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1.
Epilepsia ; 60(6): e63-e66, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31077350

RESUMO

Severe early onset epilepsies are often caused by de novo pathogenic variants. Few studies have reported the frequency of somatic mosaicism in parents of children with severe epileptic encephalopathies. Here we aim to investigate the frequency of mosaicism in the parents of children with epilepsy caused by alleged de novo variants. We tested parental genomic DNA derived from different tissues for 75 cases using targeted next-generation sequencing. Five parents (6.6%) showed mosaicism at minor allele frequencies of 0.8%-29% for the pathogenic variant detected in their offspring. Parental mosaicism was observed in the following genes: SCN1A, SCN2A, SCN8A, and STXBP1. One of the identified parents had epilepsy himself. Our results show that de novo events can occur already in parental tissue and in some cases can be detected in peripheral blood. Consequently, parents affected by low-grade mosaicism are faced with an increased recurrence risk for transmitting the pathogenic variant, compared to the overall recurrence risk for a second affected child estimated at approximately 1%. However, testing for parental somatic mosaicism will help identifying those parents who truly are at higher risk and will significantly improve genetic counseling in the respective families.

2.
Genet Med ; 21(10): 2216-2223, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30976099

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To provide a detailed electroclinical description and expand the phenotype of PIGT-CDG, to perform genotype-phenotype correlation, and to investigate the onset and severity of the epilepsy associated with the different genetic subtypes of this rare disorder. Furthermore, to use computer-assisted facial gestalt analysis in PIGT-CDG and to the compare findings with other glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor deficiencies. METHODS: We evaluated 13 children from eight unrelated families with homozygous or compound heterozygous pathogenic variants in PIGT. RESULTS: All patients had hypotonia, severe developmental delay, and epilepsy. Epilepsy onset ranged from first day of life to two years of age. Severity of the seizure disorder varied from treatable seizures to severe neonatal onset epileptic encephalopathies. The facial gestalt of patients resembled that of previously published PIGT patients as they were closest to the center of the PIGT cluster in the clinical face phenotype space and were distinguishable from other gene-specific phenotypes. CONCLUSION: We expand our knowledge of PIGT. Our cases reaffirm that the use of genetic testing is essential for diagnosis in this group of disorders. Finally, we show that computer-assisted facial gestalt analysis accurately assigned PIGT cases to the multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome phenotypic series advocating the additional use of next-generation phenotyping technology.

3.
Epilepsia ; 60(5): 830-844, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30968951

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Pathogenic variants in SCN8A have been associated with a wide spectrum of epilepsy phenotypes, ranging from benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS) to epileptic encephalopathies with variable severity. Furthermore, a few patients with intellectual disability (ID) or movement disorders without epilepsy have been reported. The vast majority of the published SCN8A patients suffer from severe developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). In this study, we aimed to provide further insight on the spectrum of milder SCN8A-related epilepsies. METHODS: A cohort of 1095 patients were screened using a next generation sequencing panel. Further patients were ascertained from a network of epilepsy genetics clinics. Patients with severe DEE and BFIS were excluded from the study. RESULTS: We found 36 probands who presented with an SCN8A-related epilepsy and normal intellect (33%) or mild (61%) to moderate ID (6%). All patients presented with epilepsy between age 1.5 months and 7 years (mean = 13.6 months), and 58% of these became seizure-free, two-thirds on monotherapy. Neurological disturbances included ataxia (28%) and hypotonia (19%) as the most prominent features. Interictal electroencephalogram was normal in 41%. Several recurrent variants were observed, including Ile763Val, Val891Met, Gly1475Arg, Gly1483Lys, Phe1588Leu, Arg1617Gln, Ala1650Val/Thr, Arg1872Gln, and Asn1877Ser. SIGNIFICANCE: With this study, we explore the electroclinical features of an intermediate SCN8A-related epilepsy with mild cognitive impairment, which is for the majority a treatable epilepsy.

