of new technologies may help to ensure alignment of participants' current beliefs and research applications that would have been difficult to anticipate at the time biospecimens were collected.


Assuntos
Bancos de Espécimes Biológicos , Humanos , Consentimento Livre e Esclarecido , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma
19.
Public Health Genomics ; 21(1-2): 77-84, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30522109

RESUMO

AIM: To develop a process for returning medically actionable genomic variants to Latino patients receiving care in a Federally Qualified Health Center. METHODS: Prior to recruitment, researchers met with primary care providers to (1) orient clinicians to the project, (2) establish a process for returning actionable and nonactionable results to participants and providers through the electronic health record, and (3) develop a process for offering clinical decision support for follow-up education and care. A Community Advisory Board was engaged to provide input on recruitment strategies and materials for conveying results to participants. Participants in the Sangre Por Salud (Blood for Health) Biobank with hyperlipidemia or colon polyps represented the pool of potentially eligible participants. RESULTS: A total of 1,621 individuals were invited to participate and 710 agreed to an in- person consenting visit (194 no-showed and 16 declined). Over 12-months, 500 participants were enrolled. Participants were primarily Spanish-speaking (81.6%), female (74.2%), and enrolled because of hyperlipidemia (95.4%). All but 2 participants opted to receive primary (i.e., related to enrollment phenotypes) as well as secondary actionable results. CONCLUSION: Efforts to bring precision medicine to community-based health centers serving minority patients may require multilevel engagement activities to include individuals, providers, health systems, and the community.


Assuntos
Bancos de Espécimes Biológicos/organização & administração , Centros Comunitários de Saúde/organização & administração , Genômica/organização & administração , Hispano-Americanos/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Arizona , Assistência à Saúde/organização & administração , Feminino , Pesquisa em Genética , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários , Seleção de Pacientes , Medicina de Precisão/métodos
20.
Appl Clin Genet ; 11: 121-127, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30498369

RESUMO

Purpose: In aging adults, mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important contributor. We evaluated the association between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, which is a biomarker for mitochondrial function, and self-rated health status. Patients and methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients enrolled within the Mayo Clinic Biobank. We utilized the questionnaire and sequence data from 944 patients. We examined the association between mtDNA copy number and self-rated health status with 3 collapsed categories for the latter variable (excellent/very good, good, and fair/poor). For analysis, we used proportional odds models after log-transforming mtDNA copy number, and we adjusted for age and sex. Results: We found the median age at enrollment was 61 years (25th-75th percentile: 51-71), and 64% reported excellent or very good health, 31% reported good health, and 6% reported fair/poor health. Overall, the median mtDNA copy number was 88.9 (25th-75th percentile: 77.6-101.1). Higher mtDNA copy number was found for subjects reporting better self-rated health status after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidity burden (OR =2.3 [95% CI: 1.2-4.5] for having better self-rated health for a one-unit increase in log-transformed mtDNA copy number). Conclusion: We found that a higher mtDNA copy number is associated with better self-rated health status after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidity burden. The current study implies that mtDNA copy number may serve as a biomarker for self-reported health. Further studies, potentially including cohort studies, may be required.

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