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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 127, 2022 Jan 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34996992

RESUMO

Identification of new genetic markers may improve the prediction of colorectal cancer prognosis. Our objective was to examine genome-wide associations of germline genetic variants with disease-specific survival in an analysis of 16,964 cases of colorectal cancer. We analyzed genotype and colorectal cancer-specific survival data from a consortium of 15 studies. Approximately 7.5 million SNPs were examined under the log-additive model using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for clinical factors and principal components. Additionally, we ran secondary analyses stratifying by tumor site and disease stage. We used a genome-wide p-value threshold of 5 × 10-8 to assess statistical significance. No variants were statistically significantly associated with disease-specific survival in the full case analysis or in the stage-stratified analyses. Three SNPs were statistically significantly associated with disease-specific survival for cases with tumors located in the distal colon (rs698022, HR = 1.48, CI 1.30-1.69, p = 8.47 × 10-9) and the proximal colon (rs189655236, HR = 2.14, 95% CI 1.65-2.77, p = 9.19 × 10-9 and rs144717887, HR = 2.01, 95% CI 1.57-2.58, p = 3.14 × 10-8), whereas no associations were detected for rectal tumors. Findings from this large genome-wide association study highlight the potential for anatomical-site-stratified genome-wide studies to identify germline genetic risk variants associated with colorectal cancer-specific survival. Larger sample sizes and further replication efforts are needed to more fully interpret these findings.

2.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2022 Jan 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35026030

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) among individuals aged less than 50 years has been increasing. As screening guidelines lower the recommended age of screening initiation, concerns including the burden on screening capacity and costs have been recognized, suggesting that an individualized approach may be warranted. We developed risk prediction models for early-onset CRC that incorporate an environmental risk score (ERS), including 16 lifestyle and environmental factors, and a polygenic risk score (PRS), of 141 variants. METHODS: Relying on risk score weights for ERS and PRS derived from studies of CRC at all ages, we evaluated risks for early-onset CRC in 3,486 cases and 3,890 controls aged less than 50 years. Relative and absolute risks for early-onset CRC were assessed according to values of the ERS and PRS. The discriminatory performance of these scores was estimated using the covariate-adjusted area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. RESULTS: Increasing values of ERS and PRS were associated with increasing relative risks for early-onset CRC (odds ratio per standard deviation of ERS = 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.20; odds ratio per standard deviation of PRS = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.51, 1.68), both contributing to case-control discrimination (area under the curve = 0.631, 95% CI = 0.615, 0.647). Based on absolute risks, we can expect 26 excess cases per 10,000 men and 21 per 10,000 women, among those scoring at the 90th percentile for both risk scores. CONCLUSIONS: Personal risk scores have the potential to identify individuals at differential relative and absolute risk for early-onset CRC. Improved discrimination may aid in targeted CRC screening of younger, high-risk individuals, potentially improving outcomes.

3.
Int J Cancer ; 2021 Dec 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34888857

RESUMO

Elevated blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been linked to colorectal cancer (CRC) survival. We evaluated genetic variants associated with CRP levels and their interactions with sex and lifestyle factors in association with CRC-specific mortality. This study included 16,142 CRC cases from the International Survival Analysis in Colorectal Cancer Consortium. We identified 618 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CRP levels from the NHGRI-EBI GWAS Catalog. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between SNPs and CRC-specific mortality adjusting for age, sex, genotyping platform/study, and principal components. We investigated their interactions with sex and lifestyle factors using likelihood ratio tests. Of 5,472 (33.9%) deaths accrued over up to 10 years of follow-up, 3,547 (64.8%) were due to CRC. No variants were associated with CRC-specific mortality after multiple comparison correction. We observed strong evidence of interaction between variant rs1933736 at FRK gene and sex in relation to CRC-specific mortality (corrected Pinteraction = 0.0004); women had higher CRC-specific mortality associated with the minor allele (HR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.19) whereas an inverse association was observed for men (HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.82 to 0.94). There was no evidence of interactions between CRP-associated SNPs and alcohol, obesity or smoking. Our study observed a significant interaction between sex and a CRP-associated variant in relation to CRC-specific mortality. Future replication of this association and functional annotation of the variant are needed.

