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1.
BMC Med Genet ; 20(1): 152, 2019 Sep 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31488071

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Consanguine families display a high degree of homozygosity which increases the risk of family members suffering from autosomal recessive disorders. Thus, homozygous mutations in monogenic obesity genes may be a more frequent cause of childhood obesity in a consanguineous population. METHODS: We identified 23 probands from 23 Pakistani families displaying autosomal recessive obesity. We have previously excluded mutations in MC4R, LEP and LEPR in all probands. Using a chip-based, target-region capture array, 31 genes involved in monogenic forms of obesity, were screened in all probands. RESULTS: We identified 31 rare non-synonymous possibly pathogenic variants (28 missense and three nonsense) within the 31 selected genes. All variants were heterozygous, thus no homozygous pathogenic variants were found. Two of the rare heterozygous nonsense variants identified (p.R75X and p.R481X) were found in BBS9 within one proband, suggesting that obesity is caused by compound heterozygosity. Sequencing of the parents supported the compound heterozygous nature of obesity as each parent was carrying one of the variants. Subsequent clinical investigation strongly indicated that the proband had Bardet-Biedl syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Mutation screening in 31 genes among probands with severe early-onset obesity from Pakistani families did not reveal the presence of homozygous obesity causing variants. However, a compound heterozygote carrier of BBS9 mutations was identified, indicating that compound heterozygosity must not be overlooked when investigating the genetic etiology of severe childhood obesity in populations with a high degree of consanguinity.

2.
PLoS One ; 14(8): e0220805, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31415576

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Based on the association of common GLIS3 variants with various forms of diabetes and the biological role of GLIS3 in beta-cells, we sequenced GLIS3 in non-diabetic and diabetic Danes to investigate the effect of rare missense variants on glucose metabolism. METHODS: We sequenced 53 patients with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), 5,726 non-diabetic participants, 2,930 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and 206 patients with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADA) -positive diabetes. RESULTS: In total we identified 86 rare (minor allele frequency < 0.1%) missense variants. None was considered causal for the presence of MODY. Among patients with type 2 diabetes, we observed a higher prevalence of rare GLIS3 missense variants (2.5%) compared to non-diabetic individuals (1.8%) (odds ratio of 1.37 (interquartile range:1.01-1.88, p = 0.04)). A significantly increased HbA1c was found among patients with type 2 diabetes and with GADA-positive diabetes carrying rare GLIS3 variants compared to non-carriers of rare GLIS3 variants with diabetes (p = 0.02 and p = 0.004, respectively). One variant (p.I28V) was found to have a minor allele frequency of only 0.03% among patients with type 2 diabetes compared to 0.2% among non-diabetic individuals suggesting a protective function (odds ratio of 0.20 (interquartile range: 0.005-1.4, p = 0.1)), an effect which was supported by publically available data. This variant was also associated with a lower level of fasting plasma glucose among non-diabetic individuals (p = 0.046). CONCLUSION: Rare missense variants in GLIS3 associates nominally with increased level of HbA1c and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In contrast, the rare p.I28V variant associate with reduced level of fasting plasma glucose and may be protective against type 2 diabetes.

3.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 2019 Jul 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31332278

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most obese children show cardiometabolic impairments, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Yet some obese children retain a normal cardiometabolic profile. The mechanisms underlying this variability remain largely unknown. We examined whether genetic loci associated with increased insulin sensitivity and relatively higher fat storage on the hip than on the waist in adults are associated with a normal cardiometabolic profile despite higher adiposity in children. METHODS: We constructed a genetic score using variants previously linked to increased insulin sensitivity and/or decreased waist-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and examined the associations of this genetic score with adiposity and cardiometabolic impairments in a meta-analysis of six cohorts, including 7391 European children aged 3-18 years. RESULTS: The genetic score was significantly associated with increased degree of obesity (higher BMI-SDS beta = 0.009 SD/allele, SE = 0.003, P = 0.003; higher body fat mass beta = 0.009, SE = 0.004, P = 0.031), yet improved body fat distribution (lower WHRadjBMI beta = -0.014 SD/allele, SE = 0.006, P = 0.016), and favorable concentrations of blood lipids (higher HDL cholesterol: beta = 0.010 SD/allele, SE = 0.003, P = 0.002; lower triglycerides: beta = -0.011 SD/allele, SE = 0.003, P = 0.001) adjusted for age, sex, and puberty. No differences were detected between prepubertal and pubertal/postpubertal children. The genetic score predicted a normal cardiometabolic profile, defined by the presence of normal glucose and lipid concentrations, among obese children (OR = 1.07 CI 95% 1.01-1.13, P = 0.012, n = 536). CONCLUSIONS: Genetic predisposition to higher body fat yet lower cardiometabolic risk exerts its influence before puberty.

4.
Free Radic Res ; 53(6): 694-703, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31161826

RESUMO

The relationship between RNA and DNA oxidation and pharmacological treatment has not been systematically investigated in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). We aimed to investigate the association between pharmacological treatments and levels of urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation in T2D patients. Vejle Diabetes Biobank cohort data was nested into nationwide registry data. Multiple logistic regression was used to associate drug usage with risk of high (above median) RNA and DNA oxidation. Data from 2664 T2D patients (64% male, age range: 25-75) were included. Questionnaire-validated lipid lowering drug use was associated with low RNA oxidation (Odds ratio, OR 0.71, 95% CI: [0.59-0.87]). Insulin and non-specific antidiabetic drugs were associated with low DNA oxidation (insulin: OR 0.60, 95% CI [0.49-0.73]). Oral antidiabetics were associated with high DNA oxidation and RNA oxidation (OR 1.30, 95% CI [1.10-1.53] and OR 1.26, 95% CI [1.07-1.29]). Our findings indicate that diabetes-related drugs are associated with RNA and DNA oxidation and further studies are required to determine causality in T2D patients.

5.
Nat Genet ; 51(7): 1137-1148, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31253982

RESUMO

Genetic studies promise to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes (T2D). Variants associated with T2D are often located in tissue-specific enhancer clusters or super-enhancers. So far, such domains have been defined through clustering of enhancers in linear genome maps rather than in three-dimensional (3D) space. Furthermore, their target genes are often unknown. We have created promoter capture Hi-C maps in human pancreatic islets. This linked diabetes-associated enhancers to their target genes, often located hundreds of kilobases away. It also revealed >1,300 groups of islet enhancers, super-enhancers and active promoters that form 3D hubs, some of which show coordinated glucose-dependent activity. We demonstrate that genetic variation in hubs impacts insulin secretion heritability, and show that hub annotations can be used for polygenic scores that predict T2D risk driven by islet regulatory variants. Human islet 3D chromatin architecture, therefore, provides a framework for interpretation of T2D genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals.

6.
Int J Cardiol ; 291: 145-151, 2019 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31155334

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Whether the increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with breast cancer may be linked to shared genetics is unknown. Our objective was to investigate the association of genetic predisposition to breast cancer with CAD risk via 1) a polygenic risk score 2) a nationwide case-control study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied the associations of a polygenic risk score based on 91 single nucleotide polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies with the risk of CAD in a sample of patients undergoing coronary angiography. Secondary outcomes were prevalent atrial fibrillation, heart failure and breast cancer. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the associations. The risk of CAD associated with having a mother with breast cancer was analyzed with conditional logistic regression in the case-control study. Among 4985 patients undergoing coronary angiography (median age 66 years (Quartile (Q) 1-Q3 57-73), 65% male) 3724 (75%) had CAD. Increasing polygenic risk score was not associated with risks of CAD (odds ratio (OR) 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94-1.08), atrial fibrillation (OR 1.03, CI 0.94-1.12), or heart failure (OR 0.97, CI 0.90-1.05). In women, increasing polygenic risk score was associated with the risk of breast cancer (OR 1.40, CI 1.14-1.73). The risk of CAD was not significantly increased in children with vs. without mothers with breast cancer (Hazard ratio 0.89 95% CI 0.83-0.96, p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Our study found no evidence of a shared genetic predisposition of breast cancer with CAD, atrial fibrillation, or heart failure.

7.
Diabetologia ; 62(9): 1575-1580, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31154479

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Epidemiological studies have shown that diabetes is a well-established independent but modifiable risk factor for stroke. The aim of this post hoc analysis of data from the Steno-2 Study was to examine whether multiple risk factor intervention reduced the risk for stroke in individuals with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria. METHODS: In the Steno-2 Study, 160 individuals with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria were randomised to intensified or conventional multiple risk factor intervention, targeting classical cardiovascular disease risk factors for a mean of 7.8 years, and then followed for a total mean of 21.2 years. The primary endpoint in this post hoc analysis was time to first stroke event. RESULTS: During follow-up, 30 participants experienced a total of 39 strokes. Individuals randomised to conventional therapy were more likely to experience a stroke than those in the intensive-therapy group, with 29 total strokes occurring in 21 participants (26%) in the conventional-therapy group vs a total of ten strokes in nine participants (11%) in the intensive-therapy group (HR 0.31 [95% CI 0.14, 0.69]; p = 0.004). Also, the number of recurrent strokes was significantly reduced with intensive therapy. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Intensified multiple risk factor intervention in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria reduces the risk for strokes as well as the number of recurrent cerebrovascular events. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00320008.

8.
Diabetologia ; 62(9): 1601-1615, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31203377

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Here, we describe the characteristics of the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification (DIRECT) epidemiological cohorts at baseline and follow-up examinations (18, 36 and 48 months of follow-up). METHODS: From a sampling frame of 24,682 adults of European ancestry enrolled in population-based cohorts across Europe, participants at varying risk of glycaemic deterioration were identified using a risk prediction algorithm (based on age, BMI, waist circumference, use of antihypertensive medication, smoking status and parental history of type 2 diabetes) and enrolled into a prospective cohort study (n = 2127) (cohort 1, prediabetes risk). We also recruited people from clinical registries with type 2 diabetes diagnosed 6-24 months previously (n = 789) into a second cohort study (cohort 2, diabetes). Follow-up examinations took place at ~18 months (both cohorts) and at ~48 months (cohort 1) or ~36 months (cohort 2) after baseline examinations. The cohorts were studied in parallel using matched protocols across seven clinical centres in northern Europe. RESULTS: Using ADA 2011 glycaemic categories, 33% (n = 693) of cohort 1 (prediabetes risk) had normal glucose regulation and 67% (n = 1419) had impaired glucose regulation. Seventy-six per cent of participants in cohort 1 was male. Cohort 1 participants had the following characteristics (mean ± SD) at baseline: age 62 (6.2) years; BMI 27.9 (4.0) kg/m2; fasting glucose 5.7 (0.6) mmol/l; 2 h glucose 5.9 (1.6) mmol/l. At the final follow-up examination the participants' clinical characteristics were as follows: fasting glucose 6.0 (0.6) mmol/l; 2 h OGTT glucose 6.5 (2.0) mmol/l. In cohort 2 (diabetes), 66% (n = 517) were treated by lifestyle modification and 34% (n = 272) were treated with metformin plus lifestyle modification at enrolment. Fifty-eight per cent of participants in cohort 2 was male. Cohort 2 participants had the following characteristics at baseline: age 62 (8.1) years; BMI 30.5 (5.0) kg/m2; fasting glucose 7.2 (1.4) mmol/l; 2 h glucose 8.6 (2.8) mmol/l. At the final follow-up examination, the participants' clinical characteristics were as follows: fasting glucose 7.9 (2.0) mmol/l; 2 h mixed-meal tolerance test glucose 9.9 (3.4) mmol/l. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The IMI DIRECT cohorts are intensely characterised, with a wide-variety of metabolically relevant measures assessed prospectively. We anticipate that the cohorts, made available through managed access, will provide a powerful resource for biomarker discovery, multivariate aetiological analyses and reclassification of patients for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

9.
Pediatr Diabetes ; 20(5): 538-548, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31074070

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Alterations in glucose metabolism that lead to the development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease may begin already in childhood. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to generate pediatric age and sex-specific reference values for fasting concentrations of glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin, C-peptide, and homeostasis model assessment: insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in Danish/North-European white children and adolescents from a population-based cohort and to compare values from children and adolescents with overweight/obesity with this reference. METHODS: The population- and obesity clinic-based cohorts consisted of 2451 and 1935 children and adolescents between 6 and 18 years of age. Anthropometric measurements and blood samples were obtained and percentile curves were calculated. RESULTS: In the population-based cohort, glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR values increased before the expected onset of puberty (P < .05). Thereafter, all variables decreased in girls (P < .05) and HbA1c decreased in boys (P < .05). Concentrations of all measured markers of glucose metabolism were higher in the obesity clinic-based cohort than the population-based cohort (both sexes P < .001). Specifically, insulin and HOMA-IR continued to increase to 18 years in the clinic-based cohort, particularly among boys. CONCLUSIONS: Fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR change during childhood, making pediatric reference values essential for timely identification of derangements in glucose metabolism. Children and adolescents with obesity exhibit increased concentrations of these biomarkers.

10.
Diabetes Care ; 42(8): 1512-1520, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31123156

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is suggested as an independent gut microbiota-derived risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. We investigated associations between plasma TMAO concentrations and cardio-renal outcomes in a prospective study of individuals with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Plasma TMAO was measured at baseline in 1,159 individuals with type 1 diabetes (58% male, mean ± SD age 46 ± 13 years). End points were all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and renal events tracked from national registries. Associations between TMAO and end points were tested using Cox regression models. RESULTS: After 15.0 (6.7-19.3) (median [interquartile range]) years of follow-up, we recorded all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (n = 363 and 120, respectively), combined CVD (n = 406), coronary outcome (myocardial infarction and coronary intervention) (n = 163), stroke (n = 115), hospitalization for heart failure (n = 81), and end-stage renal disease (n = 144). In univariate analyses, higher TMAO concentrations were associated with all end points (P ≤ 0.005). Except for stroke and heart failure, all end points remained significantly associated with higher TMAO concentrations after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors (P ≤ 0.003). After further adjustment for baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), results became insignificant for all end points. TMAO was inversely associated with baseline eGFR (R 2 = 0.29; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In individuals with type 1 diabetes, higher concentrations of plasma TMAO were associated with mortality, CVD events, and poor renal outcome, independent of conventional risk factors. However, the association became insignificant after further adjustment for baseline eGFR. This could reflect TMAO as a renal function marker or a risk factor for micro- and macrovascular complications mediated through impaired renal function.

11.
Obes Surg ; 29(8): 2554-2561, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31001758

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The weight loss after bariatric surgery shows considerable individual variation. Twin studies of response to dietary interventions and studies of bariatric surgery patients suggest that genetic differences may play a role. This study aimed to examine the effect of three genetic risk scores on the inter-individual variation in excess body mass index loss (EBMIL) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Furthermore, we searched among known adiposity-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genetic determinants of the inter-individual variation in EBMIL. METHODS: Patients with morbid obesity underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and were genotyped (n = 577). Two genetic risk scores for weight loss after bariatric surgery and a genetic risk score for body mass index were calculated. Associations between the genetic risk scores and EBMIL were evaluated. Lasso regression was performed on 126 SNPs known to be associated with adiposity. RESULTS: The average EBMIL was 76.9% (range 21.7-149.2%). EBMIL was 81.1% (SD 20.6) and 73.9% (SD 21.7) in the high and low tertile groups of a genetic risk score for weight loss. Patients with a low genetic risk score for body mass index (in the lowest 5% percentile) had an EBMIL of 68.8% (SD 20.6, p = 0.018). Thirteen adiposity-related SNPs were identified to associate with EBMIL through lasso regression. DISCUSSION: A genetic risk score was associated with EBMIL after bariatric surgery, but may not yet be applicable to clinical practice. Patients genetically predisposed to low body mass index had lower weight loss after bariatric surgery.

12.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 4822, 2019 Mar 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30886210

RESUMO

Obesity and inactivity are major risk factors of feline diabetes mellitus (FDM) and human type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In recent years, changes in the gut microbiota have been suggested as a contributing factor to T2DM. Whether the gut microbiota (GM) composition plays a role in FDM remains unknown. The aim of the current study was firstly a cross-sectional comparison of the GM of diabetic cats, to that of lean, and of obese/overweight non-diabetic cats of a similar age. Specifically, fecal samples from 82 privately-owned cats from Denmark and Switzerland were sequenced using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metabarcoding. Secondly dietary intervention data was generated, by obtaining additional samples from a subset of cats after placing them on a high-protein diet for four weeks. The GM diversity of diabetic cats was lower than that of lean cats in the cross-sectional study, and lower compared to lean and to overweight/obese cats after diet intervention. Diabetic cats also exhibited fewer Anaerotruncus, Dialister, and unknown Ruminococcaceae than lean cats. Serum fructosamine levels correlated negatively with Prevotellaceae abundance and positively with Enterobacteriaceae abundance. In summary the intestinal microbiota of diabetic cats was characterized by decreased GM diversity and loss of butyrate producing bacterial genera.

13.
Clin Chim Acta ; 493: 123-128, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30849308

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Leptin and adiponectin are two key adipocyte secreted hormones and both are involved in several essential physiological mechanisms. Due to their central role in energy homeostasis their ratio, the leptin/adiponectin ratio, is believed to be a marker of metabolic derangement. Pediatric reference values are needed for the risk stratification of individual-measured ratios. METHODS: Blood samples were drawn from healthy, Danish schoolchildren following an overnight fast. A ratio was calculated from serum leptin and adiponectin quantifications done using commercially available ELISA Kits. RESULTS: Nine hundred eighty-three participants (583 girls) aged 6-18 years were included. Smoothed percentile curves and age-group specific percentiles were calculated. A correlation with age was demonstrated, with a gradual increase with age in girls and a negative parabolic relation, with a peak in age group 10-14, in boys. The leptin/adiponectin ratio was positively correlated to the body mass index standard deviation score for both girls and boys (p < .001). CONCLUSION: The leptin/adiponectin ratio is correlated to age and differs between the sexes in healthy children and adolescents.


Assuntos
Adiponectina/normas , Leptina/normas , Adiponectina/sangue , Adolescente , Índice de Massa Corporal , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Leptina/sangue , Masculino , Valores de Referência
14.
Diabetologia ; 62(6): 1024-1035, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30904939

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Individuals with type 2 diabetes have an altered bacterial composition of their gut microbiota compared with non-diabetic individuals. However, these alterations may be confounded by medication, notably the blood-glucose-lowering biguanide, metformin. We undertook a clinical trial in healthy and previously drug-free men with the primary aim of investigating metformin-induced compositional changes in the non-diabetic state. A secondary aim was to examine whether the pre-treatment gut microbiota was related to gastrointestinal adverse effects during metformin treatment. METHODS: Twenty-seven healthy young Danish men were included in an 18-week one-armed crossover trial consisting of a pre-intervention period, an intervention period and a post-intervention period, each period lasting 6 weeks. Inclusion criteria were men of age 18-35 years, BMI between 18.5 kg/m2 and 27.5 kg/m2, HbA1c < 39 mmol/mol (5.7%) and plasma creatinine within the normal range. No prescribed medication, including antibiotics, for 2 months prior to recruitment were allowed and no previous gastrointestinal surgery, discounting appendectomy or chronic illness requiring medical treatment. During the intervention the participants were given metformin up to 1 g twice daily. Participants were examined five times in the fasting state with blood sampling and recording of gastrointestinal symptoms. Examinations took place at Frederiksberg Hospital, Denmark before and after the pre-intervention period, halfway through and immediately after the end of intervention and after the wash-out period. Faecal samples were collected at nine evenly distributed time points, and bacterial DNA was extracted and subjected to 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing in order to evaluate gut microbiota composition. Subjective gastrointestinal symptoms were reported at each visit. RESULTS: Data from participants who completed visit 1 (n=23) are included in analyses. For the primary outcome the relative abundance of 11 bacterial genera significantly changed during the intervention but returned to baseline levels after treatment cessation. In line with previous reports, we observed a reduced abundance of Intestinibacter spp. and Clostridium spp., as well as an increased abundance of Escherichia/Shigella spp. and Bilophila wadsworthia. The relative abundance at baseline of 12 bacterial genera predicted self-reported gastrointestinal adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Intake of metformin changes the gut microbiota composition in normoglycaemic young men. The microbiota changes induced by metformin extend and validate previous reports in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Secondary analyses suggest that pre-treatment gut microbiota composition may be a determinant for development of gastrointestinal adverse effects following metformin intake. These results require further investigation and replication in larger prospective studies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrialsregister.eu 2015-000199-86 and ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02546050 FUNDING: This project was funded by Danish Diabetes Association and The Novo Nordisk Foundation.

15.
Scand J Clin Lab Invest ; 79(1-2): 129-135, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30861348

RESUMO

Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormones influence the functions of many organ systems, as well as child development and growth. Several studies have reported an association between ethnicity and thyroid hormones. This study aims to explore pediatric serum concentrations of TSH, free triiodothyronine (fT3), and free thyroxine (fT4) and their relation to age and sex and subsequently to present pediatric reference intervals from healthy Danish/North-European white children. A population-based cohort in Denmark of 2411 (1435 girls) healthy school children and adolescents aged 6.0-18.9 years were included. Fasting concentrations of serum TSH, fT3, and fT4 were determined from venous blood samples using immunologic chemiluminescent assays. Age- and sex-dependent percentiles were generated using the GAMLSS function. Median values of fT3 and fT4, but not TSH, were lower in the older age group compared with the youngest age group for both sexes (all p < .05). A significant difference for fT3 was found between the sexes for all age groups (all p < .001). fT4 was negatively correlated with body mass index standard deviation scores in boys. In conclusion, serum concentrations of thyroid hormones vary during childhood and adolescence and differ with age and sex.


Assuntos
Jejum/sangue , Tireotropina/sangue , Tiroxina/sangue , Tri-Iodotironina/sangue , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Índice de Massa Corporal , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Europa (Continente) , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Feminino , Voluntários Saudáveis , Humanos , Imunoensaio , Luminescência , Masculino , Valores de Referência , Fatores Sexuais , Adulto Jovem
16.
PLoS One ; 14(2): e0211690, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30726294

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The relation between burden of risk factors, familial coronary artery disease (CAD), and known genetic variants underlying CAD and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels is not well-explored in clinical samples. We aimed to investigate the association of these measures with age at onset of CAD requiring revascularizations in a clinical sample of patients undergoing first-time coronary angiography. METHODS: 1599 individuals (mean age 64 years [min-max 29-96 years], 28% women) were genotyped (from blood drawn as part of usual clinical care) in the Copenhagen area (2010-2014). The burden of common genetic variants was measured as aggregated genetic risk scores (GRS) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) discovered in genome-wide association studies. RESULTS: Self-reported familial CAD (prevalent in 41% of the sample) was associated with -3.2 years (95% confidence interval -4.5, -2.2, p<0.0001) earlier need of revascularization in sex-adjusted models. Patients with and without familial CAD had similar mean values of CAD-GRS (unweighted scores 68.4 vs. 68.0, p = 0.10, weighted scores 67.7 vs. 67.5, p = 0.49) and LDL-C-GRS (unweighted scores 58.5 vs. 58.3, p = 0.34, weighted scores 63.3 vs. 61.1, p = 0.41). The correlation between the CAD-GRS and LDL-C-GRS was low (r = 0.14, p<0.001). In multivariable adjusted regression models, each 1 standard deviation higher values of LDL-C-GRS and CAD-GRS were associated with -0.70 years (95% confidence interval -1.25, -0.14, p = 0.014) and -0.51 years (-1.07, 0.04, p = 0.07) earlier need for revascularization, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Young individuals presenting with CAD requiring surgical interventions had a higher genetic burden of SNPs relating to LDL-C and CAD (although the latter was statistically non-significant), compared with older individuals. However, the absolute difference was modest, suggesting that genetic screening can currently not be used as an effective prediction tool of when in life a person will develop CAD. Whether undiscovered genetic variants can still explain a "missing heritability" in early-onset CAD warrants more research.

17.
Diab Vasc Dis Res ; 16(1): 13-21, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30789093

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to explore the contribution of genetically driven cardiometabolic risk factors for development of carotid arterial thickening in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: In total, 12 genetic risk scores for blood pressure, blood lipids and glycaemic traits were constructed. The genetic risk scores were tested for association with carotid intima-media thickness and plaques in patients with type 2 diabetes ( n = 401) and in non-diabetic individuals ( n = 648) and for association with glucose levels in two population-based cohorts ( n = 1328 and n = 6161). RESULTS: In patients with type 2 diabetes, the genetic risk scores for pulse pressure were positively associated with plaque formation ( ß = 0.036 ± 0.01 standard deviation/allele, p = 0.003). The genetic risk score for diastolic blood pressure was negatively associated with carotid intima-media thickness ( ß = -0.037 ± 0.01 standard deviation/allele, p = 0.005), although not significant after correction for multiple testing ( p < 0.0042). In a meta-analysis of individuals with and without type 2 diabetes, the high-density lipoprotein genetic risk scores showed a trend towards an inverse association with carotid intima-media thickness and plaques, while the low-density lipoprotein genetic risk scores showed a trend towards a positive association with plaque formation but did reach the statistical threshold. CONCLUSION: Genetic loci for pulse pressure are associated with plaque formation among patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting an underlying genetic contribution to arterial stiffening and atherosclerosis.


Assuntos
Pressão Sanguínea/genética , Doenças das Artérias Carótidas/genética , Espessura Intima-Media Carotídea , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Hipertensão/genética , Placa Aterosclerótica , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Característica Quantitativa Herdável , Idoso , Doenças das Artérias Carótidas/diagnóstico por imagem , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/diagnóstico , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Hipertensão/diagnóstico , Hipertensão/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fenótipo , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco
18.
PLoS One ; 14(1): e0210114, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30629617

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: PPP1R3B has been suggested as a candidate gene for monogenic forms of diabetes as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D) due to its association with glycaemic trait and its biological role in glycogen synthesis. OBJECTIVES: To study if rare missense variants in PPP1R3B increase the risk of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY), T2D or affect measures of glucose metabolism. METHOD: Targeted resequencing of PPP1R3B was performed in 8,710 samples; MODY patients with unknown etiology (n = 54), newly diagnosed patients with T2D (n = 2,930) and population-based control individuals (n = 5,726, of whom n = 4,569 had normal glucose tolerance). All population-based sampled individuals were examined using an oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: Among n = 396 carriers, we identified twenty-three PPP1R3B missense mutations, none of which segregated with MODY. The burden of likely deleterious PPP1R3B variants was significantly increased with a total of 17 carriers among patients with T2D (0.58% (95% CI: 0.36-0.93)) compared to 18 carriers among non-diabetic individuals (0.31% (95% CI: 0.20-0.49)), resulting in an increased risk of T2D (OR (95% CI) = 2.57 (1.14-5.79), p = 0.02 (age and sex adjusted)). Furthermore, carriers with diabetes had less abdominal fat and a higher serum concentration of LDL-cholesterol compared to patients with T2D without rare missense PPP1R3B variants. In addition, non-diabetic carriers had a higher birth weight compared to non-carriers. CONCLUSION: Rare missense PPP1R3B variants may predispose to T2D.

19.
Diabetes ; 68(3): 502-514, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30626608

RESUMO

The ADAMTS9 rs4607103 C allele is one of the few gene variants proposed to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes through an impairment of insulin sensitivity. We show that the variant is associated with increased expression of the secreted ADAMTS9 and decreased insulin sensitivity and signaling in human skeletal muscle. In line with this, mice lacking Adamts9 selectively in skeletal muscle have improved insulin sensitivity. The molecular link between ADAMTS9 and insulin signaling was characterized further in a model where ADAMTS9 was overexpressed in skeletal muscle. This selective overexpression resulted in decreased insulin signaling presumably mediated through alterations of the integrin ß1 signaling pathway and disruption of the intracellular cytoskeletal organization. Furthermore, this led to impaired mitochondrial function in mouse muscle-an observation found to be of translational character because humans carrying the ADAMTS9 risk allele have decreased expression of mitochondrial markers. Finally, we found that the link between ADAMTS9 overexpression and impaired insulin signaling could be due to accumulation of harmful lipid intermediates. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and point to inhibition of ADAMTS9 as a potential novel mode of treating insulin resistance.


Assuntos
Proteína ADAMTS9/metabolismo , Matriz Extracelular/metabolismo , Insulina/metabolismo , Músculo Esquelético/metabolismo , Proteína ADAMTS9/genética , Alelos , Animais , Humanos , Imuno-Histoquímica , Resistência à Insulina/genética , Resistência à Insulina/fisiologia , Integrina beta1/metabolismo , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Camundongos Knockout
20.
Diabetologia ; 62(2): 292-305, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30547231

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Identifying rare coding variants associated with albuminuria may open new avenues for preventing chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, which are highly prevalent in individuals with diabetes. Efforts to identify genetic susceptibility variants for albuminuria have so far been limited, with the majority of studies focusing on common variants. METHODS: We performed an exome-wide association study to identify coding variants in a two-stage (discovery and replication) approach. Data from 33,985 individuals of European ancestry (15,872 with and 18,113 without diabetes) and 2605 Greenlanders were included. RESULTS: We identified a rare (minor allele frequency [MAF]: 0.8%) missense (A1690V) variant in CUBN (rs141640975, ß = 0.27, p = 1.3 × 10-11) associated with albuminuria as a continuous measure in the combined European meta-analysis. The presence of each rare allele of the variant was associated with a 6.4% increase in albuminuria. The rare CUBN variant had an effect that was three times stronger in individuals with type 2 diabetes compared with those without (pinteraction = 7.0 × 10-4, ß with diabetes = 0.69, ß without diabetes = 0.20) in the discovery meta-analysis. Gene-aggregate tests based on rare and common variants identified three additional genes associated with albuminuria (HES1, CDC73 and GRM5) after multiple testing correction (pBonferroni < 2.7 × 10-6). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The current study identifies a rare coding variant in the CUBN locus and other potential genes associated with albuminuria in individuals with and without diabetes. These genes have been implicated in renal and cardiovascular dysfunction. The findings provide new insights into the genetic architecture of albuminuria and highlight target genes and pathways for the prevention of diabetes-related kidney disease.


Assuntos
Albuminúria/genética , Diabetes Mellitus/genética , Nefropatias Diabéticas/genética , Receptores de Superfície Celular/genética , Alelos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Frequência do Gene , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Humanos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
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