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1.
Environ Int ; 146: 106249, 2021 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33197787

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: Ambient air pollution has been associated with lung cancer, but the shape of the exposure-response function - especially at low exposure levels - is not well described. The aim of this study was to address the relationship between long-term low-level air pollution exposure and lung cancer incidence. METHODS: The "Effects of Low-level Air Pollution: a Study in Europe" (ELAPSE) collaboration pools seven cohorts from across Europe. We developed hybrid models combining air pollution monitoring, land use data, satellite observations, and dispersion model estimates for nitrogen dioxide (NO2), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), and ozone (O3) to assign exposure to cohort participants' residential addresses in 100 m by 100 m grids. We applied stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for potential confounders (age, sex, calendar year, marital status, smoking, body mass index, employment status, and neighborhood-level socio-economic status). We fitted linear models, linear models in subsets, Shape-Constrained Health Impact Functions (SCHIF), and natural cubic spline models to assess the shape of the association between air pollution and lung cancer at concentrations below existing standards and guidelines. RESULTS: The analyses included 307,550 cohort participants. During a mean follow-up of 18.1 years, 3956 incident lung cancer cases occurred. Median (Q1, Q3) annual (2010) exposure levels of NO2, PM2.5, BC and O3 (warm season) were 24.2 µg/m3 (19.5, 29.7), 15.4 µg/m3 (12.8, 17.3), 1.6 10-5m-1 (1.3, 1.8), and 86.6 µg/m3 (78.5, 92.9), respectively. We observed a higher risk for lung cancer with higher exposure to PM2.5 (HR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.23 per 5 µg/m3). This association was robust to adjustment for other pollutants. The SCHIF, spline and subset analyses suggested a linear or supra-linear association with no evidence of a threshold. In subset analyses, risk estimates were clearly elevated for the subset of subjects with exposure below the EU limit value of 25 µg/m3. We did not observe associations between NO2, BC or O3 and lung cancer incidence. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term ambient PM2.5 exposure is associated with lung cancer incidence even at concentrations below current EU limit values and possibly WHO Air Quality Guidelines.


Assuntos
Poluentes Atmosféricos , Poluição do Ar , Neoplasias Pulmonares , Poluentes Atmosféricos/análise , Poluição do Ar/efeitos adversos , Poluição do Ar/análise , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/induzido quimicamente , Neoplasias Pulmonares/epidemiologia , Material Particulado/análise
2.
Environ Res ; 193: 110568, 2021 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33278469

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: An association between long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and lung cancer has been established in previous studies. PM2.5 is a complex mixture of chemical components from various sources and little is known about whether certain components contribute specifically to the associated lung cancer risk. The present study builds on recent findings from the "Effects of Low-level Air Pollution: A Study in Europe" (ELAPSE) collaboration and addresses the potential association between specific elemental components of PM2.5 and lung cancer incidence. METHODS: We pooled seven cohorts from across Europe and assigned exposure estimates for eight components of PM2.5 representing non-tail pipe emissions (copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn)), long-range transport (sulfur (S)), oil burning/industry emissions (nickel (Ni), vanadium (V)), crustal material (silicon (Si)), and biomass burning (potassium (K)) to cohort participants' baseline residential address based on 100 m by 100 m grids from newly developed hybrid models combining air pollution monitoring, land use data, satellite observations, and dispersion model estimates. We applied stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for potential confounders (age, sex, calendar year, marital status, smoking, body mass index, employment status, and neighborhood-level socio-economic status). RESULTS: The pooled study population comprised 306,550 individuals with 3916 incident lung cancer events during 5,541,672 person-years of follow-up. We observed a positive association between exposure to all eight components and lung cancer incidence, with adjusted HRs of 1.10 (95% CI 1.05, 1.16) per 50 ng/m3 PM2.5 K, 1.09 (95% CI 1.02, 1.15) per 1 ng/m3 PM2.5 Ni, 1.22 (95% CI 1.11, 1.35) per 200 ng/m3 PM2.5 S, and 1.07 (95% CI 1.02, 1.12) per 200 ng/m3 PM2.5 V. Effect estimates were largely unaffected by adjustment for nitrogen dioxide (NO2). After adjustment for PM2.5 mass, effect estimates of K, Ni, S, and V were slightly attenuated, whereas effect estimates of Cu, Si, Fe, and Zn became null or negative. CONCLUSIONS: Our results point towards an increased risk of lung cancer in connection with sources of combustion particles from oil and biomass burning and secondary inorganic aerosols rather than non-exhaust traffic emissions. Specific limit values or guidelines targeting these specific PM2.5 components may prove helpful in future lung cancer prevention strategies.


