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1.
J Thromb Haemost ; 2019 Nov 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31680443

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Rare coding mutations underlying deficiencies of antithrombin and proteins C and S contribute to familial venous thromboembolism (VTE). It is uncertain whether rare variants play a role in the etiology of VTE in the general population. OBJECTIVES: We conducted a deep whole-exome sequencing (WES) study to investigate the associations between rare coding variants and the risk of VTE in two population-based prospective cohorts. PATIENTS/METHODS: WES was performed in the Longitudinal Investigation of Thromboembolism Etiology (LITE), which combines the ARIC study (316 incident VTE events among 3,159 African Americans (AAs) and 458 incident VTEs among 7,772 European Americans (EAs)) and the CHS study (60 incident VTEs among 1,751 EAs). We performed gene-based tests of rare variants (allele frequency <1%, exome-wide significance p<1.47x10-6 ) separately in each study and ancestry group, and meta-analyzed the results for the EAs in ARIC and CHS. RESULTS: In the meta-analysis of EAs, we identified one gene, PROC, in which the burden of rare, coding variants was significantly associated with increased risk of VTE (HR=5.42 [3.11, 9.42] for carriers versus non-carriers, p=2.27 x 10-9 ). In ARIC EAs, carriers of the PROC rare variants had on average 0.75 SD lower concentrations of plasma protein C and 0.28 SD higher D-dimer (p<0.05) than non-carriers. Adjustment for low protein C status did not eliminate the association of PROC burden with VTE. In AAs, rare coding PROC variants were not associated with VTE. CONCLUSIONS: Rare coding variants in PROC contribute to increased VTE risk in EAs in this general population sample.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31680049

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: A recently published genome wide association study of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), based on pooled case control data of European ancestry, identified four new loci for AAA: SMYD2 (top single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP] rs1795061), LINC00540 (rs9316871), PCIF1/MMP9/ZNF335 (rs3827066), and ERG (rs2836411). Of the four, rs1795061 and rs2836411 showed significant heterogeneity across studies and the p value for rs9316871 did not reach the genome wide significance threshold until discovery and replication data were pooled together in that study. The objective of this study was to replicate these newly identified genetic associations for AAA in a US based prospective cohort study, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, and a Greece based case control study. METHODS: ARIC identified 408 clinically diagnosed AAAs among 8 962 individuals of European ancestry during a median of 22 years of follow up. The Greek case control study included 341 AAAs of European ancestry recruited in a tertiary referral centre and 292 geographically and ethnically matched controls recruited from the same institution. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyse the ARIC data and logistic regression to analyse the Greek data. RESULTS: In ARIC, rs9316871 and rs3827066 were significantly associated with AAA risk (HR [p] was 0.77 [.004] and 1.22 [.03], respectively), rs2836411 was associated at borderline significance (1.13 [.08]), whereas rs1795061 was not associated (p = .55). In the Greek case control study, rs1795061 and rs2836411 were significantly associated with AAA (OR [p] was 1.66 [< .001] and 1.29 [.04], respectively), whereas rs9316871 was not (p = .81). Genotyping of rs3827066 did not succeed. In the meta-analysis of the two studies, the association for rs9316871and rs2836411 was statistically significant and consistent between the two studies: p = .02 and .007, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Associations between rs9316871and rs2836411 and AAA risk were replicated in the meta-analysis of the two independent cohorts, providing further support for the importance of these loci in the aetiology of AAA.

3.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 15192, 2019 Oct 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31645637

RESUMO

Previous research has shown that genes play a substantial role in determining a person's susceptibility to age-related hearing impairment. The existing studies on this subject have different results, which may be caused by difficulties in determining the phenotype or the limited number of participants involved. Here, we have gathered the largest sample to date (discovery n = 9,675; replication n = 10,963; validation n = 356,141), and examined phenotypes that represented low/mid and high frequency hearing loss on the pure tone audiogram. We identified 7 loci that were either replicated and/or validated, of which 5 loci are novel in hearing. Especially the ILDR1 gene is a high profile candidate, as it contains our top SNP, is a known hearing loss gene, has been linked to age-related hearing impairment before, and in addition is preferentially expressed within hair cells of the inner ear. By verifying all previously published SNPs, we can present a paper that combines all new and existing findings to date, giving a complete overview of the genetic architecture of age-related hearing impairment. This is of importance as age-related hearing impairment is highly prevalent in our ageing society and represents a large socio-economic burden.

