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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31533940

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is associated with development of cachexia, a wasting syndrome thought to limit survival. Few studies have longitudinally quantified peripheral tissues or identified biomarkers predictive of future tissue wasting. METHODS: Adipose and muscle tissue were measured by computed tomography (CT) at diagnosis and 50 to 120 days later in 164 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Tissue changes and survival were evaluated by Cox proportional hazards regression. Baseline levels of circulating markers were examined in relation to future tissue wasting. RESULTS: Compared with patients in the bottom quartile of muscle change per 30 days (average gain of 0.8 ± 2.0 cm2), those in the top quartile (average loss of 12.9 ± 4.9 cm2) had a hazard ratio (HR) for death of 2.01 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.62]. Patients in the top quartile of muscle attenuation change (average decrease of 4.9 ± 2.4 Hounsfield units) had an HR of 2.19 (95% CI, 1.18-4.04) compared with those in the bottom quartile (average increase of 2.4 ± 1.6 Hounsfield units). Changes in adipose tissue were not associated with survival. Higher plasma branched chain amino acids (BCAA; P = 0.004) and lower monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1; P = 0.005) at diagnosis were associated with greater future muscle loss. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, muscle loss and decrease in muscle density in 2 to 4 months after diagnosis were associated with reduced survival. BCAAs and MCP-1 levels at diagnosis were associated with subsequent muscle loss. IMPACT: BCAAs and MCP-1 levels at diagnosis could identify a high-risk group for future tissue wasting.

2.
PLoS Genet ; 15(8): e1008344, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31469826

RESUMO

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) is a lethal malignancy that is familial or associated with genetic syndromes in 10% of cases. Gene-based surveillance strategies for at-risk individuals may improve clinical outcomes. However, familial PC (FPC) is plagued by genetic heterogeneity and the genetic basis for the majority of FPC remains elusive, hampering the development of gene-based surveillance programs. The study was powered to identify genes with a cumulative pathogenic variant prevalence of at least 3%, which includes the most prevalent PC susceptibility gene, BRCA2. Since the majority of known PC susceptibility genes are involved in DNA repair, we focused on genes implicated in these pathways. We performed a region-based association study using the Mixed-Effects Score Test, followed by leave-one-out characterization of PC-associated gene regions and variants to identify the genes and variants driving risk associations. We evaluated 398 cases from two case series and 987 controls without a personal history of cancer. The first case series consisted of 109 patients with either FPC (n = 101) or PC at ≤50 years of age (n = 8). The second case series was composed of 289 unselected PC cases. We validated this discovery strategy by identifying known pathogenic BRCA2 variants, and also identified SMG1, encoding a serine/threonine protein kinase, to be significantly associated with PC following correction for multiple testing (p = 3.22x10-7). The SMG1 association was validated in a second independent series of 532 FPC cases and 753 controls (p<0.0062, OR = 1.88, 95%CI 1.17-3.03). We showed segregation of the c.4249A>G SMG1 variant in 3 affected relatives in a FPC kindred, and we found c.103G>A to be a recurrent SMG1 variant associating with PC in both the discovery and validation series. These results suggest that SMG1 is a novel PC susceptibility gene, and we identified specific SMG1 gene variants associated with PC risk.

3.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 28(7): 1238-1245, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31015203

