Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 15 de 15
Filtrar
1.
Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol ; 30(1): 109-116, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31531739

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Acetabular fractures are difficult to classify owing to the complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the pelvis. 3D printing helps to understand and reliably classify acetabular fracture types. 3D-virtual reality (VR) may have comparable benefits. Our hypothesis is that 3D-VR is equivalent to 3D printing in understanding acetabular fracture patterns. METHODS: A total of 27 observers of various experience levels from several hospitals were requested to classify twenty 3D printed and VR models according to the Judet-Letournel classification. Additionally, surgeons were asked to state their preferred surgical approach and patient positioning. Time to classify each fracture type was recorded. The cases were randomized to rule out a learning curve. Inter-observer agreement was analyzed using Fleiss' kappa statistics (κ). RESULTS: Inter-observer agreements varied by observer group and type of model used to classify the fracture: medical students: 3D print (κ = 0.61), VR (κ = 0.41); junior surgical residents: 3D print (0.51) VR (0.54); senior surgical residents: 3D print (0.66) VR (0.52); junior surgeons: 3D print (0.56), VR (0.43); senior surgeons: 3D print (κ = 0.59), VR (κ = 0.42). Using 3D printed models, there was more agreement on the surgical approach (junior surgeons κ = 0.23, senior surgeons κ = 0.31) when compared with VR (junior surgeons κ = 0.17, senior surgeons 0.25). No difference was found in time used to classify these fractures between 3D printing and VR for all groups (P = 1.000). CONCLUSIONS: The Judet-Letournel acetabular classification stays difficult to interpret; only moderate kappa agreements were found. We found 3D-VR inferior to 3D printing in classifying acetabular fractures. Furthermore, the current 3D-VR technology is still not practical for intra-operative use.


Assuntos
Acetábulo/lesões , Competência Clínica , Fraturas Ósseas/diagnóstico por imagem , Impressão Tridimensional , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X/métodos , Realidade Virtual , Adulto , Compreensão , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Feminino , Fixação Interna de Fraturas/métodos , Fraturas Ósseas/cirurgia , Humanos , Internato e Residência/métodos , Curva de Aprendizado , Masculino , Países Baixos , Variações Dependentes do Observador , Ortopedia/educação , Sistema de Registros
2.
World J Emerg Surg ; 14: 38, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31384292

RESUMO

Background: Multiple rib fractures are common injuries in both the young and elderly. Rib fractures account for 10% of all trauma admissions and are seen in up to 39% of patients after thoracic trauma. With morbidity and mortality rates increasing with the number of rib fractures as well as poor quality of life at long-term follow-up, multiple rib fractures pose a serious health hazard. Operative fixation of flail chest is beneficial over nonoperative treatment regarding, among others, pneumonia and both intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay. With no high-quality evidence on the effects of multiple simple rib fracture treatment, the optimal treatment modality remains unknown. This study sets out to investigate outcome of operative fixation versus nonoperative treatment of multiple simple rib fractures. Methods: The proposed study is a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Patients will be eligible if they have three or more multiple simple rib fractures of which at least one is dislocated over one shaft width or with unbearable pain (visual analog scale (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) > 6). Patients in the intervention group will be treated with open reduction and internal fixation. Pre- and postoperative care equals treatment in the control group. The control group will receive nonoperative treatment, consisting of pain management, bronchodilator inhalers, oxygen support or mechanical ventilation if needed, and pulmonary physical therapy. The primary outcome measure will be occurrence of pneumonia within 30 days after trauma. Secondary outcome measures are the need and duration of mechanical ventilation, thoracic pain and analgesics use, (recovery of) pulmonary function, hospital and ICU length of stay, thoracic injury-related and surgery-related complications and mortality, secondary interventions, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness comprising health care consumption and productivity loss. Follow-up visits will be standardized and daily during hospital admission, at 14 days and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Discussion: With favorable results in flail chest patients, operative treatment may also be beneficial in patients with multiple simple rib fractures. The FixCon trial will be the first study to compare clinical, functional, and economic outcome between operative fixation and nonoperative treatment for multiple simple rib fractures. Trial registration: www.trialregister.nl, NTR7248. Registered May 31, 2018.


Assuntos
Tratamento Conservador/normas , Fixação Interna de Fraturas/normas , Fraturas das Costelas/cirurgia , Traumatismos Torácicos/terapia , Idoso , Protocolos Clínicos , Feminino , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fraturas das Costelas/fisiopatologia
3.
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd ; 1632019 01 03.
Artigo em Holandês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30638006

RESUMO

A 37-year-old recrute in the Royal Dutch Army developed blisters on the right cheek approximately 30 minutes after a boot camp exercise in the mangroves of the island of Curaçao. This bullous dermatitis was caused by direct contact with sap from the bark of the manzanilla tree (Hippomane mancinella). As a member of the family Euphorbiaceae, all parts of this tree are highly toxic. Even rain drops falling from the leaves can cause a bullous dermatitis. Usually, symptomatic treatment will allow healing of the dermatitis in a matter of weeks.


Assuntos
Vesícula/etiologia , Bochecha , Dermatite/etiologia , Hippomane/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Curaçao , Humanos , Masculino , Militares
5.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 37(24): 2034-45, 2012 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22648023

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: A methodological systematic review. OBJECTIVE: To critically appraise the validity of preventive effects attributed to prophylactic treatments for surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: As a result of a rapidly increasing number of spinal procedures, health care expenditure is expected to increase substantially in the foreseeable future. Administration of effective prophylactic treatments may prevent occurrence of SSIs and may thus result in lower costs. To date, however, no review appraising the methodological quality of studies evaluating prophylactic treatments for spinal SSIs has been published. METHODS: Contemporary studies evaluating the preventive effect of prophylactic interventions on the rate of SSI after spinal surgery were searched through the Medline and EMBASE databases (January 2001 to December 2010). References were retrieved and bias-prone study features were abstracted individually and independently by 2 authors. RESULTS: Eighteen eligible studies were identified, including 6 randomized controlled trials and 12 comparative cohort studies. Most often, antibiotic prophylaxis administration was investigated (n = 7). Included studies covered a wide variation of indications and surgical procedures. Except for 5 studies (28%), applied definitions of SSI outcomes were ambiguous. Although several important methodological aspects, including blinding of outcome assessors and attrition, were poorly reported in randomized controlled trials, these studies were far less susceptible to bias and confounding as observed in nonrandomized studies. None of the 12 cohort studies adjusted for confounding by matching, stratification, or multivariate regression techniques. CONCLUSION: Given the plethora of previously hypothesized confounding risk factors for a spinal SSI, conduct of nonrandomized comparative therapeutic studies is strongly discouraged. On the other hand, methodological safeguards, including use of standardized definitions of putative confounders and outcomes, should be considered in more detail during the design phase of a randomized trial.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Antibioticoprofilaxia/métodos , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/efeitos adversos , Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/etiologia
6.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 37(24): 2017-33, 2012 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22565388

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: A methodological systematic review. OBJECTIVE: To critically appraise the validity of risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SSIs lead to higher morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. Understanding which factors lead to an increased risk of SSI is important for the development of prophylactic protocols to counter this risk. To date, however, no review appraising the methodological quality of studies evaluating risk factors for spinal SSIs has been published. METHODS: Contemporary studies identifying risk factors for SSI after spinal surgery were searched through the Medline and EMBASE databases (January 2001 to December 2010). References were retrieved and bias-prone study features were abstracted individually and independently by 2 authors. RESULTS: Twenty-four eligible studies were identified, including 9 (nested) case-control studies and 15 case series. Included studies covered wide variations of indications and surgical procedures. A total of 73 different types of factors were evaluated for the risk of an SSI of which 34 (47%) were reported to be significantly related to at least 1 study. Only the following risk factors-diabetes mellitus, obesity, and previous SSI-were confirmed more often (n = 11, 8, and 3, respectively) as a significant risk factor for an SSI than they were disproved (n = 7, 6, and 1, respectively). Various sources of heterogeneity were observed, including patient selection, selection and analysis of putative risk factors, and definitions of SSI outcomes. CONCLUSION: There is an abundance of conflicting data on risk factors for SSI after spinal surgery. Given various sources of heterogeneity observed in observational literature, there is a paucity of solid evidence for the proof of robust risk factors. The authors recommend the introduction, validation, and use of a standardized set of strongly justified eligibility criteria and well-defined candidate risk factors and spinal SSI outcomes.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Ortopédicos/efeitos adversos , Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/etiologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/complicações , Humanos , Obesidade/complicações , Fatores de Risco
7.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 35(20): 1887-92, 2010 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20802390

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review. OBJECTIVE: Anchor stability and prominence are problems with pelvic fixation in pediatric spinal deformity surgery. We compared the new sacral alar iliac (SAI) fixation technique (with a starting point in the sacral ala and in-line anchors deep under the midline muscle flap) with other methods of screw fixation. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Iliac anchors have been shown to provide the best form of pelvic fixation. A trajectory from the posterior sacral surface to the iliac wings has recently been described. To our knowledge, no clinical series has compared this method of pelvic fixation in children to others. METHODS: Of 32 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent SAI fixation, 2 died and 26 returned for follow-up (>2 years). Mean age at surgery was 14 years. Average screw size was 67 mm long and 7 to 9 mm in diameter. Clinical examinations, radiographs, and computed tomography scans were analyzed. Outcomes included pain over the implants, screw placement, implant prominence, radiographic lucency, need for revision, and infection. SAI patients were compared with 27 previous patients who had pelvic fixation via other screw techniques. RESULTS: For SAI fixation, correction of pelvic obliquity and Cobb angles were 20° ± 11° (70%) and 42° ± 25° (67%), respectively. For other pelvic fixation methods, those values were 10° ± 9° (50%), and 46° ± 16° (60%), respectively. Compared with other screws, SAI screws provided significantly better pelvic obliquity correction (P = 0.002) but no difference in Cobb correction. There were 2 lucencies adjacent to screws in both groups. Computed tomography scans of 18 SAI patients showed no intrapelvic protrusion, but 1 screw extended laterally (<5 mm). One early SAI patient required revision with larger screws, which relieved pain; there was 1 revision in the comparison group. SAI patients had no deep infections, implant prominence, late skin breakdown, or anchor migration; traditional patients had 3 deep infections (P = 0.09) and 3 instances of implant prominence, skin breakdown, or anchor migration. CONCLUSION: SAI pelvic fixation produces better correction of pelvic obliquity than do previous techniques. Radiographic and clinical anchor stability is satisfactory at 2-year follow-up.


Assuntos
Ílio/cirurgia , Fixadores Internos , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/instrumentação , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/métodos , Ossos Pélvicos/anormalidades , Ossos Pélvicos/cirurgia , Sacro/cirurgia , Adolescente , Parafusos Ósseos , Criança , Estudos de Viabilidade , Seguimentos , Humanos , Ílio/diagnóstico por imagem , Incidência , Infecções/epidemiologia , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/efeitos adversos , Dor/epidemiologia , Ossos Pélvicos/diagnóstico por imagem , Radiografia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sacro/diagnóstico por imagem , Escoliose/diagnóstico por imagem , Escoliose/cirurgia , Retalhos Cirúrgicos , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
8.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 35(13): 1323-8, 2010 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20150831

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, retrospective cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presentation, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SSI after spine surgery is frequently seen. Small case control studies have been published reporting the results of treatment options of SSI. We performed this study to identify the most common clinical and laboratory presentation of a SSI, the most frequently seen infective organism, and evaluate the effectiveness of current treatment. METHODS: All patients who underwent spinal surgery at our institution for diagnosis other than infection between June 1996 and December 2005 (N=3174) were reviewed. All cases of SSI were identified. Patient and operative characteristics were reviewed. Infection type (deep or superficial), treatment course, laboratory and culture results were abstracted. RESULTS: A total of 132 cases of SSI (84 deep and 48 superficial) were identified. About 72.7% of the SSI were detected as outpatients an average 28.7 days (deep, 29.9; superficial, 25.2) after the index procedure. Wound drainage was the most common complaint (68.2%). C-reactive protein level was elevated in 98.0%, erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated in 94.4%, but only 48.6% had elevated white blood cell count. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 72.6% of deep and 85.7% of superficial positive cultures. Seventy-six percent of deep SSI could be treated with a single debridement to clear the SSI. Instrumentation was retained or primarily exchanged if loose in all cases. Around 72.9% of superficial SSI were treated without formal debridement in the operating room. Antibiotic treatment was longer in deep SSI (40.8 vs. 19.6 days). CONCLUSION: Deep SSI following spinal surgery was effectively treated with single stage debridement and intravenous antibiotics. Superficial SSI could be treated effectively with local wound care and oral antibiotic therapy.


Assuntos
Infecções Bacterianas/terapia , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/métodos , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Bactérias/efeitos dos fármacos , Bactérias/isolamento & purificação , Infecções Bacterianas/epidemiologia , Infecções Bacterianas/etiologia , Sedimentação Sanguínea , Proteína C-Reativa/metabolismo , Desbridamento , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Contagem de Leucócitos , Masculino , Maryland/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/efeitos adversos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Infecções Estafilocócicas/epidemiologia , Infecções Estafilocócicas/etiologia , Infecções Estafilocócicas/terapia , Staphylococcus aureus/efeitos dos fármacos , Staphylococcus aureus/isolamento & purificação , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/epidemiologia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/etiologia
9.
Spine J ; 10(5): 410-6, 2010 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20080066

RESUMO

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Surgical site infection after spinal surgery is frequently seen. It occurs between 0.7% and 12% of patients, leading to higher morbidity, mortality, and health-care costs. Osteotomy procedures are known to have increased blood losses and surgical times when compared with other spinal surgeries. Both of these factors have previously been identified as significant risk factors for SSI. We performed a cohort study of this high-risk population to identify risk factors and rates of SSI after spinal osteotomy surgery and identify difference in risk between different types of osteotomies. PURPOSE: The objective of the study was to assess the incidence and identify significant risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal osteotomy. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of all adult patients who underwent spinal osteotomy surgery for deformity by an orthopedic surgeon in our university. METHODS: All electronic records of adult orthopedic patients whom underwent a spinal osteotomy procedure at our department between January 1998 and December 2005 (n=363) were abstracted. During surgery, a pedicle subtraction osteotomy (transpedicular wedge resection), anterior spine osteotomy (resection of anterior and middle columns), posterior Smith-Petersen osteotomy (resection of a portion of the superior and inferior lamina, ligamentum flavum, and the inferior and superior articular processed), or a combined anterior and posterior osteotomy (vertebral column resection [VCR]) (circumferential resection of the vertebrae via either a combined anterior/posterior or posterior-only approach) was performed. Primary outcome measurement was SSI. Subanalysis to deep and superficial SSI was performed. RESULTS: Twenty patients (5.5%) were found to have an SSI, with nine (2.5%) having deep SSI. Analysis showed that patients undergoing VCR (p=.042) had a significant increased risk for deep SSI (11.1%). Obese patients had a significant increased risk (p=.045) for superficial SSI. CONCLUSIONS: Vertebral column resection has a significant increased risk for SSI (11.1%) compared with other types of osteotomies (4.1%). When possible, osteotomy techniques that involve less extensive exposures and soft-tissue dissection should be chosen to minimize deep SSI risk. Obese patients should be counseled on weight loss to try minimizing superficial SSI risk.


Assuntos
Osteotomia/métodos , Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteotomia/efeitos adversos , Fatores de Risco
10.
Eur Spine J ; 19(6): 982-8, 2010 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20066445

RESUMO

Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than typical spinal procedures. Previous research has identified risk factors for SSI in spinal surgery, but few studies have looked at adult deformity surgeries. We retrospectively performed a large case cohort analysis of all adult patients who underwent surgery for kyphosis or scoliosis, between June 1996 and December 2005, by our adult spine division in an academic institution to asses the incidence and identify risk factors for SSI. We reviewed the electronic patient records of 830 adult patients. SSI was classified as deep or superficial to the fascia. 46 (5.5%) patients were found to have a SSI with 29 patients (3.5%) having deep infections. Obesity was found to be an independent risk factor for all SSI and superficial SSI (P = 0.014 and P = 0.013). As well, a history of prior SSI was also found to be a risk factor for SSI (P = 0.041). Patient obesity and history of prior SSI lead to increased risk of infection. Since obesity was related to an increased risk of both superficial and deep SSI, counseling and treatment for obesity should be considered before elective deformity surgery.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Reconstrutivos/efeitos adversos , Curvaturas da Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Fusão Vertebral/efeitos adversos , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Cifose/patologia , Cifose/cirurgia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Reconstrutivos/mortalidade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Escoliose/patologia , Escoliose/cirurgia , Curvaturas da Coluna Vertebral/patologia , Fusão Vertebral/mortalidade , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/fisiopatologia
11.
Spine J ; 10(2): 129-35, 2010 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19914877

RESUMO

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Restrictive transfusion criteria have led to decreased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Their use has been extended to other patient groups. In adult spine surgery, ongoing postoperative blood losses and soft-tissue trauma may make these patients not appropriate for restrictive transfusion practices. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of postoperative hemoglobin (HGB) level and use of packed red blood cells (pRBC) or fresh frozen plasma on postoperative patient morbidity, mortality, and hospital length of stay (LOS). STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This was a retrospective study in a high-volume tertiary hospital. PATIENT SAMPLE: The sample comprised 300 consecutive patients who underwent spinal surgeries with blood losses of more than 2 L. OUTCOME MEASURES: The outcome measures were postoperative patient morbidity, mortality, and LOS. METHODS: The records of patients who underwent adult spinal surgeries with blood loss of 2 or more L (N=300) were abstracted for patient characteristics, operative characteristics, transfusion, and HGB level over time. Intensive care unit and hospital LOS, discharge location, death, pulmonary embolism, stroke, seizures, surgical site infections (SSI), and myocardial infarctions were noted. Logistic regression analyses (SAS software version 9.2) were used. RESULTS: Twelve (3%) patients had a postoperative HGB level of less than 8 g/dL, 126 (41.3%) had 8 g/dL or more but less than 10 g/dL, and 167 (54.8%) had 10 g/dL or more. There was no significant difference in morbidity or mortality between the two groups with higher HGB levels. Multiple regression analysis revealed that patients with initial postoperative HGB level of less than 8 g/dL were six times more likely to develop SSI (odds ratio 6.37, 95% confidence interval 1.15-35.28). Deep SSI rates were increased with greater postoperative pRBC use (p=.002). Fresh frozen plasma use in the operation room was lower in cases that developed SSI (1.50 vs. 2.69, p=.042). Intensive care unit and ward LOS were longer with increased postoperative blood product use. CONCLUSION: Patients with high blood loss (more than 2 L) during spine surgery who are under-resuscitated (HGB level less than 8 g/dL) have a significant increased risk of SSI.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Ortopédicos/efeitos adversos , Ressuscitação/efeitos adversos , Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Reação Transfusional , Adulto , Idoso , Perda Sanguínea Cirúrgica/mortalidade , Transfusão de Sangue/mortalidade , Feminino , Hemoglobinas/análise , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/mortalidade , Período Pós-Operatório , Ressuscitação/mortalidade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/etiologia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/mortalidade , Resultado do Tratamento
12.
Eur J Emerg Med ; 17(2): 107-9; discussion 126-7, 2010 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19543097

RESUMO

Fractures of the cervical spine after blunt cervical trauma are associated with high rates of patient mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate patient and fracture characteristics that predict mortality. This is a retrospective, case cohort study of all adult patients admitted to our institution between January 1998 and June 2008 with cervical fracture after blunt cervical trauma (N=218). All patient records were reviewed. The patient and fracture characteristics and outcome data were stored. Age (P=0.002), involvement of the fourth cervical vertebra (P=0.002), lamina fracture (P=0.001), and a facet fracture (P=0.006) were identified as independent significant risk factors for mortality. In conclusion, mortality is highly affected by patient age, but fracture location and fracture pattern are also predictive of poor patient outcome. Fracture patterns may increase the risk of spinal cord injury at a level that can affect but not eliminate neural control of the diaphragm, which have the worst prognosis for patient mortality.


Assuntos
Vértebras Cervicais/lesões , Lesões do Pescoço/mortalidade , Fraturas da Coluna Vertebral/mortalidade , Ferimentos não Penetrantes/mortalidade , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Lesões do Pescoço/etiologia , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Fraturas da Coluna Vertebral/etiologia , Estados Unidos , Ferimentos não Penetrantes/complicações , Adulto Jovem
13.
Eur Neurol ; 62(3): 137-41, 2009.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19571541

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Little is known about the risk factors of neurological deficiency after blunt cervical fracture. This study was performed to identify factors predicting neurological deficiency after blunt cervical fracture. METHODS: Within our Level I Trauma Center, we performed a retrospective case-control study. Patients with a cervical fracture after blunt trauma between January 2000 and December 2005 were identified. In total, 76 patients sustained a cervical fracture and survived 1 year after trauma. All patient files were reviewed. Patient and trauma characteristics were registered in an electronic database. RESULTS: 26 patients were referred to the Neurology Department. Of these, 14 patients had complaints of sensory or motor loss and 12 patients were seen for sensory and motor loss. Involvement of the seventh cervical vertebrae (p = 0.030) and spinal cord compression were found to be independent significant risk factors for sensory or motor loss. The injury severity score (p = 0.001) and involvement of the vertebral body (p = 0.042) were significantly associated with sensory and motor loss. CONCLUSION: During patient evaluation, the identified variables should be taken into account. If one understands the risk factors, then it is possible to explain the expected outcome after the spine fracture.


Assuntos
Vértebras Cervicais/lesões , Transtornos dos Movimentos/etiologia , Transtornos das Sensações/etiologia , Compressão da Medula Espinal/complicações , Fraturas da Coluna Vertebral/complicações , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Humanos , Escala de Gravidade do Ferimento , Masculino , Transtornos dos Movimentos/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Transtornos das Sensações/epidemiologia , Compressão da Medula Espinal/epidemiologia
14.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 34(13): 1422-8, 2009 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19478664

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study to identify rates and analyze the risk factors for postoperative spinal wound infection. OBJECTIVE: To determine significant risk factors for postoperative spinal wound infection by comparing those patients who developed a postoperative wound infection with the rest of the cohort. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after spinal surgery. SSI leads to higher morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. To develop strategies to reduce the risk for SSI, independent risk factors for SSI should be identified. METHODS: The electronic patient record of all 3174 patients who underwent orthopedic spinal surgery at out institution were abstracted. Individual patient and perioperative characteristics were stored in an electronic database. RESULTS: In total, 132 (4.2%) patients were found to have an SSI with 84 having deep based infection. Estimated blood loss over 1 liter (P = 0.017), previous SSI (P = 0.012) and diabetes (P = 0.050) were found to be independent statistically significant risk factors for SSI. Obesity (P = 0.009) was found to significantly increase the risk of superficial infection, whereas anterior spinal approach decreased the risk (P = 0.010). Diabetes (P = 0.033), obesity (P = 0.047), previous SSI (P = 0.009), and longer surgeries (2-5 hours [P = 0.023] and 5 or more hours [P = 0.009]) were found to be independent significant risk factors for deep SSI. CONCLUSION: SSI is commonly seen after spinal surgery. In our study, we identified independent risk factors for both deep and superficial SSI. Identification of these risk factors should allow us to design protocols to decrease the risk of SSE in future patients.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Ortopédicos/efeitos adversos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/etiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Vértebras Cervicais/cirurgia , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Modelos Logísticos , Vértebras Lombares/cirurgia , Masculino , Maryland/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/métodos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/patologia , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Sacro/cirurgia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/epidemiologia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/patologia , Vértebras Torácicas/cirurgia
15.
Injury ; 39(12): 1437-41, 2008 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18589421

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Risk factors for mortality after blunt cervical trauma have received little attention within the literature. Therefore, we performed a study, to determine which factors are associated with mortality in patients with blunt cervical trauma. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective study of 88 trauma patients, with cervical fractures, who were admitted to the emergency department of the St. Elisabeth hospital, Tilburg, The Netherlands. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A retrospective cohort study was performed within the trauma department of the St. Elisabeth Hospital, in Tilburg, The Netherlands. From January 2000 to December 2005, all patients with cervical fractures after blunt trauma were included (N=88). All patient records were reviewed. Patient and trauma characteristics were registered within a standardised electronic database. Our follow-up period was 1 year. RESULTS: In total, 12 (13.6%) patients died after a traumatic cervical fracture. Age (p=0.005), gender (p=0.005), involvement of the third cervical vertebrae (p=0.003), involvement of three cervical vertebrae (p=0.010) and involvement of the spinous process (p=0.032) were associated with mortality. The multivariate analysis showed that age and the involvement of the third cervical vertebrae (both p=0.016) are both independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: Age and involvement of the third cervical vertebrae were both independent predictors of mortality. Age has been previously described as a risk factor for adverse prognosis in different diseases and trauma's. However, involvement of the third cervical vertebrae has not yet been described as a significant risk factor. Before implementation within trauma support further research is needed to evaluate the role of the third cervical vertebra regarding adverse prognosis and mortality in trauma patients.


Assuntos
Vértebras Cervicais/lesões , Fraturas da Coluna Vertebral/mortalidade , Ferimentos não Penetrantes/mortalidade , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Fraturas da Coluna Vertebral/terapia , Análise de Sobrevida , Índices de Gravidade do Trauma , Ferimentos não Penetrantes/terapia , Adulto Jovem
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...