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1.
Foot Ankle Int ; : 1071100720903721, 2020 Feb 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32028794

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Particulated juvenile cartilage allograft transfer (PJCAT) is an emerging treatment option for management of osteochondral lesions of the talus (OCLTs). This series reports on outcomes and identifies predictors for success following PJCAT for isolated OCLTs. METHODS: We reviewed 33 consecutive patients who underwent PJCAT by a single surgeon from 2013 to 2017. Preoperative demographic factors (age, body mass index [BMI], tobacco use, behavioral health comorbidity, and ankle pain visual analog score [VAS]) and OCLT morphologic data were collected. Outcomes included postoperative improvements in VAS and American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and clinical success/failure. Results of 7 second-look arthroscopies and complications are provided. Categorical data are reported as frequencies, and statistical means with P values are reported for continuous variables. We had a mean 3.5 years of follow-up. RESULTS: Improvement in ankle pain VAS following isolated PJCAT was 51% (P < .001). For the first 16 consecutive patients in whom complete AOFAS scores were available, 40% (P < .001) improvement occurred. Presence of 1 or more behavioral health diagnoses was a risk factor for decreased pain relief, while moderate to severe preoperative pain (VAS >5.9) predicted improved postoperative pain relief. Age, BMI, tobacco use, and OCLT morphology did not affect outcomes. CONCLUSION: For treatment of large, high-stage OCLTs, PJCAT resulted in 40% to 50% improvement in ankle pain and disability within 3.5 years. The results may be better in patients with moderate to severe preoperative pain but worse in those with preexisting behavioral health diagnoses. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, retrospective case series.

2.
Foot Ankle Int ; : 1071100719898278, 2020 Jan 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31904264

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although the benefit of primary intramedullary (IM) screw fixation of fifth metatarsal Jones fractures in athletes is clear, limited data support its use in conventional patient populations. This study evaluated radiographic and functional outcomes following primary IM screw fixation in a series of Jones fractures to determine if similar excellent outcomes were achievable. METHODS: We reviewed the data of 32 consecutive patients who underwent Jones fracture primary IM screw fixation by a single surgeon. Demographic risk factors of interest (age, gender, tobacco use, pertinent medical comorbidities, military service status, and prior nonoperative management) were collected prospectively. Primary outcomes included times to return to full weightbearing, radiographic union, and resumption of high-impact or restriction-free activities. Complications including reoperations were recorded. Categorical data are reported as frequencies, and statistical means with P values are reported for continuous variables. Mean age for the 32 patients was 33.4 years. RESULTS: All 32 fractures healed uneventfully, and at mean follow-up time of 24.2 months, overall patient-reported satisfaction was 100%. Overall mean postoperative outcomes are as follows: 3.7 weeks return to full weightbearing, 10.8 weeks to radiographic union, and 13.0 weeks to resumption of restriction-free activities. Among the risk factors assessed, only preoperative peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and/or diabetes mellitus (DM) and active duty military service resulted in significantly increased and decreased time to resumption of restriction-free activities, respectively, but did not impact overall weightbearing or union times. Patient age, gender, and tobacco use had no effects on radiographic or functional outcomes. CONCLUSION: Primary IM screw fixation was a safe, reliable option for all appropriate operative candidates with Jones fractures and may result in similar early weightbearing, osseous healing, and expeditious return to full activities consistently reported in high-level athletes. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, case series.

3.
J Hand Surg Am ; 2019 Dec 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31818538

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To compile and review the indications, outcomes, and complications of capitolunate arthrodesis (CLA). METHODS: We performed a literature search identifying 33 articles, 6 of which met inclusion criteria, including 80 patients. Included publications contained the results of CLA with minimum 12-month follow-up between 2000 and 2018. Data were pooled and analyzed focusing on the primary outcomes of union and complications. RESULTS: Average age of patients was 48 years (range, 22-86 years), median follow-up was 34 months (range, 12-198 months), and most common indication was scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (59%). Nearly half underwent a concomitant triquetrum excision (49%). Most patients were pain-free (78%) and returned to work (92%). Grip strength and visual analog pain scale both improved after CLA. Whereas 96% fused within a reported 42 to 210 days (median, 70 days), 11% of patients had complications including nonunion (3.8%) and loose hardware (6.3%). The reoperation rate was 14%, including wrist arthrodeses and wrist arthroplasty. CONCLUSIONS: Capitolunate arthrodesis is a feasible option for scapholunate advanced collapse and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse wrists with complications similar to those encountered in 4-corner arthrodesis. TYPE OF STUDY/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic IV.