Assuntos
Poluentes Atmosféricos , Poluição do Ar , Neoplasias Pulmonares , Poluentes Atmosféricos/análise , Poluição do Ar/efeitos adversos , Poluição do Ar/análise , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Neoplasias Pulmonares/induzido quimicamente , Neoplasias Pulmonares/epidemiologia , Material Particulado/análise
3.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0242814, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33264342

RESUMO

Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with adverse cardio-metabolic features. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high-sensitivity troponins T and I (hs-cTnT and hs-cTnI) are well-characterized cardiac markers and provide prognostic information. The objective was to assess the association of cardiac biomarker concentrations with long-term mortality in subjects with OA. In a cohort of 679 OA subjects, undergoing hip or knee replacement during 1995/1996, cardiac biomarkers were measured and subjects were followed over 20 years. During a median follow-up of 18.4 years, 332 (48.9%) subjects died. Median of hs-cTnT, hs-cTnI, and NT-proBNP at baseline was 3.2 ng/L, 3.9 ng/L, and 96.8 ng/L. The top quartile of NT-proBNP was associated with increased risk of mortality (Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-2.73) after adjustment for covariates including troponins (hs-cTnT HR 1.30 (95% CI 0.90-1.89), hs-cTnI HR 1.32 (95% CI 0.87-2.00) for top category). When biomarker associations were evaluated as continuous variables, only NT-proBNP (HR per log-unit increment 1.34, 95% CI 1.16-1.54) and hs-cTnI (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.11-1.72) showed robust results. Elevated cardiac biomarker concentrations predicted an increased risk of long-term mortality and strongest for NT-proBNP and hs-cTnI. These results might help to identify subjects at risk and target preventive efforts early.


Assuntos
Miocárdio/metabolismo , Osteoartrite/metabolismo , Osteoartrite/mortalidade , Idoso , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Fatores de Tempo
4.
J Epidemiol ; 2020 Oct 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33012774

RESUMO

Background Obesity and its health consequences will dominate health care systems in many countries during the next decades. However, the body mass index (BMI) optimum in relation to all-cause mortality is still a matter of debate.Material and Methods Data of the Vorarlberg Health Monitoring & Prevention Program (VHM&PP, 1985-2005) and data provided by the Main Association of Austrian Social Security Institutions (MAASSI, 2005-2015) were analyzed. Information was available on age, sex, smoking status, measured height and weight, and mortality. Generalized additive models were used to model mortality as a function of BMI, calendar time, age, and follow-up.Results In MAASSI (N=282,216, 46.0% men), men and women were on average 2.7 years older than in VHM&PP (N=185,361, 46.1% men). Average BMI was slightly higher in men (26.1 vs. 25.7 kg/m2) but not in women (24.6 vs. 24.7 kg/m2).We found an interactive effect of age and follow-up on the BMI optimum. Over age 35 in men and 55 years in women, the BMI optimum decreased with length of follow-up. While keeping covariates fixed, BMI optimum increased slightly between 1985 and 2015 in men and women, 24.9 (95%-CI, 23.9-25.9) to 26.4 (25.3-27.3), and 22.4 (21.7-23.1) to 23.3 (22.6-24.5) kg/m2, respectively.Conclusion Age and length of follow-up have a pronounced effect on the BMI associated with the lowest all-cause mortality. After controlling for age and length of follow-up, the BMI optimum increased slightly over 30 years in this large study sample.

5.
J Clin Med ; 9(10)2020 Sep 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32993054

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) are at increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) and all-cause mortality. Whether biomarkers improve outcome prediction in these patients remains to be elucidated. We investigated the association between growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15), a novel stress-responsive cytokine, and long-term all-cause mortality among OA patients. METHODS: Within the Ulm Osteoarthritis Study, GDF-15 has been measured in the serum of 636 subjects, who underwent hip or knee arthroplasty between 1995 and 1996 (median age 65 years). RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 19.7 years, a total of 402 deaths occurred. GDF-15 was inversely associated with walking distance. Compared to the bottom quartile (Q), subjects within the top quartile of GDF-15 demonstrated a 2.69-fold increased risk of dying (hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) 2.69 (1.82-3.96) adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoking status, localization of OA, diabetes, maximum walking distance, total cholesterol, and cystatin C. Further adjustment for NT-proBNP, troponin I, and hs-C-reactive protein did not change the results appreciably (HR (95%CI) 1.56 (1.07-2.28); 1.75 (1.21-2.55); 2.32 (1.55-3.47) for Q2, Q3, and Q4 respectively, p for trend < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In subjects with OA, GDF-15 represents a potent predictor of decreased survival over >20 years, independently of conventional CV risk factors, renal, cardiac, and inflammatory biomarkers as well as walking disability, previously associated with increased mortality and lower extremity OA.

6.
PLoS One ; 15(3): e0230648, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32203564

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate variation of care dependency after hip fracture across German regions based on the assessment by the German statutory long-term care insurance. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Patient-level statutory health and long-term care insurance claims data from 2009-2011 and official statistical data from Germany. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a retrospective cohort study. Investigated multinomial outcome categories were increase in care dependency (new onset or a higher care dependency than pre-fracture), no change as reference and death as competing risk in the quarterly period following hip fracture (follow-up 3 months). Regional variation was operationalized with the variance of regional-level random intercepts based on generalized linear mixed models. We adjusted for patient and regional characteristics. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study included 122,887 hip fracture patients in 95 German postal code regions. Crude outcomes were 30.87% increase in care dependency and 14.35% death. Results indicated modest variation on regional level. Male sex, increasing age, increasing comorbidity, pertrochanteric and subtrochanteric fracture site compared to femoral neck, time from hospital admission to surgery of 3 or more days, as well as increasing inpatient length of stay, non-participation in rehabilitation and regions with lower hospital density were positively associated with an increase in care dependency. CONCLUSIONS: Several characteristics on patient and regional level associated with the outcome were identified. Variation in the increase in care dependency after hip fracture appeared to be attributable primarily to patient characteristics. Variation on regional level was only modest.


Assuntos
Atenção à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Fraturas do Quadril/economia , Seguro Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Masculino , Análise Multivariada , Estudos Retrospectivos
7.
Bone Rep ; 12: 100244, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31970265

RESUMO

To explore the association of incident hip fractures with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its single components, we designed a prospective cohort study of hip fracture incidence among 117,053 participants of a population-based health surveillance program in Vorarlberg, the westernmost Austrian province. Incident hip fractures were recorded between 5 and 10 years after inclusion at baseline from 2003 to 2009. Applying Cox proportional hazard models for each MetS component and for a composite z-score for MetS, hazards for fracture were estimated in quintiles, as continuous z-score variables, and as pathological cut off values. Mean age was 50.1 ± 15.6 years at baseline, 5-10 years after which 947 incident hip fractures occurred. An association of a higher composite MetS score with decreased hip fracture risk was observed in women (HR 0.80, 95%-CI 0.88-0.96, p < 0.01) which disappeared upon adjustment for BMI. BMI was inversely associated with hip fracture risk in women and men (HR for the highest compared with the lowest quintile: 0.83 (95%-CI: 0.63-1.10, p trend < 0.05) and 0.55 (95%-CI: 0.38-0.79, p trend < 0.001), respectively). Only in women, hip fracture risk was reduced at high cholesterol levels (HR for the highest relative to the lowest quintile: 0.64, 95%-CI: 0.48-0.84, p trend < 0.05) and in hypercholesterolemic patients (HR 0.82, 95%-CI: 0.67-0.99, p < 0.05), but elevated in hyperglycemic patients (HR 1.33, 95%-CI: 1.05-1.70, p < 0.05). Hypertriglyceridemia was associated with increased male hip fracture risk (HR 1.33, 95%-CI: 1.03-1.72, p < 0.05). The inverse association between the MetS and hip fracture risk is mainly driven by one single component, namely BMI.

9.
Eur Rev Aging Phys Act ; 16: 18, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31673299

RESUMO

Background: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of day of the week and wearing a device (reactivity) on objectively measured physical activity (PA) in older people. Methods: Walking duration as a measure for PA was recorded from 1333 German community-dwelling older people (≥65 years, 43.8% women) over 5 days using accelerometers (activPAL). Least-square means of PA with 95%-confidence intervals (95%-CI) from multi-level analysis were calculated for each day of the week and each measurement day (days after sensor attachment). Results: Walking duration on Sundays was significantly lower compared to working days (Sunday vs. Monday-Friday: - 12.8 min (95%-CI: - 14.7; - 10.9)). No statistically significant difference compared to working days was present for Saturdays. The linear slope for measurement day and walking duration was marginal and not statistically significant. Conclusions: Studies using PA sensors in older people should assess Sundays and working days to adequately determine the activity level of the participants.

10.
PLoS One ; 13(6): e0197830, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29897925

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity is suggested to underlie development of other metabolic aberrations, but longitudinal relationships between metabolic factors at various ages has not been studied in detail. METHODS: Data from 27,379 men and 32,275 women with in total 122,940 health examinations in the Västerbotten Intervention Project, Sweden and the Vorarlberg Health Monitoring and Prevention Programme, Austria were used to investigate body mass index (BMI), mid-blood pressure, and fasting levels of glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol at baseline in relation to 10-year changes of these factors and weight. We included paired examinations performed 10±2 years apart and used them for longitudinal analysis with linear regression of changes between the ages 30 and 40, 40 and 50, or 50 and 60 years. RESULTS: Higher levels of BMI were associated with increases in glucose and mid-blood pressure as well as triglycerides levels, and, to a lesser extent, decreases in cholesterol levels. For instance, per 5 kg/m2 higher BMI at age 40, glucose at age 50 increased by 0.24 mmol/l (95%CI: 0.22-0.26) and mid-blood pressure increased by 1.54 mm Hg (95%CI: 1.35-1.74). The strongest association observed was between BMI at age 30 and mid-blood pressure, which was 2.12 mm Hg (95% CI: 1.79-2.45) increase over ten years per 5 kg/m2 higher BMI level. This association was observed at an age when blood pressure levels on average remained stable. Other associations than those with BMI at baseline were much weaker. However, triglyceride levels were associated with future glucose changes among individuals with elevated BMI, particularly in the two older age groups. CONCLUSION: BMI was most indicative of long-term changes in metabolic factors, and the strongest impact was observed for increases in blood pressure between 30 and 40 years of age. Our study supports that lifestyle interventions preventing metabolic aberrations should focus on avoiding weight increases.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Dislipidemias/epidemiologia , Hiperglicemia/epidemiologia , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Adulto , Áustria/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Suécia/epidemiologia
11.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 32(10): 901-908, 2017 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28975435

RESUMO

Weight loss appears as a strong predictor of survival of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, yet no data are currently available to describe the life course history of pre-diagnostic body mass index (BMI) in these patients. 393 ALS cases (mean age: 65.8 years, 57.3% men) and 791 controls matched by age and sex from a population-based case-control study of the ALS Registry Swabia were analyzed. Differences of BMI change in cases and controls over time were modeled using a multilevel additive model. In addition, survival in ALS cases by BMI change was modeled using an accelerated failure time model adjusted for prognostic factors. In ALS cases, BMI was consistently higher than in controls in the 20-70 years before the interview. Conditional logistic regression revealed an odds ratio of 1.05 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.11, p = 0.041) per 1 kg/m2 higher BMI 35-45 years before interview. However, a sharp decrease was evident in the BMI of ALS cases about 10 years before disease onset. Moreover, weight loss was strongly associated with shorter survival in ALS patients. Illustrating this, patients with stable weight showed a median survival time of 22.1 (95%-CI 19.2-25.0) months, as compared to 13.4 (95%-CI 10.5-16.3) months for patients with weight loss of 2.5 kg/m2 over the last 3 months before the interview. Thus, alterations in body weight are present in ALS patients already decades before clinical manifestation of ALS, while weight loss precedes motor symptoms of several years and is associated with poor prognosis.


Assuntos
Esclerose Amiotrófica Lateral/diagnóstico , Esclerose Amiotrófica Lateral/epidemiologia , Índice de Massa Corporal , Perda de Peso , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Estudos Prospectivos , Sistema de Registros
12.
J Epidemiol ; 27(6): 294-297, 2017 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28256294

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To date, the amount of heterogeneity among studies of the body mass index-mortality association attributable to differences in the age distribution and length of follow-up has not been quantified. Therefore, we wanted to quantify the amount of heterogeneity attributable to age and follow-up in results of studies on the body mass index-mortality relation. METHODS: We used optima of the body mass index mortality association reported for 30 populations and performed meta-regression to estimate the amount of heterogeneity attributable to sex, ethnicity, mean age at baseline, percentage smokers, and length of follow-up. RESULTS: Ethnicity as single factor accounted for 36% (95% CI, 11-56%) of heterogeneity. Mean age and length of follow-up had an interactive effect and together accounted for 56% (95% CI, 24-74%) of the remaining heterogeneity. Sex did not significantly contribute to the heterogeneity, after controlling for ethnicity, age, and length of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: A considerable amount of heterogeneity in studies of the body mass index-mortality association is attributable to ethnicity, age, and length of follow-up.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Mortalidade , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mortalidade/etnologia , Fatores de Tempo
13.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 18(3): 221-226, 2017 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27776984

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Persons with osteoporotic fracture history are subject to an increased risk for subsequent fractures and mortality. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the impact of a previous osteoporotic low-impact (fragility) index fracture (eg, forearm, lower leg) on mortality of a subsequent femoral fracture. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS/MEASUREMENTS: Claims data of a German health insurance agency including >1.2 million insurants aged 65 years or older and observed between 2004 and 2009. METHODS: A multistate model was developed handling index fractures and care need as time-dependent exposures, while age was chosen as the underlying time scale. Excess risks were expressed as differences in cause-specific hazards. Nelson-Aalen estimates were used for their nonparametric estimation. Time-simultaneous statistical inference was based on confidence bands provided by wild bootstrap resampling. RESULTS: Excess femoral fracture risk increased with progressive age and was highest in persons with care need. It was observed starting from an age of 79 years in women and 85 years in men onward. A prior index fracture increased mortality after a femoral fracture by increasing femoral fracture risk, while leaving the hazard of death after a subsequent femoral fracture unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated that increased mortality of a subsequent femoral fracture is not triggered by an intrinsically increased mortality hazard but an increased femoral fracture incidence.


Assuntos
Fraturas do Fêmur/etiologia , Fraturas do Fêmur/mortalidade , Ferimentos e Lesões , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Medição de Risco/estatística & dados numéricos
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 95(49): e5608, 2016 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27930587

RESUMO

There are only few studies on latent trajectories of body mass index (BMI) and their association with diabetes incidence and mortality in adults.We used data of the Vorarlberg Health Monitoring & Prevention Program and included individuals (N=24,875) with BMI measurements over a 12-year period. Trajectory classes were identified using growth mixture modeling for predefined age groups (<50, 50-65, >65 years of age) and men, women separately. Poisson models were applied to estimate incidence and prevalence of diabetes for each trajectory class. Relative all-cause mortality and diabetes-related mortality was estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression.We identified 4 trajectory classes for the age groups <50 years and 50 to 65 years, and 3 for age groups >65 years. For all age groups, a stable BMI trajectory class was the largest, with about 90% of men and 70% to 80% of women. For the low stable BMI classes, the corresponding fasting glucose levels were the lowest. The highest diabetes prevalences were observed for decreasing trajectories. During subsequent follow-up of mean 8.1 (SD 2.0) years, 2741 individuals died. For men <50 years, highest mortality was observed for steady weight gainers. For all other age-sex groups, mortality was the highest for decreasing trajectories.We found considerably heterogeneity in BMI trajectories by sex and age. Stable weight, however, was the largest class over all age and sex groups, and was associated with the lowest diabetes incidence and mortality suggesting that maintaining weight at a moderate level is an important public health goal.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Diabetes Mellitus/etiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/mortalidade , Obesidade/complicações , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Áustria , Peso Corporal , Estudos de Coortes , Diabetes Mellitus/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Prevalência , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Retrospectivos , Medição de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Análise de Sobrevida
15.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 31(6): 635-8, 2016 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26994764

RESUMO

Knowledge of epidemiologic research topics as well as trends is useful for scientific societies, researchers and funding agencies. In recent years researchers recognized the usefulness of keyword network analysis for visualizing and analyzing scientific research topics. Therefore, we applied keyword network analysis to present an overview of current epidemiologic research topics in Germany. Accepted submissions to the 9th annual congress of the German Society for Epidemiology (DGEpi) in 2014 were used as data source. Submitters had to choose one of 19 subject areas, and were ask to provide a title, structured abstract, names of authors along with their affiliations, and a list of freely selectable keywords. Keywords had been provided for 262 (82 %) submissions, 1030 keywords in total. Overall the most common keywords were: "migration" (18 times), "prevention" (15 times), followed by "children", "cohort study", "physical activity", and "secondary data analysis" (11 times each). Some keywords showed a certain concentration under one specific subject area, e.g. "migration" with 8 of 18 in social epidemiology or "breast cancer" with 4 of 7 in cancer epidemiology. While others like "physical activity" were equally distributed over multiple subject areas (cardiovascular & metabolic diseases, ageing, methods, paediatrics, prevention & health service research). This keyword network analysis demonstrated the high diversity of epidemiologic research topics with a large number of distinct keywords as presented at the annual conference of the DGEpi.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento , Congressos como Assunto , Bases de Dados Factuais , Métodos Epidemiológicos , Estudos Epidemiológicos , Alemanha , Humanos , Masculino
16.
Am J Hum Biol ; 26(5): 690-6, 2014.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24962157

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To quantify changes in height, weight and their compound effect on the body mass index (BMI) in a large cohort of Central-European men and women. METHODS: The Vorarlberg health monitoring and prevention program (VHM&PP) is a population-based risk factor surveillance program in Vorarlberg. Data of health examinations during January 1985 to June 2005 were available including 714,181 height and weight measurements in 185,192 persons (53.9% women). We estimated yearly percentage change of anthropometric parameters over the age range from 20 to 85 years within intervals of 5 years. RESULTS: We found that weight increased until the age of 70 years (from the age of 20 years: +24.8% in men and +27.6% in women), with the highest increase in men aged 20-25 years (1.07% per year). Height was shown to decrease starting from the age group 45-50 years. This decrease accelerated with age, and was more pronounced in women than in men. CONCLUSIONS: Weight is strongly related to aging. In older individuals height loss affects BMI and masks weight loss to some degree.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento , Estatura , Índice de Massa Corporal , Peso Corporal , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Áustria , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ganho de Peso , Perda de Peso , Adulto Jovem
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