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1.
Environ Health Perspect ; 129(10): 107002, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34605674

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Transportation noise is increasingly acknowledged as a cardiovascular risk factor, but the evidence base for an association with stroke is sparse. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the association between transportation noise and stroke incidence in a large Scandinavian population. METHODS: We harmonized and pooled data from nine Scandinavian cohorts (seven Swedish, two Danish), totaling 135,951 participants. We identified residential address history and estimated road, railway, and aircraft noise for all addresses. Information on stroke incidence was acquired through linkage to national patient and mortality registries. We analyzed data using Cox proportional hazards models, including socioeconomic and lifestyle confounders, and air pollution. RESULTS: During follow-up (median=19.5y), 11,056 stroke cases were identified. Road traffic noise (Lden) was associated with risk of stroke, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.06 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.08] per 10-dB higher 5-y mean time-weighted exposure in analyses adjusted for individual- and area-level socioeconomic covariates. The association was approximately linear and persisted after adjustment for air pollution [particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤2.5µm (PM2.5) and NO2]. Stroke was associated with moderate levels of 5-y aircraft noise exposure (40-50 vs. ≤40 dB) (HR=1.12; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.27), but not with higher exposure (≥50 dB, HR=0.94; 95% CI: 0.79, 1.11). Railway noise was not associated with stroke. DISCUSSION: In this pooled study, road traffic noise was associated with a higher risk of stroke. This finding supports road traffic noise as an important cardiovascular risk factor that should be included when estimating the burden of disease due to traffic noise. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP8949.

2.
Environ Res ; : 112167, 2021 Oct 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34619123

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have linked transportation noise and cardiovascular diseases, however, atrial fibrillation (AF) has received limited attention. We aimed to investigate the association between transportation noise and AF risk. METHODS: Over the period 1990-2017 we estimated road and railway noise (Lden) at the most and least exposed façades for all residential addresses across Denmark. We estimated time-weighted mean noise exposure for 3.6 million individuals age ≥35 years. Of these, 269,756 incident cases of AF were identified with a mean follow-up of 13.0 years. Analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for individual and area-level sociodemographic covariates and long-term residential air pollution. RESULTS: A 10 dB higher 10-year mean road traffic noise at the most and least exposed façades were associated with incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for AF of 1.006 (1.001-1.011) and 1.013 (1.007-1.019), respectively. After further adjustment for PM2.5, the IRRs (CIs) were 1.000 (0.995-1.005) and 1.007 (1.000-1.013), respectively. For railway noise, the IRRs per 10 dB increase in 10-year mean exposure were 1.017 (1.007-1.026) and 1.035 (1.021-1.050) for the most and least exposed façades, respectively, and were slightly attenuated when adjusted for PM2.5. Aircraft noise between 55 and 60 dB and ≥60 dB were associated with IRRs of 1.055 (0.996-1.116) and 1.036 (0.931-1.154), respectively, when compared to <45 dB. CONCLUSION: Transportation noise seems to be associated with a small increase in AF risk, especially for exposure at the least exposed façade.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34467460

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Few studies have suggested that traffic noise is a risk factor for cancer, but evidence is inconclusive. We aimed to investigate whether road traffic and railway noise are associated with risk of colorectal cancer. METHODS: We obtained address history for all 3.5 million people above 40 years of age and living in Denmark for the period 1990-2017 and estimated road traffic and railway noise (Lden) at the most and least exposed facades of all addresses as well as air pollution (PM2.5). During follow-up (2000-2017), 35,881 persons developed colon cancer and 19,755 developed rectal cancer. Information on individual and area-level demographic and socioeconomic variables was collected from Danish registries. We analyzed data using Cox proportional hazards models, including traffic noise as time-varying 10-year average exposure. RESULTS: Exposure to road traffic noise at the most exposed façade was associated with an incidence rate ratio and 95% confidence interval for proximal colon cancer of 1.018 (0.999-1.038) per 10 dB higher noise. We observed no associations for road traffic noise at the least exposed façade or for railway noise in relation to proximal colon cancer. Also, we found no association between road traffic or railway noise and risk for distal colon cancer or rectal cancer. CONCLUSION: Traffic noise did not seem associated with higher risk for colorectal cancer, although the suggestion of a slightly higher risk of proximal colon cancer following exposure to road traffic noise warrants further research.

4.
Lancet Planet Health ; 5(9): e620-e632, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34508683

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence is unclear on the health effects of exposure to pollutant concentrations lower than current EU and US standards and WHO guideline limits. Within the multicentre study Effects of Low-Level Air Pollution: A Study in Europe (ELAPSE), we investigated the associations of long-term exposures to fine particulate matter (PM2·5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), black carbon, and warm-season ozone (O3) with the incidence of stroke and acute coronary heart disease. METHODS: We did a pooled analysis of individual data from six population-based cohort studies within ELAPSE, from Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Germany (recruited 1992-2004), and harmonised individual and area-level variables between cohorts. Participants (all adults) were followed up until migration from the study area, death, or incident stroke or coronary heart disease, or end of follow-up (2011-15). Mean 2010 air pollution concentrations from centrally developed European-wide land use regression models were assigned to participants' baseline residential addresses. We used Cox proportional hazards models with increasing levels of covariate adjustment to investigate the association of air pollution exposure with incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease. We assessed the shape of the concentration-response function and did subset analyses of participants living at pollutant concentrations lower than predefined values. FINDINGS: From the pooled ELAPSE cohorts, data on 137 148 participants were analysed in our fully adjusted model. During a median follow-up of 17·2 years (IQR 13·8-19·5), we observed 6950 incident events of stroke and 10 071 incident events of coronary heart disease. Incidence of stroke was associated with PM2·5 (hazard ratio 1·10 [95% CI 1·01-1·21] per 5 µg/m3 increase), NO2 (1·08 [1·04-1·12] per 10 µg/m3 increase), and black carbon (1·06 [1·02-1·10] per 0·5 10-5/m increase), whereas coronary heart disease incidence was only associated with NO2 (1·04 [1·01-1·07]). Warm-season O3 was not associated with an increase in either outcome. Concentration-response curves indicated no evidence of a threshold below which air pollutant concentrations are not harmful for cardiovascular health. Effect estimates for PM2·5 and NO2 remained elevated even when restricting analyses to participants exposed to pollutant concentrations lower than the EU limit values of 25 µg/m3 for PM2·5 and 40 µg/m3 for NO2. INTERPRETATION: Long-term air pollution exposure was associated with incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease, even at pollutant concentrations lower than current limit values. FUNDING: Health Effects Institute.

5.
BMJ ; 374: n1904, 2021 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34470785

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between air pollution and mortality, focusing on associations below current European Union, United States, and World Health Organization standards and guidelines. DESIGN: Pooled analysis of eight cohorts. SETTING: Multicentre project Effects of Low-Level Air Pollution: A Study in Europe (ELAPSE) in six European countries. PARTICIPANTS: 325 367 adults from the general population recruited mostly in the 1990s or 2000s with detailed lifestyle data. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyse the associations between air pollution and mortality. Western Europe-wide land use regression models were used to characterise residential air pollution concentrations of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and black carbon. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Deaths due to natural causes and cause specific mortality. RESULTS: Of 325 367 adults followed-up for an average of 19.5 years, 47 131 deaths were observed. Higher exposure to PM2.5, nitrogen dioxide, and black carbon was associated with significantly increased risk of almost all outcomes. An increase of 5 µg/m3 in PM2.5 was associated with 13% (95% confidence interval 10.6% to 15.5%) increase in natural deaths; the corresponding figure for a 10 µg/m3 increase in nitrogen dioxide was 8.6% (7% to 10.2%). Associations with PM2.5, nitrogen dioxide, and black carbon remained significant at low concentrations. For participants with exposures below the US standard of 12 µg/m3 an increase of 5 µg/m3 in PM2.5 was associated with 29.6% (14% to 47.4%) increase in natural deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Our study contributes to the evidence that outdoor air pollution is associated with mortality even at low pollution levels below the current European and North American standards and WHO guideline values. These findings are therefore an important contribution to the debate about revision of air quality limits, guidelines, and standards, and future assessments by the Global Burden of Disease.


Assuntos
Poluentes Atmosféricos/efeitos adversos , Poluição do Ar/efeitos adversos , Doenças Cardiovasculares/mortalidade , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Doenças não Transmissíveis/mortalidade , Europa (Continente) , Humanos
6.
BMJ ; 374: n1954, 2021 09 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34497091

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between long term residential exposure to road traffic and railway noise and risk of incident dementia. DESIGN: Nationwide prospective register based cohort study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 1 938 994 adults aged ≥60 years living in Denmark between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2017. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incident cases of all cause dementia and dementia subtypes (Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and Parkinson's disease related dementia), identified from national hospital and prescription registries. RESULTS: The study population included 103 500 participants with incident dementia, and of those, 31 219 received a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, 8664 of vascular dementia, and 2192 of Parkinson's disease related dementia. Using Cox regression models, 10 year mean exposure to road traffic and railway noise at the most (Ldenmax) and least (Ldenmin) exposed façades of buildings were associated with a higher risk of all cause dementia. These associations showed a general pattern of higher hazard ratios with higher noise exposure, but with a levelling off or even small declines in risk at higher noise levels. In subtype analyses, both road traffic noise and railway noise were associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease, with hazard ratios of 1.16 (95% confidence interval 1.11 to 1.22) for road Ldenmax ≥65 dB compared with <45 dB, 1.27 (1.22 to 1.34) for road Ldenmin ≥55 dB compared with <40 dB, 1.16 (1.10 to 1.23) for railway Ldenmax ≥60 dB compared with <40 dB, and 1.24 (1.17 to 1.30) for railway Ldenmin ≥50 dB compared with <40 dB. Road traffic, but not railway, noise was associated with an increased risk of vascular dementia. Results indicated associations between road traffic Ldenmin and Parkinson's disease related dementia. CONCLUSIONS: This nationwide cohort study found transportation noise to be associated with a higher risk of all cause dementia and dementia subtypes, especially Alzheimer's disease.


Assuntos
Demência/epidemiologia , Ruído dos Transportes/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Causalidade , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Prospectivos , Sistema de Registros
7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34444225

RESUMO

This study aims to estimate the mortality risk associated with air pollution in a Swedish cohort with relatively low exposure. Air pollution models were used to estimate annual mean concentrations of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 µm (PM2.5), primary emitted carbonaceous particles (BC/pOC), sea salt, chemically formed particles grouped as secondary inorganic and organic aerosols (SIA and SOA) as well as ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The exposure, as a moving average was calculated based on home address for the time windows 1 year (lag 1), 1-5 years (lag 1-5) and 1-10 years (lag 1-10) preceding the death. During the study period, 1151 cases of natural mortality, 253 cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and 113 cases of respiratory and lung cancer mortality were observed during 369,394 person-years of follow-up. Increased natural mortality was observed in association with NO2 (3% [95% CI -8-14%] per IQR) and PM2.5 (2% [95% CI -5-9%] for an IQR increase) and its components, except for SOA where a decreased risk was observed. Higher risk increases were observed for CVD mortality (e.g., 18% [95% CI 1-39%] per IQR for NO2). These findings at low exposure levels are relevant for future decisions concerning air quality policies.


Assuntos
Poluentes Atmosféricos , Poluição do Ar , Ozônio , Poluentes Atmosféricos/análise , Poluentes Atmosféricos/toxicidade , Poluição do Ar/efeitos adversos , Poluição do Ar/análise , Estudos de Coortes , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Humanos , Dióxido de Nitrogênio/análise , Dióxido de Nitrogênio/toxicidade , Ozônio/análise , Ozônio/toxicidade , Material Particulado/análise , Material Particulado/toxicidade , Suécia/epidemiologia
8.
Environ Res ; 203: 111886, 2021 Aug 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34411546

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Recent studies on air pollution and disease have been based on millions of participants within a region or country, relying entirely on register-based confounder adjustment. We aimed to investigate the effects of increasing adjustment for register- and questionnaire-based covariates on the association between air pollution and cardiometabolic diseases. METHODS: In a population-based cohort of 246,766 eligible participants randomly selected across Denmark in 2010 and 2013 and followed up until December 31, 2017, we identified 3,247 myocardial infarction (MI) cases, 4,166 stroke cases and 6,366 type 2 diabetes cases. Based on historical address-information, we calculated 5-year time-weighted exposure to PM2.5 and NO2 modelled using a validated air pollution model. We used Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) with increasing adjustment for a number of individual- and area-level register-based covariates as well as lifestyle covariates assessed through questionnaires. RESULTS: We found that a 5 µg/m3 higher PM2.5 was associated with HRs (95% CI) for MI, stroke and diabetes, of respectively, 1.18 (0.91-1.52), 1.11 (0.88-1.40) and 1.24 (1.03-1.50) in the fully adjusted models. For all three diseases, adjustment for either individual-level, area-level or lifestyle covariates, or combinations of these resulted in higher HRs compared to HRs adjusted only for age, sex and calendar-year, most marked for MI and diabetes. Further adjustment for lifestyle in models with full register-based individual- and area-level adjustment resulted in only minor changes in HRs for all three diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that in studies of air pollution and cardiometabolic disease, which use an adjustment strategy with a broad range of register-based socioeconomic variables, there is no effect on risk estimates from subsequent lifestyle adjustment.

9.
Int J Epidemiol ; 2021 Jul 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34259837

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Findings and limitations of previous studies on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and pancreatic cancer risk support conducting further research in prospective cohorts. METHODS: We conducted a prospective case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Participants were 513 pancreatic cancer cases and 1020 matched controls. Concentrations of 22 POPs were measured in plasma collected at baseline. RESULTS: Some associations were observed at higher concentrations of p, p'-DDT, trans-nonachlor, ß-hexachlorocyclohexane and the sum of six organochlorine pesticides and of 16 POPs. The odds ratio (OR) for the upper quartile of trans-nonachlor was 1.55 (95% confidence interval 1.06-2.26; P for trend = 0.025). Associations were stronger in the groups predefined as most valid (participants having fasted >6 h, with microscopic diagnostic confirmation, normal weight, and never smokers), and as most relevant (follow-up ≥10 years). Among participants having fasted >6 h, the ORs were relevant for 10 of 11 exposures. Higher ORs were also observed among cases with microscopic confirmation than in cases with a clinical diagnosis, and among normal-weight participants than in the rest of participants. Among participants with a follow-up ≥10 years, estimates were higher than in participants with a shorter follow-up (for trans-nonachlor: OR = 2.14, 1.01 to 4.53, P for trend = 0.035). Overall, trans-nonachlor, three PCBs and the two sums of POPs were the exposures most clearly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: Individually or in combination, most of the 22 POPs analysed did not or only moderately increased the risk of pancreatic cancer.

10.
Int J Cancer ; 149(11): 1887-1897, 2021 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34278567

RESUMO

Particulate matter air pollution and diesel engine exhaust have been classified as carcinogenic for lung cancer, yet few studies have explored associations with liver cancer. We used six European adult cohorts which were recruited between 1985 and 2005, pooled within the "Effects of low-level air pollution: A study in Europe" (ELAPSE) project, and followed for the incidence of liver cancer until 2011 to 2015. The annual average exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2 ), particulate matter with diameter <2.5 µm (PM2.5 ), black carbon (BC), warm-season ozone (O3 ), and eight elemental components of PM2.5 (copper, iron, zinc, sulfur, nickel, vanadium, silicon, and potassium) were estimated by European-wide hybrid land-use regression models at participants' residential addresses. We analyzed the association between air pollution and liver cancer incidence by Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for potential confounders. Of 330 064 cancer-free adults at baseline, 512 developed liver cancer during a mean follow-up of 18.1 years. We observed positive linear associations between NO2 (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.02-1.35 per 10 µg/m3 ), PM2.5 (1.12, 0.92-1.36 per 5 µg/m3 ), and BC (1.15, 1.00-1.33 per 0.5 10-5 /m) and liver cancer incidence. Associations with NO2 and BC persisted in two-pollutant models with PM2.5 . Most components of PM2.5 were associated with the risk of liver cancer, with the strongest associations for sulfur and vanadium, which were robust to adjustment for PM2.5 or NO2 . Our study suggests that ambient air pollution may increase the risk of liver cancer, even at concentrations below current EU standards.

11.
Eur Respir J ; 57(6)2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34088754

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution has been linked to childhood-onset asthma, although evidence is still insufficient. Within the multicentre project Effects of Low-Level Air Pollution: A Study in Europe (ELAPSE), we examined the associations of long-term exposures to particulate matter with a diameter <2.5 µm (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and black carbon (BC) with asthma incidence in adults. METHODS: We pooled data from three cohorts in Denmark and Sweden with information on asthma hospital diagnoses. The average concentrations of air pollutants in 2010 were modelled by hybrid land-use regression models at participants' baseline residential addresses. Associations of air pollution exposures with asthma incidence were explored with Cox proportional hazard models, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: Of 98 326 participants, 1965 developed asthma during a mean follow-up of 16.6 years. We observed associations in fully adjusted models with hazard ratios of 1.22 (95% CI 1.04-1.43) per 5 µg·m-3 for PM2.5, 1.17 (95% CI 1.10-1.25) per 10 µg·m-3 for NO2 and 1.15 (95% CI 1.08-1.23) per 0.5×10-5 m-1 for BC. Hazard ratios were larger in cohort subsets with exposure levels below the European Union and US limit values and possibly World Health Organization guidelines for PM2.5 and NO2. NO2 and BC estimates remained unchanged in two-pollutant models with PM2.5, whereas PM2.5 estimates were attenuated to unity. The concentration-response curves showed no evidence of a threshold. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term exposure to air pollution, especially from fossil fuel combustion sources such as motorised traffic, was associated with adult-onset asthma, even at levels below the current limit values.


Assuntos
Poluentes Atmosféricos , Poluição do Ar , Asma , Adulto , Poluentes Atmosféricos/análise , Poluição do Ar/análise , Criança , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Incidência , Material Particulado/análise , Suécia
12.
Environ Res ; 200: 111394, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34062200

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: and Purpose: Cadmium has been associated with risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke. Human cadmium exposure occurs primarily through diet and tobacco smoke. Recent cohort studies have found an association with stroke, but residual confounding from smoking, could not be ruled out. We therefore conducted a case-cohort study to evaluate whether cadmium is associated with stroke in never-smokers. METHODS: The Danish Diet Cancer and Health cohort consists of Danes 50-64 years old, recruited in 1993-1997. From never-smoking cohort members without previous cancer or stroke we sampled a sub-cohort of 1200 persons. We also identified all (n = 534) cases in the cohort with a validated stroke diagnosis between baseline and 2009. We quantified cadmium and creatinine concentrations from baseline urine samples and used cadmium per creatinine as our main exposure metric. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with age as time scale and adjusting for BMI, education and urinary cotinine with and without stratification by sex. RESULTS: The median urinary cadmium concentration was 0.21 µg cadmium/g creatinine in cases and 0.19 µg/g in the sub-cohort. The majority (83%) of stroke cases were diagnosed with ischemic stroke. The HR for stroke in the highest quartile of exposure (median 0.44 µg/g creatinine) was 1.11 (95% CI: 0.79-1.54) compared with the lowest quartile (median 0.10 µg/g creatinine). The HR per inter quartile range (IQR, 0.19 µg/g creatinine) was 1.02 (95% CI: 0.92-1.12). Among men, the HR per IQR higher levels of cadmium (0.16 µg/g creatinine) was 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92-1.52), and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.89-1.12) among women. Adjusting for creatinine or using osmolality instead of creatinine standardization generally attenuated observed relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not support that low levels of cadmium exposure among never-smokers are strongly associated with risk of stroke, although results varied somewhat by sex and method of accounting for urinary dilution.


Assuntos
Cádmio , Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Estudos de Coortes , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fumantes , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/induzido quimicamente , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia
13.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 73: 101947, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33979714

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The aetiology for most solid tumours in childhood is largely unknown. The lack of evidence concerns also the relationship between socioeconomic position (SEP) and risk of childhood solid tumours other than in the central nervous system (CNS). We sought to access the association between individual and neighbourhood SEP measures and risk of childhood non-CNS solid tumours in Denmark and to evaluate whether associations varied by measure of SEP, time point of SEP assessment (during pregnancy versus before diagnosis) and tumour type. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide case-control study based on Danish registry data. We identified all children born in 1980-2013 and diagnosed with a non-CNS solid tumour at ages 0-19 years (N = 1961) from the Danish Cancer Registry and sampled four individually matched controls per case using the Population Registry. We fitted conditional logistic regression models to estimate associations with register-based individual-level and neighbourhood-level SEP measures. RESULTS: We observed a tendency of increased odd ratios (OR) in association with medium and high maternal income for most tumour types (e.g. OR for the highest income quintile and malignant bone tumours = 2.11; 95 % CI: 1.01, 4.38) and for parental education in association with higher education for some tumour types. For malignant epithelial neoplasms, higher parental education and income level were overall associated with an increased risk, e.g. OR = 1.63 (95 % CI: 1.00, 2.65) for the fourth group of maternal income during pregnancy. We found no risk pattern for neighbourhood SEP. CONCLUSION: This large register-study with minimal risk of bias found a tendency of slightly to moderately increased risks for most childhood non-CNS solid tumours in association with higher maternal income and parental education. Future research examining the underlying mechanisms of these socioeconomic differences in non-CNS solid tumours as well as other childhood cancer types are warranted.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Sistema Nervoso Central , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Neoplasias do Sistema Nervoso Central/epidemiologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Sistema de Registros , Características de Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Adulto Jovem
14.
Cancer Causes Control ; 32(9): 935-942, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34050843

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The etiology of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is obscure. Research on air pollution and risk of HL provides inconsistent results. We aimed to investigate the association between long-term residential exposure to air pollution and risk of adult Hodgkin lymphoma in Denmark. METHODS: We performed a nationwide register-based case-control study, including all (n = 2,681) Hodgkin lymphoma cases registered in the nationwide Danish Cancer Registry between 1989 and 2014. We randomly selected 8,853 age- and sex-matched controls from the entire Danish population using the Civil Registration System, and identified 20-year residential address history for all cases and controls. We modeled outdoor air pollution concentrations at all these addresses using the high-resolution multiscale air pollution model system DEHM/UBM/AirGIS. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios adjusted for individual and neighborhood level sociodemographic variables. RESULTS: There was no association between 1, 5, 10, and 20 years' time-weighted average exposure to fine particles (PM2.5), O3, SO2, NO2, or the PM2.5 constituents OC, NH4, NO3, and SO4 and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma. CONCLUSION: Residential exposure to ambient air pollution does not seem to increase the risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma.


Assuntos
Poluição do Ar , Doença de Hodgkin , Adulto , Poluentes Atmosféricos/efeitos adversos , Poluição do Ar/efeitos adversos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Doença de Hodgkin/epidemiologia , Doença de Hodgkin/etiologia , Humanos , Material Particulado
15.
Environ Health Perspect ; 129(4): 47009, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33844598

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Inconsistent associations between long-term exposure to particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm [fine particulate matter (PM2.5)] components and mortality have been reported, partly related to challenges in exposure assessment. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the associations between long-term exposure to PM2.5 elemental components and mortality in a large pooled European cohort; to compare health effects of PM2.5 components estimated with two exposure modeling approaches, namely, supervised linear regression (SLR) and random forest (RF) algorithms. METHODS: We pooled data from eight European cohorts with 323,782 participants, average age 49 y at baseline (1985-2005). Residential exposure to 2010 annual average concentration of eight PM2.5 components [copper (Cu), iron (Fe), potassium (K), nickel (Ni), sulfur (S), silicon (Si), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn)] was estimated with Europe-wide SLR and RF models at a 100×100 m scale. We applied Cox proportional hazards models to investigate the associations between components and natural and cause-specific mortality. In addition, two-pollutant analyses were conducted by adjusting each component for PM2.5 mass and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) separately. RESULTS: We observed 46,640 natural-cause deaths with 6,317,235 person-years and an average follow-up of 19.5 y. All SLR-modeled components were statistically significantly associated with natural-cause mortality in single-pollutant models with hazard ratios (HRs) from 1.05 to 1.27. Similar HRs were observed for RF-modeled Cu, Fe, K, S, V, and Zn with wider confidence intervals (CIs). HRs for SLR-modeled Ni, S, Si, V, and Zn remained above unity and (almost) significant after adjustment for both PM2.5 and NO2. HRs only remained (almost) significant for RF-modeled K and V in two-pollutant models. The HRs for V were 1.03 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.05) and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.10) for SLR- and RF-modeled exposures, respectively, per 2 ng/m3, adjusting for PM2.5 mass. Associations with cause-specific mortality were less consistent in two-pollutant models. CONCLUSION: Long-term exposure to V in PM2.5 was most consistently associated with increased mortality. Associations for the other components were weaker for exposure modeled with RF than SLR in two-pollutant models. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP8368.

16.
Int J Epidemiol ; 50(4): 1147-1156, 2021 08 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33755127

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Studies on transportation noise and incident stroke are few and inconclusive. We aimed to investigate associations between road-traffic and railway noise and the risk of incident stroke in the entire Danish population. METHODS: We estimated road-traffic and railway noise (Lden) at the most and least exposed façades for all residential addresses across Denmark (2.8 million) for the period 1990-2017. Based on this, we estimated the 10-year time-weighted mean noise exposure for 3.6 million Danes aged >35 years, of whom 184 523 developed incident stroke during follow-up from 2000 to 2017. Analyses were conducted using Cox proportional-hazards models, with adjustment for various individual- and area-level demographic and socio-economic covariates collected from registries and air pollution [fine particulate matter with particles with a diameter of ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)]. RESULTS: A 10-dB increase in the 10-year mean road-traffic noise at the most exposed façade was associated with an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.05] for all strokes. For road-traffic noise at the least exposed façade, the IRR per 10 dB was 1.03 (95% CI: 1.02-1.04) for all strokes. Railway noise was not associated with a higher risk of stroke. CONCLUSION: Road-traffic noise increased the risk of stroke. These findings add to the evidence of road-traffic noise as a cardiovascular risk factor.


Assuntos
Poluição do Ar , Ruído dos Transportes , Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Poluição do Ar/efeitos adversos , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Humanos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Estudos Prospectivos , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia
17.
Public Health Nutr ; : 1-18, 2021 Mar 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33749573

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To study the association between organic food consumption and lifestyle, socio-demographics, and dietary habits. DESIGN: Cohort participants completed detailed questionnaires about organic food consumption, diet, and lifestyle between 1999 and 2002. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between organic food consumption, and lifestyle, socio-demographics, and dietary habits. SETTING: This cross-sectional study uses data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 43,209 men and women aged between 54 and 73 years were included in the study. RESULTS: Overall, 15% reported never consuming organic food, 39% had low organic food consumption, 37% had medium organic food consumption and 10% had high organic food consumption. The relative risk of consuming organic food versus never consuming organic food was highest among women, persons with body mass index <25 kg/m2, persons with low alcohol intake, persons participating in sports, persons who did not smoke or were former smokers, and among persons who adhered to the Danish national dietary guidelines. Associations were more distinct with higher levels of organic food consumption. CONCLUSION: Based on a historical cohort of Danish adults, organic food consumption was associated with a generally healthy lifestyle, more favorable socio-demographics, and dietary habits. These findings have to be considered in the adjustment strategy for future studies linking organic food consumption with health outcomes.

18.
Environ Int ; 150: 106428, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33571817

RESUMO

Cadmium exposure has been associated with cardiovascular disease. Cigarette smoking is a key source of cadmium exposure and thus a potential confounder in observational studies of environmental cadmium and cardiovascular disease that include tobacco smokers. We leveraged up to 20 years of follow-up in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort to test the hypothesis that cadmium exposure is associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among people who never smoked. Between 1993 and 1997, 19,394 never-smoking participants (ages 50-64 years) were enrolled and provided a urine sample. From this sample, we randomly selected a subcohort of 600 males and 600 females. We identified 809 AMI cases occurring between baseline and the end of 2015 using the Danish National Patient Registry. We quantified cadmium, creatinine, and osmolality in baseline urine samples. Using an unweighted case-cohort approach, we estimated adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) for AMI in Cox proportional hazards models with age as the time axis. Participants had relatively low concentrations of urinary cadmium, as expected for never smokers (median = 0.20; 25th, 75th = 0.13, 0.32 µg cadmium/g creatinine). We did not find strong evidence to support an association between higher urinary cadmium and AMI when comparing the highest versus lowest quartile (aHR = 1.16; 95% CI: 0.86 - 1.56) and per IQR increment in cadmium concentration (aHR = 1.02; 95% CI: 0.93 - 1.12). Results were not materially different across strata defined by sex. Results were generally similar using creatinine or osmolality to account for differences in urine dilution. While cadmium exposure has been identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, we did not find strong evidence that urinary cadmium at relatively low-levels is associated with AMI among people who have never smoked.


Assuntos
Cádmio/urina , Infarto do Miocárdio , Neoplasias , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Dieta , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infarto do Miocárdio/epidemiologia , Fumantes
19.
Environ Res ; 195: 110739, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33460635

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have suggested that transportation noise may increase risk for breast cancer, but existing literature is scarce and inconclusive. We aimed to investigate associations between road traffic and railway noise and risk for breast cancer across the entire Danish female population. METHODS: For all 2.8 million residential addresses across Denmark, we modelled road and railway noise at the most and least exposed façades for the period 1990-2017. We calculated 10-year time-weighted mean noise exposure for 1.8 million women aged >35 years, of whom 66,006 developed breast cancer during follow-up from 2000 to 2017. We analysed data using Cox proportional hazards models with noise exposure included as 10-year running means and adjusted for a number of individual and area-level socioeconomic co-variates and air pollution with fine particles estimated for all addresses. RESULTS: For exposures at the least exposed façade, we found that a 10 dB increase in 10-year time-weighted noise was associated with incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for breast cancer of 1.032 (1.019-1.046) for road noise and 1.023 (0.993-1.053) for railway noise. For exposures at the most exposed façade, the IRRs (95% CIs) were 1.012 (1.002-1.022) for road noise and 1.020 (1.001-1.039) for railway noise. Associations were strongest among women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Road traffic and railway noise were associated with higher risk for breast cancer, especially noise at the least exposed façade, which is a proxy for noise exposure during sleep.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama , Ruído dos Transportes , Adulto , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/etiologia , Estudos de Coortes , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Exposição Ambiental , Feminino , Humanos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos
20.
Environ Int ; 147: 106371, 2021 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33422970

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We evaluated methods for the analysis of multi-level survival data using a pooled dataset of 14 cohorts participating in the ELAPSE project investigating associations between residential exposure to low levels of air pollution (PM2.5 and NO2) and health (natural-cause mortality and cerebrovascular, coronary and lung cancer incidence). METHODS: We applied five approaches in a multivariable Cox model to account for the first level of clustering corresponding to cohort specification: (1) not accounting for the cohort or using (2) indicator variables, (3) strata, (4) a frailty term in frailty Cox models, (5) a random intercept under a mixed Cox, for cohort identification. We accounted for the second level of clustering due to common characteristics in the residential area by (1) a random intercept per small area or (2) applying variance correction. We assessed the stratified, frailty and mixed Cox approach through simulations under different scenarios for heterogeneity in the underlying hazards and the air pollution effects. RESULTS: Effect estimates were stable under approaches used to adjust for cohort but substantially differed when no adjustment was applied. Further adjustment for the small area grouping increased the effect estimates' standard errors. Simulations confirmed identical results between the stratified and frailty models. In ELAPSE we selected a stratified multivariable Cox model to account for between-cohort heterogeneity without adjustment for small area level, due to the small number of subjects and events in the latter. CONCLUSIONS: Our study supports the need to account for between-cohort heterogeneity in multi-center collaborations using pooled individual level data.


Assuntos
Poluentes Atmosféricos , Poluição do Ar , Poluentes Atmosféricos/análise , Poluição do Ar/análise , Estudos de Coortes , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Humanos , Material Particulado/análise
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