4.
J Surg Orthop Adv ; 28(3): 175-179, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31675293

RESUMO

The objective of this analysis was to compare the efficiency of scholarly activity withinmilitary orthopaedic training programs. The authors obtained the lists of abstracts accepted for presentation at the 2009 through 2014 Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons (SOMOS) annual meetings. Data were extracted for each individual presentation. Three primary groups were compared: a traditional program, a research program, and a hybrid program. The hybrid program produced the highest percentage of the presentations (28.6%). The traditional program contributed the most presentations (3.32) and publications (2.16) per resident and had the highest publication rate (87.7%) and the shortest time to publication (14.4 months). The research program published in the highest average impact journals (3.2). The addition of a research year does not improve the number of academic presentations or published papers but may improve the impact factor of the journals in which the projects are published. (Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances 28(3):175-179, 2019).


Assuntos
Internato e Residência , Ortopedia , Publicações , Bolsas de Estudo , Humanos , Militares , Ortopedia/educação
5.
Mil Med ; 2019 Jun 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31184698

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Often referred to as aseptic or osteonecrosis, avascular necrosis (AVN) typically affects people between 30 and 50 years of age. Given the substantial morbidity associated with AVN as well as overlapping age groups of both the military and average age at diagnosis for AVN, the military represents an ideal cohort for a large database study to elicit the incidence and epidemiology of AVN. The purpose of this study was to identify demographic risk factors in the United States military. MATERIALS AND METHODS: First-time occurrences for ICD-9-CM codes for all types of AVN (head of humerus, head and neck of femur, medial femoral condyle, talus, and other bone) between 2004 and 2014 were queried in the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database. Multivariate data analysis was performed to obtain adjusted rate (adjusted for age, sex, race, rank, and branch of service). RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2014, 2,671 cases of AVN occurred among an at-risk population of 13,820,906 servicemembers for an unadjusted IR of 0.19 per 1,000 person-years. The most common location was located at the proximal femur, responsible for 41.7% of all cases. With an adjusted rate ratio of 18.7, the over 40 age-group accounted for 53.3% of cases. Servicemembers of black race, Senior rank, and the Army branch of service were more at risk for AVN. CONCLUSIONS: The overall incidence of AVN was 0.19 per 1,000 person-years. Whilte increasing age had the greatest influence on the development of symptomatic AVN, other statistically significant risk factors were found to be increasing age, black race, senior enlisted rank, and Army branch of service.

6.
J Surg Orthop Adv ; 28(1): 53-57, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31074738

RESUMO

All patients undergoing open reduction and internal fixation of a distal radius fracture (DRF) between the years 2010 and 2015 were isolated from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Patient demographics, respective surgical volume, outcome variables, and complications were extracted. The primary outcomes were surgical time, hospital length of stay, and unplanned reoperation. A total of 6691 patients were included in the study, the majority of whom were treated by orthopaedic surgeons. While there were no significant differences in baseline demographics between the patients treated by orthopaedic and plastic surgeons, the overall operative time was significantly less for DRFs fixed by orthopaedic surgeons. While there was a significant difference for extra-articular fractures, this difference increased significantly for complex intra-articular fractures. Additionally, hospital length of stay was significantly shorter for patients treated by orthopaedic surgeons. To produce well-rounded, technically skilled surgeons, plastic surgery programs should incorporate fixation principles into their training programs. (Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances 28(1):53-57, 2019).


