Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 29
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Tipo de estudo
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Int J Eat Disord ; 2020 Jan 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31943285

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the current study was threefold: (a) compare rates of self-reported anorexia nervosa (AN), self-reported bulimia nervosa (BN), and eating pathology-specific academic impairment (EAI) by gender identity (cisgender men, cisgender women, transgender or genderqueer) and sexual orientation (gay or lesbian, bisexual, unsure, other), (b) examine associations between gender identity, sexual orientation, and eating outcomes, and (c) identify for whom rates of eating disorder diagnosis and impairment is greatest. METHOD: The study includes a sample of Minnesota students (n = 13,906) who participated in the College Student Health Survey from 2015 to 2018. Chi-square tests with bootstrapping examined differences in eating pathology rates between groups. Adjusted logistic regressions tested the association between gender identity, sexual orientation, and self-reported eating outcomes. RESULTS: Chi-square results revealed heightened rates of self-reported AN, self-reported BN, and EAI in cisgender women, transgender or genderqueer, and sexual minority (e.g., lesbian or bisexual) students. Logistic regression analyses in cisgender men and cisgender women revealed higher odds of self-reported AN, self-reported BN, and EAI in sexual minority students relative their heterosexual peers. Chi-square analyses indicated that bisexual cisgender women reported heightened rates of all three eating pathology measures relative to other sexual and/or gender (e.g., transgender) minority students. DISCUSSION: Individuals with marginalized gender and/or sexual orientation identities report heightened rates of eating pathology, with cisgender bisexual women reporting the poorest outcomes relative to individuals from other marginalized identities. Preventive efforts and more research are needed to understand the mechanisms driving this disparity and to reduce prevalence among marginalized groups.

2.
Psychiatr Clin North Am ; 42(2): 219-229, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31046924

RESUMO

The authors present the theoretic model, structure of treatment, and preliminary evidence for several emerging treatments that are increasingly being used and studied in eating disorders treatment, including dialectical behavior therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, integrative cognitive-affective therapy, and neuromodulation. In addition, the article discusses treatments that address mindfulness, interpersonal factors, and habit.


Assuntos
Terapia de Aceitação e Compromisso , Anorexia Nervosa/terapia , Transtorno da Compulsão Alimentar/terapia , Bulimia Nervosa/terapia , Atenção Plena , Psicoterapia , Humanos
3.
Compr Psychiatry ; 82: 128-132, 2018 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29477705

RESUMO

Disordered eating frequently co-occurs with nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), and evidence suggests that the co-occurrence of these behaviors is associated with heightened emotion dysregulation. However, little is known about the relationship between restrictive eating and NSSI, and the significance of their co-occurrence. This study examined cross-sectional associations between self-reported restrictive eating, NSSI, and putative mechanisms of emotion regulation and interpersonal problems in a non-clinical sample of undergraduate students (N = 98, 80.6% female), using the Dietary Restriction Screener (Haynos & Fruzzetti, 2015), Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory (Gratz, 2001), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (Gratz & Roemer, 2006), and Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Personality Disorders-25 (Kim & Pilkonis, 1999). Hierarchical logistic regression analyses indicated that restrictive eating was associated with NSSI above and beyond the influence of binge eating, purging, and relevant covariates (B = 2.04, p < 0.001). In addition, multivariate analyses of variance revealed that the co-occurrence of restrictive eating and NSSI was associated with greater difficulties accessing and implementing effective, rather than impulsive, emotion regulation strategies when distressed than either behavior alone (p < 0.001). Findings highlight the seriousness of restrictive eating even within a nonclinical sample, as it is associated with heightened probability of NSSI and clinical severity among those who engage in co-morbid NSSI. Healthcare providers are encouraged to screen for NSSI among individuals with restrictive eating. In addition, a focus on improving emotion regulation and interpersonal skills may enhance prevention and intervention efforts for individuals with co-occurring restrictive eating and NSSI behaviors.


