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1.
Psychiatry Res ; 291: 113244, 2020 Jun 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32585435

RESUMO

Psychiatric patients are at high risk for contracting COVID-19, and inpatient psychiatric units face substantial risks of institutional outbreaks. Here, the authors describe an algorithm for testing and triage in a large psychiatric facility designed to prevent local COVID-19 transmission. The algorithm is based on expert opinion and clinical experience between March and April of 2020, during which the institution cared for 47 COVID-19 positive psychiatric inpatients. The implementation of the algorithm is designed to mitigate COVID-19 transmission, preserve the safest and least restrictive treatment environment for psychiatric inpatients, and provide a model adaptable to other institutional settings.

2.
J Sex Med ; 17(1): 83-93, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31735618

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Flibanserin is approved in the United States and Canada for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in premenopausal women. AIM: The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the safety of concomitant administration of flibanserin with alcohol. METHODS: In this single-center, randomized, double-blind, single-dose, crossover study, participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 12 sequences to receive each of 7 treatments: flibanserin 100 mg or placebo with ethanol 0.2 g/kg, 0.4 g/kg, or 0.6 g/kg, or flibanserin 100 mg only. Treatments were administered using a worst-case approach that included morning dosing and consumption of alcohol within 10 minutes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The primary end point was the proportion of participants who experienced dizziness, syncope, or hypotension. Safety end points included orthostatic vital signs. RESULTS: The study included 96 premenopausal women (mean age 31 ± 8 years). The incidence of dizziness for ethanol + flibanserin was 39.8% for ethanol 0.6 g/kg, 34.1% for 0.4 g/kg, and 27.4% for 0.2 g/kg compared with 31.1% for flibanserin without ethanol. Based on the available vital signs data, there was no effect of ethanol concentration on orthostatic blood pressure, vertigo, or hypotension; no instances of syncope were observed. The overall incidence of adverse events (AEs) was similar when flibanserin was administered alone (96.7%) or with ethanol (90.5-97.6%). CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Consumption of the tested amounts of alcohol (0.2-0.6 g/kg) does not have an additive effect on the AE profile of flibanserin 100 mg in healthy premenopausal women. STRENGTHS & LIMITATIONS: Strengths include the study population (premenopausal women, as indicated for flibanserin) and range of ethanol doses. Limitations include the morning dosing of study medication, which is inconsistent with the bedtime dosing recommended for flibanserin, and the method of handling missing vital sign measurements. CONCLUSION: Co-administration of flibanserin 100 mg with varying doses of ethanol resulted in few AEs of special interest, with no notable alcohol dose response. However, a significantly greater percentage of participants administered flibanserin with 0.6 g/kg and 0.4 g/kg of alcohol were characterized as "Participants in Whom Standing Blood Pressure Was Not Obtained" compared with participants administered flibanserin alone. Simon JA, Clayton AH, Parish SJ, et al. Effects of Alcohol Administered With Flibanserin in Healthy Premenopausal Women: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Single-Dose Crossover Study. J Sex Med 2020;17:83-93.

3.
Menopause ; 26(11): 1259-1264, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31688572

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The softgel 17ß-estradiol (E2) vaginal inserts (4 and 10 µg; Imvexxy; TherapeuticsMD, Boca Raton, FL) are FDA approved for treating moderate to severe dyspareunia associated with postmenopausal vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA). The objective here was to determine responder rates at week 2 and whether week-2 findings predicted week-12 responders in the REJOICE trial. METHODS: Postmenopausal women received E2 vaginal inserts 4, 10, or 25 µg, or placebo for 12 weeks. Proportion of responders (having ≥2 of the following: vaginal superficial cells >5%, vaginal pH <5.0, or dyspareunia improvement of ≥1 category) were calculated. Odds ratios (ORs) for positive response at week 12 given a positive response at week 2 were determined in the efficacy evaluable (EE) population. RESULTS: The responder rate (in EE population [n = 695]) was 74% to 82% with E2 inserts versus 24% with placebo at week 2, and 72% to 80% versus 33% at week 12. Positive treatment responses were 9- to 14-fold higher with vaginal E2 than with placebo at week 2, and 5- to 8-fold higher at week 12. Response at week 2 predicted response at week 12 in the total population (OR 13.1; 95% CI, 8.8-19.7) and with active treatment only (OR 7.9; 95% CI, 4.7-13.2). CONCLUSIONS: A high percentage of postmenopausal women with moderate to severe dyspareunia responded with the E2 softgel vaginal insert at week 2, and a positive response at week 2 predicted a positive response at week 12.