Assuntos
Fixação Interna de Fraturas , Cirurgiões Ortopédicos , Ortopedia , Fraturas do Rádio , Cirurgia Plástica , Fixação de Fratura , Fixação Interna de Fraturas/educação , Humanos , Ortopedia/educação , Rádio (Anatomia) , Fraturas do Rádio/cirurgia , Cirurgia Plástica/educação , Resultado do Tratamento
7.
Hand (N Y) ; : 1558944719836213, 2019 Mar 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30924361

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To decrease the time to reinnervation of the intrinsic motor end plates after high ulnar nerve injuries, a supercharged end-to-side (SETS) anterior interosseous to ulnar motor nerve transfer has been proposed. The purpose of this study was to compile and review the indications, outcomes, and complications of SETS anterior interosseous to ulnar motor nerve transfer. METHODS: A literature search was performed, identifying 73 papers; 4 of which met inclusion and exclusion criteria, including 78 patients. Papers included were those that contained the results of SETS between the years 2000 and 2018. Data were pooled and analyzed focusing on the primary outcomes: intrinsic muscle recovery and complications. RESULTS: Four studies with 78 patients met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most patients (33.3%) underwent SETS for an ulnar nerve lesion in continuity, the average age was 46.5 years, and the average follow-up was 10 months. The average duration of symptoms before surgery was 99 weeks, all patients had weakness and numbness, nearly all (96%) had atrophy, and half (53%) had pain. Grip and key pinch strength improved 202% and 179%, respectively, from the preoperative assessment. The vast majority (91.9%) recovered intrinsic function at an average of 3.7 months. Other than 8% of patients who did not recover intrinsic strength, no other complications were reported in any of the 78 patients. CONCLUSIONS: The SETS is a successful procedure with low morbidity, which may restore intrinsic function in patients with proximal nerve injuries.

8.
Hand (N Y) ; 14(2): 197-202, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29199471

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to examine the subjective and objective midterm functional clinical outcomes of surgically repaired triceps injuries in a moderate- to high-demand population. METHODS: The US Military Health System was queried to identify all surgically treated triceps tendon ruptures between 2008 and 2013. Primary endpoints included rates of rerupture, perioperative complications, or significant persistent elbow dysfunction; Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score, Mayo Elbow score, and ability to do push-ups were also extracted. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients underwent triceps tendon repair with a mean follow-up of 49.8 ± 17.3 months (range: 26.8-80.2). The most common mechanisms of injury were military duties (27%), sporting activity (24%), or fall-related (21.6%), with most injuries occurring during an eccentric movement (54%). While 45% experienced occasional elbow pain postoperatively, only 1 patient (2.7%) had a rerupture. Despite this, at 2 years, 31 patients (84%) were able to return to full military duty. While 6 patients were discharged from military service, only 1 underwent medical separation while 5 retired for reasons unrelated to their triceps tendon rupture. Patient-reported outcomes were available for 14 patients at final follow-up. The average DASH and Mayo Elbow scores were 4.7 (SD ± 4.7, range: 0-15.9) and 85.4 (SD ± 11.7, range: 60-100), respectively. The cohort could perform mean 54.2 (range: 9-90) push-ups. In additional, 12 of 14 (85.7%) were satisfied with their elbow function. CONCLUSIONS: The active duty cohort experienced excellent postoperative results with a high rate of return to military duty, despite nearly half of the patients recognizing some degree of activity-related, elbow pain.

9.
J Wrist Surg ; 7(1): 57-65, 2018 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29383277

RESUMO

Background Perilunate dislocations and perilunate fracture dislocations (PLDs/PLFDs) are rare and often associated with poor outcomes. Heretofore, these outcomes have not been evaluated in a high-demand military population. Questions/Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes in a young, active population after sustaining PLD/PLFD injuries. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the U.S. military service members who underwent surgical treatment for a PLD/PLFD (Current Procedural Terminology codes 25695 and 25685) between June 1, 2010, and June 1, 2014 through the Military Health System Management Analysis and Reporting Tool (M2) database, capturing patients with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Patient characteristics and outcomes were gathered; however, radiographic analysis was not possible. Results In this study, 40 patients (40 wrists) were included with an average follow-up of 47.8 months. The average age was 28.8 years. Twenty-two injuries (55%) were PLFD and 22 (55%) cases involved the nondominant extremity. On initial presentation, 11 (27.5%) were missed and 50% of patients were presented with acute carpal tunnel syndrome. Range of motion (ROM) was 74% and grip strength was 65% compared with the contralateral wrist; 78% reported pain with activity and only 55% remained on active duty status at final follow-up. Injuries to the nondominant extremity were significantly more likely to experience a good to excellent outcome and regained a more ROM. Patients with ligamentous PLD had less pain at rest and were more likely to return to sport. Conclusion Worse outcomes can be expected for PLD/PLFD of the dominant extremity, transscaphoid PLFD, greater arc injuries, and those undergoing pinning alone. A high-demand patient may expect worse functional results with a higher degree of limitation postoperatively. Level of Evidence The level of evidence is therapeutic IV.