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. The currently identified common susceptibility loci account for a small fraction of estimated heritability. We sought to estimate overall heritability of pancreatic cancer and partition the heritability by variant frequencies and functional annotations. METHODS: Analysis using the genome-based restricted maximum likelihood method (GREML) was conducted on Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from 3,568 pancreatic cancer cases and 3,363 controls of European Ancestry. RESULTS: Applying linkage disequilibrium- and minor allele frequency-stratified GREML (GREML-LDMS) method to imputed GWAS data, we estimated the overall heritability of pancreatic cancer to be 21.2% (SE = 4.8%). Across the functional groups (intronic, intergenic, coding, and regulatory variants), intronic variants account for most of the estimated heritability (12.4%). Previously identified GWAS loci explained 4.1% of the total phenotypic variation of pancreatic cancer. Mutations in hereditary pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes are present in 4% to 10% of patients with pancreatic cancer, yet our GREML-LDMS results suggested these regions explain only 0.4% of total phenotypic variance for pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Although higher than previous studies, our estimated 21.2% overall heritability may still be downwardly biased due to the inherent limitation that the contribution of rare variants in genes with a substantive overall impact on disease are not captured when applying these commonly used methods to imputed GWAS data. IMPACT: Our work demonstrated the importance of rare and common variants in pancreatic cancer risk.

4.
Genet Med ; 21(11): 2468-2477, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30992552

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study examined whether participants who learned research results related to a germline CDKN2A variant known to be associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer and malignant melanoma would pursue confirmatory testing and cancer screening, share the genetic information with health care providers and family, and change risk perceptions. METHODS: Participants were pancreas research registry enrollees whose biological sample was tested in a research laboratory for the variant. In total, 133 individuals were invited to learn a genetic research result and participate in a study about the disclosure process. Perceived cancer risk, screening intentions, and behaviors were assessed predisclosure, immediately postdisclosure, and six months postdisclosure. RESULTS: Eighty individuals agreed to participate and 63 completed the study. Immediately postdisclosure, carriers reported greater intentions to undergo pancreatic cancer and melanoma screening (p values ≤0.024). Seventy-three percent of carriers (47.5% noncarriers) intended to seek confirmatory testing within six months and 20% (2.5% noncarriers) followed through. All participants shared results with ≥1 family member. More carriers shared results with their health care provider than noncarriers (p = 0.028). CONCLUSION: Recipients of cancer genetic research results may not follow through with recommended behaviors (confirmatory testing, screening), despite stated intentions. The research result disclosure motivated follow-up behaviors among carriers more than noncarriers.

5.
Cancer Cell ; 35(2): 267-282.e7, 2019 02 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30686769

RESUMO

We integrated clinical, genomic, and transcriptomic data from 224 primaries and 95 metastases from 289 patients to characterize progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Driver gene alterations and mutational and expression-based signatures were preserved, with truncations, inversions, and translocations most conserved. Cell cycle progression (CCP) increased with sequential inactivation of tumor suppressors, yet remained higher in metastases, perhaps driven by cell cycle regulatory gene variants. Half of the cases were hypoxic by expression markers, overlapping with molecular subtypes. Paired tumor heterogeneity showed cancer cell migration by Halstedian progression. Multiple PDACs arising synchronously and metachronously in the same pancreas were actually intra-parenchymal metastases, not independent primary tumors. Established clinical co-variates dominated survival analyses, although CCP and hypoxia may inform clinical practice.

6.
AJOB Empir Bioeth ; 10(1): 1-22, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30596322

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genomic analysis may reveal both primary and secondary findings with direct relevance to the health of probands' biological relatives. Researchers question their obligations to return findings not only to participants but also to family members. Given the social value of privacy protection, should researchers offer a proband's results to family members, including after the proband's death? METHODS: Preferences were elicited using interviews and a survey. Respondents included probands from two pancreatic cancer research resources, plus biological and nonbiological family members. Hypothetical scenarios based on actual research findings from the two cancer research resources were presented; participants were asked return of results preferences and justifications. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed; survey data were analyzed descriptively. RESULTS: Fifty-one individuals (17 probands, 21 biological relatives, 13 spouses/partners) were interviewed. Subsequently, a mailed survey was returned by 464 probands, 1,040 biological family members, and 399 spouses/partners. This analysis highlights the interviews, augmented by survey findings. Probands and family members attribute great predictive power and lifesaving potential to genomic information. A majority hold that a proband's genomic results relevant to family members' health ought to be offered. While informants endorse each individual's choice whether to learn results, most express a strong moral responsibility to know and to share, particularly with the younger generation. Most have few concerns about sharing genetic information within the family; rather, their concerns focus on the health consequences of not sharing. CONCLUSIONS: Although additional studies in diverse populations are needed, policies governing return of genomic results should consider how families understand genomic data, how they value confidentiality within the family, and whether they endorse an ethics of sharing. A focus on respect for individual privacy-without attention to how the broad social and cultural context shapes preferences within families-cannot be the sole foundation of policy.