4.
Epilepsia ; 60(5): 857-871, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31021436

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Establishing a core set of outcomes to be evaluated and reported in intervention trials aims to improve the usefulness of health research. There is no established core outcome set (COS) for childhood epilepsies. The aim of this study was to select a COS to be used in evaluative research of interventions for children with rolandic epilepsy (RE). METHODS: We followed guidance from the COMET (Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials) Initiative. First, we identified outcomes that had been measured in research through a systematic review. Second, young people with RE, parents, and professionals were invited to take part in a Delphi survey in which participants rated the importance of candidate outcomes. Last, a face-to-face meeting was convened to seek consensus on which outcomes were critical to include and to ratify the final COS. RESULTS: From 37 eligible papers in the review, we identified and included 48 candidate outcomes in the survey. We sent invitations to 165 people registered to take part in the survey; of these, 102 (62%) completed Round 1, and 80 (78%) completed Round 2 (three young people, 16 parents, 61 professionals). In Round 2 we included four additional outcomes suggested by participants in Round 1. The consensus meeting included two young people, four parents, and nine professionals who were eligible to vote and ratified the COS as 39 outcomes across 10 domains. SIGNIFICANCE: Our methodology was a proportionate and pragmatic approach toward producing a COS for evaluating research on interventions aiming to improve the health of children with RE.

5.
Neurology ; 92(11): e1238-e1249, 2019 Mar 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30737342

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to expand the spectrum of epilepsy syndromes related to STX1B, encoding the presynaptic protein syntaxin-1B, and establish genotype-phenotype correlations by identifying further disease-related variants. METHODS: We used next-generation sequencing in the framework of research projects and diagnostic testing. Clinical data and EEGs were reviewed, including already published cases. To estimate the pathogenicity of the variants, we used established and newly developed in silico prediction tools. RESULTS: We describe 17 new variants in STX1B, which are distributed across the whole gene. We discerned 4 different phenotypic groups across the newly identified and previously published patients (49 patients in 23 families): (1) 6 sporadic patients or families (31 affected individuals) with febrile and afebrile seizures with a benign course, generally good drug response, normal development, and without permanent neurologic deficits; (2) 2 patients with genetic generalized epilepsy without febrile seizures and cognitive deficits; (3) 13 patients or families with intractable seizures, developmental regression after seizure onset and additional neuropsychiatric symptoms; (4) 2 patients with focal epilepsy. More often, we found loss-of-function mutations in benign syndromes, whereas missense variants in the SNARE motif of syntaxin-1B were associated with more severe phenotypes. CONCLUSION: These data expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum of STX1B-related epilepsies to a diverse range of epilepsies that span the International League Against Epilepsy classification. Variants in STX1B are protean and contribute to many different epilepsy phenotypes, similar to SCN1A, the most important gene associated with fever-associated epilepsies.

6.
Epilepsy Behav ; 90: 122-128, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30530133

RESUMO

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) constitutes about 10% of all epilepsies. Because of executive dysfunction, people with JME may be prone to impulsivity and risk-taking behavior. Our aim was to investigate whether psychosocial issues associated with impulsivity are more prominent in people with JME than in those with other types of genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE). Patients with GGE were recruited retrospectively through the Drammen Hospital records in Buskerud County, Norway, 1999-2013. They were invited to a semi-structured interview, either at the hospital or at home. Ninety-two patients with JME and 45 with other types of GGE were interviewed. Variables were evaluated in terms of their association with JME versus other GGE diagnosis using a logistic regression model. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy was associated with use of illicit recreational drugs and police charges, although with borderline significance (odds ratio [OR] 3.4, p = 0.087 and OR 4.2, p = 0.095); JME was also associated with being examined for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in females (OR 15.5, p = 0.015), a biological parent with challenges like addiction or violent behavior (OR 3.5, p = 0.032), and use of levetiracetam (OR 5.1, p = 0.014). After controlling for group differences, we found psychosocial complications to be associated with JME, potentially influencing the lives of the individuals and their families to a greater extent than the seizures per se. Thus, JME should be considered a disorder of the brain in a broader sense than a condition with seizures only.