10.
JAAPA ; 31(2): 36-39, 2018 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29369927

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study evaluated the accuracy and interrater reliability of US Army physician assistants (PAs) in identifying ankle fracture patterns using existing classification schemes. METHODS: Twenty-eight PAs reviewed criteria for stability, Danis-Weber, and Lauge-Hansen ankle fracture classification systems. Participants reviewed 45 ankle radiographs and independently rated each radiograph using these classification schemes. RESULTS: Participants were able to successfully identify ankle fracture stability in 82.1% of cases (95% CI, 77.6, 86.6) with established criteria. Using the Danis-Weber classification, accurate classification was achieved in 77.8% of cases (95% CI, 72.8, 82.7). The Lauge-Hansen classification system was least reliable, with accuracy of 54.5% (95% CI, 46, 63). CONCLUSION: Referring PAs can reliably discern unstable ankle fractures in more than 80% of cases. Lauge-Hansen classification was significantly less accurate than the Danis-Weber system or criteria for stability. Good communication between orthopedic surgeons and PAs and an emphasis on PA orthopedic education can improve patient care.


Assuntos
Fraturas do Tornozelo/classificação , Assistentes Médicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Fraturas do Tornozelo/diagnóstico por imagem , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Medicina Militar , Variações Dependentes do Observador , Radiografia , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Estados Unidos
11.
Hand (N Y) ; 13(2): 137-142, 2018 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28387162

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common occupational pathology, representing a high percentage of workers' compensation (WC) claims. METHODS: The literature was reviewed for all studies evaluating CTS outcomes including WC patients between 1993 and 2016. A total of 348 articles were identified; 25 of which met inclusion and exclusion criteria. A systematic review was generated; patient demographics, outcomes, and complications were recorded. Weighted averages were calculated for the demographic and outcome data. Categorical data such as complications were pooled from the studies and used to determine the overall complication rate. Statistical significance was determined between WC and non-WC cohorts when applicable with the chi-square statistic. RESULTS: The WC cohort included 1586 wrists, and the non-WC cohort included 2781 wrists. The WC cohort was younger and more often involved the dominant extremity. The WC cohort was less likely to have appropriate physical exam findings confirming diagnosis and electrodiagnostic studies. WC patients took almost 5 weeks longer to return to work, were 16% less likely to return to preinjury vocation, and had lower Standard Form (SF)-36 scores. Finally, WC patients had nearly 3 times the number of complications and nearly twice the rate of persistent pain. CONCLUSIONS: WC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (CTR) fare poorly as compared with non-WC patients in nearly every metric. Higher rates of postoperative pain with delayed return to work can be anticipated in a WC cohort. In addition, WC patients receive suboptimal preoperative workup, and it is possible that unnecessary surgery is being completed in these cases. These findings are important to consider when treating the WC patient with CTS.


