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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(11): e1914401, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31675084

RESUMO

Importance: Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychiatric disorder, and recent studies have suggested that exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) during childhood is associated with an elevated risk of subsequently developing schizophrenia. However, it is not known whether the increased risk associated with NO2 exposure is owing to a greater genetic liability among those exposed to highest NO2 levels. Objective: To examine the associations between childhood NO2 exposure and genetic liability for schizophrenia (as measured by a polygenic risk score), and risk of developing schizophrenia. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based cohort study including individuals with schizophrenia (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision code F20) and a randomly selected subcohort. Using national registry data, all individuals born in Denmark between May 1, 1981, and December 31, 2002, were followed up from their 10th birthday until the first occurrence of schizophrenia, emigration, death, or December 31, 2012, whichever came first. Statistical analyses were conducted between October 24, 2018, and June 17, 2019. Exposures: Individual exposure to NO2 during childhood estimated as mean daily exposure to NO2 at residential addresses from birth to the 10th birthday. Polygenic risk scores were calculated as the weighted sum of risk alleles at selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms based on genetic material obtained from dried blood spot samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank and on the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium genome-wide association study summary statistics file. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was schizophrenia. Weighted Cox proportional hazards regression models were fitted to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (AHRs) for schizophrenia with 95% CIs according to the exposures. Results: Of a total of 23 355 individuals, 11 976 (51.3%) were male and all had Danish-born parents. During the period of the study, 3531 were diagnosed with schizophrenia. Higher polygenic risk scores were correlated with higher childhood NO2 exposure (ρ = 0.0782; 95% CI, 0.065-0.091; P < .001). A 10-µg/m3 increase in childhood daily NO2 exposure (AHR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.15-1.32) and a 1-SD increase in polygenic risk score (AHR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.23-1.35) were independently associated with increased schizophrenia risk. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that the apparent association between NO2 exposure and schizophrenia is only slightly confounded by a higher polygenic risk score for schizophrenia among individuals living in areas with greater NO2. The findings demonstrate the utility of including polygenic risk scores in epidemiologic studies.

2.
Lancet ; 394(10211): 1827-1835, 2019 11 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31668728

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews have consistently shown that individuals with mental disorders have an increased risk of premature mortality. Traditionally, this evidence has been based on relative risks or crude estimates of reduced life expectancy. The aim of this study was to compile a comprehensive analysis of mortality-related health metrics associated with mental disorders, including sex-specific and age-specific mortality rate ratios (MRRs) and life-years lost (LYLs), a measure that takes into account age of onset of the disorder. METHODS: In this population-based cohort study, we included all people younger than 95 years of age who lived in Denmark at some point between Jan 1, 1995, and Dec 31, 2015. Information on mental disorders was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register and the date and cause of death was obtained from the Danish Register of Causes of Death. We classified mental disorders into ten groups and causes of death into 11 groups, which were further categorised into natural causes (deaths from diseases and medical conditions) and external causes (suicide, homicide, and accidents). For each specific mental disorder, we estimated MRRs using Poisson regression models, adjusting for sex, age, and calendar time, and excess LYLs (ie, difference in LYLs between people with a mental disorder and the general population) for all-cause mortality and for each specific cause of death. FINDINGS: 7 369 926 people were included in our analysis. We found that mortality rates were higher for people with a diagnosis of a mental disorder than for the general Danish population (28·70 deaths [95% CI 28·57-28·82] vs 12·95 deaths [12·93-12·98] per 1000 person-years). Additionally, all types of disorders were associated with higher mortality rates, with MRRs ranging from 1·92 (95% CI 1·91-1·94) for mood disorders to 3·91 (3·87-3·94) for substance use disorders. All types of mental disorders were associated with shorter life expectancies, with excess LYLs ranging from 5·42 years (95% CI 5·36-5·48) for organic disorders in females to 14·84 years (14·70-14·99) for substance use disorders in males. When we examined specific causes of death, we found that males with any type of mental disorder lost fewer years due to neoplasm-related deaths compared with the general population, although their cancer mortality rates were higher. INTERPRETATION: Mental disorders are associated with premature mortality. We provide a comprehensive analysis of mortality by different types of disorders, presenting both MRRs and premature mortality based on LYLs, displayed by age, sex, and cause of death. By providing accurate estimates of premature mortality, we reveal previously underappreciated features related to competing risks and specific causes of death. FUNDING: Danish National Research Foundation.

3.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 54(11): 1343-1351, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31456027

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Individuals with schizophrenia have been reported to have low employment rates. We examined the associations of schizophrenia with employment, income, and status of cohabitation from a work life course perspective. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study including all individuals (n = 2,390,127) born in Denmark between 1955 and 1991, who were alive at their 25th birthday. Diagnosis of schizophrenia (yes/no) between ages 15 and 25 was used as an exposure. Employment status, annual wage or self-employment earnings, level of education, and cohabitant status from the age of 25-61 (years 1980-2016) were used as outcomes. RESULTS: Schizophrenia diagnosis between ages 15 and 25 (n = 9448) was associated with higher odds of not being employed (at the age of 30: OR 39.4, 95% CI 36.5-42.6), having no secondary or higher education (7.4, 7.0-7.8), and living alone (7.6, 7.2-8.1). These odds ratios were two-to-three times lower and decreasing over time for those individuals who did not receive treatment in a psychiatric inpatient or outpatient clinic for schizophrenia after the age of 25. Between ages 25-61, individuals with schizophrenia have cumulative earning of $224,000, which is 14% of the amount that the individuals who have not been diagnosed with schizophrenia earn. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with schizophrenia are at high risk of being outside the labour market and living alone throughout their entire life, resulting in an enormous societal loss in earnings. Individuals with less chronic course of schizophrenia had a gradual but substantial improvement throughout their work life.

4.
PLoS Biol ; 17(8): e3000353, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31430271

RESUMO

The search for the genetic factors underlying complex neuropsychiatric disorders has proceeded apace in the past decade. Despite some advances in identifying genetic variants associated with psychiatric disorders, most variants have small individual contributions to risk. By contrast, disease risk increase appears to be less subtle for disease-predisposing environmental insults. In this study, we sought to identify associations between environmental pollution and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. We present exploratory analyses of 2 independent, very large datasets: 151 million unique individuals, represented in a United States insurance claims dataset, and 1.4 million unique individuals documented in Danish national treatment registers. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) county-level environmental quality indices (EQIs) in the US and individual-level exposure to air pollution in Denmark were used to assess the association between pollution exposure and the risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. These results show that air pollution is significantly associated with increased risk of psychiatric disorders. We hypothesize that pollutants affect the human brain via neuroinflammatory pathways that have also been shown to cause depression-like phenotypes in animal studies.

7.
Nat Genet ; 51(5): 793-803, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31043756

RESUMO

Bipolar disorder is a highly heritable psychiatric disorder. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) including 20,352 cases and 31,358 controls of European descent, with follow-up analysis of 822 variants with P < 1 × 10-4 in an additional 9,412 cases and 137,760 controls. Eight of the 19 variants that were genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10-8) in the discovery GWAS were not genome-wide significant in the combined analysis, consistent with small effect sizes and limited power but also with genetic heterogeneity. In the combined analysis, 30 loci were genome-wide significant, including 20 newly identified loci. The significant loci contain genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitter transporters and synaptic components. Pathway analysis revealed nine significantly enriched gene sets, including regulation of insulin secretion and endocannabinoid signaling. Bipolar I disorder is strongly genetically correlated with schizophrenia, driven by psychosis, whereas bipolar II disorder is more strongly correlated with major depressive disorder. These findings address key clinical questions and provide potential biological mechanisms for bipolar disorder.


Assuntos
Transtorno Bipolar/genética , Loci Gênicos , Transtorno Bipolar/classificação , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Transtornos Psicóticos/genética , Esquizofrenia/genética , Biologia de Sistemas
8.
Lancet Public Health ; 4(5): e220-e228, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31054640

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Self-harm and violent criminality have overlapping causes, but people who engage in these behaviours are typically studied as two discrete populations. In this study, we aimed to examine the risk of unnatural death (ie, death from external causes such as accidents, suicide, and undetermined causes) among people with a history of self-harm and violent crime, focusing specifically on those with co-occurring behaviours. METHODS: For this population-based nested case-control study, we used national interlinked Danish registers. Individuals aged 35 years or younger, who were alive and residing in the country on their 15th birthday, and who died from external causes (cases) were matched by age and gender to living people (controls). We compared risks of suicide, accidental death, and any death by external causes among those with a history of hospital-treated self-harm, violent criminality, or both behaviours with those in individuals without histories of either behaviour. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs), adjusted for age and gender, to compare risks. FINDINGS: We identified 2246 individuals who died from external causes, whom we matched to 44 920 living controls. 1499 (66·7%) of 2246 individuals died from accidental causes and 604 (26·9%) died by suicide. The risk of unnatural death was elevated for individuals with a history of violence (IRR 5·19, 95% CI 4·45-6·06) or self-harm (12·65, 10·84-14·77), but the greatest risk increase was among those with histories of both behaviours (29·37, 23·08-37·38). Substance misuse disorders, particularly multiple drug use, was more prevalent among individuals with co-occurring self-harm and violence than among those engaging in just one of these behaviours. Psychiatric disorders seemed to account for some of the excess risk of unnatural death among people with dual-harm histories, but excess risk, particularly of accidental death, persisted in the multivariable models. INTERPRETATION: Among individuals with co-occurring self-harm and violence, the risk of accidental death, particularly accidental self-poisoning, should be considered to be as important as the risk of suicide. People with a history of both behaviours who also have a substance misuse disorder are at particularly high risk of dying from external causes. Strategies should be designed to be accessible for people facing turbulent lives with multiple problems. Individuals in this group with both behaviours are likely to be treated by health-care services for self-harm and have contact with criminal justice services, providing multiple opportunities for proactive intervention. FUNDING: European Research Council.

9.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 116(11): 5188-5193, 2019 03 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30804178

RESUMO

Urban residence is associated with a higher risk of some psychiatric disorders, but the underlying drivers remain unknown. There is increasing evidence that the level of exposure to natural environments impacts mental health, but few large-scale epidemiological studies have assessed the general existence and importance of such associations. Here, we investigate the prospective association between green space and mental health in the Danish population. Green space presence was assessed at the individual level using high-resolution satellite data to calculate the normalized difference vegetation index within a 210 × 210 m square around each person's place of residence (∼1 million people) from birth to the age of 10. We show that high levels of green space presence during childhood are associated with lower risk of a wide spectrum of psychiatric disorders later in life. Risk for subsequent mental illness for those who lived with the lowest level of green space during childhood was up to 55% higher across various disorders compared with those who lived with the highest level of green space. The association remained even after adjusting for urbanization, socioeconomic factors, parental history of mental illness, and parental age. Stronger association of cumulative green space presence during childhood compared with single-year green space presence suggests that presence throughout childhood is important. Our results show that green space during childhood is associated with better mental health, supporting efforts to better integrate natural environments into urban planning and childhood life.


Assuntos
Meio Ambiente , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Dinamarca , Humanos , Fatores de Risco , Urbanização
10.
Nat Genet ; 51(3): 431-444, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30804558

RESUMO

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a highly heritable and heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental phenotypes diagnosed in more than 1% of children. Common genetic variants contribute substantially to ASD susceptibility, but to date no individual variants have been robustly associated with ASD. With a marked sample-size increase from a unique Danish population resource, we report a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 18,381 individuals with ASD and 27,969 controls that identified five genome-wide-significant loci. Leveraging GWAS results from three phenotypes with significantly overlapping genetic architectures (schizophrenia, major depression, and educational attainment), we identified seven additional loci shared with other traits at equally strict significance levels. Dissecting the polygenic architecture, we found both quantitative and qualitative polygenic heterogeneity across ASD subtypes. These results highlight biological insights, particularly relating to neuronal function and corticogenesis, and establish that GWAS performed at scale will be much more productive in the near term in ASD.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Espectro Autista/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Adolescente , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Dinamarca , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Fenótipo , Fatores de Risco
11.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 76(3): 259-270, 2019 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30649197

RESUMO

Importance: Individuals with mental disorders often develop comorbidity over time. Past studies of comorbidity have often restricted analyses to a subset of disorders and few studies have provided absolute risks of later comorbidity. Objectives: To undertake a comprehensive study of comorbidity within mental disorders, by providing temporally ordered age- and sex-specific pairwise estimates between the major groups of mental disorders, and to develop an interactive website to visualize all results and guide future research and clinical practice. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study included all individuals born in Denmark between January 1, 1900, and December 31, 2015, and living in the country between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2016. The analyses were conducted between June 2017 and May 2018. Main Outcomes and Measures: Danish health registers were used to identify mental disorders, which were examined within the broad 10-level International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, subchapter groups (eg, codes F00-F09 and F10-F19). For each temporally ordered pair of disorders, overall and lagged hazard ratios and 95% CIs were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Absolute risks were estimated using competing risks survival analyses. Estimates for each sex were generated. Results: A total of 5 940 778 persons were included in this study (2 958 293 men and 2 982 485 women; mean [SD] age at beginning of follow-up, 32.1 [25.4] years). They were followed up for 83.9 million person-years. All mental disorders were associated with an increased risk of all other mental disorders when adjusting for sex, age, and calendar time (hazard ratios ranging from 2.0 [95% CI, 1.7-2.4] for prior intellectual disabilities and later eating disorders to 48.6 [95% CI, 46.6-50.7] for prior developmental disorders and later intellectual disabilities). The hazard ratios were temporally patterned, with higher estimates during the first year after the onset of the first disorder, but with persistently elevated rates during the entire observation period. Some disorders were associated with substantial absolute risks of developing specific later disorders (eg, 30.6% [95% CI, 29.3%-32.0%] of men and 38.4% [95% CI, 37.5%-39.4%] of women with a diagnosis of mood disorders before age 20 years developed neurotic disorders within the following 5 years). Conclusions and Relevance: Comorbidity within mental disorders is pervasive, and the risk persists over time. This study provides disorder-, sex-, and age-specific relative and absolute risks of the comorbidity of mental disorders. Web-based interactive data visualization tools are provided for clinical utility.

12.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 5296, 2018 12 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30546018

RESUMO

Spatial mapping is a promising strategy to investigate the mechanisms underlying the incidence of psychosis. We analyzed a case-cohort study (n = 24,028), drawn from the 1.47 million Danish persons born between 1981 and 2005, using a novel framework for decomposing the geospatial risk for schizophrenia based on locale of upbringing and polygenic scores. Upbringing in a high environmental risk locale increases the risk for schizophrenia by 122%. Individuals living in a high gene-by-environmental risk locale have a 78% increased risk compared to those who have the same genetic liability but live in a low-risk locale. Effects of specific locales vary substantially within the most densely populated city of Denmark, with hazard ratios ranging from 0.26 to 9.26 for environment and from 0.20 to 5.95 for gene-by-environment. These findings indicate the critical synergism of gene and environment on the etiology of schizophrenia and demonstrate the potential of incorporating geolocation in genetic studies.


Assuntos
Meio Ambiente , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Geografia , Esquizofrenia/epidemiologia , Esquizofrenia/genética , Mapeamento Cromossômico/métodos , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Humanos , Estudo de Prova de Conceito , Fatores de Risco
13.
Nat Genet ; 2018 Nov 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30478444

RESUMO

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable childhood behavioral disorder affecting 5% of children and 2.5% of adults. Common genetic variants contribute substantially to ADHD susceptibility, but no variants have been robustly associated with ADHD. We report a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 20,183 individuals diagnosed with ADHD and 35,191 controls that identifies variants surpassing genome-wide significance in 12 independent loci, finding important new information about the underlying biology of ADHD. Associations are enriched in evolutionarily constrained genomic regions and loss-of-function intolerant genes and around brain-expressed regulatory marks. Analyses of three replication studies: a cohort of individuals diagnosed with ADHD, a self-reported ADHD sample and a meta-analysis of quantitative measures of ADHD symptoms in the population, support these findings while highlighting study-specific differences on genetic overlap with educational attainment. Strong concordance with GWAS of quantitative population measures of ADHD symptoms supports that clinical diagnosis of ADHD is an extreme expression of continuous heritable traits.

15.
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf ; 27(10): 1131-1138, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29664233

RESUMO

PURPOSE: It is not possible to fully assess intention of self-harm and suicidal events using information from administrative databases. We conducted a validation study of intention of suicide attempts/self-harm contacts identified by a commonly applied Danish register-based algorithm (DK-algorithm) based on hospital discharge diagnosis and emergency room contacts. METHODS: Of all 101 530 people identified with an incident suicide attempt/self-harm contact at Danish hospitals between 1995 and 2012 using the DK-algorithm, we selected a random sample of 475 people. We validated the DK-algorithm against medical records applying the definitions and terminology of the Columbia Classification Algorithm of Suicide Assessment of suicidal events, nonsuicidal events, and indeterminate or potentially suicidal events. We calculated positive predictive values (PPVs) of the DK-algorithm to identify suicidal events overall, by gender, age groups, and calendar time. RESULTS: We retrieved medical records for 357 (75%) people. The PPV of the DK-algorithm to identify suicidal events was 51.5% (95% CI: 46.4-56.7) overall, 42.7% (95% CI: 35.2-50.5) in males, and 58.5% (95% CI: 51.6-65.1) in females. The PPV varied further across age groups and calendar time. After excluding cases identified via the DK-algorithm by unspecific codes of intoxications and injury, the PPV improved slightly (56.8% [95% CI: 50.0-63.4]). CONCLUSIONS: The DK-algorithm can reliably identify self-harm with suicidal intention in 52% of the identified cases of suicide attempts/self-harm. The PPVs could be used for quantitative bias analysis and implemented as weights in future studies to estimate the proportion of suicidal events among cases identified via the DK-algorithm.

16.
Schizophr Res ; 199: 142-148, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29573946

RESUMO

Schizophrenia risk has been linked to urbanization, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Green space is hypothesized to positively influence mental health and might mediate risk of schizophrenia by mitigating noise and particle pollution exposure, stress relief, or other unknown mechanisms. The objectives for this study were to determine if green space are associated with schizophrenia risk, and if different measures of green space associate differently with risk. We used satellite data from the Landsat program to quantify green space in a new data set for Denmark at 30×30m resolution for the years 1985-2013. The effect of green space at different ages and within different distances from each person's place of residence on schizophrenia risk was estimated using Cox regression on a very large longitudinal population-based sample of the Danish population (943,027 persons). Living at the lowest amount of green space was associated with a 1.52-fold increased risk of developing schizophrenia compared to persons living at the highest level of green space. This association remained after adjusting for known risk factors for schizophrenia: urbanization, age, sex, and socioeconomic status. The strongest protective association was observed during the earliest childhood years and closest to place of residence. This is the first nationwide population-based study to demonstrate a protective association between green space during childhood and schizophrenia risk; suggesting limited green space as a novel environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. This study supports findings from other studies highlighting positive effects of exposure to natural environments for human health.

17.
Nat Genet ; 50(3): 381-389, 2018 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29483656

RESUMO

Schizophrenia is a debilitating psychiatric condition often associated with poor quality of life and decreased life expectancy. Lack of progress in improving treatment outcomes has been attributed to limited knowledge of the underlying biology, although large-scale genomic studies have begun to provide insights. We report a new genome-wide association study of schizophrenia (11,260 cases and 24,542 controls), and through meta-analysis with existing data we identify 50 novel associated loci and 145 loci in total. Through integrating genomic fine-mapping with brain expression and chromosome conformation data, we identify candidate causal genes within 33 loci. We also show for the first time that the common variant association signal is highly enriched among genes that are under strong selective pressures. These findings provide new insights into the biology and genetic architecture of schizophrenia, highlight the importance of mutation-intolerant genes and suggest a mechanism by which common risk variants persist in the population.

18.
J Affect Disord ; 227: 2017 Apr, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29053976

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Depression ranges among the most impairing mental disorders worldwide, and early detection is a global health priority. Little is known about the association between non-affective mental disorders in childhood/adolescence and later depression. METHODS: Nationwide register-based prospective cohort study, estimating cumulative incidences and incidence rate ratios (IRR) for later depression in individuals with and without non-affective mental disorders in early life. RESULTS: 475,213 females and 484,813 males born 1990-2007 were followed for a mean of 9.14 years (contributing a total of 8778,331 person-years of observation). In the cohort, 7963 (5451 females) were diagnosed with depression. Depression was more common in individuals with prior non-affective mental disorders in adolescence (15.98% in females and 7.02% in males) and in childhood (4.98% in females and 1.6% in males), than in the background population (3.94% and 1.3% in females; 1.37% and 0.47% in males). Eating and anxiety disorders in childhood/adolescence carried the highest absolute risk of depression. The relative risk of depression was particularly high the first year after the first non-affective disorder (IRR = 15.5; 14.07-17.10), but remained highly elevated more than five years after the first non-affective diagnosis (IRR = 2.05; 1.84-2.28), when compared to young people without such disorders. LIMITATIONS: This study only included diagnoses given at hospital departments, representing the more severe mental disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Children and adolescents with non-affective mental disorders were at substantially increased absolute and relative risk of developing depression in young adulthood, especially females diagnosed with anxiety- or eating disorders in adolescence. These findings may help identify groups of children and adolescents at very high risk of developing depression.


Assuntos
Depressão/psicologia , Transtornos Mentais/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/psicologia , Criança , Depressão/epidemiologia , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/epidemiologia , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Sistema de Registros , Risco , Adulto Jovem
20.
Schizophr Bull ; 43(1): 180-186, 2017 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27245172

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Traumatic stress disorders are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, there is a lack of prospective longitudinal studies investigating the risk of severe mental illness for people diagnosed with traumatic stress disorders. We aimed to assess if patients with acute stress reaction (ASR) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at increased risk of schizophrenia spectrum disorders or bipolar disorder. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study covering the entire Danish population including information on inpatient and outpatient mental hospitals over 2 decades. Predictors were in- or outpatient diagnoses of ASR or PTSD. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% CIs of schizophrenia, schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and bipolar disorder. RESULTS: Persons with a traumatic stress disorder had a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia (IRR 3.80, CI 2.33-5.80), schizophrenia spectrum disorder (IRR 2.34, CI 1.46-3.53), and bipolar disorder (IRR 4.22, CI 2.25-7.13). Risks were highest in the first year after diagnosis of the traumatic stress disorder and remained significantly elevated after more than 5 years. Mental illness in a parent could not explain the association. CONCLUSION: Our findings support an association between diagnosed traumatic stress disorders and subsequent schizophrenia spectrum disorder or bipolar disorder. If replicated, this may increase clinical focus on patients with traumatic stress disorders.


Assuntos
Transtorno Bipolar/epidemiologia , Sistema de Registros , Esquizofrenia/epidemiologia , Transtornos de Estresse Traumático/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Transtorno Bipolar/etiologia , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Risco , Esquizofrenia/etiologia , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/complicações , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/epidemiologia , Transtornos de Estresse Traumático/complicações , Adulto Jovem
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