7.
J Clin Oncol ; : JCO1801489, 2018 Nov 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30457921

RESUMO

PURPOSE: An ASCO provisional clinical opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction to ASCO's membership and other health care providers. This PCO addresses identification and management of patients and family members with possible predisposition to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: ASCO convened an Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature published from January 1998 to June 2018. Results of the databases searched were supplemented with hand searching of the bibliographies of systematic reviews and selected seminal articles and contributions from Expert Panel members' curated files. PROVISIONAL CLINICAL OPINION: All patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma should undergo assessment of risk for hereditary syndromes known to be associated with an increased risk for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Assessment of risk should include a comprehensive review of family history of cancer. Individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer affecting two first-degree relatives meet criteria for familial pancreatic cancer (FPC). Individuals (cancer affected or unaffected) with a family history of pancreatic cancer meeting criteria for FPC, those with three or more diagnoses of pancreatic cancer in same side of the family, and individuals meeting criteria for other genetic syndromes associated with increased risk for pancreatic cancer have an increased risk for pancreatic cancer and are candidates for genetic testing. Germline genetic testing for cancer susceptibility may be discussed with individuals diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, even if family history is unremarkable. Benefits and limitations of pancreatic cancer screening should be discussed with individuals whose family history meets criteria for FPC and/or genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/gastrointestinal-cancer-guidelines .

9.
PLoS One ; 13(8): e0202272, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30107003

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Advanced pancreatic cancer is a highly refractory disease almost always associated with survival of little more than a year. New interventions based on novel targets are needed. We aim to identify new genetic determinants of overall survival (OS) in patients after treatment with gemcitabine using genome-wide screens of germline DNA. We aim also to support these findings with in vitro functional analysis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Genome-wide screens of germline DNA in two independent cohorts of pancreatic cancer patients (from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 80303 and the Mayo Clinic) were used to select new genes associated with OS. The vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) was selected, and the interactions of genetic variation in VDR with circulating vitamin D levels and gemcitabine treatment were evaluated. Functional effects of common VDR variants were also evaluated in experimental assays in human cell lines. RESULTS: The rs2853564 variant in VDR was associated with OS in patients from both the Mayo Clinic (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.70-0.94, p = 0.0059) and CALGB 80303 (HR 0.74, 0.63-0.87, p = 0.0002). rs2853564 interacted with high pre-treatment levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D, a measure of endogenous vitamin D) (p = 0.0079 for interaction) and with gemcitabine treatment (p = 0.024 for interaction) to confer increased OS. rs2853564 increased transcriptional activity in luciferase assays and reduced the binding of the IRF4 transcription factor. CONCLUSION: Our findings propose VDR as a novel determinant of survival in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Common functional variation in this gene might interact with endogenous vitamin D and gemcitabine treatment to determine improved patient survival. These results support evidence for a modulatory role of the vitamin D pathway for the survival of advanced pancreatic cancer patients.