Assuntos
Síndrome do Túnel Carpal/cirurgia , Retorno ao Trabalho , Indenização aos Trabalhadores , Humanos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Cuidados Pré-Operatórios , Reoperação
12.
Foot Ankle Spec ; 11(2): 123-132, 2018 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28580856

RESUMO

This study sought to identify patient and operative demographics associated with 30-day perioperative complications in patients undergoing total ankle arthroplasty as recorded in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database. Complications were divided into local and systemic and further subcategorized as major and minor. A total of 404 patients underwent total ankle arthroplasty between 2007 and 2014 as captured in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database. The overall complication rate was 2.4% with 0.5% mortality and 0.2% infection rate. Length of hospital stay, both as an end point at >5 days and as a continuous variable, was associated with overall complications (odds ratio [OR] = 9.90, P = .002 and OR = 1.52, P = .006, respectively). Patient characteristics that predicted perioperative morbidity included presence of 3 or comorbidities (OR = 8.48, P = 0.038), American Society of Anesthesiologists class III, and history of previous cardiac surgery (OR = 12.22, P = .033). Correct patient selection is imperative in achieving improved outcomes and those that are at risk for complications should be counseled as such. LEVELS OF EVIDENCE: Level III: Database case control study.


Assuntos
Articulação do Tornozelo/cirurgia , Artroplastia de Substituição do Tornozelo/efeitos adversos , Artropatias/cirurgia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Taxa de Sobrevida/tendências , Texas/epidemiologia , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
13.
Mil Med ; 182(11): e1992-e1996, 2017 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29087870

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons (SOMOS) is a robust academic organization with more than 1,000 members and has held annual academic scientific meetings since 1958. Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding the volume and quality of orthopaedic surgery presentations accepted for peer-reviewed publication. The purpose of this study was to answer the following questions: (1) What is the publication acceptance rate for abstract presented at SOMOS meetings? (2) What is the distribution by orthopaedic subspecialty for SOMOS presentations accepted for publication? (3) What is the overall quality of these publications? MATERIALS AND METHODS: Abstracts of podium presentations at SOMOS were reviewed from 2009 to 2013. Author institutional information was obtained. Abstracts were then queried in PubMed to obtain publication status, time to publication, and impact factor of the journal in which the manuscript was successfully published. RESULTS: From 2009 to 2013, 592 abstracts were presented at the SOMOS conference. Overall, 59% of abstracts went on to publication at a mean of 18.1 months. Published manuscripts appeared in 59 journals with a mean impact factor of 2.6. The subspecialties of spine (67%) and basic science (66%) achieved the highest abstract publication rate while sports had the highest mean impact factor (3.3). CONCLUSIONS: The annual SOMOS meeting is a productive academic event, producing quality presentations resulting in a high manuscript publication rate in every orthopaedic surgery subspecialty. This is the first series to demonstrate overall productivity of a general orthopaedic surgery scientific meeting as well as the subspecialty-specific impact factors of published investigations.


Assuntos
Fator de Impacto de Revistas , Militares/estatística & dados numéricos , Ortopedia/tendências , Publicações/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Ortopedia/educação , Revisão por Pares/tendências
14.
Hand (N Y) ; 12(5): 431-438, 2017 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28832209

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Triceps tendon ruptures (TTR) are an uncommon injury. The aim of this systematic review was to classify diagnostic signs, report outcomes and rerupture rates, and identify potential predisposing risk factors in all reported cases of surgical treated TTR. METHODS: A literature search collecting surgical treated cases of TTR was performed, identifying 175 articles, 40 of which met inclusion criteria, accounting for 262 patients. Data were pooled and analyzed focusing on medical comorbidities, presence of a fleck fracture on the preoperative lateral elbow x-ray film (Dunn-Kusnezov Sign [DKS]), outcomes, and rerupture rates. RESULTS: The average age of injury was 45.6 years. The average time from injury to day of surgery was 24 days while 10 patients had a delay in diagnosis of more than 1 month. Renal disease (10%) and anabolic steroid use (7%) were the 2 most common medical comorbidities. The DKS was present in 61% to 88% of cases on the lateral x-ray film. Postoperatively, 89% of patients returned to preinjury level of activity, and there was a 6% rerupture rate at an average follow-up of 34.6 months. The vast majority (81%) of the patients in this review underwent repair via suture fixation. CONCLUSIONS: TTR is an uncommon injury. Risks factors for rupture include renal disease and anabolic steroid use. Lateral elbow radiographs should be scrutinized for the DKS in patients with extension weakness. Outcomes are excellent following repair, and rates of rerupture are low.