5.
Sex Med ; 7(4): 418-424, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31519497

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Flibanserin, a treatment for hypoactive sexual desire disorder, carries warnings for increased risk of severe hypotension and syncope when used with alcohol. However, these warnings are not informed by studies that used flibanserin's recommended bedtime dosing because previous alcohol studies assessed flibanserin's safety during the day. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ethanol in a real-world context in premenopausal women taking flibanserin at bedtime. METHODS: In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, 24 healthy premenopausal women (mean age = 34.5 ± 9.9 years; mean body mass index = 25.2 ± 3.4 kg/m2) were dosed with flibanserin or placebo for 3 days to achieve steady-state plasma levels. In a clinical research unit, subjects (n = 22) were provided 2 units of wine (150 mL/unit; 12% ethanol content) or a nonalcoholic beverage with a standardized 3-course evening meal. Flibanserin 100 mg or placebo was administered at bedtime 2.5 hours after the end of the evening meal. On a separate day, subjects were provided the alternative beverage (± alcohol) with the same evening meal and dosed with the same treatment (flibanserin or placebo) at bedtime. After a 5-day washout period, subjects crossed over to the other treatment arm and the protocol was repeated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Adverse events (AEs) and vital signs were monitored. RESULTS: In the absence of ethanol, headaches and hypotension were the only AEs that occurred in ≥2 subjects after flibanserin dosing (placebo corrected rates were 17.4% and 8.7%, respectively). After ethanol consumption, the rate of hypotension after flibanserin dosing was no greater than with flibanserin or placebo after nonalcoholic beverage consumption. There were no instances of orthostatic hypotension or syncope and no serious AEs or AEs leading to study discontinuation. CONCLUSION: Flibanserin dosed at bedtime after moderate amounts of alcohol with an evening meal was well-tolerated with no evidence of clinically significant hypotension or syncope. Millheiser L, Clayton AH, Parish SJ, et al. Safety and Tolerability of Evening Ethanol Consumption and Bedtime Administration of Flibanserin in Healthy Premenopausal Female Subjects. Sex Med 2019;7:418-424.

6.
J Sex Med ; 16(11): 1779-1786, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31522985

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Flibanserin is approved in the United States and Canada for the treatment of acquired, generalized, hypoactive sexual desire disorder in premenopausal women. Sedation-related side effects are among the most prevalent adverse events. Although infrequent, hypotension and syncope remain safety concerns because of possible interaction of flibanserin with alcohol. AIM: To evaluate the impact of the timing of alcohol consumption on flibanserin safety and tolerability. METHODS: In this single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 4-treatment crossover study, 64 healthy premenopausal women (mean age 32.5 ± 8.7 years; range 20‒52 years) received once-daily flibanserin 100 mg or placebo during each of two 10-day treatment periods. Study medication was administered on days 1-3 to achieve steady state. On days 4, 6, 8, and 10, after a standard breakfast, participants consumed 0.4 g/kg ethanol (approximately equivalent to two 5-oz glasses of wine) administered with orange juice 2, 4, or 6 hours before taking study medication or orange juice alone (no ethanol) 2 hours before taking study medication. OUTCOMES: The primary endpoint was percentage of participants experiencing syncope or orthostatic hypotension-associated adverse events requiring medical intervention. Secondary endpoints included the incidence of hypotension, the incidence of orthostatic hypotension, and rates of adverse events of special interest (syncope, orthostatic hypotension, dizziness, and somnolence). RESULTS: 1 participant experienced a primary endpoint event (syncope) during treatment with placebo taken 4 hours after ethanol consumption. Within each ethanol dose-timing treatment, there were no statistically significant differences for flibanserin compared with placebo. Rates of hypotension were 53.3-66.7% after flibanserin dosing and 57.4-63.3% after placebo dosing. Rates for orthostatic hypotension were 0.0-5.0% after flibanserin dosing and 1.7-6.6% after placebo dosing. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Ethanol interaction with flibanserin was not observed in this study. STRENGTHS & LIMITATIONS: This study provides information regarding the use of flibanserin after the consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol (0.4 g/kg). However, daytime administration of flibanserin is not consistent with the drug's indicated bedtime dosing. CONCLUSION: Flibanserin, at steady state taken 2, 4, or 6 hours after 0.4 g/kg of ethanol intake did not increase the incidence of hypotension, orthostatic hypotension, or syncope compared with either flibanserin alone or ethanol alone. Simon JA, Clayton AH, Kingsberg SA, et al. Effects of Timing of Flibanserin Administration Relative to Alcohol Intake in Healthy Premenopausal Women: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover Study. J Sex Med 2019;16:1779-1786.

7.
J Sex Med ; 16(9): 1331-1337, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31488288

RESUMO

This Statement is being simultaneously published in the journals Climacteric, Maturitas, Journal of Sexual Medicine, and Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism on behalf of the International Menopause Society, The European Menopause and Andropause Society, The International Society for Sexual Medicine, and The Endocrine Society, respectively. This Position Statement has been endorsed by the International Menopause Society, The Endocrine Society, The European Menopause and Andropause Society, The International Society for Sexual Medicine, The International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health, The North American Menopause Society, The Federacion Latinoamericana de Sociedades de Climaterio y Menopausia, The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, The International Society of Endocrinology, The Endocrine Society of Australia, and The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

9.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 104(10): 4660-4666, 2019 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31498871

RESUMO

This Position Statement has been endorsed by the International Menopause Society, The Endocrine Society, The European Menopause and Andropause Society, The International Society for Sexual Medicine, The International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health, The North American Menopause Society, The Federacion Latinoamericana de Sociedades de Climaterio y Menopausia, The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, The International Society of Endocrinology, The Endocrine Society of Australia, and The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

10.
Drugs Aging ; 36(10): 897-908, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31452067

RESUMO

Genitourinary syndrome of menopause is a condition comprising the atrophic symptoms and signs women may experience in the vulvovaginal and bladder-urethral areas as a result of the loss of sex steroids that occurs with menopause. It is a progressive condition that does not resolve without treatment and can adversely affect a woman's quality of life. For a variety of reasons, many symptomatic women do not seek treatment and, of those who do, many are unhappy with their options. Additionally, many healthcare providers do not actively screen their menopausal patients for the symptoms of genitourinary syndrome of menopause. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation of genitourinary syndrome of menopause as well as the treatment guidelines recommended by the major societies engaged in women's health. This is followed by a review of available treatment options that includes both hormonal and non-hormonal therapies. We discuss both the systemic and vaginal estrogen products that have been available for decades and remain important treatment options for patients; however, a major intent of the review is to provide information on the newer, non-estrogen pharmacologic treatment options, in particular oral ospemifene and vaginal prasterone. A discussion of adjunctive therapies such as moisturizers, lubricants, physical therapy/dilators, hyaluronic acid, and laser therapy is included. We also address some of the available data on both the patient and healthcare providers perspectives on treatment, including cost, and touch briefly on the topic of treating women with a history of, or at high risk for, breast cancer.


Assuntos
Doenças Urogenitais Femininas/diagnóstico , Doenças Urogenitais Femininas/tratamento farmacológico , Menopausa/fisiologia , Terapia de Reposição de Estrogênios , Feminino , Doenças Urogenitais Femininas/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Menopausa/efeitos dos fármacos , Qualidade de Vida , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Síndrome , Saúde da Mulher
11.
Menopause ; 2019 Aug 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31433355

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The softgel 17ß-estradiol (E2) vaginal inserts (4 and 10 µg; Imvexxy; TherapeuticsMD, Boca Raton, FL) are FDA approved for treating moderate to severe dyspareunia associated with postmenopausal vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA). The objective here was to determine responder rates at week 2 and whether week-2 findings predicted week-12 responders in the REJOICE trial. METHODS: Postmenopausal women received E2 vaginal inserts 4, 10, or 25 µg, or placebo for 12 weeks. Proportion of responders (having ≥2 of the following: vaginal superficial cells >5%, vaginal pH <5.0, or dyspareunia improvement of ≥1 category) were calculated. Odds ratios (ORs) for positive response at week 12 given a positive response at week 2 were determined in the efficacy evaluable (EE) population. RESULTS: The responder rate (in EE population [n = 695]) was 74% to 82% with E2 inserts versus 24% with placebo at week 2, and 72% to 80% versus 33% at week 12. Positive treatment responses were 9- to 14-fold higher with vaginal E2 than with placebo at week 2, and 5- to 8-fold higher at week 12. Response at week 2 predicted response at week 12 in the total population (OR 13.1; 95% CI, 8.8-19.7) and with active treatment only (OR 7.9; 95% CI, 4.7-13.2). CONCLUSIONS: A high percentage of postmenopausal women with moderate to severe dyspareunia responded with the E2 softgel vaginal insert at week 2, and a positive response at week 2 predicted a positive response at week 12.

12.
Menopause ; 26(10): 1110-1116, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31188286

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The perceptions and attitudes of menopause shared by men are largely unknown. This analysis characterized men's awareness and their understanding of their partner's menopausal transition. METHODS: A 35-question, online survey was used to assess men's perceptions and attitudes toward menopause. Men were recruited from an online research marketplace and were eligible to participate if their female partners (45-64 years old) experienced ≥1 of the following symptoms: hot flashes, night sweats, sleepless nights, difficulty sleeping, low libido, mood swings, pain during sex, or vaginal dryness. Couples either lived together full time, or, if living separately, resided together regularly two or more times a week. RESULTS: Of the 1,356 surveys sent to eligible men, 450 (33%) were completed. Most men were between 50 and 69 years (80%), married and not separated (90%), and lived with their partner full time (97%). Men were aware of the symptoms regularly experienced by their partner, with difficulty sleeping (54%) and lack of energy (49%) being frequently identified; these symptoms were attributed to menopause (26%) and/or aging (22%). Of those who were affected by symptoms (63%), most men reported they negatively impacted them (77%), their partners (70%), and relationships (56%). Men engaged in discussions with their partners regarding menopausal symptoms (72%) and believed they were somewhat/very influential (75%) in their partner's decision to seek treatment or make lifestyle adjustments. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, men are aware of their partner's menopausal transition and may influence decisions relating to symptom management. Educational interventions would further benefit men's awareness of menopause and available treatment options.Video Summary:http://links.lww.com/MENO/A424.

13.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 94(5): 842-856, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30954288

RESUMO

Sexual problems are common in women of all ages. Despite their frequency and impact, female sexual dysfunctions (FSDs) are often unrecognized and untreated in clinical settings. In response, the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health convened a multidisciplinary, international expert panel to develop a process of care (POC) that outlines recommendations for identification of sexual problems in women. This POC describes core and advanced competencies in FSD for clinicians who are not sexual medicine specialists and serve as caregivers of women and, therefore, is useful for clinicians with any level of competence in sexual medicine. The POC begins with the expectation of universal screening for sexual concerns, proceeds with a 4-step model (eliciting the story, naming/reframing attention to the problem, empathic witnessing of the patient's distress and the problem's impact, and referral or assessment and treatment) that accommodates all levels of engagement, and delineates a process for referral when patients' needs exceed clinician expertise. Distressing problems related to desire, arousal, and orgasm affect 12% of women across the lifespan. Low desire is the most common sexual problem, but sexual pain and other less common disorders of arousal and orgasm are also seen in clinical practice. Screening is best initiated by a ubiquity statement that assures the patient that sexual concerns are common and can be revealed. Patient-centered communication skills facilitate and optimize the discussion. The goal of the POC is to provide guidance to clinicians regarding screening, education, management, and referral for women with sexual problems.


Assuntos
Disfunções Sexuais Fisiológicas , Disfunções Sexuais Psicogênicas , Saúde Sexual/normas , Saúde da Mulher/normas , Competência Clínica , Empatia , Feminino , Humanos , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/métodos , Relações Médico-Paciente , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Encaminhamento e Consulta/normas , Disfunções Sexuais Fisiológicas/diagnóstico , Disfunções Sexuais Fisiológicas/terapia , Disfunções Sexuais Psicogênicas/diagnóstico , Disfunções Sexuais Psicogênicas/terapia , Sociedades Médicas
14.
J Sex Med ; 16(3): 452-462, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30846116

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: In 2016 the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health (ISSWSH) published an expert consensus report on new nomenclature that addressed the need for comprehensive, evidence-based criteria for new diagnoses in desire, arousal, and orgasm, with the definition on arousal focusing exclusively on female genital arousal disorder (FGAD). AIM: A new expert panel solely focused on mechanisms of arousal disorders convened to revise the nomenclature to include female cognitive arousal disorder (FCAD) and FGAD. METHODS: The ISSWSH co-chairs identified experts on arousal disorders in women. The 10 participants included clinicians, researchers, and educators, representing a diverse, multidisciplinary group. Pre-meeting preparation included evidence-based literature review as the basis of presentations panelists made at the meeting on the current knowledge in cognitive arousal. Consensus was reached using a modified Delphi method. Writing assignments were made as a basis of manuscript development. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The new definition of FCAD is characterized by distressing difficulty or inability to attain or maintain adequate mental excitement associated with sexual activity, as manifested by problems with feeling engaged and mentally turned on or sexually aroused for a minimum of 6 months. RESULTS: Female sexual arousal disorder encompasses both FGAD (revised definition) and FCAD (new definition). Recommendations regarding diagnosis include a clinical interview to assess for FCAD using targeted questions. Patient-reported outcomes that contain questions to assess FCAD are described, including limitations for differentiating between cognitive arousal, genital arousal, and sexual desire. Laboratory measures of cognitive and genital arousal are discussed, including the relationships between genital and cognitive arousal patterns. Biopsychosocial risk factors for FCAD and FGAD, as well as exclusionary conditions, are presented. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The revision of the ISSWSH nomenclature regarding the criteria for the 2 arousal categories, FCAD and FGAD, and the recommended diagnostic strategies offers a framework for management of women with arousal disorders. STRENGTHS & LIMITATIONS: This nomenclature allows for basic science and clinical research in subtypes of arousal in order to develop better diagnostic and treatment options for use by clinicians, scientists, and regulatory agencies. There are limited validated measures of cognitive arousal, including the Female Sexual Function Index, the most commonly used measure, which does not effectively distinguish between cognitive excitement, genital sensations, and event-related desire. CONCLUSION: Future directions include the refinement of FCAD and FGAD and development and validation of patient-reported outcomes that distinguish between the cognitive processes and genital responses to enhance clinical care and research in this area. Parish SJ, Meston CM, Althof SE, et al. Toward a More Evidence-Based Nosology and Nomenclature for Female Sexual Dysfunctions-Part III. J Sex Med 2019;16:452-462.


Assuntos
Disfunções Sexuais Fisiológicas/diagnóstico , Disfunções Sexuais Psicogênicas/diagnóstico , Terminologia como Assunto , Consenso , Feminino , Humanos , Libido , Orgasmo , Comportamento Sexual , Disfunções Sexuais Fisiológicas/psicologia , Disfunções Sexuais Psicogênicas/psicologia , Saúde Sexual , Saúde da Mulher
15.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 28(4): 432-443, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30714849

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although sexual health can be considered a vital sign for overall health, several barriers prevent women from receiving proper medical counseling, support, and/or care for their sexual health needs and concerns. METHODS: Experts in sexual health compiled research and experience on the impediments to women receiving adequate assessment and treatment for their sexual health. Specific solutions and a roadmap for overcoming such barriers and improving patient-clinician communication are presented. RESULTS: Social stigma around female sexuality remains in Western culture and as a result, women often avoid and/or are embarrassed to discuss their sexual health with their health care professionals (HCPs). Moreover, midlife women are typically unaware or have misconceptions about conditions that may adversely impact their sexual life, such as genitourinary syndrome of menopause and hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Without understanding there may be underlying medical conditions, there is also a lack of awareness that safe and effective treatments are available. Lack of training, tools, time, and limited treatment options impede HCPs from providing women with necessary sexual health support. Educating women, training HCPs, and providing communication tools to HCPs can facilitate effective dialog between patients and HCPs. More specifically, HCPs can be trained to initiate and maintain a sexual health conversation in a manner that is comfortable for women to convey sexual health needs and concerns, and for HCPs to correctly identify, diagnose, and treat the sexual problems of their female patients. CONCLUSIONS: Solutions exist to address the barriers currently impeding patient-clinician interactions around sexual health.


Assuntos
Relações Médico-Paciente , Saúde Sexual , Barreiras de Comunicação , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Menopausa/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Disfunções Sexuais Fisiológicas/psicologia , Disfunções Sexuais Fisiológicas/terapia , Estigma Social
16.
J Low Genit Tract Dis ; 23(2): 161-163, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30768446

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Three scientific societies, the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease (ISSVD), the International Society for the Study of Women Sexual Health (ISSWSH), and the International Pelvic Pain Society (IPPS) developed the "2015 ISSVD, ISSWSH, and IPPS Consensus Terminology and Classification of Persistent Vulvar Pain and Vulvodynia" (referred to as the "2015 consensus terminology").The terminology included 11 descriptors of vulvodynia. However, the definitions of the descriptors were not included in the 2015 consensus terminology publications. The objective of this article was to provide these definitions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The ISSVD led a discussion on the definitions for the 11 vulvodynia descriptors, with participation from the ISSWSH and IPPS. The definitions were created through a consensus process. RESULTS: The definitions are described and the rationale for their choice is elucidated. CONCLUSIONS: The definitions of vulvodynia descriptors were determined by a multistaged process of discussion among health care providers with expertise in the pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of vulvodynia. The definitions were approved by the ISSVD, ISSWSH, and IPPS. It is recommended that these definitions of vulvodynia descriptors as well as the 2015 consensus terminology be used for the classification of vulvodynia.


Assuntos
Terminologia como Assunto , Vulvodinia/diagnóstico , Vulvodinia/patologia , Consenso , Feminino , Humanos , Sociedades Científicas
17.
Menopause ; 26(2): 124-131, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30130293

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare physicians' behaviors and attitudes regarding vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) treatment in menopausal women, including women with breast cancer, using an internet-based survey. METHODS: The WISDOM survey queried obstetricians and gynecologists (OB/GYNs) and primary care physicians (PCPs) with 23 multipart questions assessing behaviors and attitudes towards VVA treatment. RESULTS: Of 2,424 surveys sent, 945 (39%) responded and 644 (27%) were completed. Of the menopausal women seen by OB/GYNs and PCPs, 44% to 55% reported having VVA symptoms. Physicians prescribed VVA treatments primarily because of effectiveness. Only 34% of OB/GYNs and 17% of PCPs felt comfortable prescribing VVA therapies to women with a personal history of breast cancer. In general, the most common VVA treatment recommended by all was prescription therapy (49%; with or without other therapies) in the form of US Food and Drug Administration-approved vaginal estrogen creams. More OB/GYNs (72%) than PCPs (47%) disagreed that VVA was best treated with over the counter than prescription products. Out-of-pocket cost and fear of risks associated with estrogens were believed to be the main barriers for why women choose not to get treated and why they discontinue treatment. CONCLUSIONS: More OB/GYNs than PCPs prescribed VVA treatment, especially vaginal estrogens, for menopausal women, but both groups generally had similar attitudes and behaviors regarding VVA treatment. Physician comfort was low when prescribing to women with a history of breast cancer, despite women's health medical societies supporting vaginal estrogen use in women with a history of estrogen-dependent breast cancer who were unresponsive to nonhormonal therapies when offered in consultation with their oncologist.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/patologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Médicos/psicologia , Vagina/patologia , Doenças Vaginais/tratamento farmacológico , Vulva/patologia , Doenças da Vulva/tratamento farmacológico , Administração Intravaginal , Adulto , Atrofia/tratamento farmacológico , Estrogênios/administração & dosagem , Estrogênios/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Menopausa , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Oncologistas/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Cremes, Espumas e Géis Vaginais/uso terapêutico
18.
Sex Med Rev ; 7(3): 455-463, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29396281

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: An association between erectile dysfunction (ED) and cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD) has long been recognized, and studies suggest that ED is an independent marker of CVD risk. More significantly, ED is a marker for both obstructive and non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and may reveal the presence of subclinical CAD in otherwise asymptomatic men. AIM: To discuss the role of ED as an early marker of subclinical CVD; describe an approach to quantifying that burden; and propose an algorithm for the evaluation and management of CV risk in men 40-60 years of age with vasculogenic ED, those presumed to have the highest risk for a CV event. METHODS: A comprehensive review of original literature and expert consensus documents was conducted and incorporated into clinical recommendations for ED management in the context of CV risk. OUTCOMES: Assessment and management of ED may help identify and reduce the risk of future CV events. Initial evaluation should distinguish between vasculogenic ED and ED of other etiologies. RESULTS: For men with predominantly vasculogenic ED, we recommend that initial CV risk stratification be based on the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association atherosclerotic CV disease risk score. Management of men with ED who are at low risk for CVD should focus on risk factor control; men at high risk, including those with CV symptoms, should be referred to a cardiologist. Intermediate-risk men should undergo non-invasive evaluation for subclinical atherosclerosis. Evidence supports use of a prognostic markers, particularly coronary calcium score, to further understand CV risk in men with ED. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians must assess the presence or absence of ED in every man >40 years of age, especially those men who are asymptomatic for signs and symptoms of CAD. We support CV risk stratification and CVD risk factor reduction in all men with vasculogenic ED. Miner M, Parish SJ, Billups KL, et al. Erectile Dysfunction and Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease. Sex Med Rev 2018;7:455-463.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/complicações , Disfunção Erétil/etiologia , Medição de Risco , Comportamento de Redução do Risco , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/terapia , Disfunção Erétil/epidemiologia , Disfunção Erétil/terapia , Saúde Global , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino
19.
J Sex Med ; 15(10): 1414-1425, 2018 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30297093

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: This article discusses a blueprint for a sexual health communication curriculum to facilitate undergraduate medical student acquisition of sexual history taking skills and includes recommendations for important elements of a thorough sexual history script for undergraduate medical students. AIM: To outline the fundamentals, objectives, content, timing, and teaching methods of a gold standard curriculum in sexual health communication. METHODS: Consensus expert opinion was documented at the 2012, 2014, and 2016 Summits in Medical Education in Sexual Health. Additionally, the existing literature was reviewed regarding undergraduate medical education in sexual health. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: This article reports expert opinion and a review of the literature on the development of a sexual history taking curriculum. RESULTS: First-year curricula should be focused on acquiring satisfactory basic sexual history taking skills, including both assessment of sexual risk via the 5 Ps (partners, practices, protection from sexually transmitted infections, past history of sexually transmitted infections, and prevention of pregnancy) as well as assessment of sexual wellness-described here as a sixth P (plus), which encompasses the assessment of trauma, violence, sexual satisfaction, sexual health concerns/problems, and support for gender identity and sexual orientation. Second-year curricula should be focused on incorporating improved clinical reasoning, emphasizing sexual history taking for diverse populations and practices, and including the impact of illness on sexual health. Teaching methods must include varied formats. Evaluation may be best as a formative objective structured clinical examination in the first year and summative in the second year. Barriers for curriculum development may be reduced by identifying faculty champions of sexual health/medicine. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Medical students will improve their skills in sexual history taking, which will ultimately impact patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. Future research is needed to validate this proposed curriculum and assess the impact on clinical skills. STRENGTHS & LIMITATIONS: This article assimilates expert consensus and existing clinical guidelines to provide a novel structured approach to curriculum development in sexual health interviewing in the pre-clinical years. CONCLUSION: The blueprint for developing sexual history taking skills includes a spiral curriculum with varied teaching formats, incorporation of a sexual history script that incorporates inquiry about sexual wellness, and longitudinal assessment across the pre-clinical years. Ideally, sexual health communication content should be incorporated into existing clinical interviewing and physical examination courses. Rubin ES, Rullo J, Tsai P, et al. Best Practices in North American Pre-Clinical Medical Education in Sexual History Taking: Consensus From the Summits in Medical Education in Sexual Health. J Sex Med 2018;15:1414-1425.


Assuntos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina/organização & administração , Anamnese/métodos , Comportamento Sexual , Saúde Sexual/educação , Competência Clínica , Comunicação , Currículo , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Sexo Seguro , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos
20.
Menopause ; 25(6): 596-608, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29762200

RESUMO

The objective of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) and The International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health (ISSWSH) Expert Consensus Panel was to create a point of care algorithm for treating genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) in women with or at high risk for breast cancer. The consensus recommendations will assist healthcare providers in managing GSM with a goal of improving the care and quality of life for these women. The Expert Consensus Panel is comprised of a diverse group of 16 multidisciplinary experts well respected in their fields. The panelists individually conducted an evidence-based review of the literature in their respective areas of expertise. They then met to discuss the latest treatment options for genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) in survivors of breast cancer and review management strategies for GSM in women with or at high risk for breast cancer, using a modified Delphi method. This iterative process involved presentations summarizing the current literature, debate, and discussion of divergent opinions concerning GSM assessment and management, leading to the development of consensus recommendations for the clinician.Genitourinary syndrome of menopause is more prevalent in survivors of breast cancer, is commonly undiagnosed and untreated, and may have early onset because of cancer treatments or risk-reducing strategies. The paucity of evidence regarding the safety of vaginal hormone therapies in women with or at high risk for breast cancer has resulted in avoidance of treatment, potentially adversely affecting quality of life and intimate relationships. Factors influencing decision-making regarding treatment for GSM include breast cancer recurrence risk, severity of symptoms, response to prior therapies, and personal preference.We review current evidence for various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapeutic modalities in women with a history of or at high risk for breast cancer and highlight the substantial gaps in the evidence for safe and effective therapies and the need for future research. Treatment of GSM is individualized, with nonhormone treatments generally being first line in this population. The use of local hormone therapies may be an option for some women who fail nonpharmacologic and nonhormone treatments after a discussion of risks and benefits and review with a woman's oncologist. We provide consensus recommendations for an approach to the management of GSM in specific patient populations, including women at high risk for breast cancer, women with estrogen-receptor positive breast cancers, women with triple-negative breast cancers, and women with metastatic disease.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama , Terapia de Reposição de Estrogênios , Doenças Urogenitais Femininas/tratamento farmacológico , Menopausa , Atrofia , Feminino , Saúde Global , Humanos , América do Norte , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Sociedades Médicas , Sobreviventes , Síndrome , Vagina/patologia , Vulva/patologia
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