Assuntos
Sintomas Afetivos/psicologia , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/psicologia , Relações Interpessoais , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Sintomas Afetivos/diagnóstico , Sintomas Afetivos/epidemiologia , Comorbidade , Estudos Transversais , Emoções , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/diagnóstico , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Autorrelato , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/diagnóstico , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
4.
Int J Eat Disord ; 50(6): 707-710, 2017 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28199032

RESUMO

This study examined the prevalence of reported suicide attempts among family members of individuals with an eating disorder (ED). 1870 individuals presenting for ED treatment reported whether their family members ever made a suicide attempt using the Eating Disorders Questionnaire. A lifetime suicide attempt by any family member was reported by 10.8% (n = 202) of the sample and ranged from 7.0% of those with eating disorder not otherwise specified to 16.1% of those with purging disorder. Controlling for age and gender, individuals with bulimia nervosa had a higher prevalence of any familial suicide attempt and mother suicide attempt than individuals with EDNOS; no other differences were observed across ED diagnoses. There were no differences in prevalence of reported suicide attempts made by fathers, brothers, sisters, uncles, or aunts by ED diagnosis. Findings support a growing literature indicating a familial association between EDs and suicide risk.


Assuntos
Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/complicações , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Adulto , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
5.
Int J Eat Disord ; 50(2): 162-165, 2017 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27859487

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (IPTS) model has not been fully tested in a clinical eating disorder (ED) population. METHOD: Participants (N = 114) completed questionnaires assessing suicidal ideation (SI), suicide attempts (SA), and constructs of the IPTS. Logistic regressions determined whether thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness were associated with lifetime SI. Among those who endorsed lifetime SI, logistic regressions were used to determine whether elements of the acquired capability for suicide (fearlessness about death and painful and provocative events) were associated with lifetime SA. RESULTS: Sixty-five participants (57.0%) had lifetime SI and 24 (21.1%) had lifetime SA. Thwarted belongingness (P < 0.001) and perceived burdensomeness (P < 0.01) were associated with lifetime SI. Painful and provocative events were associated with lifetime SA (P < 0.03). DISCUSSION: The IPTS was partially supported. Targeting interpersonal variables may be important in treating and preventing suicidality. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:162-165).


Assuntos
Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/psicologia , Teoria Psicológica , Suicídio/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Relações Interpessoais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Percepção , Ideação Suicida , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
6.
Compr Psychiatry ; 73: 143-150, 2017 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27978502

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study examined the associations between specific dimensions of emotion dysregulation and eating disorder (ED) symptoms and behaviors, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), and suicide attempts in a heterogeneous ED sample. METHODS: Participants (N=110) completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), and self-reported the presence of lifetime NSSI and a lifetime suicide attempt. RESULTS: The EDE-Q global score, a primarily cognitive measure of ED symptoms, was significantly positively correlated with DERS strategies, clarity, and awareness subscale scores and DERS total score (ps<0.01). Only the strategies subscale was uniquely positively associated with EDE-Q global score in a multivariate regression analysis. There was no association between the frequency of binge eating or frequency of driven exercise and any of the DERS subscale scores or total score (ps>0.01). Frequency of purging was significantly, positively associated with DERS impulse subscale score and total score (p<0.01). None of the DERS subscale scores were significantly different between those with and without NSSI or between those with and without a lifetime suicide attempt (ps>0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate that in a heterogeneous ED sample, emotion regulation deficits are more strongly associated with cognitively-oriented symptoms of EDs than behavioral symptoms such as a binge eating, purging, driven exercise, NSSI, or suicide attempts.


Assuntos
Emoções , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/diagnóstico , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/psicologia , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Tentativa de Suicídio , Adulto , Bulimia , Exercício/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Autorrelato , Adulto Jovem
8.
Cogn Behav Pract ; 23(3): 316-328, 2016 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27429544

RESUMO

Currently, research support is strongest for family-based treatment (FBT) for the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) in adolescents. However, a strong evidence base for treatments for older adolescents and young adults with AN is lacking. Emphasizing social support in the treatment of AN may be beneficial for older adolescents and young adults with AN. This paper provides a brief review of the literature on FBT for adolescent AN and provides a case example of adolescent AN treated with FBT. We then discuss novel treatments that have incorporated social support for older adolescents and young adults with AN, such as modified FBT and couples-based interventions. We provide case studies of each of these novel treatment approaches as well. Additionally, this paper highlights and discusses developmental considerations and challenges in working with older adolescents and young adults with AN.