10.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 27(11): 1364-1370, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30038052

RESUMO

Background: Pathogenic germline mutations in the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene are rare and associated with highly penetrant familial melanoma and pancreatic cancer in non-Hispanic whites (NHW). To date, the prevalence and impact of CDKN2A rare coding variants (RCV) in racial minority groups remain poorly characterized. We examined the role of CDKN2A RCVs on the risk of pancreatic cancer among minority subjects.Methods: We sequenced CDKN2A in 220 African American (AA) pancreatic cancer cases, 900 noncancer AA controls, and 183 Nigerian controls. RCV frequencies were determined for each group and compared with that of 1,537 NHW patients with pancreatic cancer. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for both a case-case comparison of RCV frequencies in AAs versus NHWs, and case-control comparison between AA cases versus noncancer AA controls plus Nigerian controls. Smaller sets of Hispanic and Native American cases and controls also were sequenced.Results: One novel missense RCV and one novel frameshift RCV were found among AA patients: 400G>A and 258_278del. RCV carrier status was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer among AA cases (11/220; OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5-7.1; P = 0.004) compared with AA and Nigerian controls (17/1,083). Further, AA cases had higher frequency of RCVs: 5.0% (OR, 13.4; 95% CI, 4.9-36.7; P < 0.001) compared with NHW cases (0.4%).Conclusions: CDKN2A RCVs are more common in AA than in NHW patients with pancreatic cancer and associated with moderately increased pancreatic cancer risk among AAs.Impact: RCVs in CDKN2A are frequent in AAs and are associated with risk for pancreatic cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(11); 1364-70. ©2018 AACR.

11.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2018 Jul 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29982661

RESUMO

Background: Increased risk of malignancies other than pancreatic cancer (PC) has been reported among first-degree relatives (FDRs) of PC patients; however, the roles of susceptibility gene mutations are unclear. We assessed risk for 15 cancers among FDRs of unselected PC probands. Methods: Data on 17 162 FDRs, with more than 336 000 person-years at risk, identified through 2305 sequential PC probands enrolled at Mayo Clinic (2000-2016) were analyzed. Family history data were provided by the probands. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, comparing malignancies observed among the FDRs with that expected using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data. Genetic testing was performed among a subset of probands (n = 2094), enabling stratified analyses among FDRs based on whether the related proband tested positive or negative for inherited mutation in 22 sequenced cancer susceptibility genes. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Compared with SEER, PC risk was twofold higher among FDRs of PC probands (SIR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.78 to 2.31, P < .001). Primary liver cancer risk was elevated among female FDRs (SIR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.34 to 3.12, P < .001). PC risk was more elevated among FDRs of mutation-positive probands (SIR = 4.32, 95% CI = 3.10 to 5.86) than FDRs of mutation-negative probands (SIR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.51 to 2.05, between-group P < .001). FDR PC risk was higher when the related proband was younger than age 60 years at diagnosis and mutation-positive (SIR = 5.24, 95% CI = 2.93 to 8.64) than when the proband was younger than age 60 years but mutation-negative (SIR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.21 to 2.47, between-group P < .001). Breast (SIR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.63) and ovarian (SIR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.30 to 4.00) cancers were elevated among FDRs of mutation-positive probands. Conclusions: Our study substantiates twofold risk of PC among FDRs of PC patients and suggests increased risk for primary liver cancer among female FDRs. FDRs of susceptibility mutation carriers had substantially increased risk for PC and increased risk for breast and ovarian cancers.

13.
JAMA ; 319(23): 2401-2409, 2018 06 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29922827

RESUMO

Importance: Individuals genetically predisposed to pancreatic cancer may benefit from early detection. Genes that predispose to pancreatic cancer and the risks of pancreatic cancer associated with mutations in these genes are not well defined. Objective: To determine whether inherited germline mutations in cancer predisposition genes are associated with increased risks of pancreatic cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants: Case-control analysis to identify pancreatic cancer predisposition genes; longitudinal analysis of patients with pancreatic cancer for prognosis. The study included 3030 adults diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer and enrolled in a Mayo Clinic registry between October 12, 2000, and March 31, 2016, with last follow-up on June 22, 2017. Reference controls were 123 136 individuals with exome sequence data in the public Genome Aggregation Database and 53 105 in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database. Exposures: Individuals were classified based on carrying a deleterious mutation in cancer predisposition genes and having a personal or family history of cancer. Main Outcomes and Measures: Germline mutations in coding regions of 21 cancer predisposition genes were identified by sequencing of products from a custom multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based panel; associations of genes with pancreatic cancer were assessed by comparing frequency of mutations in genes of pancreatic cancer patients with those of reference controls. Results: Comparing 3030 case patients with pancreatic cancer (43.2% female; 95.6% non-Hispanic white; mean age at diagnosis, 65.3 [SD, 10.7] years) with reference controls, significant associations were observed between pancreatic cancer and mutations in CDKN2A (0.3% of cases and 0.02% of controls; odds ratio [OR], 12.33; 95% CI, 5.43-25.61); TP53 (0.2% of cases and 0.02% of controls; OR, 6.70; 95% CI, 2.52-14.95); MLH1 (0.13% of cases and 0.02% of controls; OR, 6.66; 95% CI, 1.94-17.53); BRCA2 (1.9% of cases and 0.3% of controls; OR, 6.20; 95% CI, 4.62-8.17); ATM (2.3% of cases and 0.37% of controls; OR, 5.71; 95% CI, 4.38-7.33); and BRCA1 (0.6% of cases and 0.2% of controls; OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 1.54-4.05). Conclusions and Relevance: In this case-control study, mutations in 6 genes associated with pancreatic cancer were found in 5.5% of all pancreatic cancer patients, including 7.9% of patients with a family history of pancreatic cancer and 5.2% of patients without a family history of pancreatic cancer. Further research is needed for replication in other populations.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Ductal Pancreático/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/genética , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , DNA de Neoplasias/análise , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Sistema de Registros , Risco , Análise de Sequência de DNA , Análise de Sobrevida
14.
Nature ; 558(7711): 600-604, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29925948

RESUMO

Malignancy is accompanied by changes in the metabolism of both cells and the organism1,2. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is associated with wasting of peripheral tissues, a metabolic syndrome that lowers quality of life and has been proposed to decrease survival of patients with cancer3,4. Tissue wasting is a multifactorial disease and targeting specific circulating factors to reverse this syndrome has been mostly ineffective in the clinic5,6. Here we show that loss of both adipose and muscle tissue occurs early in the development of pancreatic cancer. Using mouse models of PDAC, we show that tumour growth in the pancreas but not in other sites leads to adipose tissue wasting, suggesting that tumour growth within the pancreatic environment contributes to this wasting phenotype. We find that decreased exocrine pancreatic function is a driver of adipose tissue loss and that replacement of pancreatic enzymes attenuates PDAC-associated wasting of peripheral tissues. Paradoxically, reversal of adipose tissue loss impairs survival in mice with PDAC. When analysing patients with PDAC, we find that depletion of adipose and skeletal muscle tissues at the time of diagnosis is common, but is not associated with worse survival. Taken together, these results provide an explanation for wasting of adipose tissue in early PDAC and suggest that early loss of peripheral tissue associated with pancreatic cancer may not impair survival.

15.
Gastroenterology ; 155(3): 730-739.e3, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29775599

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Of patients with new-onset diabetes (NOD; based on glycemic status) older than 50 years, approximately 1% are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (PC) within 3 years. We aimed to develop and validate a model to determine risk of PC in patients with NOD. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data from 4 independent and nonoverlapping cohorts of patients (N = 1,561) with NOD (based on glycemic status; data collected at date of diagnosis and 12 months previously) in the Rochester Epidemiology Project from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2015 to create our model. The model weighed scores for 3 factors identified in the discovery cohort to be most strongly associated with PC (64 patients with PC and 192 with type 2 diabetes): change in weight, change in blood glucose, and age at onset of diabetes. We called our model Enriching New-Onset Diabetes for Pancreatic Cancer (ENDPAC). We validated the locked-down model and cutoff score in an independent population-based cohort of 1,096 patients with diabetes; of these, 9 patients (82%) had PC within 3 years of meeting the criteria for NOD. RESULTS: In the discovery cohort, the END-PAC model identified patients who developed PC within 3 years of diabetes onset (area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.87); a score of at least 3 identified patients who developed PC with 80% sensitivity and specificity. In the validation cohort, a score of at least 3 identified 7 of 9 patients with PC (78%) with 85% specificity; the prevalence of PC in patients with a score of at least 3 (3.6%) was 4.4-fold greater than in patients with NOD. A high END-PAC score in patients who did not have PC (false positives) was often due to such factors as recent steroid use or different malignancy. An ENDPAC score no higher than 0 (in 49% of patients) meant that patients had an extremely low risk for PC. An END-PAC score of at least 3 identified 75% of patients in the discovery cohort more than 6 months before a diagnosis of PC. CONCLUSIONS: Based on change in weight, change in blood glucose, and age at onset of diabetes, we developed and validated a model to determine risk of PC in patients with NOD based on glycemic status (END-PAC model). An independent prospective study is needed to further validate this model, which could contribute to early detection of PC.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/complicações , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/etiologia , Modelagem Computacional Específica para o Paciente , Medição de Risco/métodos , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Glicemia/análise , Peso Corporal , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/sangue , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Estudos Prospectivos , Curva ROC , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Sensibilidade e Especificidade
16.
Cancers (Basel) ; 10(5)2018 May 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29757973

RESUMO

Oncogenic K-RAS mutations are found in virtually all pancreatic cancers, making K-RAS one of the most targeted oncoproteins for drug development in cancer therapies. Despite intense research efforts over the past three decades, oncogenic K-RAS has remained largely "undruggable". Rather than targeting an upstream component of the RAS signaling pathway (i.e., EGFR/HER2) and/or the midstream effector kinases (i.e., RAF/MEK/ERK/PI3K/mTOR), we propose an alternative strategy to control oncogenic K-RAS signal by targeting its most downstream signaling module, Seven-In-Absentia Homolog (SIAH). SIAH E3 ligase controls the signal output of oncogenic K-RAS hyperactivation that drives unchecked cell proliferation, uncontrolled tumor growth, and rapid cancer cell dissemination in human pancreatic cancer. Therefore, SIAH is an ideal therapeutic target as it is an extraordinarily conserved downstream signaling gatekeeper indispensable for proper RAS signaling. Guided by molecular insights and core principles obtained from developmental and evolutionary biology, we propose an anti-SIAH-centered anti-K-RAS strategy as a logical and alternative anticancer strategy to dampen uncontrolled K-RAS hyperactivation and halt tumor growth and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. The clinical utility of developing SIAH as both a tumor-specific and therapy-responsive biomarker, as well as a viable anti-K-RAS drug target, is logically simple and conceptually innovative. SIAH clearly constitutes a major tumor vulnerability and K-RAS signaling bottleneck in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Given the high degree of evolutionary conservation in the K-RAS/SIAH signaling pathway, an anti-SIAH-based anti-PDAC therapy will synergize with covalent K-RAS inhibitors and direct K-RAS targeted initiatives to control and eradicate pancreatic cancer in the future.

17.
Carcinogenesis ; 2018 May 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29800239

RESUMO

Diets with high inflammatory potential are suspected to increase risk for pancreatic cancer (PC). Using pooled analyses, we examined whether this association applies to populations from different geographic regions and population subgroups with varying risks for PC, including variation in ABO blood type. Data from six case-control studies (cases, n=2,414; controls, n=4,528) in the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) were analyzed, followed by replication in five nested case-control studies (cases, n=1,268; controls, n=4,215) from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). Two polymorphisms in the ABO locus (rs505922 and rs8176746) were used to infer participants' blood types. Dietary questionnaire-derived nutrient/food intake was used to compute energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index (DII®) scores to assess inflammatory potential of diet. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Higher E-DII scores, reflecting greater inflammatory potential of diet, were associated with increased PC risk in PanC4 (ORQ5 vs. Q1=2.20, 95% CI=1.85-2.61, Ptrend<0.0001; ORcontinuous=1.20, 95% CI=1.17-1.24), and PanScan (ORQ5 vs. Q1=1.23, 95% CI=0.92-1.66, Ptrend=0.008; ORcontinuous=1.09, 95% CI=1.02-1.15). As expected, genotype-derived non-O blood type was associated with increased PC risk in both the PanC4 and PanScan studies. Stratified analyses of associations between E-DII quintiles and PC by genotype-derived ABO blood type did not show interaction by blood type (Pinteraction=0.10 in PanC4 and Pinteraction=0.13 in PanScan). The results show that consuming a pro-inflammatory diet and carrying non-O blood type are each individually, but not interactively, associated with increased PC risk.

18.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 115(18): 4767-4772, 2018 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29669919

RESUMO

To evaluate whether germline variants in genes encoding pancreatic secretory enzymes contribute to pancreatic cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the coding regions of CPB1 and other genes encoding pancreatic secretory enzymes and known pancreatitis susceptibility genes (PRSS1, CPA1, CTRC, and SPINK1) in a hospital series of pancreatic cancer cases and controls. Variants in CPB1, CPA1 (encoding carboxypeptidase B1 and A1), and CTRC were evaluated in a second set of cases with familial pancreatic cancer and controls. More deleterious CPB1 variants, defined as having impaired protein secretion and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in transfected HEK 293T cells, were found in the hospital series of pancreatic cancer cases (5/986, 0.5%) than in controls (0/1,045, P = 0.027). Among familial pancreatic cancer cases, ER stress-inducing CPB1 variants were found in 4 of 593 (0.67%) vs. 0 of 967 additional controls (P = 0.020), with a combined prevalence in pancreatic cancer cases of 9/1,579 vs. 0/2,012 controls (P < 0.01). More ER stress-inducing CPA1 variants were also found in the combined set of hospital and familial cases with pancreatic cancer than in controls [7/1,546 vs. 1/2,012; P = 0.025; odds ratio, 9.36 (95% CI, 1.15-76.02)]. Overall, 16 (1%) of 1,579 pancreatic cancer cases had an ER stress-inducing CPA1 or CPB1 variant, compared with 1 of 2,068 controls (P < 0.00001). No other candidate genes had statistically significant differences in variant prevalence between cases and controls. Our study indicates ER stress-inducing variants in CPB1 and CPA1 are associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility and implicate ER stress in pancreatic acinar cells in pancreatic cancer development.


Assuntos
Carboxipeptidase B , Carboxipeptidases A , Estresse do Retículo Endoplasmático/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Mutação , Proteínas de Neoplasias , Neoplasias Pancreáticas , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Carboxipeptidase B/genética , Carboxipeptidase B/metabolismo , Carboxipeptidases A/genética , Carboxipeptidases A/metabolismo , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas de Neoplasias/genética , Proteínas de Neoplasias/metabolismo , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/enzimologia , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/genética , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/patologia
19.
J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics ; 13(3): 295-304, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29701109

RESUMO

Genetic research generates results with implications for relatives. Recommendations addressing relatives' access to a participant's genetic research findings include eliciting participant preferences about access and choosing a representative to make decisions about access upon participant incapacity/death. Representatives are likely to be blood relatives or spouse/partners (who may share genetically related children). This raises the question of whether relatives hold similar attitudes about access or divergent attitudes that may yield conflict. We surveyed pancreatic cancer biobank participants (probands) and relatives in a family registry (blood relatives and spouse/partners of probands); 1,903 (>55%) surveys were returned. Results revealed few attitudinal differences between the groups. A slightly higher proportion of blood relatives agreed with statements reflecting proband privacy. In conclusion, probands' decisions on access are likely to be accepted by relatives; in choosing a representative, probands may not face major differences in attitudes about privacy/sharing between a blood relative and a spouse/partner.

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