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2.
Ticks Tick Borne Dis ; 12(3): 101669, 2021 Jan 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33578255

RESUMO

Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) have been recognised to harbour and transmit a wide range of tick-borne pathogens (TBPs) including those of zoonotic concern. To investigate the prevalence and the distribution of TBPs and of Leishmania infantum in foxes (n = 244), spleen samples were collected within the frame of a multi-regional wildlife health surveillance program in Italy. A combined PCR/sequencing approach was performed for the detection of Anaplasma spp., Babesia spp., Borrelia spp., Ehrlichia spp., Hepatozoon spp. and L. infantum DNA. Overall, 146 foxes (59.8 %, 95 % CI: 53.6-65.8) tested positive for at least one pathogen with Hepatozoon canis being the most prevalent (i.e., n = 124; 50.8 %, 95 % CI: 44.6-57.0), followed by Babesia vulpes (n = 20; 8.2 %, 95 % CI: 5.4-12.3), different spirochete species from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex (n = 9; 3.7 %, 95 % CI: 1.9-6.9), Ehrlichia canis and L. infantum (n = 7; 2.9 % each, 95 % CI: 1.4-5.8), Anaplasma platys (n = 4; 1.6 %, 95 % CI: 0.6-4.1), Anaplasma phagocytophilum ecotype I and Candidatus Neoehrlichia sp. (n = 3; 1.2 % each, 95 % CI: 0.4-3.5). All samples scored negative for Babesia canis and Borrelia miyamotoi. This study revealed the presence of spirochetes from B. burgdorferi s.l. complex, Ca. Neoehrlichia sp., A. platys and A. phagocytophilum ecotype I in red fox population from Italy, underling the necessity to monitoring these carnivores, mainly because they live in contact with dogs and humans. Data on the tick fauna circulating on wildlife species will complement information herein obtained, instrumentally to establish preventive strategies for minimizing the risk of infection for animals and humans.

3.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(2): e0009090, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33596200

RESUMO

We assessed the presence of Rickettsia spp., Coxiella burnetii and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in reptiles, their ectoparasites and in questing ticks collected in a nature preserve park in southern Italy, as well as in a peri-urban area in another region. We also investigated the exposure to these pathogens in forestry workers, farmers and livestock breeders living or working in the nature preserve park given the report of anecdotal cases of spotted fever rickettsioses. Rickettsia spp. were molecularly detected in Podarcis muralis and Podarcis siculus lizards (i.e., 3.1%), in Ixodes ricinus (up to 87.5%) and in Neotrombicula autumnalis (up to 8.3%) collected from them as well as in I. ricinus collected from the environment (up to 28.4%). Rickettsia monacensis was the most prevalent species followed by Rickettsia helvetica. An undescribed member of the family Anaplasmataceae was detected in 2.4% and 0.8% of the reptiles and ectoparasites, respectively. Sera from human subjects (n = 50) were serologically screened and antibodies to Rickettsia spp. (n = 4; 8%), C. burnetti (n = 8; 16%) and A. phagocytophilum (n = 11; 22%) were detected. Two ticks collected from two forestry workers were positive for spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae. Ixodes ricinus is involved in the transmission of SFG rickettsiae (R. monacensis and R. helvetica) in southern Europe and lizards could play a role in the sylvatic cycle of R. monacensis, as amplifying hosts. Meanwhile, N. autumnalis could be involved in the enzootic cycle of some SFG rickettsiae among these animals. People living or working in the southern Italian nature preserve park investigated are exposed to SFG rickettsiae, C. burnetii and A. phagocytophilum.

4.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 2021 Feb 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33547868

RESUMO

Leishmania infantum and Dirofilaria immitis are among the most important vector-borne pathogens in Europe, affecting animal and human health. In endemic areas, the epidemiology of both infections is conditioned by abundance of vectors and chemoprophylaxis measures. However, knowledge on the incidence of heartworm (HW) and Leishmania infections occurring in sympatry is still scant. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the incidence of both infections in two dog shelters from southern Italy, which represent hotspots for these two diseases. In June and in October 2020, all dogs that previously scored negative for L. infantum (n = 111, site 1; n = 70, site 2) and D. immitis (n = 58, site 1; n = 61, site 2) in 2019 were tested for the estimation of the incidence of both infections. Anti-L. infantum IgG was detected by immunofluorescence antibody test, whereas D. immitis infection was diagnosed by modified Knott's test, SNAP 4Dx Plus test and real-time PCR. The overall D. immitis and L. infantum infection incidence values were both higher in site 2 (i.e. 63.9% and 10%, respectively) than site 1 (i.e. 39.7% and 1.8%, respectively). The dog shelter in site 2 was shown to be more suitable for the development of the mosquito/sand fly populations and, consequently, for the spreading of both parasites representing a potential threat for animal and human health. The high incidence of both infections recorded in this study suggests the need for chemoprophylaxis measures and vector monitoring and control to minimize the risk for animals and humans living in shelters or in their neighbourhoods.

6.
Vet Parasitol ; 290: 109369, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33548595

RESUMO

These guidelines are intended to provide an in-depth review of current knowledge and assist the planning and implementation of studies for evaluating the efficacy of parasiticides in reducing transmission of vector-borne pathogens (VBPs) to dogs and cats. At present, the prevention of VBP transmission in companion animals is generally achieved through the administration of products that can repel or rapidly kill arthropods, thus preventing or interrupting feeding before transmission occurs. The present guidelines complement existing guidelines, which focus on efficacy assessment of parasiticides for the treatment, prevention and control of flea and tick infestations, but also give guidance for studies focused on other vectors (i.e. mosquitoes and phlebotomine sand flies). The efficacy of parasiticides in reducing VBP transmission can be evaluated through laboratory or field studies. As such, the present guidelines provide recommendations for these studies, representing a tool for researchers, pharmaceutical companies and authorities involved in the research, development and registration of products with claims for reducing VBP transmission in dogs and cats, respecting the overall principles of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). Gaps in our current understanding of VBP transmission times are herein highlighted and the need for further basic research on related topics is briefly discussed.

7.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(2): e0009027, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33566799

RESUMO

Onchocerca lupi (Spirurida: Onchocercidae) is a filarial worm parasitizing domestic carnivores and humans. Adult nematodes usually localize beneath in the sclera or in the ocular retrobulbar of infected animals, whilst microfilariae are found in the skin. Therefore, diagnosis of O. lupi is achieved by microscopic and/or molecular detection of microfilariae from skin biopsy and/or surgical removal of adults from ocular tissues of infected hosts. An urgent non-invasive diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of O. lupi in dog is mandatory. In this study, an immunoproteomic analyses was performed using a combination of immunoblotting and mass spectrometry techniques. Onchocerca lupi major antigen (Ol-MJA) and paramyosin (Ol-PARA) proteins were identified as potential biomarkers for serodiagnosis. Linear epitopes were herein scanned for both proteins using high-density peptide microarray. Sera collected from dog infected with O. lupi and healthy animal controls led to the identification of 11 immunodominant antigenic peptides (n = 7 for Ol-MJA; n = 4 for Ol-PARA). These peptides were validated using sera of dogs uniquely infected with the most important filarioids infesting dogs either zoonotic (Dirofilaria repens, Dirofilaria immitis) or not (Acanthocheilonema reconditum and Cercopithifilaria bainae). Overall, six antigenic peptides, three for Ol-MJA and for Ol-PARA, respectively, were selected as potential antigens for the serological detection of canine O. lupi infection. The molecular and proteomic dataset herein reported should provide a useful resource for studies on O. lupi toward supporting the development of new interventions (drugs, vaccines and diagnostics) against canine onchocercosis.

8.
Parasitol Res ; 2021 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33506332

RESUMO

Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs) are highly prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries, mainly due to favorable climate conditions and reduced adoption of preventive measures. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive overview on the prevalence of CVBDs in Iran and Pakistan where limited data are available. Blood samples were collected from 403 dogs from six provinces in Iran and Pakistan to assess the presence of pathogen DNA (i.e., Anaplasma spp., Coxiella burnetii, Ehrlichia spp., Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp., Hepatozoon spp., filarioids, and Leishmania spp.). Sera were also screened by an immunofluorescence antibody test for the detection of antibodies against Leishmania infantum. In total, 46.9% of dogs scored positive to Hepatozoon canis being the most frequently detected (41.4%), followed by Anaplasma platys (6.4%), Ehrlichia canis (3.4%), Rickettsia spp. (2.2%), Babesia vogeli (1.0%), and L. infantum (0.3%). A seroprevalence of 9.6% to anti-L. infantum IgG was also recorded. Data reported herein demonstrate that dogs from Iran and Pakistan are at a high risk of CVBDs, particularly of canine hepatozoonosis. Effective control strategies are advocated for minimizing the risk of infection in animals and humans, also in consideration of the zoonotic potential of some pathogens detected.

9.
Parasitol Res ; 2021 Jan 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33479780

RESUMO

Capillaria hepatica (syn. Calodium hepaticum) is a globally distributed nematode with a high affinity to the liver of a wide range of mammalian hosts, including humans. Documented reports of the nematode in cats and associated histopathology are rare. Here, we describe a case of C. hepatica infection in a 5-year-old male stray cat from Iran. At post-car accident necropsy, all body parts appeared normal except for the liver, in which a few yellowish-white granulomatous nodules were observed through the capsule and in the organ. Histopathological examination of the tissue revealed a large number of clustered parasite eggs in the parenchyma. The barrel-shaped, un-embryonated eggs (55.19 × 28.37 µm), with inconspicuous caps at both ends, were covered with striated shells. The presence of ova in the liver tissue had resulted in the development of hepatic inflammation with hepatocellular necrosis associated with the development of multifocal granulomas. As predators of small rodents, the cats might have a significant role in the epidemiology of C. hepatica. Infection of hosts through ingestion of embryonated eggs in contaminated water, food, or soil is of major importance in the epidemiology of C. hepatica. Since the rare reports of feline infection have come mainly from accidental detection of the parasite, any hepatic disease presenting difficulties to find an etiological agent may virtually be associated with the infection with this little-known nematode.

10.
Ticks Tick Borne Dis ; 12(2): 101641, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33429219

RESUMO

Hedgehogs play a role in the eco-epidemiology of parasites, viruses and bacteria of veterinary and medical importance. In Europe, hedgehogs have been found infected with tick-transmitted Anaplasma phagocytophilum and A. marginale. In this study blood and ticks collected from 53 long-eared hedgehogs (Hemiechinus auritus) living in southeastern Iran close to Afghanistan and Pakistan borders were examined for Anaplasma spp. infection using microscopical and molecular biology methods. At microscopical examination Anaplasma-like inclusion bodies were found at the margin of erythrocytes in the blood smear of one infected hedgehog (prevalence 1.9 %). Each hedgehog was infested with three to eight adult ticks (average 4.7 ± 1.5). On the body of hedgehogs, the ears were the main site for attachment of ticks. Out of 248 collected adult ticks 81.4 % were Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and 18.5 % were R. turanicus. PCR and sequencing showed the presence of A. marginale infection in the blood of two hedgehogs (3.8 %) and R. turanicus ticks collected from them. This is the first report of A. marginale infection in hedgehogs in Iran. Epidemiological importance of this finding is discussed and current knowledge on the tick fauna of hedgehogs in the country is reviewed.

11.
Trends Parasitol ; 37(3): 181-184, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33454218

RESUMO

The illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is a criminal practice bringing several ecological and public health consequences, such as the spreading of zoonotic pathogens and/or the introduction of exotic species of animals into new geographical areas. Here, we discuss potential risks of IWT on the spreading and emergence of zoonotic pathogens.

12.
Ticks Tick Borne Dis ; 12(1): 101585, 2021 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33113476

RESUMO

Trombidiformes and Mesostigmata mites, as well as Ixodida ticks, infest ectothermic tetrapods worldwide, potentially acting as vectors of bacteria, viruses and protozoa. The relationship among ectoparasites, transmitted pathogenic agents (e.g., Borrelia spp., Coxiella spp., Hepatozoon spp., and Rickettsia spp.) and ectothermic hosts has been scarcely investigated. This research focuses on a large collection of Brazilian herpetofauna screened for the presence of arthropod ectoparasites and vector-borne microbial agents. Reptiles (n = 121) and amphibians (n = 49) from various locations were infested by ectoparasites. Following genomic extraction, microbial agents were detected in 81 % of the Acari (i.e. n = 113 mites and n = 26 ticks). None of the mites, ticks and tissues from amphibians yielded positive results for any of the screened agents. Blood was collected from reptiles and processed through blood cytology and molecular analyses (n = 48). Of those, six snakes (12.5 %) showed intraerythrocytic alterations compatible with Hepatozoon spp. gamonts and Iridovirus inclusions. Hepatozoon spp. similar to Hepatozoon ayorgbor and Hepatozoon musa were molecularly identified from seven hosts, two mite and two tick species. Rickettsia spp. (e.g., Rickettsia amblyommatis, Rickettsia bellii-like, Rickettsia sp.) were detected molecularly from four mite species and Amblyomma rotundatum ticks. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the molecular identification of the above-mentioned microbial agents of mites and ticks related to snakes and lizards. Overall, our findings highlighted that the Brazilian herpetofauna and its ectoparasites harbour potentially pathogenic agents, particularly from the northern and south-eastern regions. The detection of several species of spotted fever group Rickettsia pointed out the potential role of ectothermic hosts and related arthropod ectoparasites in the epidemiological cycle of these bacteria in Brazil.

13.
Trends Parasitol ; 2020 Dec 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33279398
14.
Vet Parasitol Reg Stud Reports ; 22: 100468, 2020 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33308725

RESUMO

Vector-borne pathogens (VBPs) of dogs have been extensively studied worldwide, though scientific information for some countries, as is the case for Guatemala, is almost nonexistent. From 2012 to 2015, 975 dogs residing in different departments of Guatemala were sampled and screened using a rapid ELISA for detecting antigen of Dirofilaria immitis and antibodies against Anaplasma spp., Ehrlichia spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi. Out of 975 samples analyzed, 46.4% (n = 452) scored positive for at least one pathogen, with D. immitis being the most prevalent (29.7%), followed by Ehrlichia spp. (11.5%) and Anaplasma spp. (5.1%). None of the dogs were positive to B. burgdorferi. Co-infections were observed in 18.1% (n = 176) of dogs, with the simultaneous detection of D. immitis and Ehrlichia spp. being most common. The frequency of VBPs was higher in the department of Santa Rosa (southeast coast of Guatemala), which has a tropical savanna climate. In this region, 59.7% of the dogs surveyed were infected with D. immitis. Our results suggest that the prevalence of VBPs in dogs in Guatemala may be affected by the climate, with dogs living in the southeast coast being at higher risk, as compared to other regions studied. Increased awareness regarding the risk of VBPs in dogs in Guatemala is advocated and the adoption of preventive strategies should be encouraged.

15.
Parasit Vectors ; 13(1): 546, 2020 Nov 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33168100

RESUMO

The Companion Vector-Borne Diseases (CVBD) World Forum is a working group of leading international experts who meet annually to evaluate current scientific findings and future trends concerning the distribution, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and prevention of vector-borne infections of dogs and cats. At the 14th Symposium of the CVBD World Forum in Trieste, Italy (March 25-28, 2019), we identified the need to (i) bring attention to the potential spread of parasites and vectors with relocated dogs, and (ii) provide advice to the veterinary profession regarding the importance of surveillance and treatment for parasites and vector-borne infections when rehoming dogs. This letter shares a consensus statement from the CVBD World Forum as well as a summary of the problem faced, including the role of veterinary professionals in parasite surveillance, causal issues, and the importance of interdisciplinary cooperation in addressing the problem. To limit opportunities for dissemination of parasites and vectors, whenever possible, underlying problems creating the need for dog rehoming should be addressed. However, when it is necessary to rehome dogs, this should ideally take place in the country and national region of origin. When geographically distant relocation occurs, veterinary professionals have a vital role to play in public education, vigilance for detection of exotic vectors and infections, and alerting the medical community to the risk(s) for pathogen spread. With appropriate veterinary intervention, dog welfare needs can be met without inadvertently allowing global spread of parasites and their vectors.

16.
Parasit Vectors ; 13(1): 586, 2020 Nov 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33213507

RESUMO

Parasitic infections can cause many respiratory, digestive and other diseases and contribute to some performance conditions in equids. However, knowledge on the biodiversity of parasites of equids in Iran is still limited. The present review covers all the information about parasitic diseases of horses, donkeys, mules and wild asses in Iran published as articles in Iranian and international journals, dissertations and congress papers from 1931 to July 2020. Parasites so far described in Iranian equids include species of 9 genera of the Protozoa (Trypanosoma, Giardia, Eimeria, Klossiella, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, Neospora, Theileria and Babesia), 50 helminth species from the digestive system (i.e., 2 trematodes, 3 cestodes and 37 nematodes) and from other organs (i.e., Schistosoma turkestanica, Echinococcus granulosus, Dictyocaulus arnfieldi, Parafilaria multipapillosa, Setaria equina and 3 Onchocerca spp.). Furthermore, 16 species of hard ticks, 3 mite species causing mange, 2 lice species, and larvae of 4 Gastrophilus species and Hippobosca equina have been reported from equids in Iran. Archeoparasitological findings in coprolites of equids include Fasciola hepatica, Oxyuris equi, Anoplocephala spp. and intestinal strongyles. Parasitic diseases are important issues in terms of animal welfare, economics and public health; however, parasites and parasitic diseases of equines have not received adequate attention compared with ruminants and camels in Iran. The present review highlights the knowledge gaps related to equines about the presence, species, genotypes and subtypes of Neospora hughesi, Sarcocystis spp., Trichinella spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, Blastocystis and microsporidia. Identification of ticks vectoring pathogenic parasites, bacteria and viruses has received little attention, too. The efficacy of common horse wormers also needs to be evaluated systematically.

17.
Med Mycol ; 2020 Oct 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33099634

RESUMO

Malassezia yeasts are commensal microorganisms occurring on the skin of humans and animals causing dermatological disorders or systemic infections in severely immunocompromised hosts. Despite attempts to control such yeast infections with topical and systemic antifungals, recurrence of clinical signs of skin infections as well as treatment failure in preventing or treating Malassezia furfur fungemia have been reported most likely due to wrong management of these infections (e.g., due to early termination of treatment) or due to the occurrence of resistant phenomena. Standardized methods for in vitro antifungal susceptibility tests of these yeasts are still lacking, thus resulting in variable susceptibility profiles to azoles among Malassezia spp. and a lack of clinical breakpoints. The inherent limitations to the current pharmacological treatments for Malassezia infections both in humans and animals, stimulated the interest of the scientific community to discover new, effective antifungal drugs or substances to treat these infections. In this review, data about the in vivo and in vitro antifungal activity of the most commonly employed drugs (i.e., azoles, polyenes, allylamines, and echinocandins) against Malassezia yeasts, with a focus on human bloodstream infections, are summarized and their clinical implications are discussed. In addition, the usefulness of alternative compounds is discussed.

18.
Microorganisms ; 8(11)2020 Oct 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33126584

RESUMO

The zoonotic Onchocerca lupi and tick-transmitted filarioids of the genus Cercopithifilaria remain less well known due to the difficulties in accessing to skin samples as target tissues. Here, we proposed a molecular approach reliying on multiplex qPCR assays that allow the rapid identification of filarioids from canine blood, skin, and tick samples. This includes two newly developed duplex qPCR tests, the first one targeting filarial and C. grassii DNA (CanFil-C. grassii). and the second qPCR assay designed for the detection of Cercopithifilaria bainae and Cercopithifilaria sp. II DNAs (C. bainae-C.spII). The third one is a triplex TaqMan cox 1 assay targeting DNA of blood microfilariae (e.g., Dirofilaria immitis, Dirofilaria repens and Acanthocheilonema reconditum). The novel duplex qPCRs developed were validated in silico and by screening of known DNA collection. The qPCR assays were also used for screening the blood and tick samples of 72 dogs from Algeria. This allowed the identification of canine filariasis infection with 100% of specificity and 89.47% and 100% of sensitivity from naturally infected blood and tick samples, respectively. The prevalences of 26.39% for D. immitis and 5.56% for both D. repens and A. reconditum were reported in blood and tick samples. Cercopithifilaria DNAs were detected only in tick samples, with a prevalence of 4.17% and 5.56% for C. bainae and Cercopithifilaria sp. II, respectively. Co-infections were diagnosed in 6.94% and 13.89% of blood and tick samples, respectively. Whereas all samples were negative for C. grassii DNA. The use of engorged ticks instead of blood and skin samples could be an easier option for the surveillance of all canine filarioids herein investigated. The multiplex qPCR assays herein validated were shown to be useful in the detection of filarial co-infections by overcoming sequencing of positive samples.

19.
Parasitology ; : 1-7, 2020 Sep 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32981541

RESUMO

In order to elucidate the infection pathways of third stage larvae (L3) of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, we performed experiments to assess: (i) the shedding of L3 from two species of experimental veronicellid slugs drowned in water and the ratio of emerged larvae, (ii) the transmission of viable L3 from drowned terrestrial gastropods to aquatic snails, and (iii) the transmission of viable L3 between terrestrial snails. Molluscs were experimentally infected by first stage larvae (L1) of A. cantonensis. Significantly more L3 larvae were released from Veronicella cubensis than from Veronicella sloanei. Numerous L3 were observed in the muscular foot, and also in the connective tissue between internal organs. Experimental exposure of P. maculata to L3 of A. cantonensis liberated from other gastropod species led to their infection and the infectivity of larvae after intermediesis was demonstrated by infection of laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus). The transmission of L3 was observed in three out of four experiment replications and L3 were retrieved from 6 out of 24 Subulina octona snails. The infected synanthropic molluscs represent a key component in the epidemiology of human infections by A. cantonensis. Escape of L3 larvae from bodies of dead snails or slugs and their ability to infect further gastropod hosts (intermediesis) represents a public health risk. Thus, control of molluscs living in peri-domestic environment is an essential part of prevention of human infections.

20.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 2020 Sep 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32986912

RESUMO

Following the increase in wild boar population recorded in urban and peri-urban areas throughout Europe, the present survey aimed to assess the occurrence of zoonotic tick-borne pathogens (TBPs) in wild boars living in southern Italy and in their ticks for evaluating the potential risk of infection for animals and humans. From October to December 2019, a total of 176 ticks collected from 93 wild boars andtheir spleen samples were molecularly screened for selected TBPs. Overall, all the wild boars were infested by ticks (mean intensity, 1.9) with Dermacentor marginatus and Ixodes ricinus being identified in 99.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Out of 93 wild boars, 17 (18.3%) were infested by ticks which scored positive to spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia species. Rickettsia slovaca and Rickettsia raoultii were identified in 16 (9%) and 1 (0.6%) D. marginatus, respectively, whereas a single I. ricinus (0.6%) was infected by R. slovaca. A single wild boar (1.1%) tested positive to R. slovaca. All ticks and wild boars scored negative to Babesia/Theileria spp., Ehrlichia spp., Anaplasma spp., Candidatus Neoehrlichia spp., Coxiella burnetii and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. Data herein obtained suggest that wild boars are involved in the maintenance of D. marginatus in the environment as in peri-urban areas herein investigated. An integrated management approach is advocated for wild boar population control and in preventing the potential risk of TBPs infection in animals and humans.

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