9.
Int J Eat Disord ; 49(7): 681-8, 2016 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27301347

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) frequently endorse risky behaviors such as self-harm and substance use. However, no studies of BN to date have examined factors associated with engaging in individual or co-occurring risky behaviors. Given that individuals with BN often have personality psychopathology, which has been linked to symptoms and course of illness, this study sought to examine how personality may differentiate engagement in risky behaviors among BN individuals. METHOD: A sample of 133 women with BN completed self-report measures of personality psychopathology at baseline, and then reported on bulimic and risky behaviors (e.g., substance misuse, self-harm) over 2 weeks using ecological momentary assessment. A series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the unique associations between state-level predictor variables (each risky behavior, e.g., substance misuse, and combination of risky behaviors, e.g., substance misuse plus self-harm) and trait-level personality constructs. RESULTS: Substance misuse behavior, above and beyond all other risky behaviors, was significantly associated with higher scores on trait dissocial behavior (P = 0.004). DISCUSSION: Substance misuse in BN has a unique association with dissocial behavior, a personality trait characterized by hostility, impulsivity, and entitlement. These results suggest that targeting personality variables may help facilitate more effective treatment of risky behaviors, including substance use in BN. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:681-688).


Assuntos
Bulimia Nervosa/psicologia , Assunção de Riscos , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/complicações , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Comportamento Impulsivo , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Personalidade , Transtornos da Personalidade/complicações , Autorrelato , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/complicações , Adulto Jovem
10.
Int J Eat Disord ; 49(8): 817-21, 2016 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27188448

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the frequency of self-weighing and reactions to prescribed weekly weighing among individuals with eating disorder (ED) diagnoses, and to compare individuals weighing more or less frequently on mass index (BMI) and the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) subscales. METHOD: Baseline EDE and demographics from five studies (N = 758). RESULTS: Self-weighing was most frequent among individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN), followed by those with bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED). On average, participants reacted moderately negative to prescribed weekly weighing. No relationship between weighing frequency and BMI was evident in any sample. There was indication of greater pathology (i.e., restraint, shape concern, weight concern, global) in AN with more frequent weighing. In BN, mixed evidence emerged to support a relationship between more frequent weighing and higher shape concern, weight concern, and global score. In BED, higher restraint was found in those who weighed versus those who did not. DISCUSSION: Weighing frequency in each eating disorder (ED) sample was to some extent associated with greater ED severity, but not BMI. Future research should examine relationships between self-weighing, reactions to changing weighing frequency, and ED symptomatology in both ED and non-ED groups to understand the impact of self-weighing in heterogeneous populations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:817-821).


Assuntos
Anorexia Nervosa/psicologia , Transtorno da Compulsão Alimentar/psicologia , Peso Corporal , Bulimia Nervosa/psicologia , Adulto , Transtornos Dismórficos Corporais , Imagem Corporal , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Satisfação Pessoal , Autocuidado
11.
Compr Psychiatry ; 67: 54-8, 2016 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27095335

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether narrowing the criteria of anorexia nervosa (AN) subtypes among adults based on further delineations of current binge eating and purging (i.e., binge eating only, purging only, binge eating and purging, and restricting only) improves the potential clinical utility of the current DSM-5 system that specifies two types (i.e., current binge eating and/or purging and restricting, specified as the absence of current binge eating and/or purging). METHOD: Self-reported eating disorder and psychiatric symptoms based on the Eating Disorder Questionnaire were examined in 347 adults from a multisite clinical sample who met DSM-IV criteria for AN. Classification based on binge eating and purging symptoms yielded the following subtypes: 118 restricting only (AN-R; no current binge eating or purging); 133 binge eating and purging (AN-B & P; current binge eating and purging); 43 binge eating only (AN-B; current binge eating and no current purging); and 53 purging only (AN-P; current purging and no current binge eating). RESULTS: The AN-R group had lower current body mass index compared to AN-B & P and AN-P with no group differences in highest, lowest, or desired body mass index. The probability of amenorrhea was higher for the AN-R and AN-B & P groups than the AN-P group. The probability of diet pill use was elevated for the AN-B & P and AN-P groups compared to the AN-R group. The AN-P group also had a higher probability of fasting than the AN-R group. The probability of substance use including tobacco was lower in the AN-R group than the other three groups. No group differences were found on measures of hospitalization, body image, physical symptoms, exercise, or dieting behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: These findings do not support the validity or clinical utility of classifying AN into narrower subtypes based on current binge eating, purging, and binge eating with purging given that few differences were found among groups who reported any combination of current binge eating and purging. Future research is needed to replicate these findings and to further examine the AN subtype classification schemes.