Assuntos
Epilepsia Mioclônica Juvenil/complicações , Epilepsia Mioclônica Juvenil/psicologia , Comportamento Social , Adolescente , Adulto , Anticonvulsivantes/farmacologia , Anticonvulsivantes/uso terapêutico , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/complicações , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/tratamento farmacológico , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Eletroencefalografia/efeitos dos fármacos , Eletroencefalografia/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Comportamento Impulsivo/efeitos dos fármacos , Comportamento Impulsivo/fisiologia , Levetiracetam/farmacologia , Levetiracetam/uso terapêutico , Masculino , Epilepsia Mioclônica Juvenil/tratamento farmacológico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Adulto Jovem
7.
NPJ Genom Med ; 3: 13, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29760947

RESUMO

We evaluated a new epilepsy genetic diagnostic and counseling service covering a UK population of 3.5 million. We calculated diagnostic yield, estimated clinical impact, and surveyed referring clinicians and families. We costed alternative investigational pathways for neonatal onset epilepsy. Patients with epilepsy of unknown aetiology onset < 2 years; treatment resistant epilepsy; or familial epilepsy were referred for counseling and testing. We developed NGS panels, performing clinical interpretation with a multidisciplinary team. We held an educational workshop for paediatricians and nurses. We sent questionnaires to referring paediatricians and families. We analysed investigation costs for 16 neonatal epilepsy patients. Of 96 patients, a genetic diagnosis was made in 34% of patients with seizure onset < 2 years, and 4% > 2 years, with turnaround time of 21 days. Pathogenic variants were seen in SCN8A, SCN2A, SCN1A, KCNQ2, HNRNPU, GRIN2A, SYNGAP1, STXBP1, STX1B, CDKL5, CHRNA4, PCDH19 and PIGT. Clinician prediction was poor. Clinicians and families rated the service highly. In neonates, the cost of investigations could be reduced from £9362 to £2838 by performing gene panel earlier and the median diagnostic delay of 3.43 years reduced to 21 days. Panel testing for epilepsy has a high yield among children with onset < 2 years, and an appreciable clinical and financial impact. Parallel gene testing supersedes single gene testing in most early onset cases that do not show a clear genotype-phenotype correlation. Clinical interpretation of laboratory results, and in-depth discussion of implications for patients and their families, necessitate multidisciplinary input and skilled genetic counseling.

8.
J Med Genet ; 55(9): 607-616, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29789371

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is the most common genetic childhood epilepsy, consisting of focal, nocturnal seizures and frequent neurodevelopmental impairments in speech, language, literacy and attention. A complex genetic aetiology is presumed in most, with monogenic mutations in GRIN2A accounting for >5% of cases. OBJECTIVE: To identify rare, causal CNV in patients with RE. METHODS: We used high-density SNP arrays to analyse the presence of rare CNVs in 186 patients with RE from the UK, the USA, Sardinia, Argentina and Kerala, India. RESULTS: We identified 84 patients with one or more rare CNVs, and, within this group, 14 (7.5%) with recurrent risk factor CNVs and 15 (8.0%) with likely pathogenic CNVs. Nine patients carried recurrent hotspot CNVs including at 16p13.11 and 1p36, with the most striking finding that four individuals (three from Sardinia) carried a duplication, and one a deletion, at Xp22.31. Five patients with RE carried a rare CNV that disrupted genes associated with other epilepsies (KCTD7, ARHGEF15, CACNA2D1, GRIN2A and ARHGEF4), and 17 cases carried CNVs that disrupted genes associated with other neurological conditions or that are involved in neuronal signalling/development. Network analysis of disrupted genes with high brain expression identified significant enrichment in pathways of the cholinergic synapse, guanine-exchange factor activation and the mammalian target of rapamycin. CONCLUSION: Our results provide a CNV profile of an ethnically diverse cohort of patients with RE, uncovering new areas of research focus, and emphasise the importance of studying non-western European populations in oligogenic disorders to uncover a full picture of risk variation.

9.
Front Psychol ; 9: 241, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29563887

RESUMO

Background: Consolidation of learning occurs during sleep but when it is disturbed there may be an adverse impact upon these functions. While research has focused upon how sleep affects cognition in adulthood, the effects of disrupted sleep are likely to impact more heavily on learning among children and adolescents. We aimed to investigate whether a night's sleep impacts upon executive function compared with an equivalent wakefulness period. We also wanted to know whether restricting sleep would reduce these effects on performance. To investigate this issue in children, we adapted existing research methods to make them more suitable for this population. Methods: Using a cross-over trial design, 22 children aged 7-14 completed an updated but previously validated, continuous performance task (CPT) designed to be appealing to children, containing emotional and neutral targets and presented on an iPad. We measured omission and commission errors, mean and variability of reaction times (RTs) immediately and after a delay spent in the following three ways: 11-h intervals of unrestricted and restricted sleep in the style of a 'sleepover' and daytime wakefulness. We examined differences in immediate and delayed testing for each dependent variable. Both sleep nights were spent in a specialist sleep lab where polysomnography data were recorded. Results: While there were no significant main effects of sleep condition, as expected we observed significantly faster and more accurate performance in delayed compared with immediate testing across all conditions for omission errors, RT and variability of RT. Importantly, we saw a significant interaction for commission errors to emotional targets (p = 0.034): while they were comparable across all conditions during immediate testing, for delayed testing there were significantly more errors after wakefulness compared with unrestricted sleep (p = 0.019) and at a trend level for restricted sleep (p = 0.063). Performance improvement after restricted sleep was inversely correlated with sleep opportunity time (p = 0.03), total sleep time (p = 0.01) and total non-REM time (p = 0.005). Conclusion: This tool, designed to be simple to use and appealing to children, revealed a preserving effect of typical and disrupted sleep periods on performance during an emotionally themed target detection task compared with an equivalent wakefulness period.

10.
Epilepsia ; 59(2): 389-402, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29315614

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Pathogenic SLC6A1 variants were recently described in patients with myoclonic atonic epilepsy (MAE) and intellectual disability (ID). We set out to define the phenotypic spectrum in a larger cohort of SCL6A1-mutated patients. METHODS: We collected 24 SLC6A1 probands and 6 affected family members. Four previously published cases were included for further electroclinical description. In total, we reviewed the electroclinical data of 34 subjects. RESULTS: Cognitive development was impaired in 33/34 (97%) subjects; 28/34 had mild to moderate ID, with language impairment being the most common feature. Epilepsy was diagnosed in 31/34 cases with mean onset at 3.7 years. Cognitive assessment before epilepsy onset was available in 24/31 subjects and was normal in 25% (6/24), and consistent with mild ID in 46% (11/24) or moderate ID in 17% (4/24). Two patients had speech delay only, and 1 had severe ID. After epilepsy onset, cognition deteriorated in 46% (11/24) of cases. The most common seizure types were absence, myoclonic, and atonic seizures. Sixteen cases fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for MAE. Seven further patients had different forms of generalized epilepsy and 2 had focal epilepsy. Twenty of 31 patients became seizure-free, with valproic acid being the most effective drug. There was no clear-cut correlation between seizure control and cognitive outcome. Electroencephalography (EEG) findings were available in 27/31 patients showing irregular bursts of diffuse 2.5-3.5 Hz spikes/polyspikes-and-slow waves in 25/31. Two patients developed an EEG pattern resembling electrical status epilepticus during sleep. Ataxia was observed in 7/34 cases. We describe 7 truncating and 18 missense variants, including 4 recurrent variants (Gly232Val, Ala288Val, Val342Met, and Gly362Arg). SIGNIFICANCE: Most patients carrying pathogenic SLC6A1 variants have an MAE phenotype with language delay and mild/moderate ID before epilepsy onset. However, ID alone or associated with focal epilepsy can also be observed.


