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1.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 16(11): 1516-1521, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31585696

RESUMO

This is a condensed summary of an international multisociety statement on ethics of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology produced by the ACR, European Society of Radiology, RSNA, Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine, European Society of Medical Imaging Informatics, Canadian Association of Radiologists, and American Association of Physicists in Medicine. AI has great potential to increase efficiency and accuracy throughout radiology, but it also carries inherent pitfalls and biases. Widespread use of AI-based intelligent and autonomous systems in radiology can increase the risk of systemic errors with high consequence and highlights complex ethical and societal issues. Currently, there is little experience using AI for patient care in diverse clinical settings. Extensive research is needed to understand how to best deploy AI in clinical practice. This statement highlights our consensus that ethical use of AI in radiology should promote well-being, minimize harm, and ensure that the benefits and harms are distributed among stakeholders in a just manner. We believe AI should respect human rights and freedoms, including dignity and privacy. It should be designed for maximum transparency and dependability. Ultimate responsibility and accountability for AI remains with its human designers and operators for the foreseeable future. The radiology community should start now to develop codes of ethics and practice for AI that promote any use that helps patients and the common good and should block use of radiology data and algorithms for financial gain without those two attributes.

2.
Can Assoc Radiol J ; 70(4): 329-334, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31585825

RESUMO

This is a condensed summary of an international multisociety statement on ethics of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology produced by the ACR, European Society of Radiology, RSNA, Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine, European Society of Medical Imaging Informatics, Canadian Association of Radiologists, and American Association of Physicists in Medicine. AI has great potential to increase efficiency and accuracy throughout radiology, but it also carries inherent pitfalls and biases. Widespread use of AI-based intelligent and autonomous systems in radiology can increase the risk of systemic errors with high consequence and highlights complex ethical and societal issues. Currently, there is little experience using AI for patient care in diverse clinical settings. Extensive research is needed to understand how to best deploy AI in clinical practice. This statement highlights our consensus that ethical use of AI in radiology should promote well-being, minimize harm, and ensure that the benefits and harms are distributed among stakeholders in a just manner. We believe AI should respect human rights and freedoms, including dignity and privacy. It should be designed for maximum transparency and dependability. Ultimate responsibility and accountability for AI remains with its human designers and operators for the foreseeable future. The radiology community should start now to develop codes of ethics and practice for AI that promote any use that helps patients and the common good and should block use of radiology data and algorithms for financial gain without those two attributes.


Assuntos
Inteligência Artificial/ética , Radiologia/ética , Canadá , Consenso , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Radiologistas/ética , Sociedades Médicas , Estados Unidos
3.
Insights Imaging ; 10(1): 101, 2019 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31571015

RESUMO

This is a condensed summary of an international multisociety statement on ethics of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology produced by the ACR, European Society of Radiology, RSNA, Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine, European Society of Medical Imaging Informatics, Canadian Association of Radiologists, and American Association of Physicists in Medicine.AI has great potential to increase efficiency and accuracy throughout radiology, but also carries inherent pitfalls and biases. Widespread use of AI-based intelligent and autonomous systems in radiology can increase the risk of systemic errors with high consequence, and highlights complex ethical and societal issues. Currently, there is little experience using AI for patient care in diverse clinical settings. Extensive research is needed to understand how to best deploy AI in clinical practice.This statement highlights our consensus that ethical use of AI in radiology should promote well-being, minimize harm, and ensure that the benefits and harms are distributed among stakeholders in a just manner. We believe AI should respect human rights and freedoms, including dignity and privacy. It should be designed for maximum transparency and dependability. Ultimate responsibility and accountability for AI remains with its human designers and operators for the foreseeable future.The radiology community should start now to develop codes of ethics and practice for AI which promote any use that helps patients and the common good and should block use of radiology data and algorithms for financial gain without those two attributes.

4.
Radiology ; 293(2): 436-440, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31573399

RESUMO

This is a condensed summary of an international multisociety statement on ethics of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology produced by the ACR, European Society of Radiology, RSNA, Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine, European Society of Medical Imaging Informatics, Canadian Association of Radiologists, and American Association of Physicists in Medicine. AI has great potential to increase efficiency and accuracy throughout radiology, but it also carries inherent pitfalls and biases. Widespread use of AI-based intelligent and autonomous systems in radiology can increase the risk of systemic errors with high consequence and highlights complex ethical and societal issues. Currently, there is little experience using AI for patient care in diverse clinical settings. Extensive research is needed to understand how to best deploy AI in clinical practice. This statement highlights our consensus that ethical use of AI in radiology should promote well-being, minimize harm, and ensure that the benefits and harms are distributed among stakeholders in a just manner. We believe AI should respect human rights and freedoms, including dignity and privacy. It should be designed for maximum transparency and dependability. Ultimate responsibility and accountability for AI remains with its human designers and operators for the foreseeable future. The radiology community should start now to develop codes of ethics and practice for AI that promote any use that helps patients and the common good and should block use of radiology data and algorithms for financial gain without those two attributes. This article is a simultaneous joint publication in Radiology, Journal of the American College of Radiology, Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, and Insights into Imaging. Published under a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

