Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 40
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
2.
J Clin Nurs ; 2020 Apr 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32298498

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the experiences of people living with diabetes, residing in an urban diabetogenic area. BACKGROUND: Community-level social and environmental factors have a role to play in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Socio-economic deprivation; high obesity rates; high access to fast foods; and multiculturalism contribute to higher rates of diabetes in some geographical areas. However, there is a lack of research examining people's experiences of living with diabetes in diabetogenic areas. The word diabetogenic implies that the phenomenon of interest contributes to the development of diabetes. DESIGN: Qualitative, geographical case study approach. METHODS: A convenience sample of 17 people living with diabetes in a diabetogenic, low-socio-economic urban area participated in face-to-face, semi-structured interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. This paper adheres to the COREQ guidelines. FINDINGS: Four main themes were identified: 1. Diabetes fatalism: Inevitability and inertia; 2. Living with Inequity: Literacy and intersectionality; 3. Impersonal services: Intimidating and overwhelming; and, 4. Education in the community: Access and anecdotes. CONCLUSIONS: This study has highlighted the need to develop local solutions for local problems. In this geographical area, solutions need to address generally lower health literacy, how the community would prefer to receive diabetes education and the issue of diabetes fatalism. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Findings from this study have highlighted a need to re-examine how diabetes education is delivered in communities that are already experiencing multiple disadvantages. There are research and practice connotations for how fatalism is positioned for people at high risk of developing diabetes.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32198811

RESUMO

Seclusion and restraint are coercive practices associated with physical and psychological harm. International bodies have called for an end to these practices. However, these practices continue to be used. Elimination programmes have had some success in reducing the rates of these practices. Understanding coercive practices through the perspectives of involved individuals may facilitate a complete cessation of seclusion and restraint from the practice. Therefore, this qualitative review explored how nurses and consumers experienced seclusion and restraint events in mental health care. Five databases were searched. The search strategy resulted in the inclusion of fourteen qualitative papers. A thematic analysis was used to synthesize the findings. Six themes emerged under three main categories; shared experiences: disruption in care, disruption in the therapeutic relationship and shared negative impacts; nurses' experiences: Absence of less coercive alternatives; and consumers' experiences: overpowered, humiliated and punished. Considering these experiences during planning for seclusion and restraint prevention might facilitate more effective implementation of seclusion and restraint elimination programmes. Our findings suggested that consumers should receive recovery-oriented, trauma-informed and consumer-centred care; while nurses should be better supported through personal, professional and organizational developmental strategies. Further research should focus on investigating shared interventions among consumers and nurses and exploring carers' experiences with coercive practices.

4.
Contemp Nurse ; : 1-18, 2020 Mar 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32141400

RESUMO

Background: Regular health screening provides opportunities for early detection and effective treatment of disease. There is underutilisation of health services by migrants from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, particularly refugees in Australia.Aim: To explore the beliefs, understandings, and use of health and healthcare screening services among African refugee women living in Australia.Design/Method: Qualitative secondary analysis.Method: Oral narratives derived from two primary qualitative datasets of Sub-Saharan women in New South Wales, Australia, underwent secondary thematic analysis.Findings: Twenty-two of the forty-two women had refugee status on migrating to Australia. Thematic findings reflection of misinformation, low health literacy, and health screening as not a priority.Conclusions: There is an urgent need to develop innovative strategies to engage refugee migrant women in health screening by provision of culturally meaningful health information.Relevance to clinical practice: Including refugee women's suggestions for information to be provided by health services may improve attitudes towards screening and preventative health care.

5.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 2020 Jan 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32044279

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Interacting and engaging with other health care professionals can enhance communication and collaboration within the multidisciplinary healthcare team, contributing to improved patient safety and patient outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To explore the student learning experience utilizing the Reflective Interprofessional Education Model (RIPE) model of interprofessional learning. METHODS: Qualitative study utilizing data from seven (7) focus groups sessions. Data were transcribed verbatim using a transcribing service; and analyzed using Braun and Clarke's 6-phase process for thematic analysis. RESULTS: Fifty-five Master of Pharmacy pre-licenced students (male n = 25; female: n = 30) participated in the study. The 7 focus groups consisted of 6-8 participants ranging between 18 and 28 min in duration. Thematic analysis generated four key themes: (i) Time management: managing interruptions in a time pressured acute care environment is challenging but necessary; (ii) Learning the Lingo: patient-centered communicating and engaging patients and family in care; (iii) Communication: developing interprofessional communication as a vital skill for healthcare professionals; and (iv) Teamwork: recognizing the importance of teamwork, relationships and respect. CONCLUSIONS: Students found the simulated, acute care setting challenging for effective communication and collaboration with other health professional team members. It was also perceived that critical patient information can be lost or misinterpreted if there is poor interprofessional communication and collaboration, contributing to iatrogenesis and poor patient outcomes. Effective collaboration was perceived to be beneficial to enhancing confidence with engagement and communication, appreciation and respect for the expertise of other healthcare professions.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32048469