Assuntos
Ruptura/diagnóstico , Ruptura/cirurgia , Traumatismos dos Tendões/diagnóstico , Traumatismos dos Tendões/cirurgia , Extremidade Superior/lesões , Extremidade Superior/cirurgia , Comorbidade , Diagnóstico Tardio , Humanos , Nefropatias/complicações , Recuperação de Função Fisiológica , Recidiva , Âncoras de Sutura , Suturas , Congêneres da Testosterona/administração & dosagem , Tempo para o Tratamento
15.
Hand (N Y) ; 12(6): 535-540, 2017 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28720049

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Posterior interosseous nerve neurectomies (PINN) are an option in the treatment of chronic dorsal wrist pain. However, the literature describing PINN consists primarily of small case series, and the procedure is typically done as an adjunct treatment; therefore, the outcomes of the PINN itself are not well known. We performed a systematic review of the literature to provide characteristics of patients following a PINN. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed. Papers published in the PubMed database in English on isolated PINN were included. Articles in which a PINN was performed as an adjunct were excluded. Primary outcomes were return to work, patient satisfaction, pain/function scores, wrist range of motion, complications, and pain recurrence. Weighted averages were used to calculate continuous data, whereas categorical data were noted in percentages. RESULTS: The search yielded 427 articles including 6 studies and 135 patients (136 cases). The average age was 43.6 years (range, 17-75), and most patients were female (54.1%). At an average final follow-up of 51 months, 88.9% of patients were able to return to work. After initial improvement, a recurrence of pain occurred in 25.5% of patients at an average of 12.3 months. Excluding recurrence of pain, the complication rate was 0.9%, including 1 reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Overall, 88.4% of patients experienced a subjective improvement and were satisfied with the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Isolated PINN have shown excellent clinical outcomes, with few patients experiencing recurrent pain at long-term follow-up. PINN can provide relief in patient's chronic wrist pain.


Assuntos
Artralgia/cirurgia , Denervação , Nervo Radial/cirurgia , Articulação do Punho/inervação , Humanos , Satisfação do Paciente , Complicações Pós-Operatórias , Retorno ao Trabalho
16.
J Hand Surg Am ; 42(8): 660.e1-660.e7, 2017 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28549892

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Radial head arthroplasty (RHA) is a viable treatment for complex radial head fracture. Whereas elbow stability and function is typically restored at short- to mid-term follow-up, the outcome in higher-demand populations is not well defined. We sought to characterize the functional and occupational outcomes following RHA in an active duty military population with intense upper extremity demands. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of all U.S. military service members undergoing primary RHA from 2010 and 2013 with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Patient-based, injury-related, and surgical variables were extracted from the military-wide electronic medical record. Functional and occupational outcomes including pain, and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire were recorded. The primary outcomes of interest were the rate and level of return to upper extremity activity. Secondary outcome measures included return to duty, complications, and revision surgery. RESULTS: Nineteen patients were included with average age 31 years and median 37 months' follow-up. Ten were Mason III, 6 were part of a terrible triad injury, and the remainder were fracture-dislocations. At an average follow-up of 3.7 years, 15 patients returned to active military duty, and 9 resumed their regular upper extremity military function. At the time of final follow-up, the average DASH score was 13. Seven patients returned to their usual level of sport and exercise, 6 at a reduced level, and 6 did not resume physical exercises secondary to pain or stiffness. Sixteen adverse outcomes among 14 patients included symptomatic heterotopic ossification (5 of 19) and neurological sequelae (4 of 19). Three elected to have a revision procedure at an average of 13 months for heterotopic ossification or loosening. CONCLUSIONS: Among active patients with radial head fractures treated with RHA, three-quarters will return to active duty military service, push-ups, and sport; however, half may report an adverse outcome unrelated to the prosthesis and only about half of patients will return to their preinjury level of function. TYPE OF STUDY/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic IV.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Substituição do Cotovelo , Fraturas Intra-Articulares/cirurgia , Militares , Fraturas do Rádio/cirurgia , Adulto , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
17.
J Surg Orthop Adv ; 26(1): 58-64, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28459426

RESUMO

Posteriorly based osteochondral lesions of the talus (OCLTs) are relatively rare, and when they are symptomatic and not amenable to traditional arthroscopic treatment techniques, they may require osteochondral graft transfer procedures, such as the osteochondral autograft transfer system (OATS) procedure. Historically described osteotomies to gain perpendicular access to these OCLTs, while excellent techniques, present many possible postoperative morbidities. This technical tip describes the use of a prone position midline Achilles tendon-splitting approach, a well-described approach to the posterior ankle and hindfoot, to perform osteochondral autograft transfer without need for any malleolar osteotomies. At 12 months postoperatively, the patient reported a pain visual analog score of 1.0 (75% improvement) and demonstrated an American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle and hindfoot score of 90 (38% improvement). At 24 months postoperatively, the patient had near complete resolution of ankle pain and had returned to normal recreational physical activities.


Assuntos
Tendão do Calcâneo/cirurgia , Traumatismos do Tornozelo/cirurgia , Transplante Ósseo/métodos , Cartilagem/transplante , Militares , Osteotomia/métodos , Tálus/cirurgia , Transplante Autólogo/métodos , Adulto , Traumatismos do Tornozelo/diagnóstico por imagem , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Posicionamento do Paciente , Decúbito Ventral , Tálus/lesões , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X
18.
Hand (N Y) ; : 1558944717701241, 2017 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28347178

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although routine antibiotic prophylaxis immediately preceding an orthopedic surgery has become the standard of care in most cases, this practice is poorly defined in hand surgery. The purpose of this analysis is to review the most current literature of antibiotic use in hand surgery. METHODS: A careful review of the literature regarding routine antibiotic prophylaxis in hand surgery was made. Current relevant resources were used in the construction of this review. RESULTS: There is a mixed consensus on the role for prophylactic antibiotics in hand surgery with some resources and data showing support and others opposed. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the current literature, the authors recommend the following patient characteristics not receive antibiotics: clean hygienic patients, without autoimmune disease, and those not taking steroid medication. Surgical characteristics that would render prophylaxis unnecessary include those without hardware, those without reasonable risk of hematoma formation, or those performed at an ambulatory surgery center as opposed to a large hospital. However, the decision should be made on a case-by-case basis weighing the evidence presented.

19.
Foot Ankle Spec ; 10(4): 352-358, 2017 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28345364

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: We performed a systematic review of the published literature to characterize patient demographic, surgical techniques, and functional outcomes to elucidate the complication and revision rates following isolated tibiotalar arthrodesis with anatomically contoured anterior plating. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was performed. Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed studies in English, after 1990, at least 10 patients, and reporting clinical outcomes following contoured anterior plating and with follow-up of at least 80% and 1 year. Primary outcomes were fusion rate, time to fusion, return to activities, satisfaction, and functional outcome scores. Complication rates, reoperation, and revision were also extracted. RESULTS: Eight primary studies with 164 patients met the inclusion criteria. The average sample size was 21 ± 10.0 patients and average age was 49.2 years with 61.6% male. Posttraumatic arthritis (49.4%) was the most common operative indication, followed by primary osteoarthrosis (18.9%). The average follow-up was 21.1 months. At this time, 97.6% of patients went on to uneventful union at a weighted average time of 18.7 weeks postoperatively. AOFAS scores improved significantly ( P < .05). 25% complication rate was reported with wound complication (7.9%) and hardware irritation (6.7%) most common. Overall, 21.3% of patients underwent reoperation; 4 for revision arthrodesis following nonunion. CONCLUSION: Isolated tibiotalar arthrodesis utilizing anatomically contoured anterior plating demonstrates excellent clinical and functional outcomes at short-term follow-up. Overall, 97.6% of patients went on to fusion and functional outcomes consistently improved following surgery. Furthermore, while one-quarter of patients experienced complications, wound complications were relatively uncommon and less than one-quarter of these required surgical intervention. LEVELS OF EVIDENCE: Level IV: Systematic Review.


Assuntos
Articulação do Tornozelo/cirurgia , Artrodese/instrumentação , Placas Ósseas , Humanos , Osseointegração , Complicações Pós-Operatórias , Reoperação
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