4.
Planta Med ; 2021 Dec 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34953469

RESUMO

Rumex acetosa significantly inhibits the adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) to eukaryotic host cells in vitro. The objective of this randomized placebo-controlled pilot-trial was to analyze effects of a mouth rinse containing 0.8 % (w/w) of a quantified proanthocyanidin-enriched extract from Rumex acetosa (RA1) on microbiological, clinical, and cytological parameters in systemically healthy individuals without history of periodontitis, harboring P.g. intraorally. 35 subjects received a supragingival debridement (SD) followed by mouth rinsing (3 times daily) with either RA1 mouth rinse solution (test) or placebo (control) for 7 days as adjunct to routine oral hygiene. Supragingival biofilm samples were taken at screening visit, baseline (BL), 2, 4, 7 and 14 days after SD. P.g. and 11 other oral microorganisms were detected and quantified by rtPCR. Changes in the oral microbiota composition of one test and one control subject were assessed via high throughput 16S rRNS gene amplicon sequencing. Approximal Plaque Index (API) and the modified Sulcular Bleeding Index (SBI) were assessed at BL, 7- and 14-days following SD. Brush biopsies were taken at BL and 14 d following SD. Intergroup comparisons revealed no significant microbiological, cytological, and clinical differences at any timepoint. However, a significant reduction in SBI at day 14 (p=0.003) and API at day 7 (p=0.02) and day 14 (p=0.009) was found in the test group by intragroup comparison. No severe adverse events were observed. The results indicate that RA1 mouth rinse is safe but does not seem to inhibit colonization of P.g. or improve periodontal health following SD.

5.
Eur J Cancer ; 159: 247-258, 2021 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34794066

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: While genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified germline variants influencing the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), there has been limited examination of the possible role of inherited variation as a determinant of patient outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a GWAS for overall survival (OS) in 1926 patients with advanced CRC from the COIN and COIN-B clinical trials. For single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing an association with OS (P < 1.0 × 10-5), we conducted sensitivity analyses based on the time from diagnosis to death and sought independent replications in 5675 patients from the Study of Colorectal Cancer in Scotland (SOCCS) and 16,964 patients from the International Survival Analysis in Colorectal cancer Consortium (ISACC). We analysed the Human Protein Atlas to determine if ERBB4 expression was associated with survival in 438 patients with colon adenocarcinomas. RESULTS: The most significant SNP associated with OS was rs79612564 in ERBB4 (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16-1.32, P = 1.9 × 10-7). SNPs at 17 loci had suggestive associations for OS and all had similar effects on the time from diagnosis to death. No lead SNPs were independently replicated in the meta-analysis of all patients from SOCCS and ISACC. However, rs79612564 was significant in stage-IV patients from SOCCS (P = 2.1 × 10-2) but not ISACC (P = 0.89) and SOCCS combined with COIN and COIN-B attained genome-wide significance (P = 1.7 × 10-8). Patients with high ERBB4 expression in their colon adenocarcinomas had worse survival (HR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.1-1.9, P = 4.6 × 10-2). CONCLUSIONS: Genetic and expression data support a potential role for rs79612564 in the receptor tyrosine kinase ERBB4 as a predictive biomarker of survival.

6.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 76: 102057, 2021 Nov 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34798387

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sleep problems (SP) can indicate underlying sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, which may adversely impact cancer risk and mortality. METHODS: We assessed the association of baseline and longitudinal sleep apnea and insomnia symptoms with incident cancer (N = 3930) and cancer mortality (N = 4580) in the Cardiovascular Health Study. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to evaluate the associations. RESULTS: Overall, 885 incident cancers and 804 cancer deaths were identified over a median follow-up of 12 and 14 years, respectively. Compared to participants who reported no sleep apnea symptoms, the risk of incident cancer was inversely associated [(HR (95%CI)] with snoring [0.84 (0.71, 0.99)]. We noted an elevated prostate cancer incidence for apnea [2.34 (1.32, 4.15)] and snoring [1.69 (1.11, 2.57)]. We also noted an elevated HR for lymphatic or hematopoietic cancers [daytime sleepiness: 1.81 (1.06, 3.08)]. We found an inverse relationship for cancer mortality with respect to snoring [0.73 (0.62, 0.8)] and apnea [(0.69 (0.51, 0.94))]. We noted a significant inverse relationship between difficulty falling asleep and colorectal cancer death [0.32 (0.15, 0.69)] and snoring with lung cancer death [0.56 (0.35, 0.89)]. CONCLUSIONS: The relationship between SP and cancer risk and mortality was heterogeneous. Larger prospective studies addressing more cancer sites, molecular type-specific associations, and better longitudinal SP assessments are needed for improved delineation of SP-cancer risk dyad.

7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34737207

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) activates oncogenic signaling pathways and induces inflammation to promote colorectal carcinogenesis. METHODS: We characterized F. nucleatum and its subspecies in colorectal tumors and examined associations with tumor characteristics and colorectal cancer-specific survival. We conducted deep sequencing of nusA, nusG, and bacterial 16s rRNA genes in tumors from 1,994 patients with colorectal cancer and assessed associations between F. nucleatum presence and clinical characteristics, colorectal cancer-specific mortality, and somatic mutations. RESULTS: F. nucleatum, which was present in 10.3% of tumors, was detected in a higher proportion of right-sided and advanced-stage tumors, particularly subspecies animalis. Presence of F. nucleatum was associated with higher colorectal cancer-specific mortality (HR, 1.97; P = 0.0004). This association was restricted to nonhypermutated, microsatellite-stable tumors (HR, 2.13; P = 0.0002) and those who received chemotherapy [HR, 1.92; confidence interval (CI), 1.07-3.45; P = 0.029). Only F. nucleatum subspecies animalis, the main subspecies detected (65.8%), was associated with colorectal cancer-specific mortality (HR, 2.16; P = 0.0016), subspecies vincentii and nucleatum were not (HR, 1.07; P = 0.86). Additional adjustment for tumor stage suggests that the effect of F. nucleatum on mortality is partly driven by a stage shift. Presence of F. nucleatum was associated with microsatellite instable tumors, tumors with POLE exonuclease domain mutations, and ERBB3 mutations, and suggestively associated with TP53 mutations. CONCLUSIONS: F. nucleatum, and particularly subspecies animalis, was associated with a higher colorectal cancer-specific mortality and specific somatic mutated genes. IMPACT: Our findings identify the F. nucleatum subspecies animalis as negatively impacting colorectal cancer mortality, which may occur through a stage shift and its effect on chemoresistance.

8.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 5(5): pkab077, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34738070

RESUMO

Background: Smoking has been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality in previous studies, but current evidence on smoking in association with survival after CRC diagnosis is limited. Methods: We pooled data from 12 345 patients with stage I-IV CRC from 11 epidemiologic studies in the International Survival Analysis in Colorectal Cancer Consortium. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate the associations of prediagnostic smoking behavior with overall, CRC-specific, and non-CRC-specific survival. Results: Among 12 345 patients with CRC, 4379 (35.5%) died (2515 from CRC) over a median follow-up time of 7.5 years. Smoking was strongly associated with worse survival in stage I-III patients, whereas no association was observed among stage IV patients. Among stage I-III patients, clear dose-response relationships with all survival outcomes were seen for current smokers. For example, current smokers with 40 or more pack-years had statistically significantly worse overall, CRC-specific, and non-CRC-specific survival compared with never smokers (hazard ratio [HR] =1.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.68 to 2.25; HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.78; and HR = 2.67, 95% CI = 2.19 to 3.26, respectively). Similar associations with all survival outcomes were observed for former smokers who had quit for less than 10 years, but only a weak association with non-CRC-specific survival was seen among former smokers who had quit for more than 10 years. Conclusions: This large consortium of CRC patient studies provides compelling evidence that smoking is strongly associated with worse survival of stage I-III CRC patients in a clear dose-response manner. The detrimental effect of smoking was primarily related to noncolorectal cancer events, but current heavy smoking also showed an association with CRC-specific survival.

9.
HGG Adv ; 2(2)2021 Apr 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34604815

RESUMO

Genomic discovery and characterization of risk loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been conducted primarily in individuals of European ancestry. We conducted a multiethnic genome-wide association study of T2D among 53,102 cases and 193,679 control subjects from African, Hispanic, Asian, Native Hawaiian, and European population groups in the Population Architecture Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) and Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) Consortia. In individuals of African ancestry, we discovered a risk variant in the TGFB1 gene (rs11466334, risk allele frequency (RAF) = 6.8%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, p = 2.06 × 10-8), which replicated in independent studies of African ancestry (p = 6.26 × 10-23). We identified a multiethnic risk variant in the BACE2 gene (rs13052926, RAF = 14.1%, OR = 1.08, p = 5.75 × 10-9), which also replicated in independent studies (p = 3.45 × 10-4). We also observed a significant difference in the performance of a multiethnic genetic risk score (GRS) across population groups (pheterogeneity = 3.85 × 10-20). Comparing individuals in the top GRS risk category (40%-60%), the OR was highest in Asians (OR = 3.08) and European (OR = 2.94) ancestry populations, followed by Hispanic (OR = 2.39), Native Hawaiian (OR = 2.02), and African ancestry (OR = 1.57) populations. These findings underscore the importance of genetic discovery and risk characterization in diverse populations and the urgent need to further increase representation of non-European ancestry individuals in genetics research to improve genetic-based risk prediction across populations.

10.
Nat Genet ; 53(11): 1522-1523, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34675432
13.
Oncotarget ; 12(19): 1863-1877, 2021 Sep 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34548904

RESUMO

Tobacco smoke and red/processed meats are well-known risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC). Most research has focused on studies of normal colon biopsies in epidemiologic studies or treatment of CRC cell lines in vitro. These studies are often constrained by challenges with accuracy of self-report data or, in the case of CRC cell lines, small sample sizes and lack of relationship to normal tissue at risk. In an attempt to address some of these limitations, we performed a 24-hour treatment of a representative carcinogens cocktail in 37 independent organoid lines derived from normal colon biopsies. Machine learning algorithms were applied to bulk RNA-sequencing and revealed cellular composition changes in colon organoids. We identified 738 differentially expressed genes in response to carcinogens exposure. Network analysis identified significantly different modules of co-expression, that included genes related to MSI-H tumor biology, and genes previously implicated in CRC through genome-wide association studies. Our study helps to better define the molecular effects of representative carcinogens from smoking and red/processed meat in normal colon epithelial cells and in the etiology of the MSI-H subtype of CRC, and suggests an overlap between molecular mechanisms involved in inherited and environmental CRC risk.

14.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 5(4): pkab056, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34377935

RESUMO

Background: Smoking is associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Previous studies suggested this association may be restricted to certain molecular subtypes of CRC, but large-scale comprehensive analysis is lacking. Methods: A total of 9789 CRC cases and 11 231 controls of European ancestry from 11 observational studies were included. We harmonized smoking variables across studies and derived sex study-specific quartiles of pack-years of smoking for analysis. Four somatic colorectal tumor markers were assessed individually and in combination, including BRAF mutation, KRAS mutation, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), and microsatellite instability (MSI) status. A multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between smoking and risk of CRC subtypes by molecular characteristics, adjusting for age, sex, and study. All statistical tests were 2-sided and adjusted for Bonferroni correction. Results: Heavier smoking was associated with higher risk of CRC overall and stratified by individual markers (P trend < .001). The associations differed statistically significantly between all molecular subtypes, which was the most statistically significant for CIMP and BRAF. Compared with never-smokers, smokers in the fourth quartile of pack-years had a 90% higher risk of CIMP-positive CRC (odds ratio = 1.90, 95% confidence interval = 1.60 to 2.26) but only 35% higher risk for CIMP-negative CRC (odds ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval = 1.22 to 1.49; P difference = 2.1 x 10-6). The association was also stronger in tumors that were CIMP positive, MSI high, or KRAS wild type when combined (P difference < .001). Conclusion: Smoking was associated with differential risk of CRC subtypes defined by molecular characteristics. Heavier smokers had particularly higher risk of CRC subtypes that were CIMP positive and MSI high in combination, suggesting that smoking may be involved in the development of colorectal tumors via the serrated pathway.

15.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 14(12): 1089-1100, 2021 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34389629

RESUMO

Mechanisms underlying aspirin chemoprevention of colorectal cancer remain unclear. Prior studies have been limited because of the inability of preclinical models to recapitulate human normal colon epithelium or cellular heterogeneity present in mucosal biopsies. To overcome some of these obstacles, we performed in vitro aspirin treatment of colon organoids derived from normal mucosal biopsies to reveal transcriptional networks relevant to aspirin chemoprevention. Colon organoids derived from 38 healthy individuals undergoing endoscopy were treated with 50 µmol/L aspirin or vehicle control for 72 hours and subjected to bulk RNA sequencing. Paired regression analysis using DESeq2 identified differentially expressed genes (DEG) associated with aspirin treatment. Cellular composition was determined using CIBERSORTx. Aspirin treatment was associated with 1,154 significant (q < 0.10) DEGs prior to deconvolution. We provide replication of these findings in an independent population-based RNA-sequencing dataset of mucosal biopsies (BarcUVa-Seq), where a significant enrichment for overlap of DEGs was observed (P < 2.2E-16). Single-cell deconvolution revealed changes in cell composition, including a decrease in transit-amplifying cells following aspirin treatment (P = 0.01). Following deconvolution, DEGs included novel putative targets for aspirin such as TRABD2A (q = 0.055), a negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis identified 12 significant modules, including two that contained hubs for EGFR and PTGES2, the latter being previously implicated in aspirin chemoprevention. In summary, aspirin treatment of patient-derived colon organoids using physiologically relevant doses resulted in transcriptome-wide changes that reveal altered cell composition and improved understanding of transcriptional pathways, providing novel insight into its chemopreventive properties. PREVENTION RELEVANCE: Numerous studies have highlighted a role for aspirin in colorectal cancer chemoprevention, though the mechanisms driving this association remain unclear. We addressed this by showing that aspirin treatment of normal colon organoids diminished the transit-amplifying cell population, inhibited prostaglandin synthesis, and dysregulated expression of novel genes implicated in colon tumorigenesis.

16.
Clin Oral Investig ; 2021 Aug 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34401947

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: A conometric concept was recently introduced in which conical implant abutments hold the matching crown copings by friction alone, eliminating the need for cement or screws. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the presence of microgap formation and bacterial leakage at the Acuris conometric restorative interface of three different implant abutment systems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 75 Acuris samples of three implant-abutment systems (Ankylos, Astra Tech EV, Xive) were subjected to microbiological (n = 60) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) investigation (n = 15). Bacterial migration into and out of the conical coupling system were analyzed in an anaerobic workstation for 48, 96, 144, and 192 h. Bacterial DNA quantification using qrt-PCR was performed at each time point. The precision of the conometric coupling and internal fit of cemented CAD/CAM crowns on corresponding Acuris TiN copings were determined by means of SEM. RESULTS: qrt-PCR results failed to demonstrate microbial leakage from or into the Acuris system. SEM analysis revealed minute punctate microgaps at the apical aspect of the conometric junction (2.04 to 2.64 µm), while mean cement gaps of 12 to 145 µm were observed at the crown-coping interface. CONCLUSIONS: The prosthetic morse taper connection of all systems examined does not allow bacterial passage. Marginal integrity and internal luting gap between the ceramic crown and the coping remained within the clinically acceptable limits. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Conometrically seated single crowns provide sufficient sealing efficiency, relocating potential misfits from the crown-abutment interface to the crown-coping interface.

17.
BMC Genomics ; 22(1): 432, 2021 Jun 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34107879

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Circulating white blood cell and platelet traits are clinically linked to various disease outcomes and differ across individuals and ancestry groups. Genetic factors play an important role in determining these traits and many loci have been identified. However, most of these findings were identified in populations of European ancestry (EA), with African Americans (AA), Hispanics/Latinos (HL), and other races/ethnicities being severely underrepresented. RESULTS: We performed ancestry-combined and ancestry-specific genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for white blood cell and platelet traits in the ancestrally diverse Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study, including 16,201 AA, 21,347 HL, and 27,236 EA participants. We identified six novel findings at suggestive significance (P < 5E-8), which need confirmation, and independent signals at six previously established regions at genome-wide significance (P < 2E-9). We confirmed multiple previously reported genome-wide significant variants in the single variant association analysis and multiple genes using PrediXcan. Evaluation of loci reported from a Euro-centric GWAS indicated attenuation of effect estimates in AA and HL compared to EA populations. CONCLUSIONS: Our results highlighted the potential to identify ancestry-specific and ancestry-agnostic variants in participants with diverse backgrounds and advocate for continued efforts in improving inclusion of racially/ethnically diverse populations in genetic association studies for complex traits.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genômica , Humanos , Leucócitos , Fenótipo
18.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 5(3): pkab029, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34041438

RESUMO

Background: Incidence of early-onset (younger than 50 years of age) colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing in many countries. Thus, elucidating the role of traditional CRC risk factors in early-onset CRC is a high priority. We sought to determine whether risk factors associated with late-onset CRC were also linked to early-onset CRC and whether association patterns differed by anatomic subsite. Methods: Using data pooled from 13 population-based studies, we studied 3767 CRC cases and 4049 controls aged younger than 50 years and 23 437 CRC cases and 35 311 controls aged 50 years and older. Using multivariable and multinomial logistic regression, we estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the association between risk factors and early-onset CRC and by anatomic subsite. Results: Early-onset CRC was associated with not regularly using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.21 to 1.68), greater red meat intake (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.16), lower educational attainment (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.16), alcohol abstinence (OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.39), and heavier alcohol use (OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.50). No factors exhibited a greater excess in early-onset compared with late-onset CRC. Evaluating risks by anatomic subsite, we found that lower total fiber intake was linked more strongly to rectal (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.48) than colon cancer (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.27; P = .04). Conclusion: In this large study, we identified several nongenetic risk factors associated with early-onset CRC, providing a basis for targeted identification of those most at risk, which is imperative in mitigating the rising burden of this disease.

19.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 30(7): 1349-1358, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33972368

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A positive association between circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and colorectal cancer survival was reported in observational studies, which are susceptible to unmeasured confounding and reverse causality. We used a Mendelian randomization approach to evaluate the association between genetically predicted CRP concentrations and colorectal cancer-specific survival. METHODS: We used individual-level data for 16,918 eligible colorectal cancer cases of European ancestry from 15 studies within the International Survival Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Consortium. We calculated a genetic-risk score based on 52 CRP-associated genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies. Because of the non-collapsibility of hazard ratios from Cox proportional hazards models, we used the additive hazards model to calculate hazard differences (HD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between genetically predicted CRP concentrations and colorectal cancer-specific survival, overall and by stage at diagnosis and tumor location. Analyses were adjusted for age at diagnosis, sex, body mass index, genotyping platform, study, and principal components. RESULTS: Of the 5,395 (32%) deaths accrued over up to 10 years of follow-up, 3,808 (23%) were due to colorectal cancer. Genetically predicted CRP concentration was not associated with colorectal cancer-specific survival (HD, -1.15; 95% CI, -2.76 to 0.47 per 100,000 person-years; P = 0.16). Similarly, no associations were observed in subgroup analyses by stage at diagnosis or tumor location. CONCLUSIONS: Despite adequate power to detect moderate associations, our results did not support a causal effect of circulating CRP concentrations on colorectal cancer-specific survival. IMPACT: Future research evaluating genetically determined levels of other circulating inflammatory biomarkers (i.e., IL6) with colorectal cancer survival outcomes is needed.

20.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 30(7): 1336-1348, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33879453

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies evaluating associations between sex steroid hormones and colorectal cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. To elucidate the role of circulating levels of testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in colorectal cancer risk, we conducted observational and Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses. METHODS: The observational analyses included 333,530 participants enrolled in the UK Biobank with testosterone and SHBG measured. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. For MR analyses, genetic variants robustly associated with hormone levels were identified and their association with colorectal cancer (42,866 cases/42,752 controls) was examined using two-sample MR. RESULTS: In the observational analysis, there was little evidence that circulating levels of total testosterone were associated with colorectal cancer risk; the MR analyses showed a greater risk for women (OR per 1-SD = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17), although pleiotropy may have biased this result. Higher SHBG concentrations were associated with greater colorectal cancer risk for women (HR per 1-SD = 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.29), but was unsupported by the MR analysis. There was little evidence of associations between free testosterone and colorectal cancer in observational and MR analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating concentrations of sex hormones are unlikely to be causally associated with colorectal cancer. Additional experimental studies are required to better understand the possible role of androgens in colorectal cancer development. IMPACT: Our results from large-scale analyses provide little evidence for sex hormone pathways playing a causal role in colorectal cancer development.See related commentary by Hang and Shen, p. 1302.

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