RESUMO

Nurses play a crucial role in the implementation of restrictive practices such as seclusion and restraint. Restrictive practices have been widely recognized as harmful practices and efforts to reduce their use have been in place for several years. While some reductions have been achieved, more information and insight into the perspectives and experiences of front-line mental health nursing staff is required if further changes are to be realized. Sixty-five respondents participated in an online survey to investigate Australian mental health nurses' personal experiences and opinions regarding restrictive practices. Analysis revealed restrictive practices as a complex, contested and challenging area of practice. Analysis of data revealed five main ways that restrictive practices were framed by respondents. These were as follows: as a response to fear; to maintain safety for all; a legacy of time and place; the last resort; and, a powerful source of occupational distress. In addition, findings revealed the need to support staff involved in restrictive practices. This need could be satisfied through the implementation of procedures to address post-restrictive distress at all levels of the organization. Ensuring an optimal work environment that includes appropriate staffing, availability of supportive education and structured routine debriefing of all episodes of restrictive practice is critical in achieving further reductions in seclusion and restraint.

7.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 29(1): 92-101, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31917517

RESUMO

Migrants from areas affected by war, especially refugee migrants, are susceptible to mental health issues. In addition to recognising trauma, health professionals, such as mental health nurses, need to be aware of the strength and resilience of refugees and migrants. The capacity to provide trauma-informed care that is shaped by the recognition of clients' strength and resilience is required/paramount to meet the current demand of multiculturalism emanating from an increased global migration. To facilitate increased awareness about West African women's resilience prior to migration and support trauma-informed care, we used a qualitative strength-based storytelling approach with 22 West African women residing in Sydney, Australia. Thematic analysis of the women's stories identified two major themes: When the World Falls Apart and Battered but Strong. Findings revealed that past personal experiences significantly influenced participants' strength and resilience and contributed to their mental health. Mental health professionals such as nurses can play an important role by incorporating knowledge about the resilience of migrants and refugees into providing appropriate trauma-informed care.

9.
Nurse Educ Today ; 77: 32-39, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30947020

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Research literature suggests that learning from mistakes facilitates news insights and leads to professional development. The significant growth in the use of simulation-based learning is premised on the understanding that in this context learners can make and learn from their errors without negatively impacting real patients. However, studies also suggest that making errors can be emotionally detrimental to learners. Given these contradictory findings, this literature review explores learners' views about this phenomenon. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this integrated review was to explore healthcare students' perceptions of making errors during simulation-based learning experiences. DESIGN: Whittemore and Knafl's framework for integrated reviews was used to structure this review. DATA SOURCES: Five electronic databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuest, and SCOPUS and the search engine Google Scholar were searched. The initial terms used were nursing students, medical students, health professionals, error*, mistake*, and simulation. METHODS: The original search resulted in 2317 potential records. After screening against the inclusion/exclusion criteria, 11 articles were critically appraised using The Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) checklist and were included in the review. RESULTS: The two overarching themes to emerge from the analysis were the impact of errors on learners and the impact of errors on learning. CONCLUSION: Despite the negative feelings experienced by some students regarding making mistakes in simulation, there were key factors that moderated the impact of these feelings and transformed the errors into learning opportunities. These included: the provision of a safe learning environment where constructive feedback was provided by skilled educators, and where students were supported to take responsibility for their mistakes. Although the findings suggest that making mistakes in simulation-based learning can be beneficial, optimising learning from mistakes requires a deliberate and thoughtful approach in which educators plan for and support learners to recognise, acknowledge and respond effectively to errors.


Assuntos
Erros Médicos/psicologia , Percepção , Estudantes/psicologia , Humanos , Erros Médicos/enfermagem , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Treinamento por Simulação/métodos , Treinamento por Simulação/tendências
11.
Contemp Nurse ; 55(4-5): 278-287, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30092706

RESUMO

Aim: To describe undergraduate nursing students' situational awareness and understanding of effective liaison and collaboration within the nursing team during interrupted medication administration.Background: Medication errors related to interruptions are a major problem in health care, impacting on patient morbidity and mortality and increasing the burden of related costs. Effective liaison, teamwork and situation awareness are requisite skills for nurses to facilitate the safe management of interruptions during medication administration.Method: A role-play simulation was offered to 528 second-year undergraduate Bachelor of Nursing students. Qualitative written reflective responses were subsequently collected and subject to thematic analysis to derive themes.Results: Participants (451:528) reported an improved understanding of an unfamiliar and challenging situation that required cooperation and collaboration amongst the nursing team to improve outcomes.Conclusion(s): This simulation exposed undergraduate nurses with limited clinical experience to a situation otherwise unavailable to them. The skills required to engage in effective liaison and teamwork in dynamic situations are vital elements in achieving quality care and must begin to be taught at an undergraduate level.