5.
J Digit Imaging ; 29(4): 443-9, 2016 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26847202

RESUMO

The growing use of social media is transforming the way health care professionals (HCPs) are communicating. In this changing environment, it could be useful to outline the usage of social media by radiologists in all its facets and on an international level. The main objective of the RANSOM survey was to investigate how radiologists are using social media and what is their attitude towards them. The second goal was to discern differences in tendencies among American and European radiologists. An international survey was launched on SurveyMonkey ( https://www.surveymonkey.com ) asking questions about the platforms they prefer, about the advantages, disadvantages, and risks, and about the main incentives and barriers to use social media. A total of 477 radiologists participated in the survey, of which 277 from Europe and 127 from North America. The results show that 85 % of all survey participants are using social media, mostly for a mixture of private and professional reasons. Facebook is the most popular platform for general purposes, whereas LinkedIn and Twitter are more popular for professional usage. The most important reason for not using social media is an unwillingness to mix private and professional matters. Eighty-two percent of all participants are aware of the educational opportunities offered by social media. The survey results underline the need to increase radiologists' skills in using social media efficiently and safely. There is also a need to create clear guidelines regarding the online and social media presence of radiologists to maximize the potential benefits of engaging with social media.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Radiologistas/estatística & dados numéricos , Mídias Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , América do Norte , Radiologistas/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
6.
J Belg Soc Radiol ; 100(1): 93, 2016 Nov 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30151487

RESUMO

The main objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the impact of information technology on radiology services during the past 15 years and to promote awareness of the digital revolution that is taking place in health care, including radiology. The combination of two major innovations is playing a central role in this revolution, namely, the Internet and the digitisation of medical information. The various stages of the Internet development and their relationship with the almost simultaneously ongoing digitisation of the radiology department are described. The onset of teleradiology services and the more recent trend toward the usage of cloud-based networks and services are explained. The recent changes in digital communication and electronic transmission of medical information are discussed, hereby paying attention to the value of social media in medicine and radiology in particular. Finally, the future prospects of health care and medical imaging are outlined in the spotlight of today's major trends, and the role of the radiologist in this quickly changing environment is redefined.

7.
Insights Imaging ; 6(6): 741-52, 2015 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26395089

RESUMO

UNLABELLED: Social media, which can be defined as dynamic and interactive online communication forums, are becoming increasingly popular, not only for the general public but also for radiologists. In addition to assisting radiologists in finding useful profession-related information and interactive educational material in all kinds of formats, they can also contribute towards improving communication with peers, clinicians, and patients. The growing use of social networking in healthcare also has an impact on the visibility and engagement of radiologists in the online virtual community. Although many radiologists are already using social media, a large number of our colleagues are still unaware of the wide spectrum of useful information and interaction available via social media and of the added value these platforms can bring to daily practice. For many, the risk of mixing professional and private data by using social media creates a feeling of insecurity, which still keeps radiologists from using them. In this overview we aim to provide information on the potential benefits, challenges, and inherent risks of social media for radiologists. We will provide a summary of the different types of social media that can be of value for radiologists, including useful tips on how to use them safely and efficiently. MAIN MESSAGES: • Online social networking enhances communication and collaboration between peers • Social media facilitate access to educational and scientific information • Recommendations and guidelines from policymakers and professional organisations are needed • Applications are desired for efficient and secure exchange of medical images in social media.

8.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 12(2): 174-82, 2015 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25652303

RESUMO

The ACR and European Society of Radiology white papers on teleradiology propose best practice guidelines for teleradiology, with each body focusing on its respective local situation, market, and legal regulations. The organizations have common viewpoints, the most important being patient primacy, maintenance of quality, and the "supplementary" position of teleradiology to local services. The major differences between the white papers are related mainly to the market situation, the use of teleradiology, teleradiologist credentialing and certification, the principles of "international" teleradiology, and the need to obtain "informed consent" from patients. The authors describe these similarities and differences by highlighting the background and context of teleradiology in Europe and the United States.


Assuntos
Consentimento Livre e Esclarecido/normas , Participação do Paciente , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Telerradiologia/normas , Europa (Continente) , Estados Unidos
9.
Turk J Gastroenterol ; 23(4): 381-4, 2012 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22965511

RESUMO

Small bowel neoplasms are very uncommon, especially leiomyosarcoma of the small bowel. Therefore, there is often a delay before small bowel leiomyosarcoma is diagnosed and treatment is started. A 60-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with progressive melena. Gastroscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal the cause of the melena, but magnetic resonance imaging showed a jejunal tumor. After laparoscopic resection, the tumor appeared to be a grade 2 leiomyosarcoma. Small bowel neoplasms can be accurately detected by magnetic resonance enterography or wireless capsule endoscopy. Treatment almost always consists of resection of the primary tumor and its metastases. The role of chemo- and radiotherapy is not yet clear and prognosis remains very poor, with low five-year survival rates.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Jejuno/diagnóstico , Leiomiossarcoma/diagnóstico , Anemia/etiologia , Humanos , Neoplasias do Jejuno/complicações , Neoplasias do Jejuno/cirurgia , Leiomiossarcoma/complicações , Leiomiossarcoma/cirurgia , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Melena/etiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico
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