Assuntos
Epilepsias Mioclônicas/fisiopatologia , Proteínas da Membrana Plasmática de Transporte de GABA/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/fisiopatologia , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/fisiopatologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Anticonvulsivantes/uso terapêutico , Ataxia/complicações , Ataxia/genética , Ataxia/fisiopatologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Eletroencefalografia , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/complicações , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/genética , Epilepsias Parciais/complicações , Epilepsias Parciais/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsias Parciais/genética , Epilepsias Parciais/fisiopatologia , Epilepsia Generalizada/complicações , Epilepsia Generalizada/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsia Generalizada/genética , Epilepsia Generalizada/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/complicações , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/complicações , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/genética , Masculino , Mutação , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/complicações , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Fenótipo , Resultado do Tratamento , Ácido Valproico/uso terapêutico , Adulto Jovem
11.
Trials ; 18(1): 572, 2017 Nov 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29183384

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is increasing recognition that establishing a core set of outcomes to be evaluated and reported in trials of interventions for particular conditions will improve the usefulness of health research. There is no established core outcome set for childhood epilepsy. The aim of this work is to select a core outcome set to be used in evaluative research of interventions for children with rolandic epilepsy, as an exemplar of common childhood epilepsy syndromes. METHODS: First we will identify what outcomes should be measured; then we will decide how to measure those outcomes. We will engage relevant UK charities and health professional societies as partners, and convene advisory panels for young people with epilepsy and parents of children with epilepsy. We will identify candidate outcomes from a search for trials of interventions for childhood epilepsy, statutory guidance and consultation with our advisory panels. Families, charities and health, education and neuropsychology professionals will be invited to participate in a Delphi survey following recommended practices in the development of core outcome sets. Participants will be able to recommend additional outcome domains. Over three rounds of Delphi survey participants will rate the importance of candidate outcome domains and state the rationale for their decisions. Over the three rounds we will seek consensus across and between families and health professionals on the more important outcomes. A face-to-face meeting will be convened to ratify the core outcome set. We will then review and recommend ways to measure the shortlisted outcomes using clinical assessment and/or patient-reported outcome measures. DISCUSSION: Our methodology is a proportionate and pragmatic approach to expediently produce a core outcome set for evaluative research of interventions aiming to improve the health of children with epilepsy. A number of decisions have to be made when designing a study to develop a core outcome set including defining the scope, choosing which stakeholders to engage, most effective ways to elicit their views, especially children and a potential role for qualitative research.


Assuntos
Determinação de Ponto Final , Epilepsia Rolândica/terapia , Projetos de Pesquisa , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Consenso , Técnica Delfos , Epilepsia Rolândica/diagnóstico , Epilepsia Rolândica/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Comunicação Interdisciplinar , Parcerias Público-Privadas , Participação dos Interessados , Resultado do Tratamento , Reino Unido
12.
Epilepsy Behav ; 72: 135-139, 2017 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28575762

RESUMO

Previous research shows that children with Rolandic Epilepsy have deficits of auditory processing. We wanted to confirm the nature of this deficit and whether it aggregates in families. We compared 40 children with Rolandic Epilepsy and 32 unaffected siblings with 99 typically developing children and 71 parents of RE children with 31 healthy adults on a battery of auditory processing tests. We also examined ear advantage in children with RE, their siblings and parents using population norms and measured non-word reading performance. We found a specific deficit for competing words in patients, their siblings and their parents, suggesting that this particular impairment of auditory processing present in children with RE, is heritable and likely to be persistent. Importantly, scores on this subtest in patients and siblings were significantly correlated with non-word reading performance. We saw increased rates of atypical left ear advantage in patients and siblings but no evidence of this in parents. We present these findings as evidence of familial incidence of dichotic listening and ear advantage abnormalities in relatives of children with Rolandic Epilepsy.


Assuntos
Transtornos da Percepção Auditiva/diagnóstico , Testes com Listas de Dissílabos/métodos , Epilepsia Rolândica/diagnóstico , Pais , Irmãos , Adolescente , Adulto , Percepção Auditiva/fisiologia , Transtornos da Percepção Auditiva/epidemiologia , Criança , Epilepsia Rolândica/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
14.
Epilepsia Open ; 2(2): 214-225, 2017 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29588950

RESUMO

Objective: Benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS, also known as Rolandic epilepsy) is a common epilepsy syndrome that is associated with literacy and language impairments. The neural mechanisms of the syndrome are not known. The primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that functional connectivity within the language network is decreased in children with BECTS. We also tested the hypothesis that siblings of children with BECTS have similar abnormalities. Methods: Echo planar magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data were acquired from 25 children with BECTS, 12 siblings, and 20 healthy controls, at rest. After preprocessing with particular attention to intrascan motion, the mean signal was extracted from each of 90 regions of interest. Sparse, undirected graphs were constructed from adjacency matrices consisting of Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. Global and nodal graph metrics and subnetwork and pairwise connectivity were compared between groups. Results: There were no significant differences in graph metrics between groups. Children with BECTS had decreased functional connectivity relative to controls within a four-node subnetwork, which consisted of the left inferior frontal gyrus, the left superior frontal gyrus, the left supramarginal gyrus, and the right inferior parietal lobe (p = 0.04). A similar but nonsignificant decrease was also observed for the siblings. The BECTS groups had significant increases in connectivity within a five-node, five-edge frontal subnetwork. Significance: The results provide further evidence of decreased functional connectivity between key mediators of speech processing, language, and reading in children with BECTS. We hypothesize that these decreases reflect delayed lateralization of the language network and contribute to specific cognitive impairments.

15.
Mol Syndromol ; 7(4): 210-219, 2016 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27781031

RESUMO

In recent years, several genes have been causally associated with epilepsy. However, making a genetic diagnosis in a patient can still be difficult, since extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity has been observed in many monogenic epilepsies. This study aimed to analyze the genetic basis of a wide spectrum of epilepsies with age of onset spanning from the neonatal period to adulthood. A gene panel targeting 46 epilepsy genes was used on a cohort of 216 patients consecutively referred for panel testing. The patients had a range of different epilepsies from benign neonatal seizures to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease-causing variant in 49 (23%) of the 216 patients. The variants were found in 19 different genes including SCN1A, STXBP1, CDKL5, SCN2A, SCN8A, GABRA1, KCNA2, and STX1B. Patients with neonatal-onset epilepsies had the highest rate of positive findings (57%). The overall yield for patients with EEs was 32%, compared to 17% among patients with generalized epilepsies and 16% in patients with focal or multifocal epilepsies. By the use of a gene panel consisting of 46 epilepsy genes, we were able to find a disease-causing genetic variation in 23% of the analyzed patients. The highest yield was found among patients with neonatal-onset epilepsies and EEs.

16.
Front Neurol ; 7: 130, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27559330

RESUMO

Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare, but important differential diagnosis for daytime sleepiness and atonic paroxysms in an adolescent. A recent increase in incidence in the pediatric age group probably linked to the use of the Pandemrix influenza vaccine in 2009, has increased awareness that different environmental factors can "trigger" narcolepsy with cataplexy in a genetically susceptible population. Here, we describe the case of a 13-year-old boy with narcolepsy following yellow fever vaccination. He carries the HLA DQB1*0602 haplotype strongly associated with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Polysomnography showed rapid sleep onset with rapid eye movement (REM) latency of 47 min, significant sleep fragmentation and a mean sleep latency of 1.6 min with sleep onset REM in four out of four nap periods. Together with the clinical history, these findings are diagnostic of narcolepsy type 1. The envelope protein E of the yellow fever vaccine strain 17D has significant amino acid sequence overlap with both hypocretin and the hypocretin receptor 2 receptors in protein regions that are predicted to act as epitopes for antibody production. These findings raise the question whether the yellow fever vaccine strain may, through a potential molecular mimicry mechanism, be another infectious trigger for this neuro-immunological disorder.

17.
Epileptic Disord ; 18(3): 252-88, 2016 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27435520

RESUMO

The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The term "benign" is often used in connection with the IFEs and is increasingly being challenged. Certainly most of these disorders are not associated with the devastating cognitive and behavioural problems seen with early childhood epileptic encephalopathies, such as West or Dravet syndromes. However, it is clear that specific, and sometimes persistent, neuropsychological deficits in attention, language and literacy accompany many of the IFEs that, when multiplied by the large numbers affected, make up a significant public health problem. Understanding the nature, distribution, evolution, risk and management of these is an important area of current research. A corollary to such questions regarding comorbidities is the role of focal interictal spikes and their enduring impact on cognitive functioning. What explains the paradox that epilepsies characterised by abundant interictal epileptiform abnormalities are often associated with very few clinical seizures? This is an exciting area in both clinical and experimental arenas and will eventually have important implications for clinical management of the whole child, taking into account not just seizures, but also adaptive functioning and quality of life. For several decades, we have accepted an evidence-free approach to using or not using antiepileptic drugs in IFEs. There is huge international variation and only a handful of studies examining neurocognitive outcomes. Clearly, this is a situation ready for an overhaul in practice. Fundamental to understanding treatment is knowledge of aetiology. In recent years, there have been several significant discoveries in IFEs from studies of copy number variation, exome sequencing, and linkage that prompt reconsideration of the "unknown cause" classification and strongly suggest a genetic aetiology. The IFE are strongly age-related, both with regards to age of seizure onset and remission. Does this time window solely relate to a similar age-related gene expression, or are there epigenetic factors involved that might also explain low observed twin concordance? The genetic (and epigenetic) models for different IFEs, their comorbidities, and their similarities to other neurodevelopmental disorders deserve investigation in the coming years. In so doing, we will probably learn much about normal brain functioning. This is because these disorders, perhaps more than any other human brain disease, are disorders of functional brain systems (even though these functional networks may not yet be fully defined). In June 2012, an international group of clinical and basic science researchers met in London under the auspices of the Waterloo Foundation to discuss and debate these issues in relation to IFEs. This Waterloo Foundation Symposium on the Idiopathic Focal Epilepsies: Phenotype to Genotype witnessed presentations that explored the clinical phenomenology, phenotypes and endophenotypes, and genetic approaches to investigation of these disorders. In parallel, the impact of these epilepsies on children and their families was reviewed. The papers in this supplement are based upon these presentations. They represent an updated state-of-the-art thinking on the topics explored. The symposium led to the formation of international working groups under the umbrella of "Luke's Idiopathic Focal Epilepsy Project" to investigate various aspects of the idiopathic focal epilepsies including: semiology and classification, genetics, cognition, sleep, high-frequency oscillations, and parental resources (see www.childhood-epilepsy.org). The next sponsored international workshop, in June 2014, was on randomised controlled trials in IFEs and overnight learning outcome measures.


Assuntos
Epilepsias Parciais/fisiopatologia , Criança , Humanos
18.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 3(7): 512-22, 2016 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27386500

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Rolandic epilepsy is a common genetic focal epilepsy of childhood characterized by centrotemporal sharp waves on electroencephalogram. In previous genome-wide analysis, we had reported linkage of centrotemporal sharp waves to chromosome 11p13, and fine mapping with 44 SNPs identified the ELP4-PAX6 locus in two independent US and Canadian case-control samples. Here, we aimed to find a causative variant for centrotemporal sharp waves using a larger sample and higher resolution genotyping array. METHODS: We fine-mapped the ELP4-PAX6 locus in 186 individuals from rolandic epilepsy families and 1000 population controls of European origin using the Illumina HumanCoreExome-12 v1.0 BeadChip. Controls were matched to cases on ethnicity using principal component analysis. We used generalized estimating equations to assess association, followed up with a bioinformatics survey and literature search to evaluate functional significance. RESULTS: Homozygosity at the T allele of SNP rs662702 in the 3' untranslated region of PAX6 conferred increased risk of CTS: Odds ratio = 12.29 (95% CI: 3.20-47.22), P = 2.6 × 10(-4) and is seen in 3.9% of cases but only 0.3% of controls. INTERPRETATION: The minor T allele of SNP rs662702 disrupts regulation by microRNA-328, which is known to result in increased PAX6 expression in vitro. This study provides, for the first time, evidence of a noncoding genomic variant contributing to the etiology of a common human epilepsy via a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism.

19.
Neurol Genet ; 2(2): e56, 2016 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27123475

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To identify shared genes and pathways between common absence epilepsy (AE) subtypes (childhood absence epilepsy [CAE], juvenile absence epilepsy [JAE], and unclassified absence epilepsy [UAE]) that may indicate common mechanisms for absence seizure generation and potentially a diagnostic continuum. METHODS: We used high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays to analyze genome-wide rare copy number variation (CNV) in a cohort of 144 children with AEs (95 CAE, 26 UAE, and 23 JAE). RESULTS: We identified CNVs that are known risk factors for AE in 4 patients, including 3x 15q11.2 deletion. We also expanded the phenotype at 4 regions more commonly identified in other neurodevelopmental disorders: 1p36.33 duplication, 1q21.1 deletion, 22q11.2 duplication, and Xp22.31 deletion and duplication. Fifteen patients (10.5%) were found to carry rare CNVs that disrupt genes associated with neuronal development and function (8 CAE, 2 JAE, and 5 UAE). Four categories of protein are each disrupted by several CNVs: (1) synaptic vesicle membrane or vesicle endocytosis, (2) synaptic cell adhesion, (3) synapse organization and motility via actin, and (4) gap junctions. CNVs within these categories are shared across the AE subtypes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results have reinforced the complex and heterogeneous nature of the AEs and their potential for shared genetic mechanisms and have highlighted several pathways that may be important in epileptogenesis of absence seizures.

20.
Semin Cell Dev Biol ; 52: 12-20, 2016 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26849906

RESUMO

Understanding the development and function of the nervous system is one of the foremost aims of current biomedical research. The nervous system is generated during a relatively short period of intense neurogenesis that is orchestrated by a number of key molecular signalling pathways. Even subtle defects in the activity of these molecules can have serious repercussions resulting in neurological, neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive problems including epilepsy, intellectual disability and autism. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a monogenic disease characterised by these problems and by the formation of benign tumours in multiple organs, including the brain. TSC is caused by mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene leading to activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway. A desire to understand the neurological manifestations of TSC has stimulated research into the role of the mTOR pathway in neurogenesis. In this review we describe TSC neurobiology and how the use of animal model systems has provided insights into the roles of mTOR signalling in neuronal differentiation and migration. Recent progress in this field has identified novel mTOR pathway components regulating neuronal differentiation. The roles of mTOR signalling and aberrant neurogenesis in epilepsy are also discussed. Continuing efforts to understand mTOR neurobiology will help to identify new therapeutic targets for TSC and other neurological diseases.


Assuntos
Neurogênese , Serina-Treonina Quinases TOR/metabolismo , Esclerose Tuberosa/metabolismo , Esclerose Tuberosa/patologia , Animais , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Humanos , Transdução de Sinais , Esclerose Tuberosa/enzimologia , Esclerose Tuberosa/genética
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