Assuntos
Anorexia Nervosa/psicologia , Transtorno da Compulsão Alimentar/psicologia , Imagem Corporal , Adulto , Anorexia Nervosa/classificação , Índice de Massa Corporal , Bulimia/psicologia , Bulimia Nervosa/psicologia , Manual Diagnóstico e Estatístico de Transtornos Mentais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Motivação , Inquéritos e Questionários
12.
Psychiatry Res ; 240: 202-208, 2016 06 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27111214

RESUMO

The current study examined the association between affect and self-reported alcohol intoxication in women with bulimia nervosa (BN; N=133). Participants completed a two-week ecological momentary assessment protocol. Momentary global positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA), as well as the facets of NA (fear, guilt, hostility and sadness), were measured. Forty-five participants endorsed that they "got drunk" during the study period. Daily mean and variability of global PA and NA were compared between days with self-reported alcohol intoxication and days without self-reported alcohol intoxication. Trajectories of affect were modeled prior to and following episodes of self-reported alcohol intoxication. There were no differences in the mean or variability of PA or NA on days characterized by self-reported alcohol intoxication compared to days with no self-reported alcohol intoxication (ps>0.05). PA decreased significantly prior to self-reported alcohol intoxication and remained stable afterwards. There were no changes in global NA before or after self-reported alcohol intoxication, but an examination of the facets of NA showed that sadness increased following episodes of self-reported alcohol intoxication. These findings showed only partial support for a negative reinforcement model of alcohol use in women with BN.


Assuntos
Afeto , Intoxicação Alcoólica/psicologia , Bulimia Nervosa/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Medo , Feminino , Culpa , Hostilidade , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Autorrelato , Adulto Jovem
13.
Eat Weight Disord ; 21(1): 133-6, 2016 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26449853

RESUMO

The development of eating pathology is a concern following bariatric surgery, even in the absence of any pre-surgical psychopathology. No consistent risk factors have emerged in the literature to identify those at greatest risk. However, post-surgical guidelines encourage eating behaviors that would be considered disordered in other contexts. We present a case of an adolescent developing bulimia nervosa following gastric bypass surgery and the escalation of her symptoms from diligently following recommended food behaviors to a full-syndrome clinical eating disorder. We discuss the differences between appropriate post-surgical eating behaviors and disordered eating behaviors. We provide recommendations for clinicians to screen for eating pathology and referrals to an interprofessional treatment team to address eating disordered behaviors and cognitions.


Assuntos
Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/etiologia , Derivação Gástrica/efeitos adversos , Obesidade Mórbida/cirurgia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/psicologia , Adolescente , Comportamento Alimentar/psicologia , Feminino , Derivação Gástrica/psicologia , Humanos , Obesidade Mórbida/psicologia
14.
Eat Weight Disord ; 21(2): 199-204, 2016 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26462683

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore the association between specific forms of childhood abuse and neglect with lifetime suicide attempts in women with bulimia nervosa (BN). METHODS: Two hundred and four women aged 18-65 (mean 25.6 years, SD 9.13) with full or subclinical BN were recruited in five US Midwestern communities and specialized eating disorder clinics. Participants completed questionnaires including the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and self-reported whether they had ever had a lifetime suicide attempt. Logistic regression analyses were used to predict lifetime suicide attempts from each subscale of the CTQ. RESULTS: Childhood emotional, physical, and sexual abuse were significantly associated with the presence of a lifetime suicide attempt in women with BN. Childhood emotional and physical neglect were not associated with suicide attempts. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with BN who have experienced childhood emotional and sexual abuse are at increased risk of a lifetime suicide attempt. Future research is needed to understand the mechanism to address in treatment and prevention efforts. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the potential increased risk of suicide in individuals with BN with a history of childhood abuse.


Assuntos
Sobreviventes Adultos de Maus-Tratos Infantis/psicologia , Bulimia Nervosa/psicologia , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
15.
Int J Eat Disord ; 48(8): 1150-7, 2015 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26368333

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The relative importance of loss of control and overeating in the relationship between binge eating and eating-related and general psychopathology has been debated in the literature. This study assessed the prevalence and correlates of overeating with and without loss of control within a diverse, population-based sample of adolescents. METHOD: A highly diverse (81.1% non-White) sample of adolescents (n = 2,793) from EAT-2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) completed self-report questionnaires assessing eating-related psychopathology, substance use, nonsuicidal self-injury, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem. RESULTS: Overeating without loss of control was reported by 6.9% of girls and 5.0% of boys, while 9.6% of girls and 6.3% of boys reported overeating with loss of control (binge eating). Overall, overeating (with or without loss of control) was positively associated with unhealthy or extreme weight control behaviors, dieting, nonsuicidal self-injury, lower body satisfaction, and self-esteem, and higher depressive symptoms relative to no overeating. Among girls, binge eating was associated with unhealthy or extreme weight control behaviors, lower self-esteem, and higher depressive symptoms relative to overeating without loss of control, while in boys, binge eating was associated with greater cigarette usage, lower body satisfaction, and greater depressive symptoms than overeating without loss of control (although cigarette usage was comparable in boys reporting binge eating and no overeating). DISCUSSION: Any overeating, with or without loss of control, was associated with multiple adverse correlates among adolescents. Loss of control was uniquely associated with multiple health indicators, further highlighting its importance as a marker of severity of overeating.


Assuntos
Peso Corporal , Bulimia/psicologia , Hiperfagia/psicologia , Adolescente , Imagem Corporal/psicologia , Bulimia/epidemiologia , Criança , Depressão/psicologia , Comportamento Alimentar/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Hiperfagia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Satisfação Pessoal , Prevalência , Autoimagem , Autorrelato , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/psicologia
16.
Behav Res Ther ; 73: 74-8, 2015 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26264648

RESUMO

This study examined whether perceptions of group dynamics early in treatment predicted eating disorder outcomes in a sample of adults (N = 190) with binge eating disorder (BED) who participated in a 15-session group cognitive behavior therapy (gCBT) treatment with differing levels of therapist involvement (therapist led, therapist assisted, and self-help). The group dynamic variables included the Engaged subscale of the Group Climate Questionnaire--Short Form and the Group Attitude Scale, measured at session 2 and session 6. Treatment outcome was assessed in terms of global eating disorder severity and frequency of binge eating at end of treatment, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. Session 2 engagement and group attitudes were associated with improved outcome at 12-month follow-up. No other group dynamic variables were significantly associated with treatment outcome. Group dynamic variables did not differ by levels of therapist involvement. Results indicate that early engagement and attitudes may be predictive of improved eating disorder psychopathology at 12 month follow-up. However, the pattern of mostly insignificant findings indicates that in gCBT, group process variables may be less influential on outcomes relative to other treatment components. Additionally, participants were able to engage in group treatment regardless of level of therapist involvement.


Assuntos
Transtorno da Compulsão Alimentar/terapia , Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental/métodos , Psicoterapia de Grupo/métodos , Adulto , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Autoimagem , Resultado do Tratamento
17.
Eur Eat Disord Rev ; 23(6): 417-25, 2015 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26315343

RESUMO

Accumulating evidence suggests that bariatric surgery candidates are likely to present with eating disorders (EDs) and/or problematic eating behaviours (EBs), and research suggests that these problems may persist or develop after bariatric surgery. While there is growing evidence indicating that EDs and EBs may impact bariatric surgery outcomes, the definitions and assessment methods used lack consensus, and findings have been mixed. The aims of this paper were (1) to summarize the existing literature on pre-operative and post-operative EDs and problematic EBs; (2) to discuss the terms, definitions and assessment measures used across studies; and (3) to consider the extent to which the presence of these problems impact surgery outcomes. We highlight the importance of investigators utilizing consistent definitions and assessment methodologies across studies.