12.
Contemp Nurse ; 54(2): 150-159, 2018 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29635959

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This paper reports on women's experiences of weight gain and obesity as they became acculturated to the Australian diet and lifestyle. BACKGROUND: Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa have a much higher risk of obesity than the native population when settling in industrialised countries. METHOD: Qualitative. RESULTS: Women in this study reported weight gain post-migration. This was attributed to increased access to a wide variety of food including takeaway food and more sedentary lifestyles. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity has long-term consequences for health and well-being. Further research is needed to support a healthy transition to life in Australia. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Gaining insight into the underlying reasons that West African immigrants to Australia become obese could contribute to assisting health professionals design culturally appropriate interventions and health education programmes to support new arrivals.


Assuntos
Dieta , Emigração e Imigração , Estilo de Vida , Ganho de Peso , Adulto , África Ocidental/etnologia , Austrália/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Obesidade/etnologia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Fatores de Risco
13.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 81: 14-20, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29427831

RESUMO

AIM: The aim of this study was to assess student nurses' knowledge of and attitudes towards pressure injury prevention evidence-based guidelines. BACKGROUND: Pressure injuries are a substantial problem in many healthcare settings causing major harm to patients, and generating major economic costs for health service providers. Nurses have a crucial role in the prevention of pressure injuries across all health care settings. DESIGN: A multi-centered, cross-sectional study was conducted using a paper-based questionnaire with undergraduate nursing students enrolled in seven universities with campuses across five Australian states (Queensland, New South Wales, Western Australia, Victoria and Tasmania). METHODS: Data were collected from nursing students using two validated instruments (Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Assessment Instrument and Attitude Toward Pressure Ulcer Prevention Instrument), to measure students' pressure injury prevention knowledge and attitudes. RESULTS: Students reported relatively low pressure injury prevention knowledge scores (51%), and high attitude scores (78%). Critical issues in this study were nursing students' lack of knowledge about preventative strategies to reduce the amount and duration of pressure/shear, and lower confidence in their capability to prevent pressure injury. Level of education and exposure to working in a greater number of different clinical units were significantly related to pressure injury prevention knowledge and attitude scores. CONCLUSION: The study findings highlight the need to implement a comprehensive approach to increasing Australian nursing students' pressure injury prevention and management knowledge, as well as ensuring that these students have adequate experiences in clinical units, with a high focus on pressure injury prevention to raise their personal capability.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Lesão por Pressão/prevenção & controle , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Adulto , Austrália , Estudos Transversais , Currículo , Bacharelado em Enfermagem/organização & administração , Enfermagem Baseada em Evidências , Feminino , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
14.
J Clin Nurs ; 27(1-2): e345-e353, 2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28493618

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe the effect that immersive simulation experiences and guided reflection can have on the undergraduate nurses' understanding of how stressful environments impact their emotions, performance and ability to implement safe administration of medications. BACKGROUND: Patient safety can be jeopardised if nurses are unsure of how to appropriately manage and respond to interruptions. Medication administration errors are a major patient safety issue and often occur as a consequence of ineffective interruption management. The skills associated with medication administration are most often taught to, and performed by, undergraduate nurses in a controlled environment. However, the clinical environment in which nurses are expected to administer medications is often highly stressed and nurses are frequently interrupted. DESIGN/METHODS: This study used role-play simulation and written reflections to facilitate deeper levels of student self-awareness. A qualitative approach was taken to explore students' understanding of the effects of interruptions on their ability to undertake safe medication administration. Convenience sampling of second-year undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a medical-surgical subject was used in this study. Data were obtained from 451:528 (85.42%) of those students and analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Students reported increasing consciousness and the importance of reflection for evaluating performance and gaining self-awareness. They described self-awareness, effective communication, compassion and empathy as significant factors in facilitating self-efficacy and improved patient care outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Following a role-play simulation experience, student nurses reported new knowledge and skill acquisition related to patient safety, and new awareness of the need for empathetic and compassionate care during medication administration. Practicing medication administration in realistic settings adds to current strategies that aim to reduce medication errors by allowing students to reflect on and in practice and develop strategies to ensure patient safety. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Experiencing clinical scenarios within the safety of simulated environments, offers undergraduate student nurses an opportunity to reflect on practice to provide safer, more empathetic and compassionate care for patients in the future.


Assuntos
Bacharelado em Enfermagem , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Autoeficácia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Competência Clínica , Bacharelado em Enfermagem/métodos , Empatia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Erros de Medicação/enfermagem , Segurança do Paciente , Simulação de Paciente , Preparações Farmacêuticas/administração & dosagem
15.
Contemp Nurse ; 53(4): 436-444, 2017 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28959917

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Families come in many forms and single parent women headed households are common with nurses being well positioned to provide support for these women and their children. For children growing up in lone parent households, the nature of family relationships and the availability of a social support network are important factors in reducing developmental risks. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore adult men's recollections of growing up in a father-absent home. DESIGN: This study utilised a qualitative methodology. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 adult men who grew up in a father-absent home due to family discord. Interview transcripts were thematically analysed using an inductive approach. FINDINGS: Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed two themes relating to childhood father figures and family relational networks. For some men, ambivalent, violent or unavailable father figures stepped into the void created by the absent father. Others experienced positive father figures or multigenerational relationships, which provided positive relational supports and attachments. CONCLUSION: The findings illuminate the dynamics of family resilience and provide important insights for nurses and other family healthcare workers.


Assuntos
Relações Pai-Filho , Pai/psicologia , Núcleo Familiar/psicologia , Resiliência Psicológica , Família de Pais Solteiros/psicologia , Adulto , Austrália , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa
16.
J Clin Nurs ; 26(23-24): 4839-4847, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28445621

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe undergraduate student nurse responses to a simulated role-play experience focussing on managing interruptions during medication administration. BACKGROUND: Improving patient safety requires that we find creative and innovative methods of teaching medication administration to undergraduate nurses in real-world conditions. Nurses are responsible for the majority of medication administrations in health care. Incidents and errors associated with medications are a significant patient safety issue and often occur as a result of interruptions. Undergraduate nursing students are generally taught medication administration skills in a calm and uninterrupted simulated environment. However, in the clinical environment medication administration is challenged by multiple interruptions. DESIGN/METHODS: A qualitative study using convenience sampling was used to examine student perceptions of a simulated role-play experience. Data were collected from 451 of a possible 528 student written reflective responses and subject to thematic analysis. RESULTS: Students reported an increased understanding of the impacts of interruptions while administering medications and an improved awareness of how to manage disruptions. This study reports on one of three emergent themes: "Calm to chaos: engaging with the complex nature of clinical practice." CONCLUSIONS: Interrupting medication administration in realistic and safe settings facilitates awareness, allows for students to begin to develop management strategies in relation to interruption and increases their confidence. Students were given the opportunity to consolidate and integrate prior and new knowledge and skills through this role-play simulation.


Assuntos
Bacharelado em Enfermagem , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Preparações Farmacêuticas/administração & dosagem , Treinamento por Simulação/métodos , Estudantes de Enfermagem , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Erros de Medicação/enfermagem , Segurança do Paciente/normas , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Desempenho de Papéis
17.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 71: 89-96, 2017 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28364581

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patient safety is critical to the provision of quality health care and thus is an essential component of nurse education. OBJECTIVE: To describe first, second and third year Australian undergraduate nursing students' confidence in patient safety knowledge acquired in the classroom and clinical settings across the three years of the undergraduate nursing program. DESIGN: A cross-sectional online survey conducted in 2015. SETTING: Seven Australian universities with campuses across three states (Queensland, New South Wales, South Australia). PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1319 Australian undergraduate nursing students. METHODS: Participants were surveyed using the 31-item Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey (H-PEPSS). Descriptive statistics summarised the sample and survey responses. Paired t-tests, ANOVA and generalized-estimating-equations models were used to compare responses across learning settings (classroom and clinical), and year of nursing course. RESULTS: Participants were most confident in their learning of clinical safety skills and least confident in learning about the sociocultural dimensions of working in teams with other health professionals, managing safety risks and understanding human and environmental factors. Only 59% of students felt confident they could approach someone engaging in unsafe practice, 75% of students agreed it was difficult to question the decisions or actions of those with more authority, and 78% were concerned they would face disciplinary action if they made a serious error. One patient safety subscale, Recognising and responding to remove immediate safety risks, was rated significantly higher by third year nursing students than by first and second year students. Two broader aspects of patient safety scales, Consistency in how patient safety issues are dealt with by different preceptors, and System aspects of patient safety are well covered in our program, were rated significantly higher by first year nursing students than by second and third year students. One scale, Understanding that reporting adverse events and close calls can lead to change and can reduce recurrence of events, was rated significantly higher by third year students than first and second year students. CONCLUSIONS: In order are to achieve meaningful improvements in patient safety, and create harm free environments for patients, it is crucial that nursing students develop confidence communicating with others to improve patient safety, particularly in the areas of challenging poor practice, and recognising, responding to and disclosing adverse events, including errors and near misses.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Segurança do Paciente , Autoeficácia , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Austrália , Estudos Transversais , Humanos
18.
J Nurs Manag ; 24(7): 902-914, 2016 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27213847

RESUMO

AIMS: To analyse influential policies that inform practice related to pressure injury management in Australia, England, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Scotland and the United States of America. BACKGROUND: Pressure injuries are associated with significant harm to patients, and carry economic consequences for the health sector. Internationally, preventing and managing pressure injuries is a key nursing activity and quality indicator. EVALUATION: Comparative review and synthesis of pressure injury policies that inform practice. KEY ISSUES: The predominant focus of policy is on patient risk assessment, compliance with documentation and pressure relief. Financial penalty for institutions is emerging as a strategy where pressure injuries occur. Comparisons of prevalence rates are hampered by the lack of consensus on data collection and reporting. To date there has been little evaluation of policy implementation and implemented policy strategies, associated guidelines remain founded upon expert opinion and low-level evidence. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The pressure injury policy agenda has fostered a discourse of attention to incidents, compliance and penalty (sanctions). Prevention and intervention strategies are informed by technical and biomedical interpretations of patient risk and harm, with little attention given to the nature or design of nursing work. Considerable challenges remain if this policy agenda is successfully to eliminate pressure injury as a source of patient harm.


Assuntos
Consenso , Política de Saúde/tendências , Internacionalidade , Dano ao Paciente/prevenção & controle , Lesão por Pressão/prevenção & controle , Austrália , Inglaterra , Hong Kong , Humanos , Nova Zelândia , Formulação de Políticas , Medição de Risco , Escócia , Estados Unidos
19.
Health Care Women Int ; 37(9): 946-963, 2016 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26930120

RESUMO

African migrant women represent a rapidly growing cohort of new arrivals in many countries. Many of these women demonstrate strength and resilience throughout the stressful migration process. In this integrative review, we explore the literature on African migrants' resilience using an ecological framework. Nine peer-reviewed journal articles and six grey literature documents were reviewed. Key internal and external factors in achieving resilience were identified, discussed, and diagrammatically represented using Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Framework under micro-, meso-, exo-, and macro-levels. Our findings show that the capacity for resilience demonstrated during migration could have implications for policy and practice.


Assuntos
Adaptação Psicológica , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/psicologia , Resiliência Psicológica , Estresse Psicológico , Migrantes/psicologia , Aculturação , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/etnologia , Ecossistema , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Autoimagem , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia
20.
Nurse Educ Today ; 38: 126-31, 2016 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26740031

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Simulation allows students to practice key psychomotor skills and gain technical proficiency, fostering the development of clinical reasoning and student confidence in a low risk environment. Manikins are a valuable learning tool; yet there is a distinct lack of empirical research investigating how to enhance engagement between nursing students and manikins. OBJECTIVE: To describe student perspectives of a layered, technology enhanced approach to improve the simulation learning experience. EDUCATIONAL FRAMEWORK: Tanner's Model of Clinical Judgment underpins the entire curriculum. This study additionally drew on the principles of narrative pedagogy. INTERVENTION: Across ten teaching weeks, five separate case studies were introduced to students through short vignettes. Students viewed the vignettes prior to their laboratory class. In the labs, manikins were dressed in the props used in the vignettes. SETTING: The innovation was trialed in a second year core subject of a Bachelor of Nursing program in a large urban university in the autumn semester of 2014. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Following ethics approval, students were emailed a participant information sheet. A focus group of nine students was held. The discussion was digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim prior to being subject to thematic analysis. Students' comments (143) about the vignettes in their standard subject specific student feedback surveys were also considered as data. RESULTS: Four themes were identified: Getting past the plastic; knowing what to say; connecting and caring; and, embracing diversity. The feedback indicated that these measures increased students ability to suspend disbelief, feel connected to, and approach the manikins in a more understanding and empathetic fashion. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to achieving increased engagement with manikins, other advantages such as students reflecting on their own values and pre-conceived notions of people from diverse backgrounds were realized.


Assuntos
Empatia , Manequins , Treinamento por Simulação , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Competência Clínica , Bacharelado em Enfermagem , Tecnologia Educacional , Humanos , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA