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1.
Emerg Med J ; 36(11): 653-659, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31409636

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Gamification is a non-evaluation and competition-based training methodology with high emotional involvement. The goal of this study was to evaluate gamification methodology as compared with other existing methodologies when teaching cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to secondary school students. METHODS: 489 secondary school students from two high schools in Spain participated in this randomised-block quasi-experimental study in February 2018. The students were classified into different groups. Each group received CPR training with a different methodology: GAM (gamification-based training as a compulsory but non-tested academic activity to learn by playing in teams, with instructor and visual feedback); EVA (training based on subsequent evaluation as a motivational incentive, with instructor and visual feedback); VFC (visual feedback complementary, training based on a non-compulsory and non-tested academic activity, with instructor and visual feedback); TC (traditional complementary, training based on a non-compulsory and non-tested academic activity, with instructor feedback). After a week, each student performed a 2 min hands-only CPR test and quality of CPR was assessed. Visual feedback in training and CPR variables in test were provided by the QCPR Instructor App using a Little Anne manikin, both from Laerdal (Norway). RESULTS: GAM (89.56%; 95% CI 86.71 to 92.42) methodology resulted in significantly higher scores for CPR quality than VFC and TC (81.96%; 95% CI 78.04% to 85.88% and 64.11%; 95% CI 58.23 to 69.99). GAM (61.77%; 95% CI 56.09 to 67.45) methodology also resulted in significantly higher scores for correct rate than VFC and TC (48.41%; 95% CI 41.15% to 55.67% and 17.28%; 95% CI 10.94 to 23.62). 93.4% of GAM methodology participants obtained >50 mm of compression mean depth which was a significantly higher proportion than among students in VFC and TC (78.0% and 71.9%). No differences between GAM and EVA were found. A confidence level of 95% has been assigned to all values. CONCLUSIONS: GAM methodology resulted in higher CPR quality than non-tested methods of academic training with instructor feedback or visual feedback. Gamification should be considered as an alternative teaching method for Basic Life Support (BLS) in younger individuals.

2.
PLoS One ; 14(4): e0212080, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31039154

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Decision-making in emergencies is a multifactorial process based on the rescuer, patient, setting and resources. The eye-tracking system is a proven method for assessing decision-making processes that have been used in different fields of science. Our aim was to evaluate the lifeguards' capacity to perform the ABCDE (Airway-Breathing-Circulation-Disability-Exposure) approach when facing a simulated critically ill-drowned victim. METHODS: A cross-sectional simulation study was designed to assess the skills and sequence of the ABCDE approach by 20 professional lifeguards. They had to assess a victim and act according to his/her clinical status by following the ABCDE primary assessment approach. The two kinds of variables were recorder: those related to the quality of each step of the ABCDE approach and the visual behaviour using a portable eye-movement system. The eye-tracking system was the Mobile Eye system (Bedford, USA). RESULTS: None of the study participants were able to complete correctly the ABCDE approach. Lifeguards spent more time in the Circulation step: Airway (15.5±11.1 s), Breathing (25.1±21.1 s), Circulation (44.6±29.5 s), Disability (38.5±0.7 s). Participants spent more time in viewpoints considered as important (65.5±17.4 s) compared with secondary ones (34.6±17.4 s, p = 0.008). This was also represented in the percentage of visual fixations (fixations in important viewpoints: 63.36±15.06; fixation in secondary viewpoints: 36.64±15.06; p = 0.008). CONCLUSION: Professional lifeguards failed to fully perform the ABCDE sequence. Evaluation by experts with the help of eye-tracking technology detected the lifeguards' limitations in the assessment and treatment of an eventual critically ill victim. Such deficits should be considered in the design and implementation of lifeguards' training programmes.


Assuntos
Estado Terminal , Afogamento , Primeiros Socorros , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Movimentos Oculares , Feminino , Primeiros Socorros/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Respiração , Adulto Jovem
3.
Cardiol J ; 26(5): 536-542, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30009374

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The aim was to assess future schoolteachers' basic life support (BLS) knowledge and willingness to include this content in school lessons. The aim was also to determine the learning effect of a brief BLS hands-on training session, supported by real-time feedback. METHODS: A convenience sample of 98 University students of Educational Sciences and Sports were recruited. The training program consisted of brief theoretical and hands-on interactive sessions with a 2/10 instructor/participants ratio. Knowledge and willingness was assessed by means of a survey. Chest compressions (CC) and ventilation quality were registered in 47 cases during 1 min cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) tests. RESULTS: Fifty-eight percent of subjects declared to know how to perform CPR, 62% knew the correct chest compression/ventilation ratio but only one in four knew the CC quality standards. Eighty-eight percent knew what an automated external defibrillator (AED) was; willingness to use the device improved from 70% to 98% after training. Almost half of CCs were performed atan adequate rate. Men performed deeper compressions than women (56.1 ± 4.03 mm vs. 52.17 ± 5.51 mm, p = 0.007), but in both cases the mean value was within recommendations. Full chest recoil was better in women (72.2 ± 32.8% vs. 45.4 ± 32.9%, p = 0.009). All CCs were delivered with correct hand positions. CONCLUSIONS: Brief hands-on training supported by real-time feedback of CPR quality helps future schoolteachers improve their knowledge, self-confidence and CPR skills. BLS training should be implemented in University curricula for schoolteachers in order to promote their engagement in effective BLS training of schoolchildren.

5.
An. pediatr. (2003. Ed. impr.) ; 89(5): 272-278, nov. 2018. tab
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-177116

RESUMO

Introducción: Se ha observado que los profesionales sanitarios tienen dificultades para realizar maniobras de reanimación cardiopulmonar (RCP) de calidad. Nuestro objetivo ha sido comparar la calidad de las ventilaciones en un modelo de lactante según el método utilizado (boca a boca y nariz o bien bolsa autoinflable y mascarilla facial) por estudiantes de Enfermería. Material y métodos: Estudio cuasiexperimental de corte transversal que incluyó a 46 estudiantes de Enfermería de segundo curso. Se realizaron 2pruebas cuantitativas de RCP pediátrica de 4 min: a) con ventilación boca a boca y nariz; b) con ventilación con bolsa autoinflable y mascarilla facial. Se utilizó un maniquí Resusci Baby QCPR Wireless SkillReporter(R) de Laerdal. Se registraron y analizaron los porcentajes de ventilaciones con volumen adecuado, excesivo e insuficiente, además de la calidad global de la RCP (ventilaciones y compresiones torácicas). Resultados: Los estudiantes consiguieron dar más ventilaciones con volumen apropiado con el método boca a boca y nariz (55 ± 22%) que con bolsa y mascarilla (28 ± 16%; p < 0,001). La calidad global de la RCP también fue significativamente superior cuando aplicaron el método boca a boca y nariz (60 ± 19 vs. 48 ± 16%; p<0,001). Conclusiones: La ventilación boca a boca y nariz es más eficiente que la ventilación con bolsa autoinflable y mascarilla facial en la RCP realizada por estudiantes de Enfermería con un modelo simulado de lactante


Introduction: It has been observed that health professionals have difficulty performing quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of this study was to compare the quality of ventilations performed by Nursing students on an infant model using different methods (mouth-to-mouth-and-nose or bag-valve-mask). Material and methods: A quasi-experimental cross-sectional study was performed that included 46 second-year Nursing students. Two quantitative 4-minute tests of paediatric CPR were performed: a) mouth-to-mouth-and-nose ventilations, and b) ventilations with bag-valve-mask. A Resusci Baby QCPR Wireless SkillReporter(R) mannequin from Laerdal was used. The proportion of ventilations with adequate, excessive, and insufficient volume was recorded and analysed, as well as the overall quality of the CPR (ventilations and chest compressions). Results: The students were able to give a higher number of ventilations with adequate volume using the mouth-to-mouth-and-nose method (55 ± 22%) than with the bag-valve-mask (28 ± 16%, P < .001). The overall quality of the CPR was also significantly higher when using the mouth-to-mouth-and-nose method (60 ± 19 vs. 48 ± 16%, P < .001). Conclusions: Mouth-to-mouth-and-nose ventilation method is more efficient than bag-valve-mask ventilations in CPR performed by nursing students with a simulated infant model


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adolescente , Adulto Jovem , Adulto , Reanimação Cardiopulmonar/métodos , Respiração Artificial , Estudantes de Enfermagem/estatística & dados numéricos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados não Aleatórios como Assunto , Educação em Enfermagem , Máscaras Faciais , Manequins
6.
An Pediatr (Barc) ; 89(5): 272-278, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29429863

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: It has been observed that health professionals have difficulty performing quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of this study was to compare the quality of ventilations performed by Nursing students on an infant model using different methods (mouth-to-mouth-and-nose or bag-valve-mask). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A quasi-experimental cross-sectional study was performed that included 46 second-year Nursing students. Two quantitative 4-minute tests of paediatric CPR were performed: a) mouth-to-mouth-and-nose ventilations, and b) ventilations with bag-valve-mask. A Resusci Baby QCPR Wireless SkillReporter® mannequin from Laerdal was used. The proportion of ventilations with adequate, excessive, and insufficient volume was recorded and analysed, as well as the overall quality of the CPR (ventilations and chest compressions). RESULTS: The students were able to give a higher number of ventilations with adequate volume using the mouth-to-mouth-and-nose method (55±22%) than with the bag-valve-mask (28±16%, P<.001). The overall quality of the CPR was also significantly higher when using the mouth-to-mouth-and-nose method (60±19 vs. 48±16%, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Mouth-to-mouth-and-nose ventilation method is more efficient than bag-valve-mask ventilations in CPR performed by nursing students with a simulated infant model.


Assuntos
Reanimação Cardiopulmonar/instrumentação , Reanimação Cardiopulmonar/métodos , Respiração Artificial , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados não Aleatórios como Assunto , Adulto Jovem
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