4.
PLoS One ; 14(10): e0223574, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31622379

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Increased serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), an important component of the innate immune response, are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have been identified which are associated with CRP levels, and Mendelian randomization studies have shown a positive association between SNPs increasing CRP expression and risk of colon cancer (but thus far not CVD). The effects of individual genetic variants often interact with the genetic background of a population and hence we sought to resolve the genetic determinants of serum CRP in a number of American Indian populations. METHODS: The Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS) has serum CRP measurements from 2428 tribal members, recruited as large families from three regions of the United States. Microsatellite markers and MetaboChip defined SNP genotypes were incorporated into variance components, decomposition-based linkage and association analyses. RESULTS: CRP levels exhibited significant heritability (h2 = 0.33 ± 0.05, p<1.3 X 10-20). A locus on chromosome (chr) 6, near marker D6S281 (approximately at 169.6 Mb, GRCh38/hg38) showed suggestive linkage (LOD = 1.9) to CRP levels. No individual SNPs were found associated with CRP levels after Bonferroni adjustment for multiple testing (threshold <7.77 x 10-7), however, we found nominal associations, many of which replicate previous findings at the CRP, HNF1A and 7 other loci. In addition, we report association of 46 SNPs located at 7 novel loci on chromosomes 2, 5, 6(2 loci), 9, 10 and 17, with an average of 15.3 Kb between SNPs and all with p-values less than 7.2 X 10-4. CONCLUSION: In agreement with evidence from other populations, these data show CRP serum levels are under considerable genetic influence; and include loci, such as near CRP and other genes, that replicate results from other ethnic groups. These findings also suggest possible novel loci on chr 6 and other chromosomes that warrant further investigation.

5.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 4274, 2019 Sep 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31537791

RESUMO

Genetic interactions have been reported to underlie phenotypes in a variety of systems, but the extent to which they contribute to complex disease in humans remains unclear. In principle, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide a platform for detecting genetic interactions, but existing methods for identifying them from GWAS data tend to focus on testing individual locus pairs, which undermines statistical power. Importantly, a global genetic network mapped for a model eukaryotic organism revealed that genetic interactions often connect genes between compensatory functional modules in a highly coherent manner. Taking advantage of this expected structure, we developed a computational approach called BridGE that identifies pathways connected by genetic interactions from GWAS data. Applying BridGE broadly, we discover significant interactions in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, hypertension, prostate cancer, breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Our novel approach provides a general framework for mapping complex genetic networks underlying human disease from genome-wide genotype data.

6.
Blood ; 134(19): 1645-1657, 2019 Nov 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31420334

RESUMO

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality. To advance our understanding of the biology contributing to VTE, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of VTE and a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) based on imputed gene expression from whole blood and liver. We meta-analyzed GWAS data from 18 studies for 30 234 VTE cases and 172 122 controls and assessed the association between 12 923 718 genetic variants and VTE. We generated variant prediction scores of gene expression from whole blood and liver tissue and assessed them for association with VTE. Mendelian randomization analyses were conducted for traits genetically associated with novel VTE loci. We identified 34 independent genetic signals for VTE risk from GWAS meta-analysis, of which 14 are newly reported associations. This included 11 newly associated genetic loci (C1orf198, PLEK, OSMR-AS1, NUGGC/SCARA5, GRK5, MPHOSPH9, ARID4A, PLCG2, SMG6, EIF5A, and STX10) of which 6 replicated, and 3 new independent signals in 3 known genes. Further, TWAS identified 5 additional genetic loci with imputed gene expression levels differing between cases and controls in whole blood (SH2B3, SPSB1, RP11-747H7.3, RP4-737E23.2) and in liver (ERAP1). At some GWAS loci, we found suggestive evidence that the VTE association signal for novel and previously known regions colocalized with expression quantitative trait locus signals. Mendelian randomization analyses suggested that blood traits may contribute to the underlying risk of VTE. To conclude, we identified 16 novel susceptibility loci for VTE; for some loci, the association signals are likely mediated through gene expression of nearby genes.

7.
PLoS One ; 14(6): e0217868, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31166958

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pancreatic tumor cells may avoid immune surveillance by releasing the transmembrane major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related A (MICA) protein in soluble form (s-MICA). We hypothesized that the presence of the A5.1 polymorphism in the MICA gene, which encodes a truncated MICA protein, is associated with higher s-MICA levels and increased pancreatic cancer risk. METHODS: MICA alleles and s-MICA levels were measured in 121 pancreatic cancer cases and 419 controls. General linear regression with a log transformation assessed geometric means of s-MICA levels across MICA alleles. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pancreatic cancer associated with MICA alleles. RESULTS: After multivariate adjustment, participants with at least one copy of the A5.1 allele versus no A5.1 allele had 1.35 (95% CI: 1.05-1.74) times greater s-MICA levels (1.65 times higher for cases and 1.28, for controls) and increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.05-3.48). CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests higher risk of pancreatic cancer among those with the MICA A5.1 polymorphism, which may be explained by an increase in s-MICA secretion and impaired immune response. IMPACT: These findings provide further evidence at the genetic and molecular level of the important role of MICA in pancreatic cancer development, and may have important implications with regards to pancreatic cancer screening.

8.
PLoS One ; 14(5): e0216222, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31075152

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fibrinogen is an essential hemostatic factor and cardiovascular disease risk factor. Early attempts at evaluating the causal effect of fibrinogen on coronary heart disease (CHD) and myocardial infraction (MI) using Mendelian randomization (MR) used single variant approaches, and did not take advantage of recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or multi-variant, pleiotropy robust MR methodologies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We evaluated evidence for a causal effect of fibrinogen on both CHD and MI using MR. We used both an allele score approach and pleiotropy robust MR models. The allele score was composed of 38 fibrinogen-associated variants from recent GWAS. Initial analyses using the allele score used a meta-analysis of 11 European-ancestry prospective cohorts, free of CHD and MI at baseline, to examine incidence CHD and MI. We also applied 2 sample MR methods with data from a prevalent CHD and MI GWAS. Results are given in terms of the hazard ratio (HR) or odds ratio (OR), depending on the study design, and associated 95% confidence interval (CI). In single variant analyses no causal effect of fibrinogen on CHD or MI was observed. In multi-variant analyses using incidence CHD cases and the allele score approach, the estimated causal effect (HR) of a 1 g/L higher fibrinogen concentration was 1.62 (CI = 1.12, 2.36) when using incident cases and the allele score approach. In 2 sample MR analyses that accounted for pleiotropy, the causal estimate (OR) was reduced to 1.18 (CI = 0.98, 1.42) and 1.09 (CI = 0.89, 1.33) in the 2 most precise (smallest CI) models, out of 4 models evaluated. In the 2 sample MR analyses for MI, there was only very weak evidence of a causal effect in only 1 out of 4 models. CONCLUSIONS: A small causal effect of fibrinogen on CHD is observed using multi-variant MR approaches which account for pleiotropy, but not single variant MR approaches. Taken together, results indicate that even with large sample sizes and multi-variant approaches MR analyses still cannot exclude the null when estimating the causal effect of fibrinogen on CHD, but that any potential causal effect is likely to be much smaller than observed in epidemiological studies.

10.
Blood ; 133(9): 967-977, 2019 02 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30642921

RESUMO

Factor VII (FVII) is an important component of the coagulation cascade. Few genetic loci regulating FVII activity and/or levels have been discovered to date. We conducted a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies of plasma FVII levels (7 FVII activity and 2 FVII antigen) among 27 495 participants of European and African ancestry. Each study performed ancestry-specific association analyses. Inverse variance weighted meta-analysis was performed within each ancestry group and then combined for a trans-ancestry meta-analysis. Our primary analysis included the 7 studies that measured FVII activity, and a secondary analysis included all 9 studies. We provided functional genomic validation for newly identified significant loci by silencing candidate genes in a human liver cell line (HuH7) using small-interfering RNA and then measuring F7 messenger RNA and FVII protein expression. Lastly, we used meta-analysis results to perform Mendelian randomization analysis to estimate the causal effect of FVII activity on coronary artery disease, ischemic stroke (IS), and venous thromboembolism. We identified 2 novel (REEP3 and JAZF1-AS1) and 6 known loci associated with FVII activity, explaining 19.0% of the phenotypic variance. Adding FVII antigen data to the meta-analysis did not result in the discovery of further loci. Silencing REEP3 in HuH7 cells upregulated FVII, whereas silencing JAZF1 downregulated FVII. Mendelian randomization analyses suggest that FVII activity has a positive causal effect on the risk of IS. Variants at REEP3 and JAZF1 contribute to FVII activity by regulating F7 expression levels. FVII activity appears to contribute to the etiology of IS in the general population.

11.
Genet Epidemiol ; 43(4): 449-457, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30659681

RESUMO

Although recent Genome-Wide Association Studies have identified novel associations for common variants, there has been no comprehensive exome-wide search for low-frequency variants that affect the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We conducted a meta-analysis of 11 studies comprising 8,332 cases and 16,087 controls of European ancestry and 382 cases and 1,476 controls of African American ancestry genotyped with the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We used the seqMeta package in R to conduct single variant and gene-based rare variant tests. In the single variant analysis, we limited our analysis to the 64,794 variants with at least 40 minor alleles across studies (minor allele frequency [MAF] ~0.08%). We confirmed associations with previously identified VTE loci, including ABO, F5, F11, and FGA. After adjusting for multiple testing, we observed no novel significant findings in single variant or gene-based analysis. Given our sample size, we had greater than 80% power to detect minimum odds ratios greater than 1.5 and 1.8 for a single variant with MAF of 0.01 and 0.005, respectively. Larger studies and sequence data may be needed to identify novel low-frequency and rare variants associated with VTE risk.


Assuntos
Exoma/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Análise em Microsséries/métodos , Tromboembolia Venosa/genética , Afro-Americanos/genética , Alelos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Frequência do Gene , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genótipo , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/métodos , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Análise em Microsséries/estatística & dados numéricos , Razão de Chances , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Tamanho da Amostra , Tromboembolia Venosa/etnologia
12.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 104(5): 1792-1801, 2019 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30597087

RESUMO

CONTEXT: Genomic losses/gains are associated with cancer progression and prognosis. In pituitary adenomas, analyses of copy number variations (CNVs) have shown that a subset of adenomas have higher genomic variability. However, whether CNVs are associated with tumor aggressiveness and prognosis has not been determined. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that somatic CNVs of pituitary tumors may play a role in the progression and aggressiveness of pituitary corticotropinomas in children and adolescents. SAMPLES AND DESIGN: Paired germline and tumor DNA samples from 27 pediatric patients with Cushing disease (CD), were subjected to whole exome sequencing. Somatic CNVs were identified using the ExomeDepth tool. Clinical, histological, and biochemical data from the patients were collected and correlated with the results of the CNV analysis. RESULTS: Chromosomal instability, involving 23% to 59% of the tumor genome, was noted in 5 of the 27 samples (18.5%). The patients with tumors showing chromosomal instability had similar clinical and biochemical characteristics to the remaining patients, except for tumor size, which was larger (median size 18 mm vs 5.5 mm, P = 0.005). Tumors with chromosomal instability were also associated with a higher rate of invasion of the cavernous sinus (P = 0.029). There was insufficient information on persistence or recurrence of CD to determine whether the risk was higher in those with chromosomal instability. CONCLUSIONS: A subgroup of corticotropinomas demonstrates chromosomal instability that is associated with markers of aggressiveness of these adenomas. It appears that more genomic gains/losses in a few, rare corticotropinomas may predict poorer prognosis for pediatric patients with CD.

13.
Circulation ; 139(5): 620-635, 2019 01 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30586737

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Factor VIII (FVIII) and its carrier protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) are associated with risk of arterial and venous thrombosis and with hemorrhagic disorders. We aimed to identify and functionally test novel genetic associations regulating plasma FVIII and VWF. METHODS: We meta-analyzed genome-wide association results from 46 354 individuals of European, African, East Asian, and Hispanic ancestry. All studies performed linear regression analysis using an additive genetic model and associated ≈35 million imputed variants with natural log-transformed phenotype levels. In vitro gene silencing in cultured endothelial cells was performed for candidate genes to provide additional evidence on association and function. Two-sample Mendelian randomization analyses were applied to test the causal role of FVIII and VWF plasma levels on the risk of arterial and venous thrombotic events. RESULTS: We identified 13 novel genome-wide significant ( P≤2.5×10-8) associations, 7 with FVIII levels ( FCHO2/TMEM171/TNPO1, HLA, SOX17/RP1, LINC00583/NFIB, RAB5C-KAT2A, RPL3/TAB1/SYNGR1, and ARSA) and 11 with VWF levels ( PDHB/PXK/KCTD6, SLC39A8, FCHO2/TMEM171/TNPO1, HLA, GIMAP7/GIMAP4, OR13C5/NIPSNAP, DAB2IP, C2CD4B, RAB5C-KAT2A, TAB1/SYNGR1, and ARSA), beyond 10 previously reported associations with these phenotypes. Functional validation provided further evidence of association for all loci on VWF except ARSA and DAB2IP. Mendelian randomization suggested causal effects of plasma FVIII activity levels on venous thrombosis and coronary artery disease risk and plasma VWF levels on ischemic stroke risk. CONCLUSIONS: The meta-analysis identified 13 novel genetic loci regulating FVIII and VWF plasma levels, 10 of which we validated functionally. We provide some evidence for a causal role of these proteins in thrombotic events.

14.
Cancer ; 124(19): 3900-3908, 2018 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30291793

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Males with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47,XXY) may be more likely to develop germ cell tumors (GCTs), particularly mediastinal GCTs. To date, there are no reports characterizing the prevalence of KS among male GCT cases. METHODS: The authors used array genotyping data from a Children's Oncology Group epidemiology study to estimate the prevalence of KS in males with GCTs (433 males aged birth-19 years). Using Fisher's exact tests, the authors examined differences in age at diagnosis, race/ethnicity, tumor location and histology, and several birth characteristics between cases of KS-GCT and GCT cases without chromosomal abnormalities. Using publicly available data, the authors estimated the 1-year risk, risk ratio, and corresponding 95% confidence interval of GCTs among KS cases. RESULTS: Based on analysis of array genotyping data, 3% of male GCT cases (13 cases) had KS. The additional X chromosome was of maternal origin in 7 of the 13 cases. Of these 13 KS cases, 5 of 9 KS-GCT cases with parental questionnaire data (56%) reported a diagnosis of KS. No significant differences were observed with regard to patient or birth characteristics between KS-GCT and non-KS-GCT cases. KS-GCT cases were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with mediastinal tumors than non-KS-GCT cases (P<.01). The authors estimated the risk of developing a GCT among males with KS to be 0.00025, or 1 per 4000 males (risk ratio, 18.8; 95% confidence interval, 11.7-30.0). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with males without chromosomal abnormalities, males with KS are more likely to be diagnosed with a mediastinal GCT. The presence of KS should be considered in males with a diagnosis of mediastinal GCT. In the current study, the authors report that approximately one-third of males with mediastinal germ cell tumors have Klinefelter syndrome, and therefore screening of these individuals for the syndrome may be warranted. Males with Klinefelter syndrome are 19 times as likely as males without Klinefelter syndrome to develop germ cell tumors.

15.
Hum Mol Genet ; 2018 10 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30307499

RESUMO

E-selectin mediates the rolling of circulating leukocytes during inflammatory processes. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in European and Asian individuals have identified the ABO locus associated with E-selectin levels. Using Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data in 2,249 African Americans (AAs) from the Jackson Heart Study (JHS), we examined genome-wide associations with soluble E-selectin levels. In addition to replicating known signals at ABO, we identified a novel association of a common loss-of-function, missense variant in FUT6 (rs17855739,p.Glu274Lys, p=9.02 x 10-24) with higher soluble E-selectin levels. This variant is considerably more common in populations of African-ancestry compared to non-African ancestry populations. We replicated the association of FUT6 p.Glu274Lys with higher soluble E-selectin in an independent population of 748 AAs from the Women's Health Initiative and identified an additional pleiotropic association with vitamin B12 levels. Despite the broad role of both selectins and fucosyltransferases in various inflammatory, immune and cancer-related processes, we were unable to identify any additional disease associations of the FUT6 p.Glu274Lys variant in an EMR-based phenome-wide association scan of over 9,000 African Americans.

16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30199657

RESUMO

RATIONALE: Omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have anti-inflammatory properties that could benefit adults with comprised pulmonary health. OBJECTIVE: To investigate n-3 PUFA associations with spirometric measures of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and determine underlying genetic susceptibility. METHODS: Associations of n-3 PUFA biomarkers (alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid [DPA], and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) were evaluated with PFTs (forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and [FEV1/FVC]) in meta-analyses across seven cohorts from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium (N=16,134 of European or African ancestry). PFT-associated n-3 PUFAs were carried forward to genome-wide interaction analyses in the four largest cohorts (N=11,962) and replicated in one cohort (N=1,687). Cohort-specific results were combined using joint 2 degree-of-freedom (2df) meta-analyses of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations and their interactions with n-3 PUFAs. RESULTS: DPA and DHA were positively associated with FEV1 and FVC (P<0.025), with evidence for effect modification by smoking and by sex. Genome-wide analyses identified a novel association of rs11693320-an intronic DPP10 SNP-with FVC when incorporating an interaction with DHA, and the finding was replicated (P2df=9.4×10-9 across discovery and replication cohorts). The rs11693320-A allele (frequency~80%) was associated with lower FVC (PSNP=2.1×10-9; ßSNP= -161.0mL), and the association was attenuated by higher DHA levels (PSNP×DHA interaction=2.1×10-7; ßSNP×DHA interaction=36.2mL). CONCLUSIONS: We corroborated beneficial effects of n-3 PUFAs on pulmonary function. By modeling genome-wide n-3 PUFA interactions, we identified a novel DPP10 SNP association with FVC that was not detectable in much larger studies ignoring this interaction.

17.
PLoS One ; 13(7): e0200486, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30044860

RESUMO

Current knowledge of the genetic architecture of key reproductive events across the female life course is largely based on association studies of European descent women. The relevance of known loci for age at menarche (AAM) and age at natural menopause (ANM) in diverse populations remains unclear. We investigated 32 AAM and 14 ANM previously-identified loci and sought to identify novel loci in a trans-ethnic array-wide study of 196,483 SNPs on the MetaboChip (Illumina, Inc.). A total of 45,364 women of diverse ancestries (African, Hispanic/Latina, Asian American and American Indian/Alaskan Native) in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study were included in cross-sectional analyses of AAM and ANM. Within each study we conducted a linear regression of SNP associations with self-reported or medical record-derived AAM or ANM (in years), adjusting for birth year, population stratification, and center/region, as appropriate, and meta-analyzed results across studies using multiple meta-analytic techniques. For both AAM and ANM, we observed more directionally consistent associations with the previously reported risk alleles than expected by chance (p-valuesbinomial≤0.01). Eight densely genotyped reproductive loci generalized significantly to at least one non-European population. We identified one trans-ethnic array-wide SNP association with AAM and two significant associations with ANM, which have not been described previously. Additionally, we observed evidence of independent secondary signals at three of six AAM trans-ethnic loci. Our findings support the transferability of reproductive trait loci discovered in European women to women of other race/ethnicities and indicate the presence of additional trans-ethnic associations both at both novel and established loci. These findings suggest the benefit of including diverse populations in future studies of the genetic architecture of female growth and development.

18.
Thromb Res ; 168: 53-59, 2018 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29902632

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Data from epidemiological studies and clinical trials suggest an influence of dietary and circulating polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on the hemostasis profile. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to plasma PUFAs levels. We aimed to investigate whether the SNPs related to plasma PUFAs levels were also associated with plasma levels of hemostatic variables. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We tested the associations between 9 PUFA-related SNPs and 6 hemostatic variables in 9035 European Americans (EAs) and 2702 African Americans (AAs) in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. We then conducted a replication study by looking-up our novel observed associations in three published GWAS for hemostatic factors in different EA populations. RESULTS: We observed a novel linoleic acid-related locus at the JMJD1C region associated with factor VII activity (FVIIc): rs10740118 and rs1935, Beta (p) = -1.31 (1 × 10-3) and 1.37 (5 × 10-4) in EAs, respectively, and - 1.24 (5 × 10-4) and 1.28 (3 × 10-4) in meta-analysis of EAs and AAs of ARIC. This novel association was replicated in two of three independent EA populations (p = 0.01 and 0.03 in meta-analyses). We confirmed previously reported associations at the docosapentaenoic acid-related GCKR locus with protein C and FVIIc and at JMJD1C with fibrinogen. Adjustment for plasma PUFAs did not abolish the associations between these loci and hemostatic variables. CONCLUSIONS: Our study identified a novel association for FVIIc at JMJD1C, a histone demethylase that plays a role in DNA repair and possibly transcription regulation and RNA processing.


Assuntos
Ácidos Graxos Ômega-3/genética , Ácidos Graxos Insaturados/genética , Pleiotropia Genética/genética , Variação Genética/genética , Feminino , Hemostáticos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
19.
Hum Mol Genet ; 27(16): 2940-2953, 2018 Aug 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29878111

RESUMO

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a circulating biomarker indicative of systemic inflammation. We aimed to evaluate genetic associations with CRP levels among non-European-ancestry populations through discovery, fine-mapping and conditional analyses. A total of 30 503 non-European-ancestry participants from 6 studies participating in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology study had serum high-sensitivity CRP measurements and ∼200 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on the Metabochip. We evaluated the association between each SNP and log-transformed CRP levels using multivariate linear regression, with additive genetic models adjusted for age, sex, the first four principal components of genetic ancestry, and study-specific factors. Differential linkage disequilibrium patterns between race/ethnicity groups were used to fine-map regions associated with CRP levels. Conditional analyses evaluated for multiple independent signals within genetic regions. One hundred and sixty-three unique variants in 12 loci in overall or race/ethnicity-stratified Metabochip-wide scans reached a Bonferroni-corrected P-value <2.5E-7. Three loci have no (HACL1, OLFML2B) or only limited (PLA2G6) previous associations with CRP levels. Six loci had different top hits in race/ethnicity-specific versus overall analyses. Fine-mapping refined the signal in six loci, particularly in HNF1A. Conditional analyses provided evidence for secondary signals in LEPR, IL1RN and HNF1A, and for multiple independent signals in CRP and APOE. We identified novel variants and loci associated with CRP levels, generalized known CRP associations to a multiethnic study population, refined association signals at several loci and found evidence for multiple independent signals at several well-known loci. This study demonstrates the benefit of conducting inclusive genetic association studies in large multiethnic populations.

20.
PLoS One ; 13(4): e0195719, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29649275

RESUMO

Studies have reported that higher circulating levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and lower of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol may be associated with increased risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Whether dyslipidemia causes AAA is still unclear and is potentially testable using a Mendelian randomization (MR) approach. We investigated the associations between blood lipids and AAA using two-sample MR analysis with SNP-lipids association estimates from a published genome-wide association study of blood lipids (n = 188,577) and SNP-AAA association estimates from European Americans (EAs) of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (n = 8,793). We used inverse variance weighted (IVW) MR as the primary method and MR-Egger regression and weighted median MR estimation as sensitivity analyses. Over a median of 22.7 years of follow-up, 338 of 8,793 ARIC participants experienced incident clinical AAA. Using the IVW method, we observed positive associations of plasma LDL cholesterol and TC with the risk of AAA (odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, P = 0.02 for LDL cholesterol and OR = 1.61, P = 0.01 for TC per 1 standard deviation of lipid increment). Using the MR-Egger regression and weighted median methods, we were able to validate the association of AAA risk with TC, although the associations were less consistent for LDL cholesterol due to wider confidence intervals. Triglycerides and HDL cholesterol were not associated with AAA in any of the MR methods. Assuming instrumental variable assumptions are satisfied, our finding suggests that higher plasma TC and LDL cholesterol are causally associated with the increased risk of AAA in EAs.


Assuntos
Aneurisma da Aorta Abdominal/sangue , Aneurisma da Aorta Abdominal/genética , Lipídeos/sangue , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Aneurisma da Aorta Abdominal/etiologia , Causalidade , Colesterol/sangue , HDL-Colesterol/sangue , LDL-Colesterol/sangue , Dislipidemias/sangue , Dislipidemias/complicações , Dislipidemias/genética , Feminino , Seguimentos , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Triglicerídeos/sangue
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