Assuntos
Cirurgia Bariátrica , Comportamento Alimentar/psicologia , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/epidemiologia , Obesidade Mórbida/cirurgia , Humanos , Obesidade Mórbida/psicologia , Resultado do Tratamento
18.
Eur Eat Disord Rev ; 23(6): 537-44, 2015 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26315489

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to identify personality traits and psychiatric comorbidities associated with a lifetime history of a suicide attempt in women with bulimia nervosa (BN). METHOD: Data from two samples of women with BN (n = 204 and n = 133) were examined. Participants in both samples completed the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire and reported whether they had ever had a lifetime suicide attempt. Comorbid psychopathology was based on self-reported questionnaire and interview data. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were run, predicting a lifetime suicide attempt. RESULTS: Based on the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire, identity problems were associated with a lifetime suicide attempt in both samples; cognitive dysregulation, anxiousness and insecure attachment were associated with a lifetime suicide attempt in one but not both samples. Lifetime anxiety disorder was associated with a lifetime suicide attempt in one sample, and depression was associated with a lifetime suicide attempt in both samples. Multivariate analyses revealed that only depression was uniquely associated with a lifetime suicide attempt in both samples. DISCUSSION: Although personality traits associated with aspects of emotion dysregulation were associated with a lifetime suicide attempt, depression was found to have the strongest association with a lifetime suicide attempt in two samples of women with BN. These findings suggest that depression severity may be the most important target of treatment and suicide prevention efforts in women with BN.


Assuntos
Bulimia Nervosa/psicologia , Depressão/psicologia , Inteligência Emocional , Personalidade , Tentativa de Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Bulimia Nervosa/epidemiologia , Comorbidade , Depressão/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
19.
Int J Eat Disord ; 48(7): 923-31, 2015 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26310991

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study examined negative and positive affect in relation to restrictive eating episodes (i.e., meals/snacks perceived as restrictive) and whether restrictive eating was associated with likelihood of subsequent eating disorder behaviors (i.e., additional restrictive eating, binge eating, vomiting, laxative use, weighing, exercising, meal skipping, drinking fluids to curb appetite, body checking). METHOD: Women with anorexia nervosa (N = 118) completed a 2-week ecological momentary assessment protocol. RESULTS: For both restrictive and nonrestrictive eating, negative affect significantly increased from prebehavior to the time of the behavior but remained stable thereafter, while positive affect remained stable from prebehavior to the time of the behavior but decreased significantly thereafter. Across time, negative affect was significantly lower and positive affect was significantly greater in restrictive than nonrestrictive episodes. Engagement in restrictive eating was associated with an increased likelihood of subsequent restrictive eating, laxative use, and body checking, but not other behaviors. Engagement in nonrestrictive eating was associated with a decreased likelihood of subsequent restrictive eating, binge eating, vomiting, laxative use, weighing, meal skipping, drinking fluids to curb appetite, and body checking. DISCUSSION: Despite similar patterns of affect across eating episodes over time, results suggest affect may be involved in the maintenance of restrictive eating in anorexia nervosa since restrictive episodes were associated with lower negative and greater positive affect across time compared to nonrestrictive episodes. Further, while restrictive episodes increased the likelihood of only three subsequent eating disorder behaviors, nonrestrictive episodes were protective since they decreased likelihood of all but one behavior.


Assuntos
Anorexia Nervosa/diagnóstico , Adolescente , Adulto , Anorexia Nervosa/complicações , Anorexia Nervosa/fisiopatologia , Meio Ambiente , Comportamento Alimentar , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
20.
Eur Eat Disord Rev ; 22(4): 230-6, 2014 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24852114

RESUMO

This study investigated the importance of the distinction between objective (OBE) and subjective binge eating (SBE) among 80 treatment-seeking adolescents with bulimia nervosa. We explored relationships among OBEs, SBEs, eating disorder (ED) symptomatology, depression, and self-esteem using two approaches. Group comparisons showed that OBE and SBE groups did not differ on ED symptoms or self-esteem; however, the SBE group had significantly greater depression. Examining continuous variables, OBEs (not SBEs) accounted for significant unique variance in global ED pathology, vomiting, and self-esteem. SBEs (not OBEs) accounted for significant unique variance in restraint and depression. Both OBEs and SBEs accounted for significant unique variance in eating concern; neither accounted for unique variance in weight/shape concern, laxative use, diuretic use, or driven exercise. Loss of control, rather than amount of food, may be most important in defining binge eating. Additionally, OBEs may indicate broader ED pathology, while SBEs may indicate restrictive/depressive symptomatology.


Assuntos
Bulimia Nervosa/psicologia , Bulimia/diagnóstico , Autoimagem , Adolescente , Peso Corporal , Depressão/diagnóstico , Exercício , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Lineares , Inquéritos e Questionários
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA